Collection Title: Carmarthen journal and South Wales weekly advertiser

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 8 of 8
Full Screen
15 articles on this page
vProgress of the War1

v Progress of the War. 1 Friday H M.S. MAJESTIO GONE. The loss of H.M.S. Triumph off the Gaiiipoli Peninsula has been quickly followed by the sinkiag of H.M.S. Majestic, off the same coast. Both were victims of German submarines. The Majee- tic, a battleship of 14,900 tons, Captain H. S. B. Talbot, was sunk yesterday morning. Happily, os in the case of the Triumph, nearly all the officers and men were saved. The auxiliary shio l'riuceáa Irene was accidentally bi-own up in Sheerness Har- bour yesterday. There is only one survivor. Seventy-eight dockyard workmen pensnod in the explosion, in addition to the crew. Submarine E 11 has sunk, in the Sea of Marinate a vessel containing a .great quantity of ammuni- tion and a supply ship, and has run ashore » small store ship. The submarine also Constanti- nople and discharged a torpedo at a tran'po-'t a ong- side the arsenal. The Turkish losses in the Gallipoli Peninsula have been even heavier than was reported. An official message printed yesterday related how an armistice was arranged so that the Turks might bury their 3,000 dead lying in front of the Australian and New Zealand lines, and General Birdwood now reports that it has been discovered that other sections in the Turkish front are covered with dead. On May 25 an advance trench 150 yards in front of General Cox's Brigade was rushed and occupied by our men. The chief news from France is of a daring raid by French airmen to the Rhine. Eighteen aero- planes, which were in the air for six hours and covered 250 miles, bombarded the chemical factory belonging to the Baden Aniline Dye Company at Ludwigshaven. This factory, which is now one of the most important in Germany for the manufac- ture of explosives, was badly damaged. Several buildings were struck and fires broke out in many places. Te expedition was planned as a retaliation for the recent raid on Paris. There have been lively artillery exchanges on the Belgian front and the struggle round Souchez continues in favour to the French. The great struggle on the San continues with no definite decision. North and south-east of Przemysl appear at present to be the crucial points of the battle, and off the south-east the Russians report that the enemy have brought up large reinforce- ments. King Victor Emmanuel, upon assuming the sup- reme command of the Italian Army and Navy, has issued an Order of the Day expressing his confi- dence that they will prove worthy of the great task which lies before them. The Pope has addressed to Cardinal Vanutelli a letter animadverting upon the methods of offence, contrary to the dictates of humanity and of international law," which have been introduced in this war. A Zeppelin visited the East Coast of England on Wednesday night. Bombs were dropped on Southend, two women being killed and a child badly injured. Not much material damage was done. The Zeppelin, although it was chased by aircraft, escaped. According to unofficial reports, there were two or more Zeppelins. Saturday. t I SERIOUS GERMAN REvERSE. GERMAN ANGER WITH ITALY. The French official communique of yesterday afternoon made important announcements of fur- ther successes in the area between Lens and Arras. The offensive was continued with full success." A night attack carried the Presbytery of St. Ablain, with all the neighbouring group of houses —the whole having been strongly fortified by the enemy. Thence the French went forward to the sunken road that runs south-east from Ablain to Moulin Halon. Here they met and broke violent enemy counter-attacks. At dawn they advanced again and took a big German work in the direction of Souchez, after very heavy fighting, in which the enemy suffered a serious defeat." He lost, too. during the night engagements more than 400 prisoners and about 12 machine guns; while in the successful French attack made after daylight more prisoners—whose numbers have not yet been ascer- tained—and fresh material of war fell into the hands of the French. Berlin reports that the French night attacks were repulsed and that the battle at Ablain is still raging." It admits a reverse at the hands of the Russians on the San, with the loss of six guns, which could not be withdrawn in time. The news issued in Petrograd on Thursday nigkt is distinctly favourable. It announced that formid- able Austro-German attacks delivered on the whole Russian front between the Upper Vistula and the San, on the night of May 25 and on May 26 were everywhere repulsed with great loss. South of Przemysl, and between Przemysl and the marshes of the Dniester, a very stubborn battle continues with great intensity." The Italian High Command reports satisfactory progress in the frontier campaigns. Italian airships have raided Austrian territory and bombarded the railway that runs close to the coast from Trieste to Nabresina, "causing evident damage." Mr. John Buchan, in a dispatch, describes the recent successes of the British near Festubert, and mentions some particularly gallant exploits per- formed by our men. He records the names of the heroes of these exploits and also describes the value of the work done by the auxiliaries to the fighting men, such as airmen, engineers, and signallers, who perform their indispensable duties under fire. The German Chancellor made a violent speech in the Reichstag yesterday in reference to Italy's de- claration of war. He expressed his astonishment that Italy had not accepted the concessions grace- fully offered by Germany and Austria-Hungary as the price of peace. Italy, he declared, had doubted the word of Germany and Austria-Hungary. She had no right to measure their trustworthiness by her own loyalty to her Treaty with them. Perhaps she hoped to conquer the German Tirol. Hands off! Monday. ITALIAN INVASION. ABLAIN TAKEN. The Italian invasion of the Trentino makes good progress. Ala-a town of some importance less than 25 miles south of Trent-has fallen to the army which is advancing up the valley of the Adige. West of this, -on the other side of Lake Garda, and again north-east, Italian armies have crossed the frontier and have captured important posts. Sir John French reported last night that the British troops had made further small -ains east of Festubert. Otherwise, there has been quiet along our front. The French were able on Saturday night to announce the capture of all that part of the vil- lage of Ablain which the Germans still held. Berlin admits this, saying that the weak forces occupying the eastern part of Ablain have been withdrawn to a line in the immediate rear, as their continu- ance in the advanced positions there would only have cost useless bloodshed." At Neuville-Saint- Vaast, says Paris, street fighting continues. Here the French are attacking the western ou&kirts of the village and captured on Saturday a fresh group of houses in that quarter. The latest Russian communique.' which Petro- grad issued on Saturday, shows that the Austro- German armies have almost encircled Przemysl. For some days fighting has been reported at places about five miles south of the railway from Przemysl to Lemberg (Lwow). Now we are told that en- gagements have been tang place at villages about five miles north of that railway. These villages have changed hands several times. The successful attack of the 3rd Russian Caucasian Corps, re- ported on Friday, was made at a point on the San some way north of these villages. The German reply to President Wilson's protest against the sinking of the Lusitania and other out- rfages by German submarines was expected to reach Washington yesterday. Its main features were foretold in seemingly authoritative summaries from Berlin, which are accepted as substantially accurate by "The Times" Correspondent at Wash- ington. The President's demand that the German submarine warfare shall cease in so far as it is a menace to neutrals is virtually ignored. Elaborate attempts are made to prove that Great Britain is to blame. And perfunctory apologies are apparent- lv thought sufficient to excuse the loss of American lives in the Lusitania. These summaries of the German Note have made a miserable impression in the United States. The eve of its arrival at Washington has actually been chosen for the issue f another official German warning to the United States as to the dangers incurred by neutrals in entering the war zone. Messages have passed between King George and the King of Italv expressing mutual confidence and •ratification at the alliance in arms of Great Britain ind Italy1- Tuesday. ITALIAN AIRSHIP RAID. U.S. AND GERMAN EVASION. Pola, the great Austrian naval base, was success- fully attacked by an Italian airship on Sunday. Bombs were dropped on the arsenal, railway station, and petrol depot. A fire broke out in the arsenal. Italian destroyers yesterday shelled the docks at Monfalcone, on the Gulf of Trieste, caus- ing serious damage. Several enemy sailing ships were sunk at sea. A Rome Correspondent telegraphs that the Ital- ian and Austrian Armies are getting into touch on the Isonzo river, and that the first important action of the campaign is expected to develop in this region. The news from the Eastern theatre of war con- tinues to be hopeful. Przemysl is still strongly threatened from the north and south-east, but at other points in Galicia the Russians are now the aggressors, and have already had three sucoeases— one 25 miles north of Przemysl, one 11 miles north of the fortress, and the third south of the Dneister valley. In the third battle, which was fought 75 milts south-east of Przemysl, 7,000 prisoners were captured, and the enemy retreated in disorder. In the fight north of Jaroslau, where the enemy in force had crossed the San, several positions have been regained, and further south the threat on the Przemysl-Grodek railway line on the north is now not so menacing as it has been for the past week. A feeble counter-attack, easily checked, followed the capture of Ablain by the French. In this quarter, since the beginning of the French offensive towards Lens, Carenc.y, Notre Dame de Lorette, and Ablain have fallen to our Allies. They are now advancing towards Souchez and Angres, strong- holds which still bar the way to Lens. An official telegram, published in Cairo, records a heavy defeat of the Turkish forces in the Galli- poli Peninsula on May 28. They attempted to take some vacant trenches on a bright moonlight night, with the result that our gunners brought a cross- fire to bear on them at known ranges. Their ad- vance became demoralized, and they lost at least 2,000 men. Our casualties were 300. A Special Correspondent at Mvtilene telgraphs that an enemy submarine sheltiH has been reported near Aivali, Asia Minor, and that British war- ships went there on Saturday. The German reply to President Wilson's Note on the sinking of the Lusitania, is generally de- scribed in the American Press as insulting to the United Stat-es and unworthy of a civilized Power. The steamer Dixiana has been torpedoed off Ushanfc. She is of British registry, but was owned in the United States. Sir Edward Grey has been ordered to leave off work for a short time in order to rest hi eyes. Lord Crewe, wfth the assistance of Lord Lans- downe, has been requested by the Prime Minister to take charge of the Foreign Office in his absence. Wednesday. AIRSHIP RAID ON LONDON. FOUR DEATHS FROM BOMBS. Zeppelins have at last reached London. Official secrecy prevents the publication of full details ot rthe raid, but it appears that one or more Zeppelins passed over London early on Tuesday morning in the Metropolitan area." About 90 bombs were dropped, mostly incendiary. They fell in various localities not far distant from each other." A num- ber of fires broke out, caused by the incendiary bombs. All were promptly and effectively dealt with. Three only were serious enough to need the services of fire-engines. The casualties—sad enough for those who have to suffer for them-were not serious from a public point of view. An infant, a boy, a man, and a woman were killed. Another woman received injuries which leave little hope of recovery. A few other private citizens were seri- ously injured. The official notice remarks also that no public building was damaged, and that ade- quate police arrangements, including the calling out of Special Constables, enabled the situation to be kept thoroughly in hand throughout." » The official communique from Berlin announced ] yesterday that as a reprisal for the bombardment of tfie open town of Ludwigshaven, we last night threw numerous bombs on the wharves and docks of London." The centre of the Frenoh efforts in France is still the sugar factory at Souchez. Here a very violent combat has again developed, the French having made about 60 prisoners. North-west of that point, on the Aix-Noulette-Souchez road, there has also been violent fighting. The French" pene- trated into a thicket and engaged the enemy hand-to-hand. The advantage remained with them. The French military authorities published last night a full account of the taking of Ablain-St. Nazaire on May 29. Even the tombstones in the cemetery were used by the enemy to improvise fortifications. The French took it in an irresistible rush, and with it 500 prisoners and 14 machine-guns. Austrian aircraft, revenging the raid of Italian air- ships on Pola, have dropped bombs on Bari and Brindisi. Slight damage was done, and in Bari a child of 15 waa killedL The Italian Army which is pushing up the valley of the Adige has occupied the heights of Coni Zugna. north-east of Ala. The heights command the important industrial town of Rovereto, from which the Italians are now about eight miles dis- tant. General Cadorna, the Italian Commander-in- Chief, testifies to the alacrity, devotion, and serene confidence of his troops. They have also captured Monte Belvedere, an important spur of the Dolo- mites. The German Note to the United States has shocked public opinion, which is revolted by its cynicism. The Times" Correspondent at Wash- ington savs that the people from coast to coast are not a little wounded that Germany should have dared to insult American intelligence by such a string of insolent quibbles. Public indignation, he reports, is rising, slowly but surely. Meanwhile Count Bernstorff, after a hurried meeting with Mr. Bryan, has asked, and has been given an appoint- ment for an interview with the President to-day. Thursday A new development of the German offensive in the East was reported by Petrograd on Tuesd night. On a front of about 25 miles the Germans have delivered a violent assault against the Russian lines drawn from the Pilica. to the Vistula for the defence of Warsaw. The attack failed. The same Russian communique corrects the Ger- man assertion that three of the Przemysl Forts had been stormed by Bavarian troops. On the night tf May 30-31 the enemy did succeed in penetrating the precincts of one of the forts. But his assault on the line of forts was repulsed with enormous losses, and his troops who had entered Fort V— 23 officers and 600 men—were taken prisoners. The German bulletin asserted yesterday that ^he sugar refinery at Souchez had been retaken from the French. The French, it will be remembered, announced on Tuesday night that after being once taken the position fell again into the hands of the enemy. But they showed also that at dawn on Tuesday they again captured it. Yesterday afternoon Paris reported the capture of several trenches and more prisoners in the labyrinth south-east of Neuville. The Italian Fleet cruised all day on Tuesday near the Dalmation Archipelago, but the Austrian Fleet did not come out to meet it. The warships of Italy have again destroyed the signal and wireless stations on the island of Lissa. They were destroyed gome time ago by French warships, but had been rebuilt by the Austrians.

WAR JOTTINGS

WAR JOTTINGS Pte. Tom Jackson, son of Mr. David Jackson, Holloway-road, Laugharne, has been slightly woun- ded in the hand in the Dardanelles. Out of 33 students at t Presbyterian College, Carmarthen, two have joined his Majesty's forces, both being attached to the R.A.M.C. Two Carmarthen brothers, sons of Mrs. A. Davies, Cambrian-place, have been wounded, name- ly, Private T. Hamlyn, of the 1st Welsh Regiment, and Sergeant W. Hamlyn. Lieutant David Evans, of the Cardiganshire Valu- ation Offices, has been promoted captain. Captain Evans, who is a native of Aberayron, has two brothers serving with the Medical Corps. We regret to learn that Pte. Wm. Jones, 1st Gloucester Regiment, Llanfihangel-ar-arth, who was recently home on sick furlough, has again been forced to go into hospital at Gravesend, as a result of the after-effects of his sojourn in the trenches. It is to be hoped that he will soon be quite well again. Mr. Gilbert Lloyd, only son of Mrs. Lloyd, Weston, and the la.te Rev. W. R. Lloyd, vicar of Llanddarog, is attached to the A.S.C. somewhere in France, and so far is safe and well, though close up to the fighting line. The Rev. T. Williams, B.A., son of Mrs. Wil- liams, formerly of Underbill House, Llanstephan, is serving as chaplain on board one of H.M. battle- ships in the Dardanelles. It is not known exactly whether he was on board H.M.S. Majestic which was torpedoed last week; but the official news is that all the officers were saved. Pte. David George Evans, of the 1st Dorsete, writes a letter home to his father, Mr. David Evans, saddler, Carmarthen, stating that he has been wounded. It will be remembered that last February Pte. Evans was invalided home suffering from myalgia. Mrs. S. Phillips, Arfryn, Picton-place, Carmar- then, has received intimation from the War Office stating that her son, Pte. T. H. Phillips, 2nd Light Horse. Australian Imperial Force, died on the 23rd May from wounds received in action at the Dar- danelles. In order to release as many men as possible for the Army the booking arrangements of the L. and N.W. Railway at Carmarthen have been taken over by the G.W.R. Staff. Mr. Daniel Walters, Railway Tavern, Lammas- street, Carmarthen, has been informed that his son, David John Walters, who was engaged as chief stoker on H.M.S. Triumph, which was sunk on Wednesday in last week on the Gallipoli Coast, is among the saved. Carmarthen people will heartily congratulate Mr. A. Rowland Davies, of Guildhall-square, on his being gazetted lieutenant in the 222nd Company of the Royal Engineers stationed at Tottenham. Lieut. Davies has served a long time in the Welsh Field Company of the Royal Engineers, and did splendid work there. His promotion to a lieutenancy in the Regular Army is thoroughly deserved. Sergt. Tom Davies, Castle Hotel, Lampeter, has enlisted no fewer than 300 recruits for the various branches of the Army since August. On Wednes- day in last week he was visited by about fifty probable recruits, seventeen of whom joined, which was a day's record for him. It was fair day, and with the number enlisted by Sergt. Davies and officers of the R.F.A. the total for the day was about fifty, nearly all cf whom were farm servants of good physique. No one seemed more pleased with the result than the lord-lieutenant of the county (CoL Daviea-Evans). News was received at Llanelly on Saturday that Lieut. Tom Roberts, son of Mr. J. W. Roberts, florist, has been killed at the front. Although suffering from the effects of poisonous gas, the young officer continued to lead his men until he was mortally wounded. Lieut. Roberts paid a flying visit to his home recently. He returned to the front on Saturday week, and within four or five days of his return fell a victim to the enemy. He was 22 years of age. and when war broke out was pursuing his studies in college. Dr. Goodall, a former medical superintendent of the Joint Counties' Mental Hospital at Carmarthen, has been made a lieutenant-colonel whilst emp.'oytd at the Welsh Metropolitan War Hospntl at Oerdiff Dr. Goodall was the medical superintend 3it of the Cardiff Mental Hospital, which institution has been acquired by the War Office under the HIe of the Welsh Metropolitan Military Hospital, for the treatment of wounded soldiers. He holds a position of eminence in the medical world, speaks several languages. H will be able to speak their own language to Indian warriors brought to the hospital. The Rev. George Thomas, B.A. (Oxon.), bas obtained leave of absence from his church at Good- wick, and has joined the Royal Garrison Artillery. Mr. Thomas, who is a Calvinistic Methodist minis- ter well-known in his denomination, is the first Welsh Nonconformist minister to join the new army as a soldier. The Rev. George Thomas is the son of Mr. Thomas Thomas, J.P., f-ormerly Official Re- ceiver, Carmarthen. Before entering the ministry Mr. Thomas was engaged in a solicitor's office at Swansea and practised as a solicitor at Pembroke Dock. Second Lieutenant Lionel St. George Mordaunt- Smith. 2nd Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who, as already reported in the JOURNAL, was killed near Ypres, between May 15-16, 1915, a fe.,v days after his nineteenth birthday, was the eldest son of the late Mr. Mordaunt K. Mordaunt-Smith, and of Mrs. Mathew, of Milton Bank, Laugharne. He wis born on April 23, 1896, and was educatec at Elstroe School and Charterhouse. From there he passed into Sandhurst in January, 1914, and was gazetted to the 2nd Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers m October, 1914. Three weeks later he joined his bat- talion in France, and remained with them until his death. One of his brother officers has written that he was killed leading his platoon in the charge against the German trenches, which he almost One of the most remarkable men in the local forces in training in this county is Sergeant J. Thomas, of Aberporth. He was in the Territorials and Volunteer forces, and in 1912 he retired com- pulsorily owing to his having reached the age limit of 55 years. On the outbreak of war he immedi. ately enlisted in the 4th Welsh. He is the only head-teacher in Cardiganshire who has joined the Colours. His physical activity is remarkable, and it was only the other day that he cycled all the wav to Aberporth and back, leaving Carmarthen -at 11 O in the morning and arriving back there to duty at the Recruiting Office at 9 o'clock the next morning. To the likes of him we take our hats off. Mr. George Phillips, 4, Red Lion Yard, Carmar- then, has received the following letterPrivy Purse Office, Buckingham Palace, S.W., 29th May. 1916. Sir,—I am commanded by the King to convey to you an expression of His Majesty's ap- preciation of the patriotic spirit which has prompted your seven sons and son-in-law to give their ser- vices at the present time to the Army and Navy. The King was much gratified to hear of the manner in which they have so readily responded to the eiil of their Sovereign and their country, and I am to express to you and to them His Majesty's congratu- lations on having contributed in so full a measure to the great causd for which all the people of the British Empire are so bravely fighting.—I have the honour to be, Sir, your obedient servant, F. W. PONSONBY, Keeper of the Privy Purse.

LLANDOVERY NOTES

LLANDOVERY NOTES (By" DYFEI.") The Llandovery College cricket XI. have been very successful this season so far. They have secured victories on two successive Saturdays, their opponents being Lampeter College and Aberys- twyth College. The popular fixture with Christ College. Brecon, is arranged for the 27th instant, and as the game is being played on the Llandovery ground, b the Breconians should suffer a reverse. The Llandoyerians are a strong hatting side, but in the trundling department there seems room for improvement. During this week, a trio of Llandoverians have joined the Colours. I refer to Mr. Cecil Clifford Stone-street; Mr. Thomas David Morgan, the Welsh Smithfield, and Mr. Arthur Harrison, Castle Hotel. Each have enlisted in the Army Service Corps. On Friday evening last, 16 additional wounded soldiers were received at the Red Cross Hospital. All the 26 beds are now occupied, and the patients are receiving every care and attention. At the next Town Council meeting, tne members will consider the proposal of disposing the Old Reading Room which is the property of the Cor- poration. The building is now used as a storehouse for ironmongery, but in year's gone by\ and prior to the town hall being erected, it was used for the hearing of police cases, as well as a lock up. In these days of motor traffic. the watering cart is a great boon, not only to pedestrians, but to persons residing in houses adjacent to the main roads. During the past week, Lieut. A. Lloyd Rees, of the London Welsh, and Private James, of the A.S.C., visited their native borough, both looking very fit.

No title

Owing to extreme pressure on our space, we are compelled to hold over a large amount of District News.

KIDWELLY NOTES

KIDWELLY NOTES We regret to record the death, which occurred on Thursday in last week, of Mr. John James, saddler, at the comparatively early age of 47 years. De- ceased, who was a native of Llanboidy, had resided in Kidwelly for many years, and was married to a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Levi James, formerly of the Corporation Arms. He was well known over a wide area, and carried on an extensive business, to which he devoted most of his time. He was a faithful member of Siloam Baptist Chapel. Some years ago he unsuccessfully sought a seat on the I Borough Council. He had been ailing for many months, and had been unable to attend to his busi- ness for some time. He is survived by his widow and two children. His mortal remains were tn- terred in the Siloam graveyard on I/Ionday after- noon. Prior to the cortege leaving the house, a short service was conducted by the Rev. H. R. Jones, pastor, who also officiated in the chapel and graveside. The Rev. W. C. Jenkins (Ind.) and the Rev. D. Geler Owen (C.M.) were also present, and took part in the service,—the latter at the chapel, and the former performing the committal rites. The chief mourners were: Mrs. James (widow) and two children; Mr. and Mrs. R. G. James, Hengoed (brother and sister-in-law); Mr. and Mrs. T. D. Johns, Brynmenyn (brother-in-law and sister); Mrs. Jones, Cwmdare, and Mrs. E. Evans, Trec.ynon, Aberdare (aunts); Mr. Jones and Mrs. Williams, Cwmdare (cousins); Mrs. Phillips. Whitland (cousin); Mr. T. Gibbon, Mr. John Rees, and Mr. Thomas Rees, Llanboidy (cousins); Mr. and Mrs. L. James, Kidwelly (father and mother- in-law) P.C. and Mrs. Thomas, Newcastle-Emlyn (brother and sister-inlaw); Mr. J. James (brother- in-law). Beautiful wreaths were sent, including one from the widow and children. An open-air recruiting meeting was held at the Pelican Square on Wednesday evening in last week, and in spite of the fact that it had not been/in any way advertised, there was a good-sized audience, many of whom were of military age. The Mayor (Aid.. Thomas Reynolds) presided, and he was sup- ported by Mr. Alfred Stephens, J.P., C.C., Broom- hill Lieut. Tregoning and Corporal Derry, who .was in the historic retreat from Mons, and was with the heroic Capt. Haggard of Stick it, Welsh" fame, when the latter passed away with the now memorable phrase on his lips. Stirring addresses were delivered by the gentlemen named, that by Corporal Derry being of an unusually striking character. He graphically described some of the scenes he had witnessed, and made an elo- quent appeal to the young men to come forward to save their mothers and sisters from the horrible fate which awaited them unless the barbarous Ger- man was decisively beaten. The net result of the appeal was four recruits, but another meeting of the same type would, we believe, have a salutary effect, as there are numbers of young eligibles who are on the point of breaking away from old tradi- tions and restraints and throwing in their lot with the millions who have already rallied to the Flag in defence of King and Country. Lieut. Tregoning and Corpl. Derry were accorded cordial thanks for their Addresses, on the proposition of the Mayor, seconded by Mr. D. O. Jones. Mr. Geo. E. Bowen, J.P., and Mrs. Bowen, who have been spending the winter at salubrious Porth- cawl, returned to liumsey House on Thursday in last week, bringing with them their only son, Lieut. T. S. Bowen, B.A., who was recently woun- ded at the front. No intimation of Lieut. Bowen's home-coming had been made, otherwise a fitting reception would have awaited him. As it was, he motored with his parents into the town, being re- ceived with every mark of cordiality by those who noticed his presence in the car. Lieut. Bowen, who was in charge of a machine-gun section, had been at the front only 3g days when he received the wound which has necessitated his taking a long rest. He, with a fellow officer, was reconnoitring the enemy's position in the region of Ypres at 1 a.m., when a shrapnel shell burst some distance above them, and he was struck by a bullet which penetrated his cap and found a billet in his forehead. He fell uncon- scious, and was carried by his comrade to the nearest trenches, where his wound was attended to. He was brought round, and later was conveyed to the base hopsital, and thence transported to Eng- land. Mr. Bowen, although showing evidence of suffering, is in the best of spirits, and is on the right road to recovery. Private Luther Jenkins, 3rd Welsh, wounded at Hill 60, writing from the Red Cross Hospital, Cleve- don, writes in terms of glowing praise of his treat- ment oat the hospital, which is a great change after terrible experiences in the battle area. What im- pressed him most at the front was the tremendous shelling to which the Germans subjected the British forces. The shells seemed to be coming from everywhere, thousands being fired in a single day. There was a, very large attendance at the Town Hall on Saturday evening, when the Siloam Baptist Chapel Choir performed the operetta, "The Chil- dren of Rokesby Hall." under the baton of Mr. John Reynolds, with great success. The Mayor presided. The performance was repeated on Wed- nesday evening. We hope to give a fuller report next week. The Capel Sul Choir attended the annual singing festival of the Congregational Churches of Kid- welly and District, held at Sardis, Trimsaran, on Sunday last. The choirs were conducted by Mr. Roderick Williams, Cardiff, and a very successful "gymanfa" has to be Recorded. The comfort of the visitors was well looked after by the local com- mittee, who provided refreshments free of charge. On Monday night, the death occurred at his home in Water-street, of Mr. Sidney Gibbard, who for some time was an attendant at the Joint Counties' Asylum, Carmarthen, from which he .•••-• s recently invalided home. Deceased was only 21 years of* age, and his death on the threshold of manhood is deeply deplored. On Wednesday in last week, a literary ani musi- cal meeting was held at Gwendraeth Independent Chapel, under the presidency of the Rev. w C. Jenkins, pastor. Aid. W. Wilkins cr nduetod the choir, which gave some splendid renJe-mgs. and Master Henry John Owens presided at the har- monium. Credit for the arrangements made is tine to Mr. T. J. Jones, the superintendent oc the Sunday School, and Mr. Wesley R> vnolds. secre- tary

GLAD TO BE DIVORCED

GLAD TO BE DIVORCED LAMPETER MAN'S DECLARATION. When served with a copy of his wife's petition for divorce, John Rogers Lewis, said to now reside at Lampeter, declared that he would be pleased to be divorced. In the Divorce Court on Tuesday, Mr. Justice ^Bargrave Deane "ranted his wife, wi e, Mary Lewis,' a decree nisi on the ground of his adultery. Petitioner said she was married on February 2nd 1901, and after residing at Bridgnorth, they went to live at Hafod, Cardiganshire, where she still resided. There were five children of the marriage still living. In 1909 petitioner's husband left her, saying he was going to see his mother. He had not returned or provided for her maintenance. She had since ascertained that he had been living with two women, named Agnes and Elizabeth Davies, both of whom came from Lampeter. She had re- ceived one letter from her husband, and in this he asked for some of his clothes. Although she was in Lampeter in 1913 and her husband was there, he did not call to see her. Jessie Bray, who keeps an apartment house at rixham. Devon, spoke to respondent and a woman iivinnr^ nt her house from Novembr. 1913. to the following August. The woman passed as his wife and in July gave birth to a male child. Mr: Roberts. an Aherystwith solicitor, called, and said the woman was not Mrs. Lewis. Frederick Richard Roberts, solicitor, of Abervst- twyth, gave evidence of the service of the divorce papers Respondent said he would be verv glad to be divorced from his wife. His Lordship granted a decree nisi, with costs. ♦

CIIYGWM

CIIYGWM MINISTERIAL.-Mr. E, R. Davies, of the Theologi- cal College Aberystwyth, has accepted a call from the Methodist Churches at Caerfarchell and Solva Pembrokeshire. Mr. Davies received his prepara- tory training at the Emlyn Grammar School and the Old College School. Carmarthen. He leaves college in June. and will probably take up his pastoral duties in August. Mr. Davies has been a diligent student, and there is every reason to believe that his efforts in the new sphere will be crowned with success.

ILLANSTEPHAN NOTES

I LLANSTEPHAN NOTES Among the candidates for ordination by the Bishop of London at St. Paul's Catll3 L 11 on Sun- day last was Mr. T. Edward Gwyn, son oi the late Mr. John Gwyn, Plas Uwrt Hir, and ?'rs. Wil- liams, Rose Cottage. Mr. Gwyn was educate 1 at the Carmarthen Grammar School and St. David s College, Lampeter, of which he is a graduate, leav- ing there at the early age of twenty-one. He was one of the brightest students of the college, attain- ing a first-class at every examination. He was the holder of the Williams" and "Phillips" Scholar- ships of J620 each during his residence. A keen student of the social conditions of the age, his ap- pointment to the curacy of St. Jude's, Bethnal Green, will be an invaluable experience for him in his efforts towards the uplifting of the teeming population among whom he has elected to start on his life's career. Major T. H. Dowdeswell, J.P., presided at the monthly meeting of the local Refugee Committee on Friday evening, 28th ult. Some correspondence was read respecting the tendency of the different churches to reduce their contributions towards the Refugees, it was felt that the local committee was powerless in the matter, and could only impress upon the subscribers the statements made in the recently issued circular by the Carmarthen Union Refugee Committee a reference to which was made in our irotes of the 21st ult. A request from a local chapel for information as to the amount in the Bank, the total weekly contributions, and weekly expenses was not complied with, but assurance was given that ultimately a full statement will be pub- lished, as the Committee did not deem it wise to publish the present position of the fund. It was agreed that no refugee be allowed to leave the Plas in search -of employment, unless it was definitely proved that he was going direct to a situation. A meeting of the Ladies' Executive Committee was also held the same evening. A further public meeting in connection with the conditions of the Ferry was held at the School on Friday evening, Mr. G. Barratt Evans, J.P., C.C., presiding. The deputation appointed to interview the owners presented their report, in which it was started they were very courteously received by Mr. Beckett, and favourably impressed by his state- ments as to the future working of the Ferry. It is his firm wish and intention to place a perfectly reliable and convenient service to meet all trains. Referring to the breakdown on Whit-Monday, he sincerely regretted the occurence, and under the circumstances he did the only thing possible in en- gaging all the fishing boats to convey the passen- gers back to Ferrvside. Being new to the business, this first drawback has put the management on their guard for similar crushes in future, and in- tending trippers may rest assured that a repetition will not take place. It is intended to carry on the Ferry on up-to-date business lin-tickets will be issued to passengers, uniform prices, and a time table issued; and, weather conditions permitting, no deviation will be made from it. Provision is made on the motor boats for life-belts, and ex- tinguishers on board, but both motor boats are perfectly free from any danger to the public. Another boat, but of a larger type, will soon be placed on the water, and every confidence can be placed in the owners to do all in their power to satisfy the public convenience as well as in their own interests; and, with a little co-operation, the service may once more be restored to the efficiency which could be expected under the difficulties In- separable from a tidal estuary. The deputation heartily thanked Mr. Beckett for the ready and courteous manner in which he responded to the appeal of the inhabitants in meeting assembled. The chairman, Major Dowdeswell, J.P.; Revs. J. John, Gwernogle Evans; T. Thomas, The Green; Messrs. J. Morris, chairman of the Parish Council; J. O. W. Bruce (late L.F.B.); Mr. James TKbmasi Phoenix House, were appointed to form a com- mittee to consider any further steps to be taken in the matter. It is with regret that the inhabitants of Llan- stephan and the postal district from Carmarthen down will learn of the definite retirement -of Mr. D. Morgan from the circuit. It was hoped & pro- longed rest would restore him to his usual health, to carry out once more his duties so cheerfully per! formed in the past; but it has now been decided that Mr. Morgan is to retire on a well-earned pen- sion owing to failing health. He has served thia district faithfully and honestly for twenty years; three years at Porthyrhyd, and three years at Car- marthen. We can only wish him a happy retire- ment and speedy restoration of health, and this is mingled with the regret of all classes that the long connection is severed at last. Perhaps somebody well versed in such matters will move in the direc- tion of giving an opportunity to the public of showing their esteem for so efficient and upright a public servant, in some tangible form. Many ex- pressions of this wish have already been heard. The adjourned vestry meeting was held on Mon. day evening, 31st ult., the Rev. J. Rowland Thomas, B.A., vicar, presiding. The accounts were presented and passed, as audited and found correct by Messrs. J. Morgan, Bristol House, and D. Evans, Myrtle Cottage, and, notwithstanding some extra expenditure, showed a balance in hand of over L6. The following sidesmen were ap- pointed Messrs. J. Morgan, Bristol House; Peter Bowen, Bryn Arlais; James Thomas, Phoenix House; W. Lewis, Bonvilie House; J. C. W. Bruce, Brynhyfryd, and D. Evans. Small mercies are thankfully received nowadays, and ratepayers will rejoice to know that for the six months ending September next, the old rate of 2s. lOd. in the £ will remain the same. The Rev. J. Rowland Thomas, B.A., has now taken up his residence as vicar of the parish, but owing to necessary extensive repairs, the Vicarage will not be ready for some time; but j;he parish and congregation once more receive the benefit of a resident clergyman to minister to their wants, and to have the various organisations of the church carefully guided, organised, and encouraged.

CARMARTHENSHIRE MAIN ROAbo

CARMARTHENSHIRE MAIN ROAbo. A meeting of the Carmarthen County Main Roads Committee was held at the County Offices Carmarthen, on Tuesday, Mr. W. J., Williams Brynamman, presiding. The Clerk (Mr. J. W. Nicholas) reported that the Board of Trade's award relating to the dispute be- tween the Council and the Tramways Co., Llan- elly, with regard to the repair of a road had been received, and it seemed to be satisfactory to the Council. It found that the Tramways Co. were in default in repair of the several matters with regard '7n io poun^ claimed. The costs amounted to lbs. 8d., which were to be paid in equal shares by the Council and the Company. A committee was given power to arrange for carrying out the repairs..

ABERGWILI

ABERGWILI COURT LEET. A court leet and view of frank- pledge for the manor and lordship of Abergwili was held at the Wheat Sheaf Inn, Abergwili, on Thurs- day, the 27th ult. Twelve jurors were sworn in of whom Mr. John Lloyd J.P., Penybank, was 'the foreman. The following were appointed Portreeves for the ensuing three years:-Dr. Pryce Jenkins, Messrs Tom Evans, Wenallt, and James Richards, Pongader. Mr. David Arthur, postmaster, was re- appointed Beadle for the coming three years. After the business had been transacted, the usual dinner followed, over which Mr. Jones, of Haverfordwest, presided. The usual loyal tolasts were watrmly honoured, and afterwards those of the Ecclesiastical Comimssmners. Felicitous speeches were made by Mr. J. Lloyd, J.P., Mr. Wm. Miles, Rev. P. J. Harries, Messrs. Wm. Williams, J.P., and D. Arthur, Beadle, and D. Jones, clerk to the Deputy Steward. An excellent hot dinner was served bv Miss Rees. The post-prandial proceedings were thoroughly enjoyed, especially the entertainment provided by Mr. William Miles.

Advertising

k H^ARCHER&C^ U ipaiiiRHsjl facsimile of One-Ounce Pa* t. Archer's Golden Returns The Perfection ot Pipe Tobacco. COOL. SWEET

ST CLEARS NOTES

ST. CLEARS NOTES Our young townsman, Mr. Stanley Phhiips, Belle Vie", has been home tor ik, hours leave, while his snipj- Catricla, has Leell coaim. on which he is serving as a steward. During -the past few weeLs the -t dtneia has been doing unry sboiiiewhero in the North Sea. watching out for German, craft, mainly of the submarine kmd. On ulv occasion they spied a submarine vvhica discharged, a torpedo at tne Patricia, but those oil board were not caught napping a o-inch gun was fired at the approaching torpedo, and to the great relief of all aooard, the snot toid, and presently there was a terrific explosion. Tho torpedo was stopped on its deadly course. No doubt that gunner was patted on the back for his marksmanship. ALI are pleased to see amongst us oncG more Mr. Tom Hughes, Croft Cottage. Some five months' ago, while at his work on the line near Port Talbot, he was overtaken by an express train, and wa« thrown over on to anqther line 13 feet below. r,h» he vv'!3 .found to have broken three ribs, his leg fractured m three places, and other minor injuries. So severe was the accident he wag v^iven up a9 past recovery when taken to 'hospital, allnJ^ L °areful he was, last Saurday, allowed to come home after 18 weeks in hospital :r tP} eSeT\ I18 13.'°nIy able to hobble about on two hilrSdM ,Silrry prospect o £ puUmg th™«h fW° festivals of the Sunday Sohool •m,! vvh°H °i ^Tn(iry w, re held at Clears f;, hitland on \V hit-Monday and Tuesday, and both proved a great success. At each festival the musical portion was under the command of Mr John Davies, Pendine; while the Rev W L Davies, vicar of Henllan-Amgoed, was the cate- WK>i ^relsh schools of the deanery meet at Whitland on June 9th to hold their festival The annual meeting of the shareholders of the GwS?' H ^arket Company, Ltd., was held in the -iv Hall on h riday last, Mr. Wm. Beynon iemperance Hotel, chairman of the directors/ pre! w»« tV address, the Chairman said there as a. diminution in the receipts from market tolls due to causes over which the directors exercise no control An agreement had been entered "into with ami Messra66/eSST^' 'in Ho^ Thomas and &S vJhLhfl L1,oyd and Thomas, Carmarthen, under Ste 3ehnt? C0rV0mtly are granted the sole rights of holding auction sales of stock on the market premises on market days for a further period of seven years from the 3rd July 1914 at> "T1"1' Th<> Drmrlm'r i the Purpose of repairs and LH hoardings for advertisements. No divi- cerd1t<5 to P°rtion of the profits ia cerdited to the dividend account, and to be naid to the shareholders, with any dividend that mav be declared at the annual meeting- for the year 1916 The director who retires is Mr M. W. Jenkins, who was finally re-appointed. The two auditors Mr H Lyons and Mr. Benjamin Salmon, were re-appointed T°te of,t|?anks for their services. The rec«™mend^ (and which was agreed tol iqtc the prapta ^allaed from April, 1914, to April, 1915, amounting to £ 55 13s. lO^d., together with vear^m P 4^d' brou&ht forward from last TV?hi account^ be appropriated as follows, viz — oredit of the dividend account, with distribution with dividend for 1916, £ 37 108 to the caedit of repair and contingency fund, £ 15; 16s ?d' £ 1°i and the balance, £ 22 lbs. 3d., carried forward. Mr. Wm. Beynon was unanimously appointed chairman. Messrs James Davies and Phillips, in coniunc- tion with Mr. Tom John, offered fof salc b?puW?a action at the Gwalia Hall, St. Clears, the follow. ing freehold properties:—Two pieces of meadow land, called Piiihin Pistyll and Morfa situate at I °™PS™ °L J»»n, was sold i James Stone Thomas, Glaspabt St, Clears, who also bought a moiety of a piece ot oTB^ Inh °alled ^enstoney, in the occupation of Benj. John, for £ 42. A moiety of a piece of meadow, called Park Martha, in the occupation ol ?f a fieId and strip of land called Patchin Enoch, in the ocoupation of David Walters, and a moiety of Colby Lodge-and garden at Backe were sold together for £ 60 to the same buyer, Mr. James Stone Thomas. The fully licensed house and premises called Rose and Crown g rStureet' Clears> in the occupation ot Air. lom John, were withdrawn at £ 100 The stores and rooms, part of the Rose and Crown Inn. m the occupatiom of Mr. Stephen Evans, were with- drawn at £ 30. The dwelling-house, garden and ST68' ,Crow| VllIa> together with larga stable and storehouse,! m the occupation of Mrs. Williams, were sold for J3100 to Air. John Phillips, Belle Vue. St. Clears. The dwelling-house and o-irden adjoining were sold for £ 45 to Mrs. Jones 3, Amnian-road, Brynamman. The dwelling-house Cr°Tn 0otta§'e, were with, avvn at £ 65. The newly-erected dweilin°--h0use and garden, known as Kieffe Park House, in High- Parl F l.l 8' and a adjoming called Kieffe t TikWOrfr. together lor the sum of £ 300 Davie9> Malt House, St. Clears Kieffe Cottage, in the occupation of Marv Aubrey" tfon of \n r? OUSe m H;=h-Stre«t, in the occupS Wls' irere s'old to Mr. George Brown Croft Cottage, St. Clears, for £ 90. A Srden WW St^ cL near ,River Ginnin^ adjoining wnart, St. Clears; a garden near Ginning Stores of ft wCUPaTrT1 ,°f Mr; Thomas, and a part tL ?n Heol»°yv bt- Clears, were withdrawn. •«i rfSsrcStter* Morgan Gr,ffitlu' s°d

PRACTICAL FAifiRIERY DEMONSTRATIONS

PRACTICAL FAifiRIERY_ DEMONSTRATIONS The end of last year, application was made to the Cardiganshire Education Committee by the New- castle-Emlyn and District Master Farriers and Smiths Lmon for a series of practical demonstra- fwLw- nreS 111 farriery' The Agricultural Organisation Committee, through ita courteous organiser, Mr. D. J. Morgan, B.Sc., granted a week's series, and on the recommendation of the 7p,Vn Vm0ti' t 1SSrV1Ces of Mr" W. Jones Anstey, 11 i Leeds, were engaged. Mr. Anstey is well-known as an authority on farriery, being a leoturer on the subject to the Leeds University as well as examiner under the R.S.S. He posses ea a thorough knowledge of his subject, and has the happy knack of being able to impart it to others. His explanation of the anatomical construction of the horse s foot and leg was most clear and interest- ing, and ought to prove highly beneficial to the farriers who attended the lectures. A most impor- tant point which was strongly emphasised by him was the necessity of frog-bearing-that is. that the horse., frog should not be pared or prevented from coming into contact with the ground. In its perfect state the frog should form an equilateral triangle, and soft and elastic like rubber. In support of his remarks, he likened the horse's foot to the human hand. No one, he argued, would dream of playing a. piano or operating a typewriter by putting the foroe of the manipulation upon the nails of the hand. Nature had designed the hand so that the pressure could be borne by the pads of the fingers, which are rubber-like. The uses of the frog were-to relieve the force of concussion, to prevent slipping to pre- vent contraction of the heel, and to promote the circulation of the blood through the foot. Eaoh day at 2 p.m. practical demonstrations were given at a forge and each evening a lecture at 7 p m. On Monday and Tuesday Mr. Anstey was at Llanarth, when Mr. Jenkin Davies, C.C., and Mr. R. E. Bowen CM., presided at the lectures. On Wednesday and Thursday he attended at Cardigan rnrMfr j-p"ac- H- Mathlas- may°r of Cardigan, pre- sided. The series concluded at Newcastlo-Emlyn on Friday and Saturday, Mr. W. Jeremy, C.C., presiding. On Saturday evening the members of the Union gave a dinner in honour of Mr. Anstey's visit, at the Cawdor Hotel, when Mr. Tom Lloyd provided an excellent menu Mr. Anstey, in reply to the toast "Our Guest," delivered an excellent address on co- operation, showing how it could be carried out and the benefits to be derived from it. It is to be hoped that next year the Cardiganshire Education Com- mitee, providing that the country will not be in a worse state than it is at present, will be able to grant a longer time for He lectures, and also that more farmers and horse owners will avail themselves of the opportunity of acquiring a good knowledge of the requirements of proper shoeing and care of the horse s foot. ■■ i

HUNTING APPOINTMENT

HUNTING APPOINTMENT. The Pembrokeshire and Carmarthenshire Otter Hounds will meet on Mondriy, June 7, at Whitland, and on Thursday, June 10, at GlMSWilly Bridge; each day at 10,30 a.m.

Family Notices

BIRTH. EV ANS.-May 29th, the wife of the Rev. D. J Evans, B.A., Bron Dewi, Lampeter, of a daughter. Printed and Published for the Proprietor* bv Lewi. Gluts at the Carmarthen Journal" Worka, S, King Street, CarauHkm.