Collection Title: Carmarthen journal and South Wales weekly advertiser

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 4 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
10 articles on this page
Advertising

G. R. A Number of BAKERS Are Urgently Required for The ARMY SERVICE CORPS. i AGE 19 to 40. Enlistment for duration of the War. Apply in person, or by letter, to the nearest Recruiting Office. WHAT TO DRINK During war-time, peace-time, summer-time, and all times- JONES' HOME-BREWED GINGER BEER. It is easily made at home, and is sold in threepenny packets, which, with I t to two pounds of sugar (according to taste), makes three gallons of healthful, invigorating and refreshing I non-alcoholic beverage. It is used extensively by farmers during the haymaking season on account of its thirst- quenching and satisfying properties. One size only, 3d. per packet, and obtainable only from A. I. JONES, M.P.S. (S THREES? S I Qualified Pharmacist, Optician & Seedsman, 16. LAMMAS Sl REET, CARMARTHEN. Sales bs Buction. TO BE SOLD BY PRIVATE TREATY. CARMARTHENSHIRE. The following FREEHOLD FARMS:- 1. CEFNGORNOTH, LLANGADOCK, quarter of a mile from Town, half-mile from Railway Station, Superior Country Residence and Build- ings. 152 ACRES, RENTAL VALUE, £ 300. One of the choicest pasture farms in the Vale cf Towy. Situation unequalled, main road, and good trout driver intersecting property. Vacant possession 29th September next. 2. CWMDU FARM, LLANDDEUSANT, 40 Acres, in the Sawdde Valley, easily accessible from highway, good buildings; occupier, Mr. John Mor- gan. 3. TYLEPENGAM and TYUCHAF FARMS, Llanddeusant; 170 Acres good dry land bordering Black Mountains, with extensive convenient graz- ing; occupier, Mr. Wm. Davies. 4. DOLAUBACH COTTAGE and GARDEN, close to Llangadock, new building; rental, £ 4 4s. 5. PENCAECELYN FARM, Vale of Towy, lb miles from Glanrhyd Station, Llandilo Parish, good modern buildings, 34 Acres; rental, £ 40; occupier, Mr. T. Thomas. Further Particulars from Messrs. W. and W. JAMES, Auctioneers, 7, Goat Street, Swansea, and Frondeg, Llangadock. TO BE SOLD BY PRIVATE CONTRACT, with A possession at Michaelmas next, the Valuable FARM and LANDS, called ABERBEDW, situate in the Parish of Penbryn, in the County of Cardigan, and about 2 miles from Rhydlewia, the whole containing 42 Acres, or thereabouts, of well- watered meadow, pasture, or arable land in the highest state of cultivation. For further particulars, apply to the Owner, J. GRIFFITHS, Aberrbedw Rhydlewis, Henllan, R.S.O. May 12th, 1915. (3739 CARMARTHENSHIRE. Highly Important Sale of a Valuable Freehold Dairy Farm. Small Holdings and Accommodation Lands situate close to the Town of Carmarthen. ■mJTESSRS. J. HOWELL THOMAS & SON have 1U. reoeived instructions to offer for SALE by AUCTION at the Ivy Bush Royal Hotel, Carmar- then, on SATURDAY, the 12th of June, 1915, at 2 o'clock promptly, the well-known Dairy Farm, called. HAFODWEN Together with SMALL EOLDINGS and ACCOM- MODATION LANDS, being portions of the tYSTRA.O ESTATE, which will be offered in the undermentioned, or such other Lots as may be determined upon at the time of Sale:— Lot I.-A Valuable Freehold Holding, to be known as LOWER HAFODWEN, and at present forming part of HAFODWEN," and comprising an extensive range of Outbuildings, together with 81a. 3r. 3p., or thereabouts, of excellent Meadow and Pasture Land, including some of the beat Marsh Land in the neighbourhood. Lot 2.-Part of the well-known Freehold Dairy Farm, called HAFODWEN, to be known as UPPER HAFODWEN, comprising the excellent and commodious Farmhouse and the extensive range of Outbuildings thereto belonging (excepting the range annexed to Lot 1), together with 74a. m. 38p., or thereabouts, of some of the best land to be met with in the County, in which is included a tract of excellent Marsh Land. The above Lots are held by Mr. J. E. Footman under a lease for 21 years, expiring on 29th Septem- ber, 1916. Lot 3.—The Freehold Small Holding, known as AALTON FARM, comprising Dwelling-house and Outbuildings, together with 44a. Or. 16p., of excel- lent Land, and held by the Carmarthenshire County Council under a lease for 35 years from 29th September, 1911, at an annual rental of 282 IDs., the tenants undertaking all repairs. Lot 4.—All that Freehold Salt Marsh or Accom- modation Meadow, numbered 194 on Plan, and known as GREENCASTLE ISLAND, abutting upon the River Towy, and contaiaing 20a. 2r. 3p. of very rich Salt Marsh Land, now in the occupa- tion of Mr. Evan Evans at the annual rental "f JMO. Lot 5.—All that very desirable Freehold 'tene- ment known as MORFA BRENIN LODGE and MORFA BRENIN. abutting upon the main road and the River Towy, which it borders for a con- siderable distance, containing by admeasurement 23a. 2r. 15p., or thereabouts, and being in the occupation of Mr. Thomas Rees at the annual rental of 250. The House is in good repair, and contains 3 Rooms with Garden, Coal-house, and Pigsty. The Purchaser of this Lot will have the option of renting Ystrad Home Farm and Tirbach (com- prising an area of 68 acres) with' which Holdings it is now let as from Michaelmas, 1916. Particulars, with Plan and Conditions of Sale, may be obtained of the Auctioneers,. at their Offices, St. Mary Street, Carmarthen; Or of Messrs. Paddock and Sons, Solicitors, Hanley. Sales bs auction PARISH OF LLANWINIO, CARMARTHENSHIRE. ¡ Tt/fESSRS. J. HOWELL THOMAS & SON have •1-tA received instructions to SELL by AUCTION at the Swan Hotel, St. Clears, on TUESDAY, 6th July, 1915, the two following Farms, viz.:— CASTELLMAWR and ANFODD, situate in the above Parish, full particulars of which will duly appear, and in the meantime may be obtained of the Auctioneers, St. Mary Street, Carmarthen, or of Messrs. Lewis and James, Solicitors, Narberth. (3770 QUARRE COCHION FARM, LLANDDAROG. MESSRS. J. HOWELL THOMAS & SON have received instructions from Mr. Thos. Brazel to SELL by AUCTION, at the above place, on FRIDAY. June 18th, 1915, about 12 Acres of Standing Hay, and 1 Acre of Oats; also the whole of the Implements and Dairy Utensils, and a por- tion of the Household Furniture. The Sale of Live Stock will take place in September. Auction Mart at Carmarthen JUNE 16TH, 1915. AN AUCTION MART Will be OPENED at CARMARTHEN On this date at the request of many influential Farmers, and in future will be held every fort- night. Entries for all kinds of Stock are solicited. MODERATE CHARGES. LLOYD i& THOMAS, 3768) Auctioneers. TO BE SOLD BY PRIVATE TREATY. CARMARTHENSHIRE. PARISH OF MERTHYR. ALL that Valuable and Desirable Freehold Dairy Farm, known as MERTHYR FACH situate in the above Parish and 2 miles from Sarnau G.W. Railway Station, and 5 miles from Carmarthen Town, containing 115 Acres and 39 Perches, more or less, and now in the occupation of Mr. John Richards. Vacant possession on the 29th September next. Apply:— LLOYD & THOMAS, Land Agents, Carmarthen. SALE TO-MORROW. I FERRYSIDE. THE Sale of the Leasehold Property, known as FOREST HOUSE, Ferryside, will be offered for SALE by AUCTION (subject to Conditions of Sale), at the White Lion Hotel, Ferryside, TO- MORROW (Saturday), 5th June, 1915. Auctioneers-JOHN FRANCIS SON, Carmar- then. Solicitors—Messrs. WALTERS & WILLIAMS, Carmarthen. SALE ON WEDNESDAY NEXT. FOUNTAIN INN. MYDRIM. JOHN FRANCIS & SON have received instruc- M tions from Mr. Owen Phillips, Blaengora, to SELL by AUCTION, at the above place, on WED NESDAY, 9th June, 1915, the following valuaole Stock, comprising— 'O/I HEAD OF CATTLE, including 3 Milch OTt Cows, one expected to calve about the date of Sale; 7 In-calf Heifers; 10 Yearling Heifers; 14 Steers. Oi) HORSES, comprising 3 Cart Mares, Three- /w vear-old Mare, Four-year-old Cob, Seven, year-old. Cob, 2 Two-year-old Fillies, 3 Yearling Colts and Fillies, Three-year-old Cob, 2 Six-year-old Ponies, 2 Five-year-old Ponies, 3 Four -year-old Ponies, 2 Three-year-old Ponies, 3 Two-year-old Ponies. 4 Yearling Ponies; and 5 Aged Ponies. Sale to commence at 2 p.m. Credit on Conditions. PLOUGH HOTEL, CARMARTHEN. JOHN FRANCIS & SON have received instruc- tions from Mrs. Thomas (who is leaving) to SELL by AUCTION, at the above plaoe, on THURSDAY, 17th June, 1915, a portion of the Household Furniture and other Effects. Further particulars will duly appear. (3750 BANK HOUSE, CARMARTHEN. JOHN FRANCIS & SON have received instruc- tions from the Representatives of the Late P. J. Wheldon. Esq., to SELL by AUCTION, at the Ivy Bush Royal Hotel, Carmarthen (where the Goods will be removed for convenience of Sale), on THURSDAY, 24th June, 1915, the valuable Household Furniture and Effects. Particulars wíil duly appeg;r. Sales b}2 Huction HORSES! HORSES! HORSES! A SALE of 40 Cart Mares and Horses, Harness Horses, Welsh Cobs and Ponies will be held at Llynyfelin, Cardigan, on SATURDAY, June 12, 1915. All will be sold subject to two days' trial. Credit on Conditions. For full particulars, apply to Mr. John Evans, Auctioneer, Cardigan. (377S public lRottces HORSE Shoeing Competitions will be held at JLl CARMARTHEN on SATURDAY, June 19th,, 1915. Send for Entry Forms,—David Jones, Secretary, Gwyddgrug Forge, Pencader. Last day of Entry June 11th. (2586p TENDERS are invited for erection Two Shops at A Broad Street, Llandovery. Plans and specifi- cations can be seen at the Plough Inn, Llandovery. Tenders to be sent in not later than June 15th. The lowest or any tender will not neoessarily be accep- ted. (2588p BOROUGH OF CARMARTHEN. BILLETING ALL Residents in the Borough who have accom- modation for the Billeting of Soldiers, and who are prepared voluntarily to aooept payment for such accommodation at the rate of 2s. 6d. per day, are requested to attend at the Borough Police Office as soon as possible, when their names and addresses will be taken and afterwards, if found necessary, the lists compiled will be handed to the Military Authorities in the Borough. H. BRUNEL WHITE, Town Clerk. Town Clerk's Office, Carmarthen, 3rd June, 1915. (3776

THE RAID ON LONDON

THE RAID ON LONDON The Zeppelin raid on London has at last been achieved by the enemy. After making allowance for the wise reticenoe of the Government in giving de- tails of the event, one gathers that the damage re- sulting was small. But that is not the main point after all. A more important question is how have the Zeppelins succeeded in getting so far as London or even to our own coasts? Two or three months ago Mr. Churchill assured the country that a Zeppelin which ventured to our shores would immediately become the prey of our aeroplanes which would attack her like a swarm of hornets. The enemy's airships have arrived and the result is not at all what Mr. Churchill promised us. The raid is doubt- less from the German point of view a dlstmplete stic- oess, and having reached London once the enemy will go there again, especially if it be true, as it seems to be, that our own aerial forces cannot pre- vent them. If they can get as far as London it is reasonable to assume that the whole of the United Kingdom is at the mercy of German frightfulness." We may therefore expect in due time to find Zep- pelins dropping bombs in West Wales. We do not desird to play the part of alarmists, but it is only right that the whole country should realise that, the German menace is to our hearths and homes a very grave one. There are a great many people, in this part of the country at any rate. J especially in the run! districts, who delude them- selves with the cowardly and selfish assurance that they themselves have no use to be anxious about the progress of the war and suffer no personal in- convenience from it. Indeed there is reason to believe that there are many of those, especially that kind of patriot who is making an added income out of it. who either secretly or openly hugs the hope that the war may continue and who regard it merely as good business." One could almost wish that such wretches might feel their loathsome indifference and satisfaction disturbed by the shock of a Zeppelin bomb. There is one splendid feature about the raid on London. Far from alarming and making them anxious in their own interests for peace, it has sent those who are of military age and physique in in- creasing numbers to the Metropolitan recruiting office, thus adding fresh vigour to the new armies with which we shall finally settle our long account with this brutal and unscrupulous foe. We believe that the same result will happen if the murder ships came to West Wales. —

NITES OF THE WEEK

NITES OF THE WEEK When 370 millions of people are in a state of war (this figure stops at the boundaries of Europe), and when not fewer than 20 million men become de. stroyers instea.d of producers, the question of food promptly assumes an unlimited importance. The nations now engaged in war are among the great wheat-producing countries of the world. Without counting Turkey, Japan or Italy, the countries now given over to war produced in 1913 1,767,642,000 bushels of wheat. If the falling off should be no higher than twenty-five per cent.. there will still be a shortage of over 400,000,000 bushels. Throughout all Canada, and particularly in the vast oorn-growing regions of the West, a great effort is being made to supply this shortage. Canada could in herself supply the entire shortage if enough labour and equipment could be brought to bear; but this its manifestly im- possible. According to a Dominion Government report, there are 330,173,195 acres of arable agricul- tural lands in Canada not yet occupied, and of the land oocupied there are still 73,777,085 acres which have not yet been brought under cultivation. If this enormous area were under crop the world would face a surplus instead of a shortage. I Germany's reply to America over the sinking of the Lusitania shows total unrepentance, and a dis- position to play with the subject. In spite of Presi- dent Wilson's direct and serious tone, the answer raises a host of hypothetical issues and prepares the way for a long argument by seeking t,), "define the terms." The straightforward demand that the pre- sent- mode of submarine warfare shall cease is vir- tually ignored, while with regard to the actual sink- ing of the Lusitania, Germany attempts to cast the whole blame upon Great Britain. This country is accused of embarking American passengers, to shield the vessel from torpedo attack and to provide a safeguard for a great trans-Atlantic traffic in ammu- nition. Moreover, it is affirmed that the British Admiralty issued orders to its merchantmen to ram submarines, which makes it impossible for German commanders to give warning of their attack. The last point of this so-called reply is also the unlike- liest. namely, that the ship was an armed auxiliary cruiser under direct orders of the Admiralty. This statement is directly contradicted by the Admiralty's announcement, published soon after the disaster, that the vessel was unarmed. No further evidence is asked by this country, but it may be mentioned that New York customs officials, after examining the Lusitania prior to its sailing, reported that there were no guns on board. The reply has given no satisfaction to the American people, and the world will avrikit with interest the next move. At the evening service in a parish church not a hundred miles from CaAnarthen, the organ and choir revelled in the last hymn to the martial strains of Haydn's Austrian Emperor's hymn, while at the same time an officer of the British Army in full regimentals, carried round the alms-dish. Cannot such scenes he censored? Surely the strains of the National Anthem of Germany may be left alone now! When so many countries are at war with one an- other the oonsequences are necessarily odd. For instance, is Japan at war with Turkey, or Portugal with Austria? Italy's intervention* makes the con- fusion worse. She is nominally at war with Austria, but what is her attitude towards the other powers of the Alliance? According to an Austrian diplomat, Germany is stated to be unwilling to make a de- claration against Italy in order to prevent the latter power from sending troops into France. At tne same time she seems to have reserved the right to strengthen Austrian ranks with substantial forces of her own, though with an eye to the amenities and decencies of her official relations with Italy these warriors are despatched in secret and dressed in the uniforms of her Ally. Similarly, Turkey shows no disposition to declare war on Italy, lest the Italian hosts should join in the expedition at and about the Dardanelles. But it is very hard to live on friendly terms witn your neighbour's enemy, and one may hazard a guess that Italy will not be restrained in her proceedings against Austrian- dressed Germans by the fear of untoward diplo- matic contingencies. No power likes to declare war without some overwhelming provocation, and it may well be that no official declaration will take place between Italy and Germany till the capture of a few spurious Austrians gives the former power a pre- text.

SOCIETY AHD PEIWMML

SOCIETY AHD PEIWMML Mrs. Mcfie, Borthwich Hall, has left Pontllwni. Seoond-lieutenant Gwion J. B. Lloyd, Waunifor, of the 5th Dorsets, has been home on a few days' leave. Lieut. R. T. S. Gwynne, of the lst/4th K.O.Y.L.I., was killed in action on the morning of the 23rd May last. He was the eldest Jbn of Major Gwynne, of Southdene, Hiley, and nephew of Major D. C. S. Gwynne, 3rd South Wales Borderers. Educated at Eton, and was completing his education at Trinity, Cambridge, when on the outbreak of war he volun- teered for active service. He, together with Second- Lieutenant Sugden, of the same regiment, in storm- ing a house occupied by Germans which eventually they took, met their death and had a number of men killed and wounded. Major De Pentheny O'K'elly, chief recruiting officer for the 41st Area, although not eligible for active service, has several of his family at the front. The following notice from the "Times" refers to Major O'Kelly's brother, whose name is among the list of killed, viz.:— Captain Henry Arundell de Pentheny O'Kelly, of the 18th Hussars, was born in 1869, received his first commission in 1900, the honorary rank of captain in-1910. He had retired from the 15th Hussars in June of last year, but rejoined on the outbreak of war and was gazetted a temporary captain in the 18th Hussars in October last. He served on the Staff in the South African War from 1900 to 1902, being present at operations in Orange River Colony and Cape Colony, and re- ceived the Queen's Medal with three clasps and the King's Medal with two clasps." Another brother of Major O'Kelly (Captain E. J. de Pentheny Q'Kelly) is in the 1st Battalion of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers at present serving in the Dardanelles; and his only son is -also serving. Another brother was killed in the South African War.

LOCAL NEWS

LOCAL NEWS. WEDDING. The wedding took place at the Regis- try Office on Friday of Mr. Wm. Harries, Llwyn- melin, Philadelphia, and Miss Elizabeth Anderson, eldest daughter of Mr. J. V. Anderson, Garregcoch. The bride was attired in a navy blue costume with hat to match. FORTHCOMING MARBIAGE.—A marriage has been arranged and will take place at Llanstephan, on June 29th, between Robert Chaloner Lindsey- Brabazon, of Termonfeckin, Ireland, and of Tonna Vicarage, Neath, lieutenant in the Second 6th Bat- talion The Welsh -Regiment, and Dorris Mary Dowdeswell, second daughter of Major and Mrs. Dowdeswell, of Llanstephan, Carmarthenshire. MAYOR'S BELGIAN REFUGEES FUND.—Amounts already acknowledged:—i>741 18s. 7d. (this amount includes subscriptions that have been paid in ad- I vance, in some cases up to one year); Principal and Mrs. Evans, Greenhill, £ 26; Parish of St. David's, £ 16; Parish of St. Peter's, £ 8; Zion Presbyterian Church, £ 7 10s.; Priordy Chapel, 25: English Con- gregational Church, JE5; English Wesleyan Church, £4 8s. lOd.; Tabernacle Chapel, 23; English Baptist Church, £ 3; Union-street Chapel, Jb/2; Llanllwch Church, £ 1 5s.; Bethania Chapel, £ 1. FAIBS.—iThe following are the local' fairs for June :-Llandilo Bridge, 7; Haverfordwest, 8; Nar- berth (wooli, 10; Newcastle-Emlyn, 10; Newcastlo- Emlyn (wool), 11; Pembrey, 11; Conwil, 15; Brecon, 1'; Whitland, 15; Istrad (Card.), 16; Llangennech, U6; Llangenneoh, 17; Cilycwm, 17; Llanarth, 17; Llanedy, 18; Myddfai, 18; Llandovery, 19; Llandilo, 21; Maenclochog, 22; Newport, 23; Newport (Pem.), 28; Narberth, 29. POLICE INSPECTION.—On Friday last, Mr. Leonard Dunning, B.A., H.M. Inspector of Constabulary, inspected the County Police, consisting of one super- intendent (Mr. T. Jones), one, inspector, two ser- geants, and eighteen constables. The inspector savy the men through their drill and examined the books, and was highly pleased with all he saw.—In the afternoon the Borough Police Foroe were inspected, P.C.'s Daniel Davies and Llewellyn being mounted. The Inspector was met at the inspection by the Mayor (Alderman John Lewis), Aldermen W. Evans, J B. Arthur, Councillor Dd. Jenkins, and the Town Clerk (Mr. H. B. White). WILL.—Mr. Charles Jones, Fronheulog, New-road, Llanelly (who was well known at Carmarthen, where he resided at Bank House), commercial traveller, for many years representing Messrs. J. N. Phillips and Co. in Mid-Wales, who died at Abergavenny on the 9th April, aged 64 years, left estate of the gross value of E2,272, of which the net personalty has been sworn at £ 2,240. The testator left all of his property to his four children, Samuel Humphrey Jones, Vincent Hadfield Jones, Carlton Gwynne Jones, and Helen Madfield Jones, in equal shares. CARMARTHEN ARTIST'S SUCCESS.—Mr. B. A. Lewis this year again succeeded in getting. one of his pictures exhibited at the Royal Academy. It ie a beautiful water-colour of Tenby from the Sands." This is the third year that this gifted artist has had a picture exhibited and not hung—distinctly hard lines. Let us hope that next year the proverbial luck of the artist. will bring him the reward which he thoroughly deserves. On Sunday last the Sunday school's anniversary in connection with the English Wesleyan Church took place. when the preacher was the resident minister, the Rev. Vincent Taylor, B.D. There were large congregations both morning and evening, and the eloquent sermons were highly enjoyed. Mr. Taylor's subject in the morning was "The Church and the Child," and he emphasised the importance of child life to the nation and to the church. In the afternoon, the united meeting of the four English Nonconformist Sunday schools of the town was held, Mr. Maurice Jones presiding. Mr. Jones pro- posed a vote of sympathy with the relatives of the late Mr. P. J. Wheldon, i.P.. who at the time of his death was president of the Sunday School Council. This was carried in silence, all the members stand- ing. An address was given by the Rev. Vincent Taylor. Mr. Dd. King read a portion of Scripture, and prayer wa.s offered by Mr. Idris Jones, N.S.P.C.C. The children also sang very sweetly special hymns. Miss Ethel Jones presiding at the organ. In the evening, Mr. Taylor took for his text The Unescapable God," and quoted largely from that beautiful poem of Francis Thompson, The Hound of Heaven." THROAT CUT ON HEDGE SIDE.-Whilst proceeding along the road at Login, Llangunnor, on Thurs- day in last week, John Davies and his son, David John Davies, Orchard-street, Carmarthen, dis- covered a man lying on the side of the hedge with a severe gash in his throat. Davies gave informa- tion to the police, who conveyed the man to the County Infirmary at Carmarthen. The identity of the injured man has not yet been established, and how lie came by his injuries is a mystery. He is about 45 years of age, -and when found was wearing a well-worn suit of clothes. There was no money in his possession. EMPIRE THEATRE.—This up-to-date place of enter- tainment has always attractive programmes, and this, supplemented by the careful attention of the management, affords all that is desirable tor a. pleasant evening. Crowded audienoes visit it again this week. and all are delighted with the ex- cellent performance to which they are entertained. For next week the Manager has made the engage- ment of Brez, the tramp violinist. The principal pictures for next week are the exclusive star pic- ture, "Two Little Britons," a. very fascinating pa- riotio picture, reminiscent of the German attack rn the fortress of Liege last August, and that magn.fi cent majsterpieoe, "Home, Sweet Home." The story of the origin of the most famous song in the English language. Fine comics, and the latest .vtr films will also be shown. "CRICKET.—A match betwen Carmarthen College 1st. XI. and the Grammar School XI. was played on' Thursday in last week on the School grounds. Scores:—Grammar School: Mr. Jones b T. Jones, 0; A. J. Jones c T. Jones b T. Harlow, C; J H. Evans b T. Jones, 0; R. Lewis b T. Harlow, 7; T W. Griffiths not out, 9; G. R. Davies c J\ Jones 0 T. Harlow, 0; D. J. Price c P. M. Ca-e b T. Hal" low, 0; Eric Lewis b T. Jones, 2; f ui lor Lewis b T. Harlow, 0; W. J. Thomas b T. Jorcs, 0; T. Treharne c A. Williams b T. Jones, 0; extrcs. 1; total, 19. College 1st XI. Etheridge ibw b R. Lewis, 0: Wain c G. R. Davies b D. J. Price, 2; T. Jones c T. Lewis b R. Lewis, 6; Morris b Price, 0; Williams b R. Lewis, 0; T. Thomas lbw b D. J. Price. 8; Brown c Treharne b J. R. Evans, 10; P. M. Care b D. J. Price, 19; Boot not out, 11; George b D. J. Price, 1; extras, 4; total (for nine wickets). 61. Bowling: D. J. Price, 5 wickets for 17 runs; R. Lewis, 3 for 25; T. W. Griffiths, 0 for 15; J. R. Evans, 1 for 1. BILLETING OF SOLDIERS.—At a special meeting of the Town Council, held on Wednesday night, a letter was read from the Military Authorities nuw in the borough, having reference to prices for billeting. They informed the Council that in many boroughs special agreement had been made for accommodation at lower rates, viz., 2s. 6d. per day, either with the individual or the community; and asking the Council if they were prepared to make any offer of a like nature. The Council ex- pressed themselves as being very desirous of re- taining all the troops if possible, and instructed the Head Constable to advertise in the local press asking all persons who are willing to accept troops at this rate (2s. 6d. per day) to register their names at the police station. It is a noteworthy fact that the remedy for failure to agree to such conditions might be the removal* of the troops en bloc to another locality where such terms are accepted. RINK PICTURFDRO-dE.-Patroiis of this popular house of entertainment are being exeptionally well catered for this week, and the magnificent pictures presented should on no account be missed. Equally as good programmes have also been billed for next week, the principal dramas being "The Mysterv of the Seven Chests," a thrilling exclusive, and "The Dare Devil Circus Queen," showing one of the most sensational acts ever filmed. Pathe Gazette, con- taining the latest war films, and other interesting pictures, will also be shown. For further particu- lars see our advertising columns. RECRUITING.—A vigorous recruiting campaign was carried out at Carmarthen on Friday and Satur- day last by a recruiting party consisting of N.C.O.'s and men of the 12th Battalion, the Welsh Regiment, with their band and 22 male singers. An open-air concert was held at Guildhall-square on Friday evening, when stirring appeals for recruits were made by Major de Pentheny O'Kelly, Corporal Derry, Lance-Corporal Fuller, V.C.. as well as by the Mayor (Alderman John Lewis), and the Rev. B. Parry Griffiths, M.A. (vicar of St. Peter's). The other part of the programme was as follows:—Duett, Ptes. Parry and Jones; cornet solo. Bandsman Jones: song, Pte. W. J. Parry; glee, Male Voice Party; song, Pte. Jones; recitation, Miss Eluned Pbiilips; Welsh National Anthem by the band and Male Voice Party. Recruiting was oontinued on Saturday morning, when the men accosted all eligi- bles in the street, whether ministers of religion, farmers' sons, clerks or shop assistants. A number of recruits were obtained, and the party left in the afternoon to conduct a similar recruiting meeting at Llanelly. ° CARMARTHENSHIRE RECHABITES. The annual council of the Carmarthenshire District of Rechabites was held at Carmarthen on Saturday. The chair at the outset was occupied by Brother T. Morgan, D.C.R., but subsequently he resigned it for Brother Stanton, the H.C.R. of the Order. A request by the military authorities to allow recruiting officers to address the delegates was readily acceded to, and Capt. Duff, Lieut. Lewis, and Corpl. Derry received a warm welcome on entering the hall. Brother .stanton said that 20,000 members of the Order had enlisted, and the Order was paying their contribu- tions and benefits. The D.S. read the annual state- ment of aocounts, which showed a balance in hand of £ 6.580 in the adult funeral fund, and of £1,269 in the juvenile. In the sick funds the balance Was respectively £3,863 and JB515. The following officers were elected:—P.D.C.R., T. Morgan, Llanelly; D.C.R.. Rev. D. Williams, Abergwili; D.D.R., Hy. Owen, Garnant; treasurer, T. Gee; secretary, W. David, of Llanelly; D.S.J.T., G. W. Jenkins, Llan- dilo. The challenge shield for the greatest increase of members was awarded to Brynymor Tent, Pem- brey. and for the greatest in the juvenile section to Saron Tent, Ammanford. It was resolved, on the motion of the P.D.C.R., T. Morgan, to celebrate the attainment to the Chief Rulership of the Order by the district secretary, W. David. RETIRF,MENT. -After 26 years' diligent service, Mr. Dd. Morgan, Southern-terrace, Pensarn-road, the Llanstephan postman, has retired from the services of the Post Office. Mr. Morgans, who is retiring with a well-deserved pension, was for three years a postman at Porthyrhyd, for three years at Carmar- then town, and for the last twenty years in Llan- stephan. Throughout, he has been "most faithful, and he will be greatly missed by all on his rounds, as well as by many annual visitors to the village. Mr. Morgans is esteemed by a large circle of friends, whose earnest desire is that he may be spared good health for many years to enjoy his fully earned rest. INQUEST.—On Saturday last, Mr. T. Walters (coroner) conducted an inquest respecting the death of Nanse Williams, Cwmddolfawr, Llanegwad. Daniel Williams (farmer) said the deceased, who was his sister, was 74 years of age, and lived with him and his brother John at Cwmddolfawr. She had been suffering .from asthma for the last twenty-one years, and was rather worse of late. On Thursday, the 27th ult.. she retired to bed about 10 p.m., after partaking of supper as usual. He heard her breath- ing very hard about 3.30 a.m., and he got up and asked her if she was worse, but she replied that she was not. He gave her two tablespoonfuls of medi- cine, and she then told him to return to his bed. When he got up about 6 a.m. he found her dead. A verdict of Death from natural causes was returned by the jury. THE LATE MRS. MARY JONES.—A wide circle of friends learnt with regret of the death of Mrs. Mary Jones. Bwlch Cottage, Abergwili, formerly pro- prietress of the Buffalo Inn, Carmarthen, which took place on Wednesday in last week. Eighty-eight years of age, deceased had until recently enjoyed good health. She was well known in Carmarthen town and district, and by her kindly disposition had earned the highest esteem of all. She is sur- vived by a son and daughter, to whom deep sym- pathy is extended. The funeral, which was private, took place on Monday, the place of interment being Penygraig Chapel burial ground. The Rev. George Evan;. Pensarn, officiated. The ohief mourners were: Mr. Dd. Jones, Black Lion. CwmffrwJ (soil); Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Evans. Bwlch Co-Lage (daughter and son-in-law): Mr. and Mr. Richard J'ames, Stafford Houpc. Nott-square (son-in i.1WI; Mr. and Mrs. Dd. Jones, Cwm, Llangendeirne (nephew); Mrs. Margaret Lewis, Kidwelly (niece): Mrs. Jones, Richmond-terrace (niece): Messrs. J. 0., and W. A. Jones, Black Lion (grandchildren); Mr. Holiday James and Miss May James, Stafford House (grandchildren); Mr. Emrys Davies and Misses Nellie and Annie Davies (grandchildren); Mr. and Mrs. J. Davies. Ferndale (srranilson); Mr. Ivor Evans, Llandebie. and Pte. Stanley Evans. Bwlch Cottage (grandson*. Amongst those who sent beauti- ful wreaths and floral tributes were the following:— Mr. and Mrs. Dd. Jones, Black Lion Messrs. J. O. and W. A. Jones, Black Lion: Mr. and Mrs. R. James and family, Stafford House; Mr. and Mrs. V. Rees, Quay-street. As a protest against its criticism of Lord Kit- chener, the committee of the Carmarthen Literary and Scientific Institute, on Tuesday night, decided, on the motion of Ald. Walter Spurrell, seconded by Prof. M. B. Owen, to ban the "Daily Mail" from the Institute until such time as it apologised to Lord Kitchener.

LOCAL WEDDiNG

LOCAL WEDDiNG WILD-BOWEN. All interesting wedding was solemnized at the Llandeteilog Parish Church on Tuesday, when the contracting parties were Miss Mary Bowen, third daughter of the late Mr. John Bowen, J.P., and of Mrs. Bowen, Lan House, near Carmarthen, and Mr. Joseph Wild, The Grange, Kidwelly. The bride who was given away by her brother, Mr. Wm. Bowen, was attended to as bridesmaid by her youngest sister, Miss Mia Bowen. Mr. John W. Wild (bridegroom's brother) was the best man, and x> Jones (vicar), assisted bv the Rev. D. CUJq11? charge of St. Theodore Church, Bryncethin, St. Bride s Minor, performed the cere- mony There were a large number present at the church as the bridal party were highly popular throughout the distriot Later in the dav Mr. and Mrs. Wild, who were the recipients of a very large number of expensive presents, motored to Swansea and Mumbles for the honeymoon. .90

FUNERAL OF MRS STEPHENS TRAWSMAWR

FUNERAL OF MRS. STEPHENS, TRAWSMAWR TV?" S01^ re,mi;"ls °,f iftc Mrs. Martha lay lor Stephens (whose death was recorded in our last issue) were interred in the Newchurch Church- yard on Friday afternoon. The funeral, which was strictly private, left Ferryside about 1 p.m., arriving^ at the burial ground about 3.30 p.m. when the cortege was met by the tenants of the Trawsmawr Estate, the school children, and a number of the neighbouring farmers, who had gathered to witness the sad rites and pay a last tribute of respect. The chief mourners included Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Stephens; Dr. and Mrs. J. W. W. Stephens, of Hoy lake; Lieut D. J. M. Stephens and Miss Doria Stephens (grandchildren); Miss Evelyn Thomas, of Caeglas Llandilo (cousin); Dr. Lewis Williams, of rerryside; Mr. Hosgood, of Birmingham; Mr. T. E. Brigstocke, Carmarthen; Mr. C. V. B. Morris Mrs. Evans, of Temple Bar, and Mr. J. E. Croker were invited, and were present, together with the servants at Ferryside. A special request was made that no floral tri- butes should be sent, but wreaths were sent by the trr^n'- an<^ Mrs- J. Jones, of Parcvronen; Dr. Lewis Williams; and Miss Evelyn Thomas, who were unaware of the expression of the request.

PROPOSED VOLUNTEER TRAINING CORPS

PROPOSED VOLUNTEER TRAINING CORPS SOME FURTHER PARTICULARS. Last week we published a reference to the above Force with an invitation to men of non-militarv age at Carmarthen to form a unit in the borough. We now give some further particulars dealing with the status and objeots of the Corps. This new Force is intended for utilising the ser- vices of the thousands of men in this country who, although over the military age, are perfectly fit and capable of taking up axms for the defence of th-ir native country, and would form a most valuable military asset, in case of invasion by the enemy, but who would be useless without the excellent training which membership of the Corps would give them. Only those may join the Corps who are un- able either from age or other genuine reasons to join the regular forces. Genuine reasons may be defined as follows:— (a) Men engaged in Government contracts on arms and ammunition, boots, olothing, etc., aud men engaged on railways if they cannot be spared. (b) Government and municipal employment such as clerks in the Inland Revenue, water supply, teachers, etc., where permission to enlist is refused by the authorities. (c) Men physically unfit for the army. (d) Men whose enlistment would entail a serious dislocation of business and the throwing of men out of employment. It is only therefore men who come under one of these headings who may be received into a unit of this Volunteer Training Corps. The Corps is recognised as a military unit of his Majesty's torces and men who join it may be satis- fied that they are doing their duty to their oountry. They may also before the war is over be placed in positions of danger, just as are the men at the front, for it is certain that the enemy will attempt in- vasion by more methods than one. The Corps will therefore be by no means a body of dummy soldiers. They must undergo a regular training, the mini- mum for acquiring a badge being forty drills of one hour each, and shooting at a miniature range must be learned under the control of a properly qualified officeil. The approved uniform inoludes a Norfolk jacket with shoulder straps, made in a green-grey rain- proof drill, with closed collar and military cuff; for officers with open neck to show tie and piain cuffs to show the rank which is indicated by white braii bands worn on the cuff; trousers or breeches to match, brown leather gaiters and boots and the ordinary military peak cap. Each unit of the Corps should be controlled by a committee, and training must be carried on under qualified instructors. The Mayor of Carmarthen (Aid. John Lewis, J.P.), has kindly consented to preside at a meeting of the townspeople to be held at the Council Cham- ber on Wednesday. 9th inst., at 8.0 o'clook, with the intention of forming a committee to carry out the formation of a local unit. Fuller information will be placed before that meeting. After that a public meeting will be called and possibly a capable speaker may be got down from London to further explain the objects of the movements. Already a large number of town residents have promised to attend on the 9th inst., so that a good business meeting is assured. Remember that everyone eligible to join the Corps is welcomed; even if physically or otherwise unable to take the training his interest and sympathy will be valued. igfc.

CARMARTHENSHIRE BRANCH BRITISH RED CROSS SOCIETY

CARMARTHENSHIRE BRANCH BRITISH RED CROSS SOCIETY. SIR, -I wish to acknowledge with grateful thanks the following donations towards equipping the new ward opened at the Red Cross Hospital at Carmar- then:— £ s. d. Mrs. Spence-Jones. of Pantglas 5 0 0 Miss Elizabeth Price. Tallev 4 0 0 Mrs. Newland, Dolhaidd 3 0 0 These kind donors have all previously subscribed to the County Red Cross Fund. The following sums have also been received to the County Fund:— £ s. d. Conwil Eisteddfod 8 0 0 Association Masters of Harriers, per Mrs. Pryse-Rice 3 0 0 Concert Llanddarog Church Sunday School 6 7 6 Mr. Rees Griffiths 1 1 0 Mr. J. L. Ree-, 1 1 0 A fortnight ago I appealed through your paper to owners of motors to generously lend their cars to take the wounded for drives. One or two are ar- ranging to send their motor one afternoon in the week, as is being done almost even where throughout England wherever there are hospitals and if more are able to do so in Carmarthenshire for either hospital, we should be very grateful. A special appeal has been issued from headquarters asking for more volunteers for special service from approved members of Women's V.A.D.'s for work in military hospitals, and oommandants should endeavour to meet this appeal.-Yotirs faithfully, M. PRYSE-RICE, President Carmarthenshire Branch. Llwvn-y-Brain, Llandovery. June 2nd. 1915.

PEK6ABER

PEK6ABER P.C. Tom Jones, Castle View, Pencader, a mem- ber of the Carmarthenshire Constabulary, is now at home with a broken leg. the tibia being broken in a scuffle at Ffairfach recently while on duty. He is, we are glad to say, making satisfactory pro- gress towards recovery. Pte. Tom Evans, 1st Welsh, of Davies-street, Pencader. has iv-ritten to say he was wounded in the fighting at Hill 60, and is now in hospital at Bir- mingham. where is is progressing as well as could be expected. The "gymanfa ganu" cnmnrttee. in connection 1c, with the local Congivigationulists, met ut Gwyddgrug on Sunday last, Mr. J. Davias, Maosisaf, Allty- walis. presiding. It was decided to hold a "gy- manfa" next year as usual, and the Rev. P. H. Lewis, F.T.S.C.. Barmouth, was again chosen as conductor.