Collection Title: Denbighshire free press

edition: Supplement

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 4 Next Last
Full Screen
9 articles on this page
H TYPICAL BAG

H TYPICAL "BAG." [British Official- Runs cauaht by the British in Prance.

WARTIME GARDEN WORK ALLOTMENT INTERESTS

WAR-TIME GARDEN WORK & ALLOTMENT INTERESTS. When asparagus leaves have turned yeliow items Bhould be cut down quite to the g, ound and the beds well weeded. The toughest v. veds may be got out v itli a fork and' the smaller ones with the rake, all the refuse being uJcen to the rubbish heap. When the foliage has been spread out to dry for a few days it t .oaid be burnt to destroy insects. The bed should then be dress.(-ci with manure, and soil from the aMeys placed over it to prevent the birds from scratching it up. If it is necessary to move sage plants, this may be done any time from now onward till .••ia"lch. The plants should be lifted with a large ball of soil, great care being taken not k> break the roots. Holes should be dug in raadiness, So that there is as little disturbance as possible, and a thorough soaking of water should be given immediately after planting. A Sight sprinkle overhead may M given occasion- f.Mj" on drr CUVVQ to Kelp to hasten tlif* forms- ijirtn W'- Tn.öt 9: 5- Where peas are wanted early next year, a sowing of those varieties able to stand a win- ter outdoors should be made now. They must be sown in a warm south border, with the shelter of a wall if possible. Heavy fooils should be first well dug, and a quantity of road sweepings, and, if it can be obtained, some lime rubble worked into it. A gooc. early rariety should be chosen. Before sow- ing the seeds should be moistened, then rolled in red lead, or soaked for a few minutes in paraffin, to keep away mic-e and birds. r — Lettuce is gueli a useful plant for the winter months that a little trouble taken with any plants now growing in the garden is well I wocii' while. Those plants almo-st developed ehouM be got up with a good root and planted in a cold frame for the winter, and given a thorough watering. During warm weather the frames can be kept open, and whenever decaying leaves appear they should be re- mcmed at once. t" • Winter epinaen sown in the late summer will now be getting forward, and a watch must be kept on the plants to prevent them becoming overcrowded. They never do well if growing too thickly, and where this is noticed they should be thinned now, so that they are far enough apart not to be likelly to J touch. In this way the stems will grow strong- and stout, and the leaves attain a large size. In autumn time we look forward to next year's flowers and vegetables by getting the ground well prepared for them. As soon as plants are cleared off the soil should be weli dug. and where the soil is heavy and unwork- able it must be trenched. The under soil must be well broken up with a fork and the surfaee soil left in a rough state. This will make the ground much more workable another year, and vegetables will grow all the better in it. Where this is properly done the Jumps of clay in heavy soils will crumble away to powder during the winter, and a good I friable soil be the result. If a heavy crop'of pears on small trees is de- sired it is best to plant cordon trained or dwarfs or pvraniid*. Pear trees may be planted dTTTTfig present tnovih^ Hut it must be re- membered ti -iitt some v arte are unreliaBie if they are grown on the pear or free stock. In selecting trec-s it is important to remember tliiu most dessert kinds bake and cook well before they are ripe, so it is hardly necessary j to pla-it pears as well. Pears require plenty of warmth to ripen, and when cold weather comes early in the autumn, a3 it has done this year, some kinds of stewing pears may not ripen at all. Medlar fruit can be gathered during the pre- sent month or in November, but after gather- ing it should be allowed to remain for two or three weeks in a light, warm place till a kind of decay, known as "bletting," begins. Then the fruit is fit for eating. It remains eatable for two or three weeks after this. Though many people do -not like the fruit raw, it makes a delicious jelly, and can be used in pies with apples, giving a nice flavour. Where space allows it is well worth while to have a hedge or a few rows of filbert trees. During this month, while the soil is still fairly dry and the weather not yet too cold, these trees may be planted. Though they grow and thrive in almost any garden, a little care with them wifll produce fine results. The best posi- tion is one on a, slope facing the south-east, south, or south-west. If standards are planted, spinach or some similar crop may be grown beneath them.

THIS WAS 099

"THIS WAS 099 BY eaPTfllN R. P. W. REES. One of the latest war photographs shows a signboard bearing the simple inscription "This was Riencourt." But. simple though it may be. that signboard symbolises the epitaph written by Germany over much of war-wrecked northern France. It is practically impossible for anyone who has not been out there to realise what utter devastation has fallen upon some of the vil- lages in the battle-zone. One sees pictures of broken houses and ragged walls, roofless mansions and debris-scattered streets, and says: How teri-ible! but of the villages that have seen the worst of the fighting there is nothing left to photograph. I remember once, last year, having to march a draft of rei ii force me ntr,* from Bray to a little place called Bouchavesnes. I was marching by the map, and my first objective was Clery. When I thought I should be nearly there, although I could see no sign of the place, I ask

Advertising

"BRUTES they were when they began the war. Brutes they remain at the present moment. The sinking of the 'Leinster' was pure barbarism, pure frightfulness, deliberately carried out." -,IIR. BALFOUR.

DRILLING PLATESI I

DRILLING PLATES. I JBrfHsh Officio!. A munition worker at a magazine drilling machine.

FRENCH DIVER AT WORK

FRENCH DIVER AT WORK [British Official. On this Mediterranean coast the beach shelves abruptly oi S I

11 KITCHEN RECIPES H IN WARTIME 1

$1 1" KITCHEN RECIPES H IN WAR-TIME. Potato and Carrot Soup.—INGREDIENTS.— 2 ib. potatoes, 2 lb. carrots, 2 qts. vegetable stock, 4 oz. onions, 1 oz. dripping, 2 oz. fine oatmeal, chopped parsley, saiJt, pepper. METHOD.—Wash, scrape, and chop the carrots small, peal and chop the onions. !'ut these witih the fat, stock, and a teaspoonful or salt to boil steadily for an hour, or until the carrots are soft. Rub the soup thro-igh a colander. Rinse the saucepan, put back the soup and bring it to the boil. Mix the oatmeal smoothly and thinly with eold water, and pour it into the boiling soup. stirring alll the time to prevent lumps. Boil for ten minutes, stirring oecasion- ally to prevent burning. Season, add the parsCey, and serve hot. Chocolate Pudding.—INGREDIENTS.—I lb. flour, £ lb. soaked, squeezed, sta'Je bread, £ lb. chopped £ uet, 3 oz. sugar, 1 oz. eocoa-powder, 3 table-spoonfuls baking-powder, about I pt. i mil k-an

I GENERAL AND STAFF AT POLO

I GENERAL AND STAFF AT POLO. [British Official. J British officers in Italy, out of the line at rest, enjoy a fine game.

A MOUNTAIN FIELD AMBULANCE

A MOUNTAIN FIELD AMBULANCE. -=- [British Official A view of the outside of a British Ambulance station In Italy. M >