Collection Title: Carmarthen journal and South Wales weekly advertiser

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 3 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
16 articles on this page
Advertising

CREAM SEPARATOR. A L'rY,fATIC LUBIUCATION to ¡"\TERY BRA RnG -G easy silent working, long weal' and cheap repairs. IT PAYS to use the ALFA LA VAL" instead of machine of othcr makes, for which liberal termG are given in part exchange. or AWARDED 1,000 FIRST PRIZES. Fixed in any Dairy )D One Month*' Free Trial. AaDTe- W. THOMA6 k SON, FTaH Street, Owmwtbm T. M. WILLIAMS, Ironmonger, LUndiU.

AGRICULTURAL NOTES

AGRICULTURAL NOTES [BY A PRACTICAL FABMM.] IMPROVING POOR CLAY LAND. Poor land is of many varieties, and it needs Careful tests and experiments adapted to the particular circumstance of each piece of land to ascertain how the land may be boat improved. gorrie experiments which have been made in Suffolk were on what is described as "exceedingly poor clay land down to grass. On one portion during the past thirteen years basic slag has been applied in three dressings, at the rate of lOcwt. per acre, the total cost of the dressings being 62s. 6d. per acre. The result has been to inorease the average crop of hay from 9icwt. per acre to E8c,wt.. with a total profit over the whole period of yB23 l*2s. 6d. This is a striking proof of the value Of slag, applied at intervals of some years, in liberal dressings on heavy land. The addition of kainit to the slag reduoed the profit, probably because such heavy land contains » .sufficient supply of potash for the requirements of pnany crops. The lime in slag helps to liberate the natural stook of potash in heavy soils. Another ex- periment was made to test the relative advantage tof smaller but more frequent dressings of basic slag per acre. The result of this was a smaller total profit. This bears out the figures obtained from experiments elsewhere, showing that more profit-1 fcble results are obtained from a large initial dress- ing of slag than from two smaller dressings. The bddition of nitrate to the slag has slightly increased the profit. Superphosphate at intervals have proved very profitable, although not quite euch good result* have been obtained as from the use of slag. The addition of kainit to the superphosphate has la- creased the profit, the use of a potash manure being more necessary than with basic slag, because there is no free lime present in the superphosphate to liberate potash. The addition of ground lime to the superphosphate made a slight reduotion in the profit, which is not surprising in view of the com- paratively large percentage of lime present in the soil. The addition of sulphate of ammonia to the superphosphate increased the profits over that ob-. tained from superphosphate alone. The plot re- ceiving bones in two forms has given the smallest profit of any of the plots. TWO FORMS OF WASTE. The annual report of the Rothamsted Experi- mental Station just issued contains much informa- tion of the greatest practical value. There is a record of two stacks which, instead of being threshed soon after harvest, was left to the follow- ing October. In both cases the loss was found to be serious—in one there was a considerable loss of 1 grain, in the other the total grain did not greatly decrease, but much was damaged and came out as tail corn. The conolusion is that under ordinary circumstanoes wheat should be threshed out as soon after harvest as possible. In connection with another experiment manure heaps were set up under various conditions of storage, and it was found that serious loss was ooca-i sioned when rain washed into the heap, even though no visible drainage took place. The old view that loss is due to volatilisation of ammonia cannot be regarded as complete. Considerable saving was effted by sheltering the heap, and the loss was reduced to very small proportions by a combination of sheltering and compacting. A MILK SUPPLY CONTEST. The Royal Agricultural Society has introduced an important and interesting milk competition in connection with the forthcoming show at Notting- ham. The idea is to encourage farmers who supply milk for consumption in the large towns to pay particular attention to the quality and cleanli- ness -of the milk. It is to be hoped that the innovation will be so successful as to justify its continuance as a regular feature in future years. For this year s show prizes and certificates of merit are offered to far- mers who supply milk to Nottingham daily from the counties of Nottingham, Derby, and Leicester. The classes and prizes are as follows: Class 1.— Farmers sending thirty-one gallons of milk and upwards in two deliveries, morning and evening, £6 6s. Class 2.—Farmers sending fifteen to thirty gallons of milk in two deliveries, morning and evening, JB4 4s. Certificates of merit will be given to all milks obtaining forty points and upwards. The awards will bo made on the certificate of the Steward of Dairying, whose decision will be final. Samples of milk will be taken from the morning and evening consignments between June 4th and 25th while the milk is in transit, but on different days, and without notice. In no case will the in- formation obtained from the analysis be used to the prejudice of the farmer or for the purpose of instituting legal proceedings, and only the names of those farmers obtaining prizes or certificates of merit will be published. The points awarded will be as follows: Four points for 1 per cent. of fat, two points for 1 per cent. of solids other than fat, fifteen points as a maximum for the cleanliness of the milk. Milk showing less than 3 per cent. of fat and 8.5 per cent, of solids other than fat, or not' gaining ten points for cleanliness will be disqualified. The dis- qualification of one sample of milk will debar the competitor from receiving a prize or certificate of merit. MILK SUBSTITUTES FOR CALVES. Probably no class of experiment carried out at the agricultural colleges interests practical men more than the relative profit of food mixtures in stock feeding. And of all questions re aring to stock feeding none is of greater lice than the profitable feeding of calves. At the suggestion of the Shropshire Chamber of Agriculture, the Harper Adams Agricultural Col- lege carried out a calf-feeding experiment. The main idea was to contrast several methods of feed- ing which had been found most suitable in past experiments. At various oentres some sixteen Shorthorn calves were bought at a cost of J33 each. They were brought on to the college farm and were fed alike on new milk until the beginning of the test. Four pens were made up, the calves being fed twice daily, and' weighed every fortnight for ten weeks. The details of the food are as follows: Pen 1.—Calves fed on new milk, each calf getting six quarts daily for a period of ten weeks. The total consumption was 420 gallons, which at 8d. per gallon cost R14. The total increase in weight of the four calves was 4581b. Pen 2.—In this case the new milk was gradually reduced and the following gruel substituted: Two parts oatmeal, one part of ground linseed, two parts of maize meal. The cost of this was 12s. 8d. per cwt., the milk being scalded twelve hours be- fore being used. At the beginning of the test the calves were given daily four quarts of new milk and two quarts of gruel, made from half a pound of the meal. At the end of the experiment they were getting three quarts of new milk and three quarts of gruel made from three-quarters of a pound of the meal. The calves did not relish this meal, however. The cost of food was £ 9 10s. ll^d., and the increase in weight was 2841b. Pen 3.—These calves wpre fed in the same wav as Pen 2, except that the following meal was sub- stituted Five parts of ground linseed (home grown), fourteen parts of linseed cake meal, two parts of flour, and two parts of locust bean meal. This cost lis. 6d. per cwt.. and the meal was steeped in cold water twelve hours before being used. The total cost of the food was J67 14s. 2d and the increase of live weight was 2461b. liver oil and crushed oats were used with most suc- cessful results. The cod liver oil was mixed with the fresh milk and the crashed oats were fed dry. The diet consisted of: i Six quarts of separated milk, two ounces of cod liver oil, and a half-pint of crushed oats. The increase in weight of this pen was 4071b., and the total cost of the food was E4 15s. that is to say, the cost per pound increase in live weight was 2.80d. as compared with 7.25d. for Pen 1, 8.06d. for Pen 2, and 5.34d. for Pen 3.

MARKETS

MARKETS GRAIN, &c. NEWPORT, Wed., May 26.—Business of quite a holiday character. Maize slow, and 3d to 6d down from last week. Barley and oats about the same. Flour slow, with no alteration. Bran and sharps in fair request at the same price as last week. HEREFORD, Wed., May 26.—Small attendance. Wheats firmly held at 83 per bushel. Nothing doing in barley and oats. Maize unchanged. CATTLE. NEWPORT Wed.. May 26.-Moderate supply of cattle, large number of sheep, lambs, calves, and pigs. Exceptionally good demand for beef, cattle realising higher prices; other stock about late ratee. Quotations:—Best beef lid, seconds lOd to 10d, bulls and oows 8ld to 9d, best wether mutton 4 Is Id, shorn wethers Itld to Is, ekes 9d to lOd, lamb Is, and calves lOd to Is per lb. porker pigs 15s, bacon pigs 12s, and sows 10s per score. HEREFORD, Wed., May 26.—A sharp trade for beef, and the advance of last week was fixed; if anything, a. slight advance ruled, top price being lOd per lb.; secondary sorts made Sid to W good. Both 2 fat lambs and fat calves in request and very dear. lambs going up to Is 2d, and rarely below Is. Fat sheep a steady demand, and sold at recent rates. Pigs a bit easier, but far from cheap. Good stock in request. LEICESTER, May r26.— Small supply of cattle, but sufficient for the trade, which commenced very dear, but finished rather easier than last week; some Norfolk stall-feds made up to 69s per live cwt., while grass-fed beasts not so well finished realised about 60s. Sheep hardly so well sold as last week, although trade was still dear; hest quality hoggs realised Ilid, heavier weights lid, and lambs 12d to 14d por lb. Both veal calves and pigs dearer, the former making lid to 121d per lb., and pigs up to 14 and 16s per score. LONDON, Metropolitan Cattle Market, May 24.— A holiday market, and supplies of cattle short, but trade very dear, prices showing a rise of fully 8d per 8-lb. stone on the week; 1st quality made fully 8s per stone, and even more in some cases. Sheep also in small supply, but, with very few buyers attending, trade ruled slow. although prices were fully as high as last week, best Downs and Cross- brede realising 12d per lb. Best lambs also main- tained late rates, although the demand was not so brisk, but inferior sorts were lid per lb. cheaper. NORTHAMPTON, May 26.—Rather fewer fat beasts in the market than last week, but the supply included a few grass-feds; trade very keen, and prices fully as high as last week, best quality again making 8s per stone, or Is per lb., while cows made 6s 6d per 8-lb. stone. Sheep and lamba unchanged in prioe, late rates being well maintained. Pigs rather dearer, especially bacons, prices ranging up to 14s 6d per score. NOTTINGHAM, May 26.-Fat cattle were offered in large numbers,"and trade ruled slow, but dear, 1st quality averaging 13s per stone, or 6d more than last week. Sheep were the best lot offered for many weeks, and prices ruled similar to last week, except for ewes, which were slightly cheaper. Lambs also about maintained late rates, choice sorts making 13d per lb. Pigs in short supply, and trade keen at more money, prices ranging from 8s 9d to 10s per stone. SALFORD, May 25.-0wing to the warmer weather, the demand was slow, but prices ruled higher; some of the choicest Polled Scots made 12d per lb., but useful quality beasts could be bought at lid to ld. Both sheep and lambs show very little change in price, but demand for the latter was rather keener owing to the warm weather. Bacon pigs at Manchester included 153 Irish, 208 Welsh, 149 Cheshire, and 72 Yorkshire. Trade slow at 14s 6d to 148 8d for the best quality, and 12s to 12s 4d. per ecore, for sows. WOLVERHAMPTON, May 26.-Fat cattle num- bered about 350. and trade again ruled very sharp at a further advance in price, prime Herefords being sold to weigh at Hid per lb., against lOid last week, while 64s 6d was about the average price per live cwt. Sheep also sold very well, best quality tegs making 12d, and lambs 14d to 15d, per lb. Pigs in keen demand, bacons and porkets realising 14s 9d per score. NORTHAMPTON, May 22.-The rapid improve- ment of the pastures and the high prices of fat atock caused trade for store cattle to rule very fast at about 21 per head more money all round; strong cattle made up to jB24 10s, and barren cows to 222, per head. Dairy cows. however, sold slowly, prices ranging up to £ 27 5s, but calves for rearing were in improved demand up to 74s each. Store sheep ruled very dear, Downs making 53s clipped and 63s in wool, while ewes with lambs realised up to 77s per couple. SHREWSBURY, May 21.—At this special sale, 1,194 store cattle were on offer, and, with another very large attendance of buyers, the majority of the beasts making from 56s to 65s, and good grazing beasts making from 5 s to 65s, and good grazing cattle 52s to 55s. while very few lots could be bought under 50s, per live cwt. The top price of 65s per live cwt. was paid for a bunoh of 21 Polled Angus bullocks of 6 cwts., which made 919 10s per head, while a lot of Angus cross heifers, of 4 cwts., made B13 lOs per head, or 60s per live cwt. A smart well- bred bunch of Herefords, about 20 months old, realised JB25 15s per head, or fully 61s per live cwt., while other useful bunches made from 55s to 69s per live cwt. A bunch of two-year-old Devon bullocks realised 55s 6d, some very good home-bred Short- horns, of 6i cwts., 58s, and a very useful bunch of growing two-year-old Shorthorns, of n owts., 54s, per live cwt. (May 25).-Dairy cows dear, prices ranging up to JB54. while a large number of store cattle changed hands at prices fully as high as last week. Rearing calves very dear, 70s being quite a common price for a useful well-bred calf. Strong store pigs in demand, but small stores were not quite such a keen trade. PROVISIONS. CARMARTHEN, Sat., May 29.-There was a good supply of produce at the weekly market here to-day, ana the demand was keen. Quotations:— Butter-in pats Is Id to Is 2id, in casks Is Oid to Is ld per lb.; eggs, 11 and 12 for Is; poultry- chickens Is 6d and Is 7d per lb., or as 6d to 3s 6d each, fowls 3s to 4s 1 each, duoks 3s to 4s each; rabbits, 9d to Is each; cheese 6d and 7d, Caerphilly ditto lid per lb. potatoes, 3s 6d to 4s. per cwt. There were also porkers on offer at 9s 6d per eoore. LLANDILO, Sat., May 29.-The market to-day was a. very quick one. the supply being short of the demand. Quotations:—Fresh butter Is 21d per lb., tub ditto Is lid, eggs 10 and 11 for 19, cheese-Welsh lOd per lb., cream and Caerphilly Is, rabbits lid and Is each, leverets 8d each, honey lid per lb.; poultry —spring chiokens (trussed) 55 6d each, fowls (trussed) Is Id per lb., ditto alive 5s 6d a couple; ducks (trussed) Is 2d per lb., ditto alive 3s 3d and 3 6d each; llannel-white Is 2d per yard, shirting Is 3d, blouse flannel Is 5d, serge coloured Is 9d, costume cloth single width 3s 3d, blankets white 24s a pair, turnovers 2s lOd each, large nursing shawls coloured from 12s 6d to 13s 6d each; wool—white in the grease 2e 6d, grey and brown 2s lOd, black 3s 2d, -best black fine 4s; plants 4d per bundle and Is per 100. BUTTER. CORK, Sat., May 29.-Firsts 126s, seconds 124s, and fresh from 127s per cwt.

HEW PARLIAMENTARY SECRETARIES

HEW PARLIAMENTARY SECRETARIES The following appointments are announced:— Parliamentary Under-georetariea:- Home Affairs-Mr. Brace. Foreign Affairs-Lord Robert Cecil. Colonies—Mr. Steel Maitland. India-Lord Islington War—Mr. Tennant. Financial Secretaries:— To the War Office-lr. H. W. Forster. To the Admiralty—Mr. Macnamara. Parliamentary Secretaries:— Board of Trade—Captain Pretyman. Local Government Board-Mr. Hayes Fisher. Board of Agriculture—Mr. Acland. Board of Education—Mr. Herbert Lewis. Munitions—Dr. Addison. Assistant Postmaster-General—Mr. Pike Pease. Vice-President of the Department of Agriculture for Ireland-Mr. T. W. Russell. Joint Parliamentary Secretaries to the Treasury- Mr. Gulland and Lord Edmund Talbot. Lords Commissioner of the Treasury:—Mr. G. H. Roberts, Mr. Howard, Mr. Bridgman, Mr. Walter Rea (unpaid). Treasurer of the Household—Mr. James Hope. Vice-Chamberlain of the Household—Mr. Beck. Comptroller of the Household—Mr. Charles Roberts (and Chairman National Heal Insurance Joint Committee).

Advertising

« ppDCpfT » CREAM I I 1 1 SEPARATORS 1 (:D T You Want More Butter, I r You Want Better Butter, You Want Less Work to do, You Are Shorthanded Owing to the War, Get a FERFECT SEPARATOR. For a month's free trial. You will wonder how you have gone so long without one. Stocked, Sold and Fixed free by DAVID LEWIS, Aeron Villa, Pencader. OWEN EVANS, R.S.S., Brongest Smithy, Newcastle-Emlyn.

LOCOMOTIVE MENS GRIEVANCES

LOCOMOTIVE MEN'S GRIEVANCES. [To the Editor of the CARMARTHEN JOURNAL.] SLB,—Kindly* allow me a little space in your columns to reply to "Ex Army" and "S-ceptic." "Ex Army" wishes to know how we are bearing our share of the expense of the war if we get a bonus to oover our extra expense of food, etc, and pay no income tax. We do not get a bonus to cover one half of the extra expense which we have been sailed upon to bear, and we are told by other workers who receive more than double the bonuj we get that it does not oover the extra cost of living, so that even if we get the full amount asked for we shall still be out of pocket, and our case must be good. Next we know we do not directly pay income tax, because we are not allowed to share in the profits of our labour to the extent that this may be claimed from us, but no worker is free, as all pay indirectly, all his earnings go to purchase many of the things tlat create income on which the tax is raised, so that in peace or war the worker is not spared. "Ex-Army next wishes to know what credit it is to us who remain at home that so many of our com- rades are serving with the colours. The credit fi'&t is this: that we who hato war and all the forces that are responsible for it, have given such a number from the industrial field to assist the nation in its hour of need. Does not "Ex .Army'' think it is some credit to those who remain at home that we have been iiLle to maintain such a service of trains as the public enjoy, with nearly 5,Ci_J of our number missing, and does he know anything of the strain and the unooii- fortable position that we are very often placed inΠDoes he know that we are very often away "rom home for a whole week, and on duty for 30 hours without rest, and where no food can be obtained? Only those who understand life on the foot-plate know what this means to the man who remains at home. To us this is sufficient credit. The Govern- ment and War Office as "Ex Army" should know holds first claim to the services of our railways, "'1d they have not been slow to show their appreciation of our efforts. "Ex Army" next tells us that because traders ire charging more for their goods, the railway man wants to charge more for his services. If he can show us a better way we shall consider it a great servioe. When the worker could once purchase for JB1 what he now needs 30 shillingi for. and has not had any more wages than he had when goods were so much cheaper, how is it to be done? Two ways we see open to us—they are,—eat less, or get more wages, and we certainly prefer more wages. "Ex Army" next tells us that high prices come from too much liberty of the subject, with him we agree. But surely niose who enjoy that liberty should know when to say enough, and have some regard for others who are in poorer conditions of life. He next tells us that if the Government held the same control here as in Germany even in peace- time this would not happen, and advises me to at tack the Government to get this brought about. We hope to get this and many other things brought about when we get sufficient of our own members at West- minster to protect the interests of the worker. But he reminds us that we should not like the methods of dealing with traders in Germany applied to us for the prevention of strikes and agitations. Let me remind him that we have good cause to know something of Government suppression of strikes under British rule; we have not forgotten Llanelly, Dublin and South Africa; we have rot heard of worse even from Germany. May I suggest to "Ex Army" that to widen his knowledge of 1'>00- motive men's greivanoes, he should attend a few of their meetings and hear from them their troubles. He would then be able to ask questions from the other side and answer those put to me without any fear of contradiction. "Soeptic" wishes to know who the workman is who receives 5s. per week war bonus and does not pay his landlady one-half. He should heve taken salt when he heard the fairy tale of the 5s as well as when he read my letter. There is no railwayman receiving more than 3s., and many of us only 2s. per week, but there are many landladies who have taken all that, leaving nothing for the man to meet the expense of other things which he still has to provide which have risen in prices. Seeing that this statement of "Sceptic" is false, I must ask him through the same channels that he has made use of, to withdraw it. apologising for its presence in the Press, or furnish me with the name of the person who made the statement, as we consider it reflects upon the honour o-f locomotive men which we do not intend to tolerate.—Yours, etc., 2, Jackson's Lane, Carmarthen. S. J. JONES. June 2nd, 1915. ——«{•——

THE WELSH LANGUAGE SOCIETY AND THE UNION OF WELSH SOCIETIES

THE WELSH LANGUAGE SOCIETY AND THE UNION OF WELSH SOCIETIES. [To the Editor of the CARMARTHEN JOURNAL.] SIR,-On behalf of the Welsh Language Society and the Union of Welsh Societies, we earnestly beg to call the attention of your numerous readers to the desirability of utilising the Welsh language in the Religious and Moral Instruction lessons in those schools in which such instruction forms part of the curriculum. Unfortunately, the language of the home and the sanctuary is often ignored in the schools, to the detriment of the moral and religious development of Welsh children. When this instruction is given in English to children whose parents are Welsh and who attend a Welsh place of worship the result is often a disinclination to attend and a failure to profit by Welsh religious services. Serious harm ia thus inflicted upon the children's mind and charac- ter at a time when they require careful guarding, moulding, and strengthening. It would seem edu- cationally unsound thus to neglect to utilise the Welsh language as the medium of religious in- struction in the case of children of Welsh parentage. And we venture to suggest that the desired change can be effected without the slightest disloca- tion, trouble, or expense in every well-organised school. We bope therefore that your kind consideration will be given to this appeal and that you will not only grant permission for, but give the utmost en- couragement to the utilising of the Welsh language in this connection so as to ensure that this impor- tant part of the instruction of the school shall be of the utmost benefit to the obildren.-We have the honour to remain, respectfully yours, I Isambard Owen, Vioe-President of the Welsh Language Society. J. E. Lloyd, Hon. Treasurer of the Welsh Language Society. D. James, Secretary of the Wel.sh Language Society. D. Lleufer Thomas, Chairman of the Union of Welsh Societies. W. Lewis, Hon. Treasurer of the Union of Welsh Societies. D. Arthen Evans, Seoretary of the Union of Welsh Societies.

THE MOTHERS UNIONS APPEAL TO MOTHERS

THE MOTHERS' UNION'S APPEAL TO MOTHERS. DFAR SISTERS.—This most .fearful and desolating war has brought upon us at home .serious problems of special difficulty. It has affected every class and age of our nation in ways we oould hardly have expected. And while our heroes in many parts of the world are fighting with such seLf-ce and protecting our homes from the horrors of invasion, it liea with us here to attack no less deadly enemies and to guard our home life from the taint of sin. Among the many problems thus set before every olass of the oommunity the mothers of our land will be most concerned for the purity of the lives of our young people. The danger does not come so much from the presence of soldiers in our midst, as from the unaccustomed excitement of these dark sad days. The times have brought special temptations, but excitement cannot be an excuse for sin. Considering their number and conditions the oon- duct of the soldiers is exemplary. They are hard- worked every day and they endure discomfort; they have offered themselves for their country's service, and they are preparing themselves for the sacrifice they are willing to make. But the conduot of some of our young girls, as you must have noticed with sorrow, is not what it Was a year ago. As in other towns, so also here, young children of fourteen or so are out late at night, often in the oompany of men who are pro- bably strangers, and conducting themselves in ways that are not becoming to them or safe for their own souls. The evil is well enough known to all of us, and Christianhave puzzled and worked to find the true remedy. And wo are more and more convinced that it lies in the hands of the mothers of our country and with no one else. The mothers of our young girls can, with prayer and loving influence, do very much to prevent it. This is what we ourselves propose to do, and we invite you to join with us in doing it. We will take a .greater care of our young people, warn them quite fearlessly and quite plainly of the dangers, make rules about earlier hours and get to know how and with whom their leisure time is spent; above all we will try and teach them the religious meaning of these critical days. Of course, it means a -ricter hand; but these are days when a firm disoipline is laid upon every class of the community, from the Army and Navy down- wards. And when the dangers are explained and the girls are taken lovingly into our confidence, then they w:Il not refr.so to boar their share of restricted liberty. While Britain's sons are doing their duty so nobly in war. we will try and help their sisters to honour Gori by the modesty of their behaviour and the purity of their lives. On behalf of the Pembroke Dock branoh of the Mothers' Union, (Signed) FRANCES P. HUGHES, Pembroke Dock, Hon. Sec. May 25th, 1915.

BRITISH FARMERS RED CROSS FUND

BRITISH FARMERS' RED CROSS FUND. [To the Editor of the CARMARTHEN JOUMA.L.] ,IIR,-The second British Farmers' Hospital for Serbia is now ready for diapatoh, and we are await- ing a Government Transport. It is expected that this Hospital will leave very shortly. The Fund is now committed to a further £ 5,000 in connection with the Farmers' Enteric Hospital at Calais, and towards this amount further sub- scriptions are urgently appealed for. All contributions should be sent to the British Farmers' Red Cross Fund, Room 5, Tower Bridge Flour Mills, Bermondsev. S.E.—Yours faithfully, HERBERT BROWN. P.S.-We regret to inform you that no subscrip- tions have been received this week from the dis- trict in which your paper circulates. Grand total to May 14th, £ 21,03 14s. 7d.; re- cieved this week, B659 8s. 9d.; grand total to date, £ 21,698 3s. 4d.

CARMARTHEN RECRUITING

CARMARTHEN RECRUITING. [To the Editor of the CARMARTHEN JOURNAL.] SIR, When passing through Carmarthen this week I was struck with the large number of strong, sturdy young countrymen whom I saw wandering about tho streets on and after the Bank Holiday. I was told that recruiting was very bad in this district, a fact which was self-evident and not to be wondered at, for, when in the town lately, I ventured to look into the extremely well-oonducted soldiers' club, and was astounded to find that it was, apparently, run by a committee of young, able-bodied men. I was also informed that none of the members of the Presby- terian College, or Old College School had enlisted, though in the case of the Training- College the men I believe, are willing and anxious to enlist, but the Board of Education stops the way. No wonder, then, 'our young men do not answer the call when they see so many others who ought to set an example, and who are equally well able to go, holding- back, and doing work, very necessary and desirable, but yhich could be done as well, if not better, by any elderly men or even by women.-I am, &o., PRO PATRIA. Referring to the statement made in the above letter that none of the members of the Carmarthen JL raining College had enlisted, Principal A. W. Parry writes:— SIR, I am sorry that it is possible for anyone at the present time to make a statement of so un- founded a character, and that under the veil of anonymity a letter should appear in the public press without the writer having first endeavoured to ascertain the truth of his assertions. May I, therefore, state that of the students who were in residence at the Carmarthen Training Col- lege during the session 1913-14 no less than 90 per cent. are now members of his Majesty's forces. In addition, every member of the teaching staff of the college, who is of military age, is also serving in the army. 0 The writer of the letter refers to the extremely well-conducted soldiers' club." apparently run by a committee of young men. HI' may be interested to learn that the chairman of the committee is the Prinoipal of the Carmarthen Training College, who is also serving as the chaplain to the 4th Battalion Welsh Regiment. The other members of the com- mittee are the Mayor of Carmarthen, the registrar of the Diocese of St. David's, and Sir Owen Philipps (president of the club). I may be allowed to point out that a list of the ex-students of the Carmarthen Training College who are now serving with the colours is now in course of compilation, and that though this list is incom- plete there are already nearly 200 names'on it. The writer of the letter is also probably ignorant of the fact that at the present time (Carmarthen Iraimng College is housing students of St. Mark's College, Chelsea. These students were at one time members of the 10th Middlesex Battalion. When that regiment- was sent abroad these young men were discharged from the army on medical grounds, and were sent by the Board of Education to complete their course of training at the Carmarthen Training College. ——»>

RECRUITING IN LAMPETER

RECRUITING IN LAMPETER. [To the Editor of the CARMARTHEN JOURNAL.] ,SIR,- Visiting the town of my birth on the occa- sion of the fair known as Ffair Sylgwvn." I was very much sf-uok with the large number'of eligible young- men v o ought to be serving their King and country. I tun disgusted with the Lampeter boys and district for their slackness. Doubtless this arises from the fact that they do not realise the danger our country is in. Think of what German kultur has done, and what might happen in our own country, and to our own kith and kin. Wake up, young men, before compulsory service has been enforced. I do not apologize for expressing my opinion. My two boys are now serving in His Majesty's service—the one as a private in the R.N.D., aged 21, and the other a midshipman in the Royal Navy, aged 18. AN OLD LAMPETER BOY.

AMMAN VALLEY SCHOOLS

AMMAN VALLEY SCHOOLS "MEANNESS" OF EDUCATION COMMITTEE. Mr. J. Harries, Ammanford, presided over the meeting of the group managers of the Amman Valley Schools held at Garnant on Thursday after- noon in last week, when there were also present. Revs. J. Edryd Jones and J. Rees, M"s,. R. D. Powell, T. V. Jones, J. nomas Morris, Evan Evans, D. Glyn Jenkins, B. R. Evans, David Davies and John Hughes; also the Clerk (Mr. D. J. Morris). MONTHLY LETTER. The Clerk to the Education Committee wrote that they had sanctioned the payment of l's. to the cleaner of the Ystradowen School ;n respect of the extra work devolving upon her prior to the open- ing. The architect would arrange with the con- tractors, Messrs. J. Begg and Sons, Swao.»ea, for the protection of the small taps and ihe pipes of the heating apparatus. For the G.irntnt infants' eohool an uncertificated teacher ws U-ing adver- tised for to fill the place of Miss May Rees. A visit would be paid to the m¡x' department in respect of the application for additional apparatus.. With reference to the overcrowding at tpe Amman- ford infants' school, the Comnv*o hop-d to com- plete arrangements for the dra'img » clr." to the vestry in the course if a week Mist- Mary Hannah Morgans haJ Io

AMMAN VALLEY SCHOOLS

Mr. B. R. Evans—If there is more work than when he tendered it is only fair to allow him to give a fresh estimate. Mr. J. Hughes said Mr. Williams kept the matter so long that now there was a great deal more work to do there. Mr. R. D. Powell proposed that both Mr. Wil- liams and another local builder be asked to tender. As an amendment. Mr. T. V. Jones proposed that it be let -op-en to the whole world. J. Edryd Jones-With the exception of Germany (laughter). Eventually, Mr. Jones agreed to withdraw his amendment, and the motion was carried. HAD MOVED ABOUT. A supplementary teacher at the Ammanford in- fants school (Miss NL E. Rees, Tycroes) wrote that after nearly ten years' experience in teaching she now received less money than many girls who had had far less teaching experience. She had moved about and had had to start at the minimum of JB30 each time. Mr. B. R. Evans-There is too much of the sys- tem of starting at the minimum going on. There is no reason in it. Rev. J. Edryd Jones moved that they make a special request to the Education Committee to give their most sympathetic consideration to this appli- oation. This was agreed to, and it was also decided to recommend that she be given an advance of 210. MEAN." A newly-appointed certificated teacher at the Garnant school (Miss Jennie Vaughan) wrote com- plaming of her payment for April. It appeared that she was engaged to commence on the 1st of April, but the school was closed on that day, and the Easter holidays afterwards intervened, with the result that she had only been paid from the 12th ot April whereas, she contended, she should have been paid from the date of engagement. th

Advertising

WHY WASTE MONEY by payinp^an absurdly high price fof cream if jiarttor I I ABio Bas proved itself to be eQual to others at dcublo llio pnoe. One Month's Trld Pre. and tho Geri^Ti Agricultural Society's TSE EKHE'ET 'AWiSB3 It Is GUARANTEED for 10 years, K JB0rlr Bnd to 6lc'm 113 cte&n, turn easier, nnri be B simpler to^iaaiiai.-e tl-.tn mci-.y of _h9 evry reapect t.o 1.11(: lù\cr-pne ODes Sale* over I2G.CC9 la i Yean. i ■ 15 £ 3 Ss. I m 27 cla,,ts* £ 5 I BBS 50 £ 9 7s. Capacity I -.MB. R. J. FULLWOOD & BLAND, "WIN 31 to 35 Bevenden Street. roO.DOII,

IN CARMARTHEN

IN CARMARTHEN EVERY CLAIM IS BACKED BY LOCAL TESTIMONY. ^OCAL If the reader wants stronger proof than the fol- lowing statement and experience of 0. resident of Carmarthen, what can it be? months ago, and wa's "bliged to stay in bed for two nij baok were very bad T u? the pains in kidneys, and I think this m "8"ht a chill on the Of the trouble thlS mUSt have been cause I 'go?"LfWTrC„mUriffi.str°Lblr r "ft but soon They eased my Lk at L kl^ey pilla. was quite well acain T 9 i iri a s^°ft time I enjoyed verv good health^ver t0r?fy 1 have are splendid, &, dj £ £ £ £ {W. pills LATPP '12Th' OVER TWO YEARS LATER—Mrs. Jones said-—"Doan'e Dnit cured me, and I k-pan ^oan s Pills trouble. They are exeell3nt Pills, and I have told many to try them." SeTere pain and tenderness in the back and loins aggavted by motion, and often coming on excess uric acid which ;a ? eliminate the of lrbr„"aShba''ka* London, W. Don't ABIT w k 1J8.'st-> Oxford-st., Pills, -a,k DISTINCTLY for^OAN'S 1, fT Icjdney pll,, the u M„. JoMs had. bMjiache

TRIMSARAN

TRIMSARAN Wrties being fttr. tJZTA Waunyclun. and Miss Sarah Morgan, second daughter K hM- "S" d"tiM by Mr. Daniel Morris, brother of th<- Dridgercro Mis, Katie Morgan, sister of the bride, acted aa bridesmaid. The marriage ceremony took pW at Capel Newydd. Llanelly, the officiating Crater being the Rev. D. G. Owen, Kidwelly. The happy couple then left for Aberystwyth for the honeym< £ >n The bride and bridegroom who are well-known and popular in the district, were the recipients of very numerous and costly presents. TJe eisteddfod held last Saturday week in con- nection with the Llanderry Church proved a hu^e success. Great praise is due to Mr. Johnny Hughes, secretary Mi e End, who worked with the greatest energy to make it a success. Mr. Howell Roes and Mr. Sam Edwards, member., of the local division of the St. John Ambulance Brigade, left on Wednesday morning en route for Reading Military Hospital. This makes the number up to seven who have left the division."