Collection Title: Denbighshire free press

edition: Supplement

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 4 Next Last
Full Screen
8 articles on this page
A SMASHED BRIDGE

A SMASHED BRIDGE. lUrilisli Ojjicua Artillery passing through the dry eanal du Nord-

Our Note Booki

Our Note Book. By RANGER. NEARING THE END. There is a distinct danger that the tidings I f victory which have gladdened our hearts ay have a bad effect in various directions. l the face of good fortune we may become ctravagant and self-indulgent, careless out our duties and indifferent to our responsibilities. We are tempted to say Now we shan't be long so here goes And then we rush into those very foolish practices that undermine the national wel- fare. To put it into plain terms, the real danger at this moment is that the British people may think that there is no longer any need to stint themselves and to make sacrifices for their country. ilr. Bonar law is one of those who are alarmed at the prospect of what may happen if people permit themselves to be too much influenced by the good news of the last fort- night. He pleads that this shall not be allowed to react unfavourably upon the sale of W ar Bonds. Now is the time," he declares, "to redouble our effort. Money ■was never more urgently necessary. We must complete the edifice that we have built up. It cannot be too widely known that most of the difficulties that have interfered 'with our daily life and habits will continue -r for months to come. The shortage yl coal cannot be remedied in time to meet this winter's needs. The results of a bad fruit year wjll be set-ii for a long time. The diminished output in certain" branches of food production is only to be put right slowly. The necessary stoppage of building operati-ons for four years means a grievoiio lack of housing accommodation for 1919. Nothing could 'De more irrrwise -bo imagine that the troubles caused by the war can disappear suddenly. Peace is not a pantomime fairy who can produce a paradise by a wave of her shining wand. For one tiling, we must not close up our purses with a snap. There are thousands of wounded soldiers still to be cared for and sus- tained out of the Red Cross funds. There are the blinded heroes at St. Dunstans and others whose needs do not end with the ending of the War. Let us give full play to our instincts of generosity for a long time yet, partly from a sense of duty and partly from a sense of gratitude for our escape from the brutalities that we might have suffered if we had been invaded. That freedom from invasion we owe, first of all, to the Grand Fleet, and, in a second but important degree, to the gallantry of the troops who withstood the Huns when they strove to reach the Channel ports last Springtime. In connection with this recognition of the wondrous deeds of our heroes we can watch with deep interest the plans that are being made for the training of disabled warriors. The Village Centres Council is preparing a number of villages in different parts of the

Our Note Booki

I Olix NOTE BOOK—continued. f country, and at these Villages arrangements are being made to look after men who are recovering from shell-shock or fever, from wounds or loss of limbs. The Council's first centre has been established at Enham, near Andover. Here are a thousand acres, 1, housing lor a hundred and fifty meu. It is hoped that, later on, a thousand men may get treatment and training on this Enham estate. The idea is to bridge over the gap between the hospital period and the return to ordinary life. The medical treatment is continued for these disabled soldiers, and at the same time they are taught trades. They get themselves trained in dairy- farming, poultry-farming, gardening work, I, 9 and other pursuits connected with agriculture. Others learn how to make boots or furniture. Thus the man who has fought and bled for our sakes is "refitted," so that he may, in due time, go back to his ordinary life on an equality with his fellows. < Once again warnings are being issued about coal. Many people have failed to apply for coal-ration forms because they had in their cellars, before the Fuel Order was issued, more coal than they would be entitled to under the ration system. Now the Order insists that a person shall not have in his possession at any time more coal than his ration for twelve months. Where he has more, he is to declare it to the Local Fuel Overseer and must ask permission to hold it, otherwise it may be seized. The Local Fuel Overseers have been instructed to investigate all cases where no ration forms have been taken out and all suspicious cases where theie is reason to believe that extra stocks are bem, kept. ) The President 01 the Board of Trade, Sir Allien; Stanley, is extremely anxious about this coal supply lor tlxo wintci Knowing that the position is serious, he is considering how far it may be possible to save coal and lighting if religious service* are held in daylight only. He has sent a letter on the subject of the shortage to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Cardinal Bourne, the Chief Rabbi, the General of the Salvation Army, and the heads of churches of other denomi- nations in the Kingdom. Sir Albert makes it clear in his letter that he would never have ventured to suggest any restriction on evening services if he had not felt that the present situation calls for immediate action in a way. Excellent reports come from all parts of the land of the interesting work carried on by the cinematograph vans of the War Aims Committee. The films displayed include pictures of our troops in France, Palestine, and Mesopotamia; of our submarines, drifters, standard ships, and the Grand Fleet; of air work over land and sea; of muni- tion factories, and women's work and of food subjects. In the early days of November, the vans will visit Hexham. Bury (Lanes.), Roth- erham, Sheffield, Kettering, Hereford. Leominster. Grimsby, Louth, Imminghain, Widnes, Howdenshire, North Cumberland, Wrexham, and Flintshire.

CRACKING UP

CRACKING UP. THE REFLECTIONS OF "A." Behind the mysterious developments of German policy are clearly to be seen the evidences of her internal collapse. After shouting about their victories for four years, the German people are now thinking of nothing but peace—peace as soon as possible, and, in any case, peace by Christmas. They want no more of those expensive gains of territory that bring them no permanent advantage. "Give us food," they say, instead of conquests. Give us clothes and the comforts of life. Let us have peace instead Of these victories which only lead to more fighting and more misery." To the ordinary German father and mother, the prospect of another winter campaign for their sons in the trenches is something terrible. They know at last that they are getting the worst of the battles in Western France and in Serbia, that the weekly lists of Huns killed are enormous, that our aero- planes are overwhelmingly superior to theirs in numbers, that our reinforcements from America alone can more than replace our losses, so that every day we get stronger, and the German army gets weaker. Send our sons back to us." is the cry of these mothers and fathers. c. Never mind about dominating the earth. Get peace before the winter on the best terms you can-in fact, peace at any price!" A few days ago thousands of workmen went on strike at Essen, which is the Woolwich of Germany. They marched up and down the streets, carrying placards that bore the words: "Down with war!" "We Want Peace!" &c. Crowds of shouting men sur- -=--=.. rounded the Mayor's house. The police were not strong enough to stop the demonstration, and the soldiers were so much in sympathy with the demonstrators that it was not thought wise to order them to interfere. There was only one safe policy for the authorities—to keep on telling the exas- perated multitude that the Government was doing everything in its power to bring about peace quickly. How different from the attitude of the German population in the earlier days of the war. Then they were all for the triumph of their splendid army, which was to make Germany top dog of all (" Deutschland ueber Ailes."). Only one thing now interests them —how to get out of the mess. Then the Kaiser was to them the greatest emperor of all history. Now they do not mind if he dis- appears, so long as they can have an end of bloodshed and famine. The same story is told by Germans who have crossed over into Holland recently. They left their country for various reasons- some because they were in search of better rations, some because they feared a revolution in Berlin, some because they had a notion that the German cities were about to be invaded by British, French, and American troops, who would give the inhabitants a taste of the treatment meted out by the Huns themselves to the Belgians and others. Naturally, these wanderers into Holland do not like to tell tales of their own country- men, but they say enough to prove that Germany to-day is on the edge of a vast upheaval. r

H MACHINEGUN POST

H MACHINE-GUN POST. ■——————I —— — IBelgian Official. Belgian soldiers on duty near Kippe.

I TRENel4 WORK

I TRENel4 WORK. [Llrilish OfficiaL American troops in France practising going "over the top."

ION THE MEDITERRANEAN eAST

ON THE MEDITERRANEAN eøAST. [British Official. j Sailors bringing in a large French seaplane.

I MARCHING DOWN THE MOUNTAINS

I MARCHING DOWN THE MOUNTAINS. [Urilish UJjiciaU British troops on a beautiful Italian mointain path. ¥