Collection Title: Carmarthen journal and South Wales weekly advertiser

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 8 of 8
Full Screen
12 articles on this page
Progress of the War

Progress of the War. LANDING AT THE DARDANELLES. The British Commander-in-Chief reported on Monday that there was no change in the general situation. The First British Army, which gained on Sunday the ground south-east of Fromelles, made no further advance. The fighting on its front was confined to artillery actions. Farther south, the French hold north of Arras all the important gains won on Sunday. German Main Headquarters on Monday referred to the advance on Sunday as "the great Anglo-French attack, anticipated as a reply to our successes m Galicia. The attack is alleged by the Germans to have been almost wholly unsuccessful. 4l x Sir John French also told us yesterday that the British line east of Ypres is substantially the same as that to which our men withdrew on the night of Ma 3-4, in spite of repeated German attacks. On Sunday five such attacks were made in this region. All were unsuccessful, and all cost the enemy very heavy losses. A Special Correspondent of the Times de8- cribes the landing of British troops at the southern end ot the Gallipoli Peninsula It could only have been brought to a succesful conclusion by the most devoted heroism on the part of our officers and men. But the results justify the sacrifices. Zepphliv RAID AT Soxjthknd. Southend wae visited by a Zeppelin (or Zeppelin^) early on Monday morning, and bombs, estimated to number 80, were rained on the popular resort at themouth of the Thames and the surrounding dis- trict. The airoraft is said to have fcur?led three times, and the bombs were fairly wl

WAR JOTTINGS

WAR JOTTINGS On Monday, Lieutenant Harford, eldest son of Major J. C. Harford, Falcondale, Lampeter, left for the front, and we wish him every success. Lanoe-Corporal T. Evans, 1st Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers, son of Mr. David Evans, Cwmanne, Lampeter, was wounded at Armentieres. Private Luther Jenkins, 1st Welsh, son of Mr. Griff Jenkins, The Arlais. Kidwelly, has been seriously wounded at Hill 60. Seoond-lieutenant Humphrey Bebb, third son of Principal and Mrs. Bebb, St. David's College, Lam- peter, has been appointed an offioer in the Flying I Corps. Mr. Bebb hap thoroughly studied mechanism. Pte. Harry L. Thomas, 1st Welsh Regiment, who was employed at the Albion House, Carmarthen, writes to a friend this week informing him that he has been wounded and is at present lying in hospital in Havre, France. He expects to be back in the trenches soon again. Mr. Charles Reeves, son of Mr. H. Reeves, jeweller, King-street, Carmarthen, has joined the Royal Naval Division at the'Crystal Palace. This is a new, very popular, and sucoesful force, trained to do the land work of the Royal Navy. Everybody at Carmarthen was very pleased some time ago when the members of the old Pontyberem Brass Band joined the 4th Welsh Reserves, and was corespondingly sorry when they left. Their place, however, has been taken by the Llanelly Public Priae Band. who have joined the Pembroke Yeomanry en bloc, bringing with them their own silver instru- ments. Excellent music they give, too, under Bandmaster E. G. Jenkins. Bravo, boys! Pte. William Jones, 1st Gloucester Regiment,_ is home at Llanfihangel-ar-arth from the front on sick furlough. He has been in the trenches, and was in reserve at Neuve Chapelle. He was taken ill, and has been in hospital at Boulogne, and at the American Women's Hospital. Paignton, Devon. He hopes to rejoin the 3rd Gloucester this week, from which he will probably be drafted to the front again. During the bombardment of Southend on Monday by a Zeppelfn, a number of bombs were dropped all round Queen Mary's Hospital, and marks of their fall are to be seen in many of the neighbouring roads. The hospital is a magnificent building situ- ated on the coast, and presented an easy target for the Huns. It is interesting to note that two Carmarthen ladies are engaged in St. Mary's Hospi- tal, -viz., Miss Fanny Davies and Miss Olive Davies, the daughters of Mr. an4 Mrs. Thomas Davies, of 125, Priory- street, Carmarthen, who received a telegram on Monday stating that the hospital had escaped destruction. News has just been received that Tom Griffiths, one of the twelve ambulance men from the Pont- henry Brigade who placed their services at the dis- posal of their country, has been killed in the Dardan- elles. It was known that the Turks were not sparing the Red Cross men, but little was thought that our own local men were srivin# their aid in the place of most danger and that one of them had fallen. Tom Griffiths was 26 years of age, and the son of Mrs. Bowen, FarmerLe-Cot-tage. Llangendeirne. He waa married, and lived at Bron-Gwendraeth. Ponty- ates. Much sympathy is felt for his wife and child and sorrowing relatives. To die in defence of one's country is noble, but to die succouring- the wounded in the firing line is, if possible, nobler still. Tom will be much missed at home and among his fellow- workmen at the colliery. # Mr. E. A. Owen, Nott-square, Carmarthen, has a son in the Regular Army. He is Quartermaster- Foreman R. G. Owen, of the Royal Engineers, and is stationed at Gibraltar, and 19 in charge of im. portant work there. Bombardier Phil Davies, R.F.A., son rjf Mr. Tom Davies, JOURNAL Office, Carmarthen, writes an interesting letter home from the front this week, stating how they captured a Gerrrum spy who was disguised as a priest. It appears that they had noticl-d him in the vicinity for many days, and when captured he was busily telephoning from a cellar. Another, he says, was dressed in an Indian officer's uniform, and had the audacity to even go up and speak to their major. Both, he adds, did not reign for long. Mrs. Olive, Boar's Head Hotel, Carmarthen, on Tuesday, received a postcard from her son, Lance- Corporal George Olive, of the Queen's Westminster Rifles, who has been at the front since September last. He states:—" My darling Mother,—Am still fairly fit. I am in a new billet this time, four doors away from the old one. We are boing shelled continually, and on Monday the houses on both sides of my old billets were blown to pieces; also a church which is about 40 yards away. We had three killed, 15 wounded, and four civilians, includ- ing the priest. They shelled the place for about 2g hours, and the poor old church in pieces. Terri- fie fighting all round.' Mrs. Olive received another postcard on Thursday from her son in the trenches. He states that they have heard of the sinking of the Lusitania. The following members of the staff at the County Offices, Carmarthen, are serving their country:- Dr. D. Arthur Hughes, county medical officer of health and school medical officer; Dr. Rowland L. Thomas, assistant school medical officer; Mr. T. E. Taylor, County Department; Mr. Ivor A. Evans, medical inspection clerk; Mr. A. E. Savage, archi- tect's assistant; Mr. John Williams. Insurance De- partment; Mr. Percy J. Williams, Carne, architect's department; Mr. J. H. Richards, local taxation de- partment. The numerous friends of Mr. Joseph Morgan, chief attendance officer, will be interested to hear that at the last meeting of the Education Committee he applied for and was granted permis- sion to join His Majesty's Forces. We understand that Mr. Morgan will be leaving shortly for an unknown destination. Well done, boys, especially good old Moc of Ferry side! The names of three Kidwelly men appear in the lists of wounded published during the past week. Seoond-lieutenant T. S. Bowen, 3rd Welsh Regiment, who was in charge of a machine-gun section, sus- tained a shrapnel wound in the head, but fortu- nately the injury is not regarded as serious. Lieut. Bowen is the only son of Mr. Geo. E. Bowen, J.P., and Mrs. Bowen, Rumsey House, now residing at Porthoawl, whither numerous messages of sym- pathies were sent on receipt of the news at Kidwelly. —Another name is that of Private Dd. Luther Jenkins, let Welsh, son of Mr. and Mrs. Griffith Jenkins, Arlais Farm. Luther, who was wounded in the shoulder, writes cheerfully from the Southern General Hospital, Bristol, and is loud in his praises of the treatment meted out to him. I am going on in the pink, he says, and get plenty of every- thing in the hospital."—The third to be rendered hors de combat is Private Sam Evans, 12. Gwen- draeth Town, Kidwelly, who, writing to hig wife and children from the base hospital •'somewhere in Franee,* says, I am getting on all right. The doctor doesn't know yet whether I have broken my left arm, or only knocked it out of place, as it has swollen Puch a lot. It. is very pdlnful with me. I was buried in the trench, and I was lucky to get off so good. because two other fellows were killed on top of me. They were bit by the shell, but I saved beoause I was underneath." Both Privates Evans and Jenkins are crack shots, and one would not be surprised to hear that they were engaged in sniping the Boechee when they were unluckily hit. We hope to hear that they have sufficiently reoovered to visit their old homes, where they are sure of a rousing reception. e

ST CLEARS NOTES

ST. CLEARS NOTES One of our Belgian guests, Madame Nourallt, residing at the old post office, met with a rather severe aocident last Friday evening. Anxious to have a cycle ride, she had the loan of Miss Wil- liams' (Bank House) machine, but being rather in- experienced at riding, she lost control going down hill and plunged into the wall by the river at the lower end of St. Clears. She was picked up uncon- scious, having received a terrible wound in the head. She was quickly attended to by Dr. Jones, who had to put in several stitches. In addition, she was considerably bruised about the arms and legs. She has been confined to bed since, but is making progress towards recovery. The good lady might easily have plunged into the river, when the conse- quences might have been more severe. About the same time the other guest, Madame Dantan received bad news from the seat of war. Her husband has been in "the thick of the fight in the Argonne district, and wrote home to say he had been severely wounded by shrapnel, both heels being badly injured, as well as the lower part of the body. He wished to see her and his little daughter. Mr. Jones, Bank House, who is the secretary to the fund, set to work to make arrange- ments for Madame Dantan and her daughter to go over to France. There seems to be some difficulty in getting a passage over. Up to the present it is not quite certain whether she will be able to go over to see her husband. The inhabitants sympathize with the two ladies in their trouble. On Friday night, a very succesful entertainment was given by the Band of Hope in the Council School, St. Clears. The management was in the hands of Miss J. Thomas, Brynheulog, assisted by Miss Williams, Brynawel, and other ladies, who have bees very energetically working through the winter to keep the class going. Mr. D. C. Evans was in the chair. The work of the little ones re- flected great credit on the ladies who give up their spare time to this great work. The terrible disaster to the Lusitania, which has caused such a wave of indignation over the civilized world-Germany excepted as apparently their thin veneer of civilization long ago, got rubbed off-has been brought home to the people of St. Clears by the loss of Mr. Ernest Thomas and family, 01 Whitland. Mr. Thomas was well-known in St. Clears, he and his brothers having been engaged in building operations. Mr. Thomas was on his way home from the United States, when this terrible dis- aster occurred. So far there is no trace of either Mr. Thomas, wife or family, evidently all having been drowned. The candidates for the Town Trust election on the 22nd inst. appear to be going slow. So far there is not much excitement, but perhaps the "ten" intend reserving all their energies for the week prior to the contest. Good luck. Some will be disappointed.

ACTION AGAINST VICAR

ACTION AGAINST VICAR JUDGMENT RESERVED IN AMMANFORD CASE. The hearing of the action brought by the trustees of the property of Mr. A. J. Colborne against the Rev. J. W. Jones, the vicar, and the building com- mittee of All Saints' Church, Ammanford. was re- sumed by Mr. Justice Atkin on Thursday. The cross-examination of Mr. Jenkins, the archi- tect, was continued. In reply to Mr. Morton, he denied that he had had any friction with Messrs. WilkTns and Son, contractors for the Gorseinon Church, of which he was the architect. Mr. Morton read a letter from Wilkins and Son to Mr. Jenkins, in which they said that unless they received a certificate for £ 1,000 the-- would dismiss their men and put the matter in tho hands of a solicitor and claim damages for breach of contract. Witness denied that there was any friotion between himself and Messrs. Wilkins. Mr. Morton—Is' it not a fact that Mr. Wilkins looked you out of the church because he could not get certificates from you? Witness-I have not heard of that until now. It was not true that he gave Wilkins a certificate for 21,000. so that he should unlock the church door. There is always friction between builders and archi- tects. The Rev. J. W. Jones, the vicar, giving evidenoe, said that in 1911 he was surprised at the slowness of the work, and he complained to Mr. Colborne about it. The committee started with £3,000 in the bank. There was no difficulty whatever about money. They made LI,000 by means of a bazaar, and they intended to have another when the church was opened. The first contract was for 26,099. and it was afterwards increased to £ 5,399. All the archi- tect's certificates were paid promptly. The church was completed in March, 1915. The oontract was for some £ 2,000. The hearing was adjourned till Monday, when judgment was reserved.

Advertising

FORD! FORD! For light delivery work anything except a 20 h.p. Ford Van is bad business and sheer waste. Now is the time to retrench, level up, and progress. The service of several horses is in every Ford Van, YET THE FORD COSTS LESS TO RUN THAN ONE HORSE. There is not a depot that can give better service than we can give as Ford Specialists. 20-h.p. efficiently equipped steel panelled body with double doors at rear. Price (at Works, Manchester) £120. For fuller particulars and demonstration apply to T. ROBERTS & SONS Crown Garages, LLANDOVERY.

LLAMOVEKY NOTES

LLAMOVEKY NOTES [By Dtfbi."] The appearance of the pratering-cart on the streets is generally a sign that summer is approaching. Nowadays it is wanted very badly, too, owing to the motor traffic, which stirs up a lot of dust. Mr. D. Thomas, who haa been on the clerical staff at the National Provincial Bank in this town for upwards of six years, has just been transferred to Ross, Herefordshire. Unfortunately, the rates in the borough are on the increase. The total for the current half-year will be 4s. Id. in the JB, oompared with 3s. 8d. in the corre- sponding half-year. The Collegians have commenced practising, oricket, but in consequence of the war, the fixtures I will be very few. Of course, the Christ College, I Brecon, will be amoxipt the opposing teams. < On Sunday morning, at Llandingat Church, the Warden of Llandovery College made some touching references to the late Lieutenant May, a former master of the school, who died from injuries received in action. The war working party connected with Llandingat Church have juet issued their balance sheet. The reoeipts from lectures, sooials, and subscriptions total £ 19 13s. 9d., and the expenditure £ 20 6s. 10d.. the latter being money spent for purchasing flannel and wool. Over 300 shirts and oomforte have been made by the members; 600 of these were sent to Lady Jelliooe for the Navy; others were sent to the Red Cross Headquartera, and for the Canadian troops; whilst over 100 pairs of socks have been forwarded to the brave Llandoverians who have nobly responded to the call of their King and country. Mr. Thos. Williams, Cwmllynfeuchaf, the newly- elected chairman of the Rural Distriot Council, was duly sworn in as a magistrate at the last Petty Sessions. Llaneadwrnites are delighted at the honour conferred upon their representative. At the last meeting of the Town Council, it was decided to sell the old Reading Room. What offers? The new rate was signed at the last meeting, and we are pleased to hear that the Deputy Collector has recovered from his illnss.

LLANDOVERY TOWN COUNCIL

LLANDOVERY TOWN COUNCIL Tho monthly meeting of the Llandovery* Town Council was held at the Town Hall on Monday, the Mayor (Councillor C. B. Pryse-Rice) presiding. There were also present: Aldermen T. Watkins (deputy mayor), C. P. Lewis, and D. S. Thomas; Councillors T. Roberts, H. Havard, R. Thomas, W. Jones, J. Prytherch, J. Nicholas, D. Jones, G. Anthony, and D. Lewis; together with the Medical Offioer (Dr. T. Morgan), and the Surveyor (Mr. E. Williams). Mr. T. Watkins referred in sympathetic terms to the illness of the Town Clerk, and expressed the hope that he would soon be amongst them again. He moved a vote of sympathy with Mr. Thomas in his indisposition. Mr. C. P. Lewis seconded, and the motion was unanimously carried. A letter was read from the Chief Constable (Mr. W. Picton Philipps), approving of the appointment of the sergeant of police for the time being to act as hallkeeper. BEE-KEEPING. A letter was read from the Clerk to the County Agricultural Education Committee informing the Council that the Committee would at their next meeting award six courses of lectures in Horticul- ture and Bee-keeping. Mr. C. P. Lewis said that in view of the present state of the country it would not be advantageous to hold such lectures. He moved that no applica- tion be made. Mr. D. S. Thomas seconded, stating that there was very little interest taken in bee-keeping ap present.—Motion carried. REMOVAL OF FOUNTAIN. A letter was read from Mr. T. Handley, Rose Cottage, complaining that in consequence of the removal of the water fountain from New Road he had been deprived of the means of obtaining water. Mr. T. Watkins explained that he had been given to understand by Councillors Thomas and Nicholas that every house in New Road was provided with a water supply, and consequently the fountain was of no use to the residents. When the waterworks dealt with the matter some time ago, these facts were placed before them, and if these were in- correct, the committee had been misled in the matter. He had spoken to Mr. Handley that morning, and he informed him that he had never used the town water, but was supplied with water from his private well. Mr. C. P. Lewis said that wells were so open to contamination that they should not be used at all. The Clerk was directed to inform Mr. Handley that his complaint was receiving the council's at- tention. GUTTER. A letter was read from Mr. Tom Lewis, mason. Orchard-street, informing the Council that as the length of the gutter proposed to be constructed in Broad-street had been reduced so much, he must withdraw the tender accepted by the council at the last meeting. Mr. C. P. Lewis said he was given to understand that the original intension of the council was to oonstruct a gutter 44 yards in length. The Surveyor explained that the council at the last meeting resolved only to make a gutter from the pine end of Granta Cottage to Bedwas House, and this the tenderer was aware of. Mr. C. P. Lewis—Yes, but this decision was not arrived at until after the tender was accepted. The Mayor—But the tender is at a rate per yard, and the specification did not disclose any particular length. On the motion of Mr. T. Roberts, seconded bv Mr. C. P. Lewis, it was resolved to invite fresh tenders for making a gutter from Granta Cottage to Bedwas House, and that full powers be given to I the Highway Committee to deal with the matter. 4 ,J WAR BONUS. The scavenger mado an application for an in- orease in wages from 30s. to 32s. 6d. per week in consequence of the inoreaaed price of oats and barley meal for the horse. Mr. T. Robert* said there were many labourers at present receiving 30e. per week, and considering the keep of a horse nowadays, the application was quite reasonable. Mr. T. Watkins agreed, and moved that the matter be treated as a war bonus. Mr. D. S. Thomas seconded, and the motion was oarried. HIGHWAY COMMITTEE REPORT. The Highway Committee reported that the scavenger's cart required repairing and re-painting, and the borough seats re-painted, and recommended that these should be attended to forthwith. The committee also reported that the Surveyor had sub- mitted to them a specification with regard to the proposed re-building of the pine-end of the Old Reading Room, and as this was likely to incur con- siderable expenditure, they recommended that the bmlding be offered for sale. The committee further recommended to the council that the inside and outside of the corn and meat market buildings, and also the iron railings and lamps surrounding the Memorial Fountain in Market-square be painted. The report was adopted DOLAUHIRION ROAD. The Surveyor submitted a lengthy explanatory report upon his method of metalling Dolauhirion Road, remarking that although some adverse criti- cisms were made at the last meeting, the opinions of a county surveyor, an inspector of roads, and several roadmen possessing many years experience, coincided with what he had done. On the motion of Mr. D. S. Thomas, seconded by Mr. C. P. Lewis, it was resolved to accept the ex- planation as most satisfactory. SEATS. The tender of Mr. Joseph Johnson, Bristol House, for re-pamting the borough seats at 2s. 6d. each was accepted. RATES. The Corporation Seal was affixed to the first in. stalment of the general district rate at 3s. 4d. in the £ and to the borough rate at 3d. in the JB.

BRYNAMMAN NOTES

BRYNAMMAN NOTES (By" Park. Lane.") A pitiful accident took place at the screens of Rhosamman Colliery last Thursday week. Idris Llewelyn, the 14 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. John Llewelyn, Park Lane, was blocked between some moving trucks, and so gravely crushed in the ribs that death ensued in about five hours. The sad event shocked the whole neighbourhod, for all instantly realized the deep pathos of the little chap's end. Idris was of an exceptionally sweet disposi. tion, well-bred, and very intelligent. His fondness ior little ohildren wa,s a very noticeable trait in o" funeral was one of the largest ever seen at Brynamman, and was attended by people from tu Amman Valley. The children from the Banwen Schools, who headed the cortege, pre- sented a moving spectacle, and the ohildren's choir that sang so plaintively at the home and grave- side made strong men weep. The Revs. J. Lee Davies and D. J. Moses, M.A., officiated. May the sorrowing parents and their remaining children find some solace in the fact that their grief at the loss of so dear and sturdy a child is shared by all who knew him. On Monday, after some seven weeks of suffering, the death took place of Mr. Thomas Davies, better known perhaps as Thomas, Cilmaenllwyd." De- ceased, who was in his 71st year, was highly esteemed for his many exoellent qualities. His son, Mr. William Watkin Davies. has been at the front, and is now in Ireland, having been severely woun- ded. Deep sympathy is felt with the bereaved family. and is now in Ireland, having been severely woun. ded. Deep sympathy is felt with the bereaved family. family. Ihere is "something in the wind" concerning Caegurwen Common. Representative^ of Mr. E. Evans-Bevan, Neath, who is now lord of the manor, Evans-Bevan, Neath, who is now lord of the manor, have been around the owners of the numberless little sheds, fowl coops, clothes-line posts, etc., that are placed on various parts of the Common, and have warned them that they will have to pay the lord of the nor for the use they make of the Common. The scale of charges that is to be en- forced (?) is as yet inclined to be moderate. Thus, for a clothes-line, a penny a post per year is asked just something to keep our claim "—and four- penco per year for a small cwb fowls." But the point is this: when will the homagers—the owners of the grazing rights of the Common-make their appearance, and what will their charges be—" just to keep our claim "? If payments to the lord of the manor are made the homagers also, who as yet have behaved very well indeed, will step in and claim compensation for the blades of grass they are deprived of by pig-styes and clothes-lines. The Common is of' priceless value to tho whole of the claim compensation for the blades of grass they are deprived of by pig-styes and clothes-lines. The Comrrron is of priceless value to the whole of the locality, and strong opposition will be given to any movement which will have the effect of depriving the general public of rights and customs which have been observed from time immemorial! The owners of no less than sixty houses in the Caiegurwen district have until now managed to evade payment of the water-rate. By relying on the godwill of neighbours who had secured taps for their own use. these people have until recently dodged the water-rate, and have deprived the coun- cil of a yearly sum of 221. This is henoeforth to be remedied, for every person who gets his water from a neighbour's tap instead of from the publio tap. will have to pay 6s. 6d. for the privilege. But they will take it like sportsmen! The "Lusitania shame reminds the writer of the vastly better war-spirit that has prevailed all along in the town of Cardigan than is evidenced at ■T^11 anininji. Here we nave a. number of people who flout ideas, that are rankly pro-German, for do thev not openly adore such beings as the notoriety- seekers of the Keir Ruciip and Ramsay Macdonald t. Tn Cardigan, however, where nearlv every Person is either a gallant "Tommy" or' "Jack Tar, the super-enlightened persons referred to would spedily find that anvthing nro-German in tendency would be highly uncomfortable to them, there the ohurch bells are rung daily at noon, to remind the neighbourhod that its sons are fighting on land or sea for the safety and protection of all that is good. Immediately noon is struck by the town clock the church bells begin to chime for worship and prayer oa behalf of those in peril. One of the results of this is that one will never see at Cardigan groups of fine young fellows standing idly at the street corners to discuss the morning papers, *rii t0 cli.ticise the strategy of Britain and her Allies. The writer was privileged the other dav to havo a chat with a jolly tar who wag home short furlough from somewhere in the North Sea." What annoyed the Navy, he Haid, was the barren results of the unceasing vigil they had to keep whilst on duty. Not a single German warship ever came to break the monotony. But what would you say if the whole of the German Navv came out at once? was the question. His whole bodv seemed to respond to tho suggestion, and his eyes 'glittered with JOJ. as he exploded, "Oh damo na ddelon nhw I Haner awr fvdde ni'n moyn ddoli nhw i gyd Ar waelod y

KIDWELL Y NOTES

KIDWELL Y NOTES A large number of the members of the Siloam Baptist Chapel journeyed to Burry Port on Tuesday last to take part in the annual singing festival of uhv€ of the district They were accompanied nm £ V' Jones, the esteemed pastor of Siloam, who was one of the presidents for the day. JS? Ia:test, tft?h o* soldiers home on short fur- £ ugh prior to being sent to the front, include Corpl. Tiki!' ^y-street. and Private Charles Gibbard, Water-street, 9th Welsh, and Private Tom hdlfd9' They look in the b £ t 3 health, and fit for anything thev may be called to da The 9th Welsh f„ the US 2 thf' majority of the Kidwelly boys" are in ita ranb. The torpedoing of the Lusitania by a German submarine on Friday last just off the Old Head of Kinsale, sent a shudder of horror through the land It arTv Lj aT?nm !u*°lve 40 crl,sh the ruthless SLany]f°lBtA Xuf anything were needed to s.how that donfhU w barbaria,ns had touched the lowest S^dS.5, ",e murd" °'the ,wa* a large attendance at the meeting of Hall Com,mittee held in the Hall on Monday evening, the 10th inst., Mr*. H. B Pr0S f Tho treasurer's report "a* con- s r minILryf £ CtKry' J4 Was ^P^'ned that the six months for which subscriptions were promised would expire on the 29th inst., and it was dcSSf to oons.der the future of the fund at the next meeting? The employment of Mr. Brochard at Mr. Smarts brickworks at an approximate weekly wage of 20k waiq reported, and the committee formallv approved tor f8 

CARMARTHENSHIRE BANKRUPTCY cauay

CARMARTHE-NSHIRE BANKRUPTCY cauay LAMPBTBR SOLICITOR S LOSSES ON bTUCK EXCHANGE. The Carmarthenahire Bankruptcy Court was hold at the Guildhall, Carmarthen, on Tuesday bworo the Registrar (Mr. D. E. Stephens). *1 £ 3,\567. 12b- id- and defici«n«T at £ 2,183 5s. 10d., Mr. Daniel Watkins, soli&ko* and magistrates clerk, Lampeter, came up for hi publio examination. He attributed his failure to "Stock Exchange speculation." According to the printed observations of tks Official Receiver (Mr. H. W. Thomas), a receiving order was made on a creditor's petition filed aId October, 1914. Debtor, age 52, stated that he was admitted a solicitor in 1888, and oommenoed prac- tising at Lampeter in 1899. He resided at Thor«. dale, Lampetor, of which premises his wife was tenant. She claimed the household furnitui* on tka ground that a portion was purchased by her from m in June, 1914, for :690, and the remaiinder, valued at £ 81 3s. 6d., she claimed in her own right. His books of account consisted of cash book ledger and costs book, which had not been written up for sometime. An offer of 2s. 6d. in the £ had beella refused by th« creditors. His liabilities were then estimated at P,2,600, and assets £100. He had in- of r £ ?odrBe^° v. tli? jStuck ExchanS« tha extent or £ 3,000, ahd he had been aware of his insolvency for th(- last two years. The Partly secured credits, were (a) debtor s bank for overdraft of £ 1 068 16a 6d in respect of which the bank held shares and polioies of the estimated value of JMM, and also shares and mortgage of property deposited by h:8 S'L estlmated. v*lue of £ 700—a total of (b) a. person in respect of advances made amounting to £ 868 who held as security two life £ r°icies for £ 3K> and £ 250, which were estimated to produce £ 40. A contingent creditor was in respeot fira £ 49ttran?ie °> b0hill{.v{ wife to her bank A.u, was issued against debtor on ebruary 4th last by a client for damages, but tha ac ion had not been proceeded with; the ajnounl this claim the debtor had not inserted in his state- mnd! ?ma 7'n unsecured liabilities were £ ^845%s 7°7'S:~Elght Tdlt°rS £ 239 2

Advertising

-4 a. n- KVD. The Case-hardened Bearings of the RALEIGH THE ALL-STEEL BICYCLE will but a lifetime. The ovlar (bell b hard as a aianond to aippart tha balk wbile tha cMlra n toasn, fibroin (Ual to nm mm- pM« laummitr (ram IncMn. Prim froas £ .5/19/6 or 9/4 per month. Smd n p*. /tr Bwk AW Bmhtck. Carmarthen—J. Tom Jones, 11 and 29, Bridge Street. Tenby— Davies Bros., South Street. Pdato ftr Ordide. by rntnk Bawdaa, 7JLO.B. la. Froa A frnit A Baoksteito IMatafcrOralMi 4b pq Nonius- |1 II II < I ==S5gU In acoordanoe with a Resolution passed 5y the Cycle Manufacturers' Association dua fee the increased cost of labour and material, all prioee are advanced 10

LAMPETER TOWN COUNCIL

LAMPETER TOWN COUNCIL The monthly moeting of the Town Council was held at the Victoria Hall, Lampeter, on Thursday evening in last week, tho following members being preaentr-AJderman Walter Davies, mayor, in th! chair; Aldermen W. Jones, L. Jones, and E. Evans: Councillors Lvan Davies, John Owen, David Davies n'r,TdaineiT °' Wa D" Idri# Joufc». D- F! Lloyd, D. Jones, and J. S. Jones. REPORT OF MEDICAL OFFICER. <-2um> £ las L)avius, medical officer of health read his report, whioii was as follows:—•• I us to bo able to report that tho borough is at present free from any epuiemio, and that we are expP