Collection Title: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 4 of 4
Full Screen
11 articles on this page
THE PASSING WiEkV 1

THE PASSING Wi-EkV; Let the*e be ihiMic. theic art viapes, If old thiny-, thi-T-j are new Ten thousand broken and Iiapc;, Vet glimjvc. ''I the tiue.'—I LINNS SON. The Peace ProposaV of Genu .my bear o'u the theory that the sense oi hiiniotir. ing and terrorising all Luropo, aud tlun when they have grabbed ail they can, they say "It time this row was stopped. Shake lnuuU and allow us to keep all our war plunder. If yul, don't. then nlIïl He responsible tor all the tli-,it, Avill fo,lo% We are anxious to spare you the horrors ot war but it a-sk u> to drop any ot the swag, your blood be upon your oiri head." This offer b character:stxa 1 ly German, the German-- are quite unable to H'e any other point of view but their own. 'ihu)j in 1870, 1 Bismaivk said that -Metz must be handed over I by 1'ianee to (.♦erniany because it was a very eon vent out point from win; h France eould r- vade Germany. He for a uionunt saw the other side of the question -that Metz Gorman hands would be a very convenient point from which to invade l'ranee. We have had many instances of this pit'lt lately. The Germans say tht they are waging thfir submarine campaign in order to attain the "freedom of the seas." Britain is strong as sea, and Germany after ail is weak. There, lore Germany takes up the attitude that the weaker peoples have rights and that they must not be (lom inn r»>d liy thnt oi orbom-ing 1)\111." John Bull. When Germany is weak, Germanv wants freedom and equality On the other hand, G-erniany is strong on land. Germany never says a word about the "freedom of the land." On the land there i" to be 110 freedom. Be;gitim, Sen-ja, Riumania art smashed up because such weaklings can't be allowed to stand in the way of a big Power which requires i r e,,3 room for development. **■ During the fighting labt- summer, several French areophuies left Verdun and dropped bombs on Carlsrube. The Germans said that Vxrdun was too close to the German frontier. and that after the war it must be handed over to Germany to prevent stieh things happening again. erdun must be handed over because from it bomb-, could be dropped on German towns. Very good! If Verdun were handed over. then Yerduu would he a German town, and by the same logic Paris would have to hp handed over to Germany because from Paris it is possible to drop bombs oN Verdun. This position is quite as logical as the other. Having made Paris a German town, the dwi, r would arise that it would be ridiculousiv easy to drop bombs on Par's from Calais. Of course it would. Then Calais by the same logic would be handed over to Germany. But Calais would not then be safe. It is the easiest thing in the world to fiy over from Dover and drop bombs oil Calais' "f: The effect of German logic is evident. There is no room for anybody else in the world extent Germany. It i, not Germany's, enemies who say o. Germany says it herself. Aiiv sti-il) of land which can be used as a ba6e of opera- tions against Germany must be handed over to her. iiow tlwre i not a strip of land in he world which may not vr.,nie under this descrip- tion. German principles required the compb te extermination of the other nations of the wor'd If Germany owned Prance up to the Pyrenees she would be bound to annex Spain because otherwise the would lie open to attack fi-o i the South. If Germany annexed Great Britain she would be bound to annex America, because the Western coasts of these islands are open to attacks by American cruisers, if Germany annexed Russia right up to Siberia and Man churia she would be bound to annex India, China and Japan in order to protect her' frontiers! ♦ This in fact is the German motto: "Get off the earth." And the Peace proposals aiv couched in the same strain of overweening insolence. It is to bo a peace which will pro- tect German frontiers. Of course, nobody ). to have a chance of attacking Germany. But there is not a word of the protection of other nations. The idea that other nations are be protected against invasion by Germany is not to be considered tor a moment. Germany is the great big brass god of this earth, and its Jecrees are not to be questioned. fl All the same Germany knows she is beaten. Germany i3 liko a bankrupt tradesman who puts all his goodg in the shop window and makes a big ",I)Ias It" for the last week it- though every room m the establishment 's empty. We are not to be deceived by the pretended moderation of the Germa-n terms. Germany has failed. We all remember the fight for Calais. Calais was going to be taken at all costs. The American papers were filled with pictures of the scheme which the Ger- mans had for invading England. Huge guns were to be brought up to Calais—guns with a range of 60 kitometres -that is to say 36 miles. As the Channel is only 21 miles wide the gullS I would be able to destroy the fortifications )t Dover! The American papers contained pictures showing how the German transports were to get aoioss. From Calais mines were to be iiii 1 right across the Channel. Hie Germans calcu- lated that in spite of the efforts of the British Navy they would be able mile by mile under cover of their guns to stretch a mine field j across tho Channel. It was to he not so much a mine field as two parallel rows of mines. Tlmre were to bo two compact lines of mines When this arrangement was fully carried out. with a mile of safe water in between them, the Germans would have a safe "corridor through the Channel to Cover. When the Germans had constituted a per- fectly safe "corridor" through the Channel, they were to land, an immense Army in Eng- land. At this time we had in England only u quarter of a million Territorial* and raw re- cruits of Kitchener s Army, and we had not. enough rifles to arm them. It is a fact that in many battalions there were only about rifles for about 800 men, and that the ser- geants had to wn it until their turn canu- 10 get the loan of rifles to practice their com- panies in the "manual." The Germans had on the Western front four millions of men ready, and had they landed at Dover in the autumn of 1914 or the .spring of 1915 tliev would have finished Great Britain off is a fort- Might. We should have been unable to make the stand that Ihmanm did. *K But they did not take Calais and they did not land at Dover. The Germans were so sure ot their scheme that they iad the guns ready with which to bombard Dover. In the sum- mer of 1915 there a great sensation caused by a few German shells falling on Dunkirk. i)unkirk is 40 or -J0 miles from any Gorman post and is regarded as being outside the war 7.6IlP. It happened two or three times the same week and no more has since been heard of any such occurrence. The explanation of the occurrence is simple enough. The Genua lis weie tiying one of their big guns which had wn hllilt to bombard Dover from Onlais Thev had several of these monsters constructed at Krupp's works. The guns have sine* tilta.1 been me ted down again probably. j Then we had the "inferno" of Verdun. For ii-e months, tile German commanders threw away 5,000 men every day in an effort to cap- lure Verdun. They lost three quarters of ;1.: million men—and they failed. They nev ?r i gaillcd an indl ot the V erdull fortifications. At the start they gained a few varus of the outer defences towards the end the trench r lea red them out and pushed the German lines back to their former place. *»» Let us not he dazzled by German successos. They are nothing at all compared to the Ger- man failures. The Germans have knocked out Belgium and Rumania, and Servia and Monte- negro. They can maul ail the "juniors" of the European school—and that is all the t,ig German bullies can do. But when they attaoked France and England thn.' hit the dust. Tho road to Calais and the road t Verdun are paved six feet deep with the hones of German soldiers, and Calais and Verdun stand where they did. « »• Germany declared war on France on the 1st August, 1914. Franco had not mobilised until the. end of September—eight weeks after war start*s.i. Franc? was taken by surprise; Ger- many was ready. Great Britain did not begia to mobilise util the spring of 19 K5 when com- pulsion was introduced. And the Germans had prepared for this war for ten year* every- thing was ready, even the spare set of shos for each horie. Six millions of well-equipped Germans moved forward to the conquest 1 t sleeping Europe. And they failed! And we are asked to admire German genius! Balder- dash! According to all the laws of war "In.1 probability they ought to have occupied Pans i*L a fortnight and London in a month. Now their chance is gone for ever. We have millions of soldiers in this country. We don't know how many exactly, and we dare not cell if we knew. It may be only three and on otlier hand it may be seven—it all depends upon how many of our men axe abroad. And they are not short of arms. AVe have not on I r enough rifles for every soldier, but enough for every man in the wuntry should we hare a "levee fill ma»se." And as tor ammunitio 1 we liii-o enough to bury every soldier in Ge many under the empty cartridge cases. »•* Of course, the Germans don't want to fig:lt any more. They will be graciously pleased Jo step fighting if we "let bye gones be bye gones," and allow them to keep their plunder. They have not been able to finish the job as they expected. So they want us to disband our armies, close up the munition works and IO back to our former occupations for five or six years until they get a chance to catch us un- prepared—when they certainly won't make the mistakes which spoiled their little game m 191-1.

Llanartnney Woman Her I TheologyI

Llanartnney Woman & Her Theology. PECULIAR VIEW'S~EXPOSED IN COURT. At the Carmarthen County Police Court cn Saturday, Mrs Maria Thomas, Glanbedw, Llanarthney. who wai stated to be a small farmer, wa- brought up in custody on a charge of not sending her three grandchildren, of which she was guardian, to school. She wii further charged with refusing to fill in tho agricultural census form. She had been sum- moned to appear at a previous court, but as she did not attend a warrant had been issued for her apprehension. It was stated that there had been some difficulty in executing the war- rant as the previous afternoon the defendant left home and had been arrest-ed five or tix milos aWly-at Cefneithin. When the charge was read to her, defendant who spoke Welsh said that she had not sent the children to school, but added that she wars "innocent before God." They aire teaching the commandment "Thon shait not kill' to the children in school, and afterwards they send them to be killed. Is that according to the teaching of the Bible? Mr Harris, attendance officer. said that out of a possible 40 attendances, the three chil- dren had not made a single attendance. When he asked for an explanation defendant recited some scriptural quotations and said, "God lifts commanded me not to send them to school. Prior to the period in question the attendance had been good. On the other charge, Supt. J. E. Jones said that on two occasions the census form was re- turned in blank. P.C. Roberts, Llanarthney, said defendant d'xlared, "I will not fill it up. I cannot u3 1 against my Bible." Some days late ehc satd, "You cannot understand rae at all, because you don't live in the same world as me." Delendant, bursting into tears in court, ex- claimed in W elsh 'Tlie law wa.s not give to the righteous! Diolch Iddo! I have a higher guide than law, and I am endeavouring to bring up the children in the fear of the Lord." The Chairman (Mr F. D. W. Drummond) Has the son also got these peculiar religious tenets I-' P.C. Roberts Yes, sir. Tho Chairman: S. he also suffers from the same complaint? P.C. Roberts: Yes. The Chai rmau asked how the defendant j came to be the guardian of tho children? I P.C. Roberts They are orphans. The Chairman: Poor things. It was added that the defendant's grown up son had on similar grounds to tlio-w expressed by the mother refused to fi!l up the National Registration form. The Chairman, addressing defendant, said the children were not being given the prop Ar chance in life, and by not sending them to school she was going to bring them up as ) ignorant as herself in these matters. "In spite of any imaginary deities and fancy theologies you may have, the law must be up- held. You cannot break it in these fancy ways." Defendant n as fined 30s on the school attend a nee summonses, and 40s on the other, and was allowed a week to pay. The Chairman added it was hoped this to fier. Conduct like this could not be tolerated. If she went to prison he hoped her mental condition would be en- into. SHORT WEIGHT IN COAL. James Evans. Abergwili, was summoned for soiling coal which was of less quantity than the weight represented. Inspector David Roderick said a load of 19cwt. was found 49lbs Rhort, Defendant "aid the shortage was due to a mistake in the weighig. He was fined 10s CRWBYN, LLANGENDEJRNE. As a to the mission of the Rev D. Lioytl Morgan, Pontardulais. un behalf of the j British and Foreign Bible Society, n meeting was held at Crwbiu estry, L-la.ngendeirne, u Wednesday evening the dOth nit., when there were pres-ent representatives from ail the various ehurr lies in tlJW eeighbourhood. It was unanimously decided lo form a local branch of the Society, and the following offi- cers were (,Iec,tkd Rev R. H. Jones, C.C.. Llangendeirne: vice-presidents. Rev T. W. Morgan, Crwbyn and Rev W. F. Edwards, C,J. Llangendeirne; treasurer Mi- David Williams, Shop Isaf, I and secretary, Mr Thomas, schoolmaster, Bankffosfelen. The district wa* diveded into seven divisions and two collectors were selected for every division. It is hoped that the movement will bring forth much fruit and that the collectors will receive a hearty wel- come from all and that a substantia! sum may be raised.

Advertising

LINSEED COMPOUND with warm water ia | m excellent garble for Sore Throat, Colds, Coughs, &c j

C AUMAR1HEN UMKK nik SKA UGH LIGHTJ

C AU.MAR'1HEN UM)KK nik SKA UGH LIGHT, J C ome, come, and sit you down; you shall not budge, You shall not go. till I set you up a glass Where you may see the inmost part of you. SHAKESPEARE. The most interesting cases of ail have yet fo come before the Tribunal. A good many young men who obtained exemption in the cai-ty days of compulsion will shortly be called up "lor revision." Some of the exemptions of course will stand others will be withdrawn. It is not impossible that a few might he criminally pro- secuted. It is a crimina i offence to make false statements in applications for exemption. We had an agricultural lecture at Carmar- then early in the year, and we were told that then early in the year, and we were told that we might ignore winter, because we never see winter "except on a Christmas card." This certainly was a somewhat unlucky statement. There is an idea laid by some people that we have had a big Russian army landed in Eng- land and that they have brought their climate with them. #*•* There was rather an animated discussion -t the meeting of the Carmarthenshire Education Committee as to whether a certain appoint- ment should be filled now or after the war. It was decided to proceed with the appointment immediately. If this means that suitable men injw in tho Army and Navy are to bu excluded, it is a very bad po:iey; if it means that tho men on active service may apply and that n the event of one being appointed his place will be kept open for him, it is reasonable enough. A vigilant eye must be itept on this and similar cases. A man is not a "shirker because he obtains exemption. Usually no man is "indispensable" but if hundreds T thousands of men in a certain profession .join the Army then the few who are loft are indis- pensable. We have not yet come to that pass that we must close up our schools and our public offices and suspend all national work until the end of the war. There are men whose "calling up" would mean the closing of the schools and other important offices, and who are asked to remain at their usual work. These men arc out of the Army, not because of their own wish, but in order to meet the wishes oi others. *< But a man because he is at home should not have an undue advantage over another man, because that other is in tho Army. it will ijad to bitter recriminations, if men who have served years in the Army come back to hud that those who have stayed at hom<> have been able to gain professional precedence over them. There will he a good many bitter reckonings after the war, and public bodies had better e careful that they do not contribute to the list. In occupation- over which public bodies have no control the "job snatcher" is frankly reeog niseJ. The young man who manages to bam- boozle a tribunal into granting him total ex- emption or who bamboozles a Medical Board into believing that he has St Vitus dance )t, locomotor ataxy is in many districts regarded as a public nuisance. He works himself into good positions to which he never would have dreamt of aspirirng in peace time, and from nis cosy ne.it he hopes to beable to look down on the "unemployed" who will perhaps be .0 plentiful after the war when the Army s demobilised. The cases of men in business afford even greater cases of hardship than those of men earning salaries. If every business were closed up for the period of tho war, there would be an equality of sacrifice. But the man who stays at home stands in a fair way of making his fortune by collaring the business of the in-lio man who is called up. When the man who has served his country comes back, he may find that lie and his family are ruined as the busi- ness rival who got exemption has captured all his trade. 'J(';T- I think 1 can foresee work for the This sounds iike poetry, but I really don' mean it. We are going to grow vegetables ia Carmarthen Park. I don't know who is going to do the ploughing and the sowing and the manuring; but I know who is going to gath r the crops unless very stringent measures are taken to prevent depredations. The peopie who will walk a couple of miles and smash a public seat and sell it for old iron wiil nevei I allow an onion, a cabbage, or a spud to reach maturity. It is true that by cultivating ho Park we shall i ncrea.se the food supply of Uio "People." But I rather fancy that it is net exactly for the benefit of the People" of that ciass that it i intended to cultivate the Park. **11 The only way in which it will be possible to cultivate the Pa.rk successfully will be to liav.) half a dozeen men on guard day and night with loaded rifles until the cropt; are gathered. Wo have to face the blunt fact that there is a section of the population which lives by steal- ing. Wreaths are stolen from graves in 1 he; churdl-hards and sold again. It is a well established fact that in some quarters of the town people who live alone always die when they spend their last penny-- and never die before. People who have always plenty of money to pay their way manago just to die when they when they have spent t)ie;i, last co. 11. At any rate not a halfpenny is over found in the houses of people who die by them- selves. It is curious that there is not even a couple of coppers. The only explanation :s that when they feel their end approaching, they proceed to "blow" their money and die just as tho last copper is fepent. 1 see that appellants whose cases come b- fore the Carmarthen Rural Tribunal are i shy of going before the Medical Board. They have been plainly told so in their notices, but it is said that they have not sufficient know- ledge of English and that they don't grasp tll:) instruction.- «** I would be prepared to make a small hot. If the Rural Tribunal were to send out a 110ti •e stating that all appellants wore invited to a dinner of roast turkey and plnm pudding w-ti; a unlimited supply of suitable liquors to wa"! down these solids before the meeting started, I II guarantee they'd nit hav sufficient know- ledge of English to grasp the point. I'll guar- antee that if the notice were in Latin or Greex they'd get to the bottom of it. There is at lemit, one B.A. in every Welsh parish, and they'd go to him for an explanation. | 8.. But they'll never understand that noti'e about the Medical Board, if it is translate J into Welsh, Clio will be too classical or too colloquial or there will he some hitch. There arc wild tales circulating in the country about the Medical Board. It is said quite seriously that men have gone up before the Medical Board, and that nothing has sinc ■been heard of them alive or dead. Some wag has spread' tales which has put the fear of the Mediical Board into the minds of the rustics. Even a man who is "rejected" is not satisfied. He feels that he has he en bewitched—that ho went up sound and came out a cripple. Every man is innocent until he is proved guilty, anl every cripple thinks himself "Class A" tint ho is rejected as "totally unfit." ALETHIIA. &

Llandilo County School

Llandilo County School. ANNUAL PRIZE DISTRIBUTION. The annual prize distribution in connectio.i with the Llandilo County School he'd n Friday till, ilitli liirt. Mr W. N. Jones pre- sided; and there were also present Mr Gwyn Jones. M.A. (headmaster), Yen. Arohdeaon Williams, Capt. Roberts, Mr Win. Thomas, and Mr H. J. Thomas (Penihos-uchaf). prizes were distributed by -Mrs Jones, Man *i- avon, and Mrs Roes, Blaenwen. The follo v- ing is the I:st of honours and prizes: — Carmarthenshire County Exhibition of oCT) per annum: Elwvn Austin Peers. Entrance Scholarships at University College of Wales, Aberystwyth: Elwyn Austin Pee^rs (£10), William Clifford Lewis ( £ 15). Central We'sh Board Examination Honours Certificate: Elwyn Austin Peers, Englw- Language and Literature, History, French; William Clifford Lewis, English Language ;1111 Literature, History, Additional Mathematics. Higher Certificate Bess'e Uoyd, Eng. Lang, and Lit., History. Welsh, Latin (senior stage) .John Thomas, Eng. Lang. and Lit,, History, French, Latin; Olwen Thomas.. Eng. Lang, and Lit., History, French, Latin; Thomas Thomas, Ehg. Lang. and Lit., History, Welsh, Latin; Eugeno Tugela Williams, Eng. Lang. and Lit., History, French. Latin; Sarah Bro i. weu Williams, Eng. Lang and Lit., Historv, Welsh. Senior Certificate: Elizabeth Muriel Aulbrey Charles Davies, with distinction in History, Elizabeth Bowen John Gerald Child "William Arithmetic and Welsh Elizabeth Ann Davies. with distinction in Needlework; "Herbert Morgan Davies, with distinction in Chemistry Moan Davies, with distinction in Chemistry *John Hubert Lewis Davies; Lettice Davies Rachel Ann Davies; Margaret Eveline Ed- wards, with distinction in Arithmetic; 'Jasper Rccs Evans, with distinction in Arithmetic and Chemistry Lily Maudo Howells; Thomas Daniel Jones; William Ewart Jones; \)ohn Lewis, with distinction in Chemistry Marah Lewis Daniel Morgan Parry, w ith distinction in Arithmetic, Chemistry, and Shorthand; D. Martin Luther Thomas; *Edgar Thomas, with distinction in History and Chemistry Elune 1 Kate Thomas Robert Tudor Young, with dis- tinction in Geography. *T'lw Asterisk denotes that the pupils have passed in all subjects required for exemption from the Matriculation examination of the University of Wales. Supplementary Certificates: John Cecil Jones, History and French William Vernon Jcnes. Latin; Hannah Catherine Williams, Element a ry M a t hematics. Junior Certificates: Dai-id Walter Davies, distinction in Drawing and Woodwork; Idris Dalles Reps Da\ies, with distinction in Arith- metic. Elementary Mathematics and Drawing; Hft) y Rob rt Frans William Lloyd Davies, with distinction inArithnietie, •Mathematics, ShorthanJ and Woodwork A. Gwladys Griffiths Jane Jones, distinction in Arith- metic, Drawing and Needlework; Margaret Helena Jones, with distinction in History. Webb, Dra wing and Needlework: Laura Christina Lewis, with distinction in History, Welsh, and Needlework; Annie Olwen Mor- gans. with distinction in Arithmetic, Welsh. and Needlework; David John Morgans Eliza- beth Hannah Morgans; Elsie Doris Rowlands; Odon Charles Schram, with distinction in His- tory, Arithmetic, Mathematics, French, ("eo graphy. Woodwork Margaret Alma Smith; Thomas Glyn .Stephens, ii-itli distinction 1:i History. Arithmetic, Mathematics, Latin, French, Drawing and Woodwork; David John Thomas, with distinction in Arithmetic, Mathe- matics, Geography, and Drawing; Giyn Red- vers Timmas Henry Davies Thomas, with dis- tinction in History, Welsh. Drawing and Won! work; Jomcs Idns Thomas; Alary Thomas; M arcus Thomas Rachel Maud Thomas, with distinction in Arithmetic, Welsh Botany, and Needlework David Rufus Watkins, with dis- tinction in Arithmetic, Shorthand, and Draw- ing; Margaretto Williams. FORM PLnZE. Form VI. A. 1, IDlwyn Austin Victor Peers; 2, William Clifford Lewis. Form VI. B. Boys, 1, Thomas Thomas. 2, John Thomas; girls, 1, Olwen Thomas; 2. Eugenie Tugela W iiiianis 3, Sarah Bronwn Williams; 4, Bessie Lloyd. Form V.: Boys. 1, William Charles Davies 2, Edgar Thomas; 3, Jasper Rees Evans J, Daniel Morgan Parry 5, Herbert Morgan Davies. Form IY. Boys, Odon Charles Schram 2, Thomas Glyn Stephens; 3, Henry Davjes Thomas; 4. James Idris Thomas; 5, Willie Lloyd Davies; 6. David John Morgans; Girls, 1. Eliz. Hannah/Morgan 2, Mary Thomas; 3, Heleiia, Jones; 4, Rachel Maud Thomas; 5, Jane Jones; 6. Laura Christina Lewis. Form III A. Boys, 1. Horace Schram; 2, Dd. John Rees; 3, Dd. John Davies; 4, Valentine Lewis; girls, 1, Margaret Jones; 2, Annie Maud Morris 3, Dorothy Davies 4. Magdalen Morgas; 5, Jennie May Thomas; 6, Doris Francis. Form IIIB. Boys: 1, Cyril Picton Davies; 2, Ronald Morris; 3, William Haydn Thomas; 4, Morloy Griffiths; girls. 1, Edith Davies; 2, Elizabeth Hannah Evans 3, Mary Margaretta Roes; 4, Evelyn Morris 5, Dilys Rees li, Minnie Davies. [ Form 1HC.: Boys, 1, Rupert Picton Davies; 2. Hugh Rees Davies 3, Wiliia-m Price Davies girls, I. Mabel Lang ley 2. Louie James; 3, Elizabeth Mary Jones. Form II, Boys. 1, David Geoffrey Griffiths; g:,rls. Olwen Rees; 2, Anuio.Hay Davies; 3. Ethel Evans. AVelsh prize (given by the Ven. Archdeacon W i'Jiams, M.A., A iear of Llandilo-fawr): Tros. Thomas. The Chairman road a letter from the He; illiam Davies, viioe-chairman of the gover- nors. In his letter Mr Davies said that he was sorry lie was unable to be present at the meet-1 ing. Ho was proud of the school, which was second to none in AA ales. This reflected great credit on the headmaster, the staff and pupils, and he hoped Oil the governors as (laughter). The Headmaster said that he had already madu a report to the governors on the work done during the past year, and the pupils all knew what they had done; but he did not think that lie could let this meeting go by without once more congratulating them on the excellent results of the examination last year. Tliey had never done better work as shown hy the results of the examinations. Ho did not wish to lay very great stress 011 examination results as the most important; but until some- thing better is suggested and adopted we must, to some extent test the work of a school by -Its examination results. Our educational system, he believed, was in the melting pot. What will come after the war we did not know; of one thing however he felt assutred-the, cordial help of the governors, of his colleagues on the and girls. Whatever might be the system adopted in future yeni's he felt sure that this school would keep up ts record and would do woll. Sixty of the pupils j had sa t for examinations last year, iiii.d -)f these 08 passed. A pupii of the school I K Peers) had taken the County Exhibition of £ 25 a year, and the socoiul boy. Clifford Lewis, who was only a few marks behind him, was also a pupil of the school. These two boys went to Aberystwyth College. Before tboy J wont to Aberystwyth they had had to contend against the pupils of all the County Schools of

Llandilo County School

Carmarth -nshiro; at Aberystwyth they had to contend against the boys and girls of ali the County S. hoo-'s hi Wales, 'i ncst' two they hc'lù f:l'r O\\ll, i'eers gained an exhibit-ion >1 £ 20 an., Lewis of LLi. The highest exhibition j gained is only £ 33. 5.0 that they w;-ro net ve y in behind. He was very proud of the work j dene by the juniors. Out of nearly 100 papers worked the percentage of marks was rather more than seventy. They would have gained a hundred distinctions were it not for the fact that SQtne of them wore born too early. The regulations did not permit "distinctions" to bü gained for the Junior Certificate by pupti'* over sixteen. Some of them on the examina- tion results were entitled to three or four or five distinctions. 'I lie so they had really gaintd; but they would not appear, on tho certificates. This year (the Headmaster continued) the school came of age. Generally when someone great comes of ago a celebration is held lie should have asked the Governors to celebrate the event in some way were it not for the fact that the war is on. Ih view of the fact that the school came of age this year he thought :t as to run shortly over the history of the school. Many had dune excellent spade work in preparing the way for the school before "t started. Ho intended to begin on the day when the school was started oil the 23rd )t October, 1894. It was started in the building which is now usol as an Institute in Rhosmacii street. What a fine playground the boys ot that time had in Rhosmaen street! He ex- pected they were a bit of a nuisance! The school was rather a strong child from its birth. Although it was started in the middle of a term 35 boys entered the first day. By lie end of the term the number had risen to .103. It was then a boys' school only. The reason why it was so easy to start the school was that for many years Llandilo had been an educa- tional centre for tho boys from the country. There had been private school or grammar schools here, so that it was easy for a school f this kind to start. He knew of several places whore the school took a long time to estab- lish thomeelves, and where they had to st.-t, i with 10 to lopupils and whore for years there was no progress made. But from the "tart this school made progress. The new buildings were opened in the autumn of 1890. In April. 1897, girls were admitted for the firsttime. So were admitted. One of the girls admitted he first day wa> now present. He would leave them to guess who t'ho was. The building was then a good deal different inplan from what .t was now. The staff had by that time increased to four. The headmaster was Mr Edgar Jones, now of Barry,and the second master was Mr Morgan Davies, who had kept the academy previously. Ho die-.J a few years ago. Mr Edgar Jones left in the year 1899, and he (Mr Gwyn Jones) was appointed headmaster. H.e started workin May. 1899. Tho only other member of the staff who had any claim to any- thing like the same length of service was llr Rees. who came in the autumn of 1899. The others had come after that. There was pre- sent one gentleman who had been in official connection with the school from the beginning and who know probably more of the details of the preparatory work than anybody else. That was the Clerk. Mr Win. Thomas. If they could get :\1 r Thomas some time to give I lecture it would be most interesting. The numbers quietly increased from 1899 onwards so that they had not only to add to the staff, but adJ to the building. Not only did the numbers increase, but the requirements Ill- creased. He referred to their own require- ments they were not always driven by the Central Welsh Board. 'Hie Governors were always most ready to fall in with any suggos- tion. As the requirements developed so did ( the buildings. The laborotory used to be n j Form UI A. room as it was in the olden time before the fire. It got too small with the re- suit that they had to build ao build a new laboratory which is commodious and largo. then came the workshop; then the gymnasium and then the Art room. The last addition was the garden. What the next addition h would be he did not know but they were not going to rest where they were. One require- ment they still had and they wanted that badly was a good playing field that they could look upon as permanently their own, so that they would not be lriven from pillar to post. Ae present they could not say whether they were likely to have a field for a long or a short time. It would be a great convenience to have a field in which they woul-d not have to drive a cov out of the pitch; every school should have permanent playground. They had had two great blows since the starting of the school. They had had many blows; but he refererd il. particular to two great blows. For 19 years this school not only served the Llandilo district from Llandebie up, but also the Amman Vtll-v A largo number of pupils came from the Am- ma.n Villey. They knew that a school would have to be established there sooner or later but they hoped that the time would be put off and off as it was, but the school did come. They were afraid that it would mean a very serious stroke. Some were more despondent about it than others. The Ammanford school had been opened two years ago and he believed the Llandilo school was very much alive after all They were very sorry to lose the boys and girls from the Amman Valley. There was a distinct difference between them nnd the boys and the girls from tho Llandilo district." I liked these boys and girls" added Mr Jones "but I like you too" (laughter a.nd applause). They had recovered wonderfully from that blow. He was more despondent before it came than after it came. The other great blowthey had ha:1 was the fire which occurred in March, 1914. The Chairman That was a blessing. The Headmaster said that it was n great Mow at, the time; but it turned out as the chairman had suggested to be a. blessing. They had had the school re-built- on a better plan. A largf) number of the pupils of the school had responded to the Call of Duty. Some of them had made the supreme sacrifice; others had suffered from sickness and wounds; and the majority are still doing their duty worthily. The Chairman said that they regretted very much the* absence of Mrs Gwynno-Hughes, of Tregeyb, who was unable to be present. He congratulated the master and the staff on the excellent work which they had done. Perhaps I

Advertising

LINSEEl) COMPOUND for Coughp, Colds & Bronchial troubles. !>kl Is l £ d. 2a 9d. of Chemist^

IQuestion of Health

Question of Health. Tho question of health is a matter which it lure to concern us at one time or another when Tnflnenza is ao provalent as it if just aow, so it is weil to know what to taxe to ward off an attack of this mist weakening disease, this epidemic catarrh or cold of an aggravating kind, to combat ic whflet iitidel, its baneful influence, and particularly afte? ap attack, for then the aystem ia so lowered as to be liable to the most dangerous of com pilaints. Gwitym EV9ns' Quinine Bitters w acknowledged by all who have given it a fair trial to be the best, speoific remedy dealing with fnfluen&a in all its various stages, being a Preparation skilfully prepared with Quinine and accompanied with other blood purifying and enriching agenta, suitable for the liver, digestion, and all those ailments requiri- tonic strengthening and nerve increai propmties. It is invaluable for those euffur. ing from colds, pneumonia, or any serious ill ness, or prostration caused by sleeplessness, or worry of any kind, when the body has a geneml feeling of weakness or lassitude. Send for a copy of the pamphlet of te&i> monialk, which carefully read and consider well, then buy a bottle (sold in two sizes, 2s fid and 4s 6d) at yout nearest Chemint tlzl Stores, but when purchasing see that the naino "Gwilym Evans" is on the label, stamp nnd bottle, for without which Erine are gennine. Sole Proprietors: Quinin Bitteen Manufacturing Comixiny, I/mited 'J&neil*. South Wales. the Governors might do sonn-th;ng to cele- brate the coming of ago of the S'hool after alt. Tho highest numb of of pupils -it school wh»B the Amman VnKey boy and g;Ü-: were thero was 21!). Last year the number was 17(3. and this year it was ISO. Tiiev d.i not want th3 fire; 1) t as it did III, were able to carry out inip,rovemen.ts At one time the governors had been in eonsidera,ble financial difficulties; and thc-y used.to go and interview the bank manager in order to see if they couid get the money to pay the staff. They had survived all that, and they wore proud of the Llandilo school. He believad the governors would shortly be able to rent a field as a playground. He was glad to learn that the garden was car- ried on well. He would like if somebody would place a plot of ground at the disposal of th<* boys and girls for the cultivation of potatoes. He saw a large number of uncultivated gar- dons in some plaecs. He hoped that every effort would be made to cultivate all available piots next spring, particularly with potatoes, which are easy to grow and are a good staple food. 150 ex-pupils of the school were in the Army eight had been killed; one was missing and twenty were wounde-i. The Vonerabie Archdeacon Williams said that they had good reason to be proud of the schrol. They llild an excellent staff of assistant mtresses. The first schoolmistress of which lie had any recollection was of a different type She used to amuse herself by pushing pins into the knuckles of the boys. She was a widow; they often i-egretted that it did not happen the other way—that it was not her husband who had been left a widower. Other speakers foil awed. Selections were given by the School Choir at intervals, and II. recitation by Miss Myfanwy Dyer.

1 Carmarthen Board of Guardians

— 1 Carmarthen Board of Guardians. A meeting of the Carmarthen l5oard C* Guardians was held at the Guildhall on Satur- day. The Rev J. Herbert, Lii,nllawddog. pre- biaod. The other members present were: Air W. D. Stephens, Llanarthney; Mr John Jones, Ferryside; Mr D. T. Gilbert, Carway; Rev A. Fuller Mills, Carmarthen; Mr Thoe. Davies, Abernant; Mr T. Davies, Bankyfelin; Mr J Patagonia Lewis and Mr Thomas Wiiliams, Carmarthen; iMr M. J. Jenkins. St. Clears; Mr Benjamin Salmon. St. Clears; Mr James Lewi s, Laugharne Parish Mr J. Bowen, Tre- leh-ar-Bettws; Mr R. Howells, Llanpump" saint; Mr W. Williams. Llamunio; Mr J. W. Lewis, Lianddarog; Mr R. Jeremy, Nolr- church :\1r W. Bow en, Llandefeilog; Mr T. TIiomas. Liangendeirne; Mr H. Griffiths, Llangunnor; together with the Clerk (Ir J Sat r) and other officials. YlSIT TO THE CHAIRMAN. Rev A. Puller Mills said he and Mr Salmon paid a \'iit last week to the chairman of th.) board (Mr Llewelyn Morgan, Llanginningb who was very ill. He very Fiori-v to fin I him in such a low state, but w as very glad to find him so contented under the very licxLIY trials he was passing through, willing to place himself in the hands of Him, who had th' lives at His disposal. NOT PAID. The Clark reported that the following parishes had not paid up their calls due on the 4th November, viz.. Abergwili, LlandawkV Llanddowror, Xewchurch, and St. Peter. There was nearly 1:4,300 to be paid to the County Council. nie. Chairman And you want the money ? The Clerk Certainly. Rev A. F. Mills: W e ought to have a strong whip for them. The Clork was directed to write to the over- seers of the several parishes asking for pay- ment within a week. MORiE FREQUENT MEETINGS. The Rov A. Fuller Mills said that as a result of their now only meeting monthly there was great accumulation of business which necessi- tated somo members sitting there until late. Many members left before the meeting was over and left the business to be carried on by two or three. He moved that meetings be held fortnightly as formerly. Mr J. Patagonia Lewis seconded the pro- posal. £ Mr James Lewis, Laugharne, proposed that the meetings be held once a month, and Mr J. W. Lewis, LUtnddarog, seconded. Mr J. Patagonia Lewis: What is the use of the relieving officers sending in reports 'hn there is no time to road them at the monthly meetings. Mr Thomas Williams said his experience of monthly meetings was that at the end of the meeting there was only two or three members present. It was a farce to go on like that. The Chairman said they had found by ex- perience that monthly meetings were not suc- cessful. They could not do all the work a two hours. It was decided to lioid the meetings fort- 11 nightly. ATTENDANCE OX OLD AGE PENSIONERS Mr J. J. Bowen, Llangunnock, had ginm notice of the following motion:—To consider in A iew of the increased cost of living whether the sum of 2s per week granted for attendfi-nee 011 old age pensioners is sufficient." Mr Bowen was not present when the matter was reached, and it was allowed to drop. The Chairman explained that the relieving officers would bring on any hard cases, and the Board would consider each case on its merits. Referring to a certain relief case later aU the Clerk remarked "This is a case against Mr Bowen's motion. Here is a pensioner who gets (id extra." The Clerk asked if it was intended that orphan children who were boarded out should get an increase of Gd as other children. It was agreed that this should be so. MASTER'S REPORT. The Master's report for the four weeks end- ing December loth was as follows:—Divine service was conducted in the House on Sunday, 19th November by the Rov D. J. Thomas. Eng- lish Congregational Church; on Sunday, 25th November,-by Mr R. Bethel Davies, St. Peoters Church on Sunday, 3rd December, by the Rov Piofessor J. Oliver Stephens, Union street Congregational Church; and on Sunday, 18th December, by the Rev Professor M. B. Owen, Penuel Baptist Church. The number of in- mates in the House on the last day of tho week was .35, against 65 for the corresponding period fast year. The number of cassual paupers ro- lieved during the four weeks was 25, against 33 for tho same period last year.

BCRR r I0HT

BCR.R r I'0H.T. AT Lla-neily Police Court on Wednesday the 13th inst.. the following were fined for not sending their children to school regularly: — Thomas Williams, 2, Park row. 2s6d; William Jones, 2, Brazil terrace, Pwli., 2s 6d; Beatrice Phillips. 1. Huskisson row (case dismissed); Wm. Jones, 5, Huskisson row, 5s6d; Hector Rees, Mount Pleasant, Graig, 5s 6d.

PONTYA TES

PONTYA TES. A hranch of the West Wales Free Churoh Federation was established for Pontyates, Ponthenry and district on the 15th inst. The Rev D. Gorlech Jones was appointed president, the R.{.!v M. T. Rees vice-preisdent, Mr David Hewitt, treasurer; Rev Hugh Edwards, secre- tary, and Mr James Morris, Brynderw, Pont- henry, vice-secretary. CARMARTHEN—Printed and Published by the Proprietress, M. LAWRENCE, at her Offices, 3 Blue Street, FRIDAY, December 22nd, 1916.