Collection Title: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 4 of 4
Full Screen
10 articles on this page
THE PASSING WEEK

THE PASSING WEEK "Let there bo tasstlea; there are grapes. If old things, thore are new Ten thousand broken lights and thipeo let glimimes of the true."—TINNYSCN. The Carmarthenshire Tribunal lias voiced a pretty general feeling in protesting against the employment of Irishmen not liable to military service in the munition works. The demand of the Carmarthen Tribunal is that these men should be either compelled, to join the Army or to go back to Ireland. j ..it The decision that "compulsory service" should not be extended to Ireland has given rise to a good many rather embarrassing prob- lems. It is very difficult to understand why the Government arrived at the decision. There is compulsory service in Great Britain; in Canada and Australia there is no compulsion but Canadians and Australians are invited to join the British Army voluntarily. Ireland is placed in this respect on the same footing as the self-governing colonies. But then Ire- land is not a self-governing dominion. Home Rule has not been set up in Ireland. Ireland at the present moment is governed by the advice of Sir Edward Carson and Mr Johr Redmond. who form a kind of Advisory Com- mittee. The Government does this under the impression that these two gentlemen represent the opinion of all sections of Irishmen. This is quite possibly a great mistake. If there were a General Election in Ireland next week, it is quite possible that the result would startle both Mr Redmond and Sir Edward Carson. ••• This, howencer, is an internal question. When however Irishmen came to reside in Great Britain, difficult problems arise. There is no practical or theoretical difficulty in the dis- tricts in which Irishmen have long been settled. Many of the Liverpool and Glasgow and Tyneside battalions are composed entirely of Irish residents. who were amongst the first to volunteer in answer to the call in August, 1914. If a commercial traveller who in Dublin is exempt from military service comes over to London to collect an account intending to re- turn to Ireland at the end of the week, is he liable to be arrested and forced to join the 'Army? This would be a palpable absurdity so long as the law is what it is. The case might be extended a good deal further. Many Irish students come over to Edinburgh to qualify for the medical profession. They go home for their holidays and although they arc in Great Britain for nearly a year at a tim" they may be fairly said to be visitors—espe- cially if there is clear evidence that they Mi- tend to return home to practise as soon as they are qualified. The definition which has been laid down s that the Military Service Act applies to natives of Ireland who are "ordinarily resi- dent" in Great Britain. How doo.; this applv to the munition workers? These men have been invited to come over her to "work at the munitions." Agents have gone over to Ireland soliciting labourers to come over here to work for wages. The poorest county in Ireland is Mayo. In the county of Mayo the ordinary wages of agricultural labourers before the war were Is 2d a day with food. Having regard to the standard of living in that dis- trict and the prices which then ruled, it would be a generous estimate to value the "food" at 4s a week. In the West of Ireland, the wages of a labourer without food were 12s to 13s a week! Canvassers from munition firms came into these districts to find labourers. A West of Ireland newspaper stated about 12 months ago that an agent was looking out for labourers illulo V* IV il.ii uv auuiu "were" up to HJS a week." The complaint which the Irish writer seemed to be making was that the wages were so high that the workmen all went off and that the local farmers found it difficult to get men. These men have certainly before em barking asked the question whether they are in England liable to military service, and they have been told they are not. They certainly did not come to Great Britain to join the British Army. They could join the Connaught Rangers in any market town at home. U8 This new gives rise to a pretty problem. These men have in many cases come over here to take up work on the distinct assurance given by somebody that they are not liable to military service. If Ireland is exempt- rightly or wrongly—from compulsion. Irish- men should not be inveigled-over here on false pretences and then compelled to join the Army. This is putting the case rather crude- ly; but that is exactly how it stands, and that is exactly how it would look to force these men to join the Army here. It can hardly be contended that these men are not "ordinarily resident in Gt. Britain." None of them have any definite intention of returning to Ireland. They have come over here to get work. When the munition works stop there is no suggestion that they will all go back to Ireland. The chances are that they will then. if left alone, go to the colliery districts to look for work. or migrate to Liver- pool to act as. dock labourers. In cannot be contended that they are in the position of a rom-mercial traveller or a student who comes over here on a definite mission intending to return home at a definite date. t«« The grievance to the British workman which arises by the importation of Irish labourers exempt from military service is keenly re- sented. In Lincolnshire the local labourers have been "called up," and the farmers im- ported Irish labourers. This gives rise to an intolerable situation. The English labourer of 35 has to leave his wife and family to fight in France..and his job is filled by a young i Irishman aged 23 or 24. The situation in Lin- colnshire. provoked such a revolt that the newly imported labourers from Ireland had to be sent back. This is not a question of national animosity. Irish women in Scotland who have sent two or three sons into the Army have been exasperated at the sight of their sons' places in the works being filled by men just landed from the Irish steamers. It is essentially a labour question. **» If it is unfair to the men to induce them to come over here on the understanding that they are exempt, it is unfair to others to create a class to fill up all industrial and agricultural vacancies whilst the settled population is forced into the Army. The simplest way would be to give all Irishmen who have migrated to this country since a certain date an oppor- tunity to return home within 14 days, after which they are to be regarded as being settled in Great Britain. This would cause very little shifting of population, and would solve the question euqitably. It could not be said that any Irishman was "trapped" into coming over here and then forced into the Army as a result of a breach of faith. ••• The curious part of the problem is that there is not a. single party in Ireland who defend the Irish munition workers of military age so there is no need to delay taking action. Mr John Redmond. the leader of the Irish Parlia- mentary Party, has done all he could to pro- mote recruiting for the British Army in Ire- la.nd. If there is any deficiency of Irish re- cruits, it is because there are plenty of people in Ireland who do not take Mr Redmond's ad- rice. On the other hand, there are certainly people-like the Sinn Fein set—who advise Irishmen not to enlist in the British Army. hut they also regard Irish munition workers as traitors, AYhat- difference is there in prin- ciple between making bullets to kill Germans and actually firing them ? •*» The Irish munition workers who refuse to enlist are therefore regarded with no very friendly feelings by any political party. Tlie Irish Unionist and the moderate Nationalist regard then as "slackers" the extreme Na- tionalists regard them as traitors. The whole problem arises because the Government in London will always pursue a mixed policy of coercion and bribery in regard to Ireland. The best possible thing for both would be for England to say to Ireland "Start in business on your own account, sink orswim." If Ire- land were absolutely independent she would have to adopt compulsory military service forthwith—with the age limit up to 50. An independent Ireland would require, the biggest possible Army she could raise to defend her shores. If Ireland were betrayed to Germany —as Casement tried to do—every man there would be forced into the German Army. The Irish rebel "shirker" does not want indepen- dence that would bring too much responsi- bility. He certainly does not want the Prussian drill sergeant kicking him round a barrack square. In spite of all his froth he really wants the British Government to re- main, whilst he keeps up the farce of object- ing to it and thus being the only man in Europe to-day who can evade military service. And the farcical rebel goes on pretending to denounce the British Government but trusting all the time that the Government will remain and shield him from the responsibilities of citizenship. An Ireland with an independent Parliament would be forced to mobilise her last available man to-day. The young slackers who are spouting "Sinn Fein" balderdash in Ireland to-day know well that Irish Indepen- dence would put them all in khaki, and that they owe their present ease to the British Government. The only solution of the diffi- culty is to insist on Ireland being treated like the rest of the Kingdom. Then there will be no question of sending "slackers" back to Ire- land. That after all would be unfair to Ire- land, for we can't send her back her heroes who died at Mons and in Gallipoli.

The Question of Health

The Question of Health The question of health is a matter which it tore to ooncern us at one time or another when Influenza is so provalent as it if just now, so it is .41 to know what to tnae ic ward off an attack of this mist weakening disease, this epidemic catarrh or cold of an aggravating kind, to combat it whilst uuder ita baneful influence, and particularly aft., tin attack, for then the system is so lowered as to be liable to the most dangerous of com- plaints. Gwilym Evans' Quinine Bitters ia acknow-lcdged by all who have given it a fair trial to be the best. specific remedy dealing with loBnenlJa in All its various stages, being a Preparation skilfully prepared with Quinine and accompanied with other blood purifying and enriching agents, suitable for the liver, digestion, and all those ailments require tonic strengthening and nerve increat propei ties. It is invaluable for those cuff or. ing from colds, pneumonia, or any serious ill ness, or prostration caused by sleeplessness, or worry of any kind, when the body has < general feeling of weakness or lassitude. Send for a copy of the pamphlet of testi- monials, which carefuUy read and consider well, then buy a bottAe (sold in two sizes, 2s 9d and 4s 6d) at your nearest Chemiat or Stores, but when purohasing see that the name "Gwilym Evana" is on the label, stamp and bottle, for without which iane are genuine. Sole Proprfetors. Quinin Bitten Manufacturing Company, Limited, lanellj. South Wales.

No title

Carmarthenshire Insurance Committee. A meeting to the Carmarthenshire Insurance Committee was held at the Carmarthen Guild- hall on Saturday. Mr D. Evans (chairman), presided. ELECTION OF CHAIRMAN. On the motion of the retiring 'Chairman. Mr J Harrison Evans, Carmarthen, was unani- mously elected chairman for the ensuing year. A vote of thanks to the retiring chairman was moved by Mr J. Hrrison Evans, seconded by Mr W. N. Jones, supported by Mr Rees Davies (Whit-land) and carried unanimously. ELECTION OF VICE-CHAIRMAN. Mr E. Williams, Llanelly, was unanimously chosen as vice-chairman for the year. AVHAT IS THE REMEDY ? Mr Mervyn Peel referring to the financial statement asked "If there is not enough money to pay the chemists they do not get full pavment." The Clerk: No. Mr Peel: And they have no remedy ? Mr D. Evans They agreed to a composition. A question was asked "What remeqdy had the doctors and chemists when they could not a get paid." The Clerk: It is not exactly the province of the Insurance Committee to say what the remedy against the Insurance Committee would be (laughter). STOCK MIXTURES. Mr W. Llyod moved that the recommenda- tion as to keeping ten stock mixtures to be prescribed by number should be referred back. If this were adopted the chemist's profit on a bottle of medicine would be reduced from 2d to Id. This was a serious injustice to ohemists and if it were not for the war he did not think a chemist would be on the panel to-day. Dr Hopkins said that the system of stock mixtures was unfair to the chemist, the doctor and the patient. The matter was referred back. PATIENTS ALLEGED DRUNKENNESS. A statement from the AYest Wales Sana- torium stated that a patient had been dis- charged because he was found evidently under the influence of alcohol. Mr B. J. Griffiths said that they ought to hear the patient's version. The number who refused to go to the Sanatorium was increasing Mr W. Lloyd said that the matter had been before the Committee. It wasperfeçtly correct. WELCOME. The Chairman extended a welcome to Mr T. Reed, the local Supt. of the Prudential Co., who had been appointed a member of the Com- mittee. r FOR OLD AND YOUNG MORTIMER98 COUGH M I X T U R, f: FOR COUGHS, COLDS, WHOOPING COUGH, ETC., ETC. — OVER 70 YEARS REPUTATION IN THIS DISTRICT. THIS CELtBRAfED WELSH REMEDY Is now put up in cartons securely packed for transmission to all parts of the world and contains a Pamphlet, written by an eminent Medical Authority, dealing with the various beneficial uses of this specific Price Is lid and 2s 9d per bottle, Tkt arger bottle is by far the cheapest.

KIDWELLY

KIDWELLY. On Thursday the 7th inst, Mr W. N. Jones, auctioneer, sold by auction at the Pelican Hotel, Kidwelly, a freehold house and garden, situated near Tycoch, to Mr Thos. GraveH, Gwendracth place, Kidwelly, for £ 250. Mr C. H. Newcombe. Swansea, was solicitor for the vendor.

CARMARTHEN Tliii iifJ S E AI 11 L I G B T

CARMARTHEN Tliii <, i\ i fJ S E AI 11 L I G B T Jome, come, and -,It Yoti down you shall noll budge, Yt,- shall not go, till 1 set you up a glass vV note you may see the inmost part of yoo. SHiKUrUBl. It appears that the Insurance Commissioners and the doctors are quit-e agreeable to a plan by which the panel chemists are to supply "stock mixtures." This is perhaps a very good plan. But in face of this, is not the professional objection to "patent medicines" rather knocked on the head. Is there any difference in fact between rcommending a patient to take a certain well known patent medicine and giving him a prescription for "No. 7" or "No. 9" mixture-which are patent medicines in all but name? It is quite refreshing to note the difference between the treatment of farmers and other classes of the community at the Tribunals. Ko far as the farming classes are concerned, com- pulsion is almost a dead letter. It has only to be shown that a farm can't be carried on without a certain man, and "absolute exemp- tion" is granted. Let however a tradesman come before the Tribunal and say that he will have to give up business if he has to join the Army, and he is allowed six weeks to "sell up." » The practical effect of all this is that farm- ing is the only business which is apparently to be carried on. We are to go without shoes for shoemakers are very summarily dealt with. If a tailor appeals he is told that we can do without new suits until the end of the war. Several funeral undertakers have been "called up," and-this is quite serious—the burial of the dead is actually becoming a serious prob- lem in some cases. And so on through all trades. Who is to pay the taxes to keep the war going? If the farmers are the only people who are left behind, then the farmers will have to pay the whole of the taxation. It Is of course possible to shut up every place of business and to send the men into the Army, and to give separation allowances to their wives and children. But where is the pay of the men and the cost of their rations and the separation allowances to come from ? The farmers do not quite seem to realise it, but it strikes me that they are going to be the only taxpayers left. It looks a fine thing for the farmer to be the only man who is left to carry on his business; but it means that lie will be the only man who will have to pay the whole of the bill. When a place of business is closed up, the tradesman ceases to pay rates and taxes; and lie immediately vcomes on the revenue. He ceases to be a source of income to the State, and he immediately becomes a charge to the State. I defy anybody to get away from this. Logic is logic, sense is sense, as an American poet says. **• Carmarthen is now faced with a proposal to turn the Cwmtawel reservoir into a resort for anglers. It is true that the proposal has been adjourned this year, but that is only because the season is at an end practically. The idea will certainly be mooted next spring, and having regard to the trend of the discussion at the Council last week it sesms likely that the proposal will be agreed to. **• The Medical Officer was asked for his opinion and he said that he would not like to see many people going there. It is of course impossible for the Medical Officer to say definitely that any particular persons will pollute the water. But having regard to all the probabilities of ^Ve-n^o^ Q"cfl"i^SOl]^P^;tainty that if you voir for seven or eight months of the year it will inevitably be turned into a cesspool. The argument as to the practice in other places is quite irrelevant. In the case of the very big reservoirs, there are officials on the spot night and day. Every precaution is taken to prevent the water becoming polluted by the people who angle there. There is noth- ing of the sort here. The proposal here is to allow a body of anglers to come and go as they like at a reservoir which is five, miles from any effective supervision by the Corporation offi- cials. Considering the little matters about which we make a fuss in Corporation circles sometimes, this is decidedly a case of straining at the gnat and swallowing the camel. This, however, is quite a common characteristic of humanity everywhere. Indians who would not touch a piece of bread if it happened to be baked by a man who was of another caste will drink water of the Ganges into which big cities drain and into which they throw dead bodies. There is another fact which is quite over- looked. It is easier to pollute a wineglassful of water than it is to pollute a hogshead. The reservoirs for these big towns usually contain some thousands of millions of gallons. The Cwmtawel reservoir only contains some six or eight million gallons. It may be ten; but I doubt it. An amount of pollution which would pass unnoticed in ten thousand millions of gallons is a very serious matter in ten millions. Besides in big water works there are most elaborate systems of filtration. There is one pond after another through which the water passes after having to penetrate the filter beds. I don't suppose if you threw dead cats into the top reservoir in the Elan Valley, it would make any diffe-rence to the water as it ran into the main at the foot of the lowest ponds. In Carmarthen we are without this protection. AYe are getting quite enough through our taps at times, and we don't want any more. There is only one thing to be said in favour of the proposal. It would not last long. The reservoir has been in existence for 17 or 18 years and naturally it would afford good fish- ing for a season. But how long would it last? All that would happen would be that it would be figbed out in a season and nobody would give a penny for the fishing afterwards. A pond which has be-en preserved for 17 years would naturally provide good sport. But how long would it continue to do so if you let 25 expert anglers at it? There is no suggestion of annual revenue; it is simply an offer of 1:12 10s—the tenth part of a penny rate-for per- mission to clear the reservoir of the trout which hare got into it. I think that quite as much could be realised by letting the reservoir as a swmming bath. That would be no more objectionable, and it would be a more certain source of revenue. J am surprised that nobody proposes that. It the idea were properly handled, we might raise enough to pay for an isolation hospital to cope with the subsequent outbreak of typhoid. It is a curious fact that all the talk has been about the burial of horses at the manure heaps. It must be true that nobody has ever seen a. dead donkey. If poor Neddy died, it would be such a ra.re event that we should give him a public funeral. ALBTHXU.

Llandilo Board of Guardians

Llandilo Board of Guardians. The fortnightly meeting of this body was held at the Board Room on Saturday last. The members present were Mr W. E. Richards (in the chair), Rev J. T. Jenkyns, Rev J. T. Morgan. Messrs W. Hopkins, Arthur Williams W. Roberts, Evan Morris, W. Stephens, Dan Davies, John Hughes. D. W. Lewis, AYilliam Griffiths, John Lewis, L. N. Powell, Evan Davies. AY. Williams. J. Humphreys, J. Rich- ards, AAT. Lewis, Jacob Davios, Caleb Thomas, J. Bevan, D. Jones, Glyn Jenkins, R. Thomas, J. L. Williams the Clerk (Mr R. Shipley Lewis); the Deputy Clerk (Mr D. J. Morris). VOTES OF CONDOLENCE. Mr W. E. Richards said that it was an un- usual thing in that Beard to see Mr Matthews (the chairman) absent. Since coming to Llan- dilo that morning he had learned that the chairman's son, a very bright young man and with a promising career in front of him, had been stricken down by death, and he thought it was their duty to pass a vote of condolence with the chairman and his family, and he begged to to propose the Clerk should write to that effect.—Mr W. Williams seconded the motion with heartfelt sorrow. Mr Tom Matthew's death would be felt in his family, to the members of which he was very devoted. It was a blow to lose a son in the prime of life. He was sure the death of Mr Tom Matthews would be felt outside the family. He had earned a name for himself in literature. He was a Master of Arts, and if his life had been spared would have contributed a good deal educationally in that direction, not only in that locality but in a much wider sphere his death would be keenly felt.—Mr J. L Williams supported the motion. Only a few days a.go he had had a letter from Mr Tom Matthews. He was a distinguished lliterateur, both in English and AVeish, and he was sure that the members of the Council, if not familiar with his works, would .if they knew them, be deeply interested in many that he had published. Apart from being distinguished in many kinds of literature he was distinguished as a school- master. His loss was a, national one.—The motion was carried in silence. Mr W. E. Richards said that another mem- ber had lost a son. He referred to Mrs Roberts, whose son had been killed in the field of battle whilst fighting for his king and coun- try. He proposed a sincere vote of condol- ence be passed with her and her family in their bereavement.—Rev J. Thompson Jenkins seconded and Mr W. Hopkins supported.—It was adopted in silence. APPOINTMENT OF COLLECTOR. For the post of rate collector for the parish of Lla,ngathen there were four applicants. Mr Timothy Davies, Ysgwyn Farm, stated in his application he was over military age and well acuqainted with the whole parish. David Jones, tailor, 43 years of age, Dovey Cottage, Ci.lsane; Thomas Jones, Penrhiw. 44 years of ago, had a holding under Lord Dynevor. He was prepared to withdraw in favou r of Mrs Evans, widow of the late collector, who was also an applicant. She had assisted her hus- band in the collection of rates and in the pre- paration of the books. Last year she had been practically responsible for the whole of the work. No mistake had been found in it, and that was the best testimonial she could pro- duce. She had been appointed overseer,- Mr W. Griffiths said it would only be a waste of time to talk about the applications any more. They had had a parish meeting at the schoolroom on Friday night, and they had de- cided to recommend the applicant that had the highest number of votes. The votes were as follows: Timothy Davies 39, Mrs Evans 27, D. Jones 20. They were unanimous in recom- mending Timothy Davies as a result of the voting.—Mr J. Bevan said he did not think it was right. The matter was in the hands of the Guardians.—The Chairman said the Parish Council had bten asked by the Guardians to make a recommendation. Griffiths pro- posed and Mr W. Lewis seconded that Mr Timothy Davies bes appointed.—Mr J. Bevan maintained it was inconsistent to invite appli- cants to apply to the Board of Guardians if they left it to the Parish Council. It was not fair to the other applicants.—Mr L. N. Powell pointed out that they had to apply, for appli- cations before the Parish Council could con- sider them.—Mr J. Bevan proposed they should take the usual course and vote on all the applicants.—Mr Evan Davies rose to ex- plain matters. It was the feeling of the Board at the last meeting that they should invite the opinion of the parish. They always dealt with these cases according to the wishes of the parish. If they were going to ignore that wish he did not see it fair. What occasion was there for a vote. AYere they going to approve of what the parish meeting had done. It was L^VnKstim'e'feie We SfieFgSSSg tu of or ignore what the meeting had done -Mr L. N. Powell supported the motion that the nominee of the parish should be ap- pointed. It would not be very complimentary first to ask the parish to recommend and then possibly upset what they had done, if they took a vote by ballot. He did not personally know either of the applicants, but he would' support the nominee of the palrish.Cihairman: I have only one motion.—Rev J. T. Jenkvns said he would vote in any way for Timothv Davies, but he thought the appointment should be made in the ordinary way.—Br J. Bevan expressed the same opinion. He wanted the ordinary routine.—,Mr Arthur Williams said they as a Board had unanimously decided to asik the local members to call a parish meeting and to decide the matter among themselves.—Rev J. T. Jenkyns: What they have said will impress the members of the Board.—Mr L. N. Powell: As a point of order there is only one motion before the Board.—.Mr Evan Davies held that there would have been room to object if only three or four parishioners had attended, but such a. representative fleeting they could not ignore. There was a full house.—Timothy Davies was unanimously appointed. A DESER VING CASE. Mr Evan Davies direw the attention of the Board to a very deserving case. In his dis- trict a working man's child had a deformed foot. Dr Davies thought the child should be taken to Swansea Hospital. Had they as ai Board power to give an order for admission to the hospital.—The Clerk said they could not issue an order, but they could ask for admis- issue an order, but they could ask for admis- sion to the hospital for the child as the Board of Guardians were sbuscribers.

Llandilo Rural district Council

Llandilo Rural district Council. =71 Mr W. E. Richards (chairman). MEAS&LES AT BRYNAMMAN. The Sanitary Inspector (Mr Evan Jones, reported an outbreak of measles at Bryn- amman in epidemic form. There were a largj number of cases. He visited the place last week. Everything had been done to check the'spread of the epidemic. The schools he found in good order, and they had restarted last Monday. OEFN BRYN BRAIN SCHOOL. The Inspector said that Mr Shipley Lewis, the Clerk, had had a letter from the Educa- tion Commitee, enquiring if the sanitary work at Cefnbrynbrain Schools had been completed so that the work might be inspected by the County Surveyor and reported on by the next meeting. He (Mr Jones) reported that he had visited the school and found the drainage a bit complicated. The whole of the school drainage was choked The sewer had been emptied to a water course at the back of the terrace. Owing to the present complicated1 state of the sewers and drains he had suggested to the Sanitary Committee that a sub-com- mittee should meet the County Architect on the ground to see what could be done.—Mr J. Hughes moved a motion to that effect, and it was agreed to.—Mr L. N. Powell asked if they could have the meeting before next Thurs day as the Education Committee met that day —It was not found possible, and the Clerk was instructed to reply to the letter. MILLO WATER SUPPLY. The Surveyor (Mr E. Jones) said that with regard to the Millo water supply, he had Let out the trenching by contract. He did not wish to divulge the figures. The work was proceeding satisfactorily The Clerk said he had received a long circu- lar from the L.G.B. in reference to numerous returns required now with regard to the war, and it would be more than one man's work to complete them all. There were two forms A. and B. The first asked for suggestions from this authority as to works which were needed within the area within their jurisdiction which ought to be taken up by them at the conclusion of the war, They required the the amount of the loan, if any, the cost and the number of men likely to be employed and the period over which the work would continue. In respect to the Guardians there would be the Infirmary and as to the District Council there would be the Rhyd,"merdy bridge and sewerage works including Ffairfach. He couM put the parti- culars in with the help of Mr Bvan Jones (the Sanitary Inspector) and give an approximate idea, of the oost.—Mr W. Williams said they had spent some money on plans a.nd specifica- tions for road improvements. Could not theso details be included ?—The Clerk Do you in- tend taking them in hand the moment the war is over?—Mr W. Williams: As soon as we ha.ve have any money.—The Clerk: That is quite another thing.—Mr Evan Davies said they had these things prepared in anticipation of having a grant from the Roads Board.—Mr W. Wil- liams I think they should he included if there is any room for remarks on the form.—Another matter mentioned was Bettws water supply. The Amman Valley sewerage scheme would be a matter for the joint board.—Information was also sought as to work by bodies and per- sons other than local authorities.—The Clerk said that if members knew of any work likely to be taken up by private individuals perhaps they wouid inform h:illl.-1h- Evan Davies mentioned Brecbfa road.—A Member That will go on for ever (laughter). VELINDRE BRIDGE. The Clerk mentioned that in 1914 he received a note signed by Mr Wm. Roberts, Pengoitre, and other persons for a sum of £ 54 towards Velindre bridge. He had tht note still. Sub- sequently he received from Mr J. Richards, R35 16s, the-amount collected in the parish up to that period he supposed. He had paid the sum into the treasurer, and still held the note. There was a balance outstanding therefore of £ 18.—»Mr Evan Davies suggested that they should write to the signatories to the note that they must he paid wihin so many days.— The Clerk sai-d, he would write to Mr Roberts. 28 CASES OF DIPHTHERIA. The Medical Officer of Health (Dr Lloyd) reported that in the 10 weeks precodi ng_Aug. 10th, 1916, 28 case sof diphtheria were notified to him from various parts of the rural district. The majority of the cases occurred in the Llan- debie sub-registration district, and most of them were attending Llandebie School. Uf the 28 oases notified, their distribution was as follows:—17 from the district immediately 1. J1 Til CI- 1 1 £ »U_ surrounding tne x>iaenau ocnooi; six irom village of Llandebie; one from Penybank, Ammanford one from Pentregwenlais one from Carmel; one from Manordeilo one Llan- fihangel-Cilfargen. Three of the cases notified from the Blaenau district died, and one of these was only 21 months old. All the other cases recovered. The origin of the outbreak in the Blaenau school district is obscure, but diphtheria seems to be endemic in our indus- trial area and occasional exacerbations of dis- ease are only what are to be expected in the absence of any proper isolation hospital. He hoped that as soon as possible one should be provided. The treatment of diphtheria with ample injections of anti-toxin given as soon as the case is seen is now well recognised as the only effective method of successfully combat- ing^ the disease. He had carefully enquired into the amount of anti-toxin given in each of the above 28 cases. He maintained as he had always done that it was the duty of this autho- rity to supply anti-toxin fre of charge in every case of diphneria. If it would mean that the fre supply would save only one life it would be worth while undertaking. It was done by every other sanitary authority in the kingdom He had carefully gone into figures over this matter for the last 16 years and he found that the average number of diphtheria cases noti- fied for each year was 27.8, and if 4.000 units of diphtheria anti-toxin was given to each case at its present price it would cost this autho- riy the sum of £ 7 12s lid approximately per year to give every case of diphtheria a fight- ing chance.—A discussion followed in which members showed themselves keenly alive to the necessit yof adopting the doctor's recommen- dations.—It was decided on the motion of Mr W. Williams, seconded by Mr L. N. Powell, to supply all the doctors in the district with anti-toxin gratuitously.

Caruiarthensbire Appeal Tribunal

Caruiarthensbire Appeal Tribunal The Carmarthenshire County Appeal Tri- bunal was held at the Carmarthen Guildhall on Friday. The members present were: Mr W. Griffiths, Llanelly (chairman), Mr Dudley WiHiams-Drummond, Mr J. W. Gwynne- Hughes., Mr David Evans, Mr Joseph Roberts Mr T. Morris, and Mr D. AVilliams. Capt. Cremlyn acted -as Military representa- tive. NEWGHUROH MARKET GARDENER'S APPEAL. Mr Wallis Jones appeared on behalf of Mr David Jeremy, Mount Pleasant, Newchurcdi (37). who applied for a renewal of a temporary exemption. He said that lie had been in a certified occupation at the Llandebie Lime AVorks, but came home temporarily to work in the market garden on account of his father's illness. He would be prepared to work three shifts a week in a munition factory and to help his sister to carry on the business. The application was refused. A LArG'HARXE PISH HAWKER. John Pearce, Frogmore street, Laughairne (23) applied for a renewal of the exemption feia/uwru J11IU iu. v TT ,„i .hn.t- l'A 1"(\rrv1 on business as a fish and cockle merchant. Several of his relatives had joined the Army, and there was no one to carry on his business. -Mr Wallis Jones appeared for appellant. The appli cation was refused. BANKYFBLIN BUTTER. BLENDING. Mr Howell-Davies appeared on behalf of Mrs Anne Levis, Plaspant, Banikyfelin, who asked for the renewal of a certificate granted in re- spect of her son, Johnnie Lewis (29), a butter blender. The son said they blended a large quantity of butter by hand, and his sister's hand did not suit the work. The application was refused. KIDWELLY BLACKSMITH. Mrs Louisa Rees, Park House, Kidwelly, appealed in respect of George Crouchman (29) a shoeing smith. A petition was put in from several residents of the neighbourhood. The appellant said that iher son was an invalid. The application Vas adjourned for a week to enable the son to go before the Medioal Board. LLANSAAATEL TAILOR. Mr John Thomas, 2, Castle terrace, Llan- sawel, tailor, applied for temporary exemption in respect of his son, Ll. R. Thomas (19). He asfced for three months to finish some orders in hand. Capt. Cremlyn: You appealed first in March You have had plenty of time. Appellant: I have been ill a, good pa.rt of the time. I The appeal was dismissed. BYNEA GROCER. Mr E. D. Morris, Caegwyn, Bynea, groee* asked for exemption for himself. He end that he had advertised his business for and had had no offers. The appeal was dismissed. LLANDEBIE SHOEMAKER. Henry Rees, 3, Central Buildings, Llandebie (24). bootmaker and repairer, appealed for ex- emption. A letter was put in stating that the appellant was indispensable to the colliers. He had advertised the business for sale and had had no offers. The Tribunal dismissed the appeal. CRWBIN SHOEMAKER. Edwin Jones, Tyrsteps, Crwbin, Kidwelly (22), boot repairer, appealed for a renewal of a certificate. Mr J. F. Morris, solicitor, Carmarthen, who appeared for the appellant, said that he was now the only boot repairer within nine miles in one direction and three miles on the other. A large number of his customers were colliers. The application was refused.

CARMARTHEN NEWSAGENT

CARMARTHEN NEWSAGENT. Mr C. H. Carpenter asked for a renewal of the certificate granted to his son, aged 21. Mr J. F. Morris appeared for the appellant. Mr Carpenter said that he was a wholesale distributing agent for West Wales for several London newspapers. He was 66 years of age and worked from 4.30 until 10.30 p.m. Mr Morris: If your son went away you would have to give up the business. Appellant: Yes; and that would be almost a national loss to the people in the rural dis- tricts The application was refused. LLANELLY BAKER. Thomas Thomas and E. J. Rees, 17, Camp- bell street, bakers and grocers, applied for exemption for Thomas Thomas, a baker. Mr W £ ^vies, solicitor, appeared for appellant. Irs Rees who gave evidence said that they baked 30 sacks a week-a sack producing about 92 loaves. He workod from 6 p.m. until 8 a..m. Witness was his aunt. The appeal was dismissed. TWO KIDAVELLY BUTCHERS, D. J. Evans, 26, AVater street, Kidwelly (32) applied for exemption for himself. Mr Lewis Phillips, solicitor, Llanelly appeared for the appellant. He had been ten years building uo the business. There was no other butcher in the same part of Kidwelly. Cfcpt. Cremlyn Kidwelly is only a village. It is not very far from one part to another. Mr J. Lewis Phillips You had bettor not tell Kidwelly that. The appeal was dismissed. David Phillips, Oxford House, Kidwelly, butcher (29) applied for exemption for himself. Capt. Cremlyn said that he need not press this case, a the man had only passed in Class B3 (sedentary work), and the group wati not likely to be called up. The appeal was adjourned sine die. LLANMLO IRONMONGER. Mr T. M. Williams, Rhosmaen street. Llan- dilo, applied for exemption for his brother, Mr W. AVilliams, who assists him in his business as an ironmonger, etc. Appellant said that he had one of the largest businesses of its kind in South Wales. There was no other mechanic to deal with petrol and oil engines between Carmarthen and Brecon. A postponement was allowed until the 31st October with an intimation that no further appeal would be allowed. TRELECH WEA VEIl. Mr J. D. Evans, Danygraig, Trelech, wea-rer applied for an exemption in favour of David John Thomas. It waa stated that arrange- ments were being made to have men in the, trade replaced by women. The appeal was dismissed. KIDAVELLY GROCER. Mr D. O. Parry, Llanelly, appealed for fur- ther exemption in respect of Mr T. J. Jones, who manages his Kidwelly branch. Mr Parry said that the work could not be done by women as there were a good many heavy sacks to handle. He had three women engaged in the shop at Llanelly; but only one of them was experienced. The application was adjourned until the 31st December with an intimation that no fur- ther appeal would be allowed. METHODIST PREACHER'S CASE. Capt. Margrave appealed against the ad- journment of the case of Mr Victor G. Griffiths now pastor of Penllwyn O.M. Church, Llanon, who had appealed as a student in immediate preparation for the ministry, being at the timo in his second year at Jesus College, Ox- ford. As he then stated that he expected & can to a church in August and to be ordained in August, the local tribunal adjourned the case. Mr Griffiths, who was represented by > Mr T. Howell Davies, solicitor, said he had since accepted a call and had taken up his duties at Penllwyn. Capt. Cremlyn: The point is., are you, an ordained minister of the Gospel? Mr Griffiths: No; that will, come in due eour86. Have you completed your course at the U ni versity ?—No. And you have taken this church in order to escape military duty ?—No. The examinations I was preparing for at Oxford have been set aside. Evidence that the appellant was the pastor of the church was given by a deacon. Capt. Cremlyn How long has this church been without a. minister. Witness: Two years. Capt. Cremlyn: As you have carried it on without a minister for two years, don't you thinkyou could carry it on until the end of th« war? In answer to Mr Drummond, the appellant said that as a candidate for the ministry he would have to satisfy the Presbytery as well as the deacons of the church. The military appeal was dismissod. A LOCAL AVHITELEY. Capt. Margrave appealed against the deci- sion of the Carmarthen Rural District Tri- W"T' Sich had_a,,owed an exemption to Mr >V. J. Thomas (37), who assists his brother to cary on the business of a general shop at Taloir Thomas, tne employer and elder brother, said that the business had been established 85 years ago. He dealt in seeds and manures, he was a grocer, an ironmonger, and boot dealer. He kept the Post Office including Money Order and AAar Loan business. Ca.pt. Cremlyn: You are a local Whiteley. Respondent said that the shop was open 14 hours a day. Capt. Cremlyn. Have you a wifep Appellant: lhafre not. Capt. Cremlyn: Couldn't you get a wife Respondent: I daresay I might if I tried. The appeal of military officer was allowed. FENYGROES GROCER Mr Albert H. Jones, Lewis terrace, Peny- groe,s, grocer and china dealer, appealed for exemption for himself. Mr Ungoed Thumaa h*sppella,,t- 'n>* ™ ST. CLEARS STORES. The appeal of Mr John John, Peotre Stor", St. Cleaxs in respect of John Lewis was dis- missed. TINPLA T'S OASE. tha t? \Mad,ge' Garnaat' an employee of In mT forka< -Mied for exemp himself. A fetter was put in from Mr controls the output of <,t»I for "ot Mnniti<,ns J u xui a fortnight m order to nrocure a. formal communication from the Ministry of Munitions. ENROILiLiED IN NAVY Mr "Willie John, Pleasant View, Uanstephan sherman, produced a doouinent showing that ^serveenH ^««teer RST T appeal was therefore allowed. Af w" SOCIETY AND THE SADDLER. nhln c ■Davks' -Dyffrynolewm, Llanate- self It waT' tPC1^ f°r him. sell. It ^as stated that he was the only saddler in several parishes. a ^nl^al,iSf °neu mad A letter containing esolution by the Llangunnock Bull Society in favour of the appeal. Ca.pt. CromIyn: It is a nw thing to hear that a Bull Society requires a saddler. -ita £ SrJo"poi,,t is they are aUf 8Irmers. The appeal was dismissed. REJECTED BY NAVY Mr R. J. Davies, Belle Vue Villa* Fermide that heTii ?r,°duoed a create showing wtelrVredt°^tin^t^ N*vy, and W+h wj€cted on a<*°nnt of hi« teeth and his chest measurement Ca,pt. Oremlyn said that that did not prorim Board at M*dlC"1 A ppeUant s'aid th8Jt ,fi:sh>elrm were giTn the option of joining the Navy. join the Army • that wf required to Army Medioal Btaird. mattW f<" diiww'tT". ,n(i thA appellant Boarf aPPear be,ore th* Medical

0 FAIRS FOR SEPTEMBER

'0 FAIRS FOR SEPTEMBER J.;&. -iregaron. 14. Llangadock. 16. Lampeter. 18. Llanboidy". 19. Whitland, Haverfordwest ». uZ7ZEm,Fn wd Adp"- 25. Pontardulais. 28. Llandillo, Narberth, Pontardulai, 29. AVhitland. dulais. CAKMAETHEN—Printed and l Proprietress, M. LAWBINCE AT HM OFFL Street, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15th, 1!)1& BIu<5