Collection Title: Carmarthen journal and South Wales weekly advertiser

edition: First Edition

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 8 of 8
Full Screen
15 articles on this page
THE WAR

THE WAR. Friday. FIERCE BULGARIAN ATTACK. The Bulgarians are making a desperate attempt to breais. the Franco-British front in Maoedoma To the west of Lake Doiran, on the Greco-berbian frontier, they attacked tne British troops on Tuesday last, and succeeded in driving them out of their position*. On Wednesday our forces repulsed all attacks, but in order to conform with the generaJ alignment had again to withdraw, ine Bulgarian make large claims. They say that they are P™ the French on both sides of the Vardar, that y have occupied Demir Kapu station, they annihilated with the bayonet one French battalion. An unofficial Salonika, telegram carries the fighting on the British front to yesterday morning, when the Bulgarians seemed determined to breilk the British lines which, however, were strongly held. Cta the Albanian border King Ferdinand's troops hnvp entered Ochrida. In Mesopotamia the Turks are evidently trym2 ° turn the British positions at Kut-el-Amara, i:or t report that their advanced columns have rcached a place twenty-five miles of that town. Russian forces have won a considerable success near Hamadan, one of the centres of German in- th. BritiA in France reports aerial reconnaissances and artillery G^^Tchancellor delivered his lo^'aJaj^ speech in the Reichstag yesterday. He stated that Germany had enough provisions if they are properly distributed," and described the reports that Germany was sending missions to various places to make peace as legends." r„i Apart from sympathetic references to the painiul position of Greece, the rest of the speech was a glorification of German arms and German methods in the occupied territories. Saturday. GERMAN CHANCELLOR ON PEACE. The German Chancellor made his reply to the Socialist interpellation on peace in the Reichstag. He stated that the Allies had made no peace pro- posals to Germany, that before he could speak of peace he must first see the conditions of the enemy, and that the attitude of the hostile Governments was "completely decifive." After contending, that tne German wastage in men was smaller than that of the French, he went on to say that if the Allies came to Germany with proposals assuring the safety of Ger- many they were ready to discuss them. He refused to enter into any details concerning his country's aims in the war. Herr Scheidemann, in moving the Socialist interpellation, stated that his party wished that the first decisive step towards ending the war should emanate from Germany. The Socialists generally appeared to insist on the retention of Alsace-Lorraine. Herr Liebknecht again entered protests against the Chancellor's assertions and those of his supporters. It is estimated unofficially that four divisions of Bulgarians are attacking the Franco-British troops in Macedonia. The Allies continue to withdraw in good order. According to Berlin the Bulgarians captured ten British guns to the south of Strumitza. It is reported that an Italian Army has crossed the Adriatic and landed at Valona. A petition, with over ten thousand signatures, has been presented to the President of the Hungarian Chamber asking for a separate peace. The pro- moters of the economic union between Germany and Austria-Hungary appear to be anxious to settle the negotiations before the opening of peace discussions. More outrages are reported from the united States. Mpnday. SALONIKA TO BE HELD. The Allies have decided to maintain their hold on Salonika. It is reported from various sources that an agreement has been reached between Greece and the Entente. The Morning Post Athens correspondent sends an account of the unceasing efforts that pro-German Court circles have been making to hamper in every way the movements ol General Sarrail's forces. The Anglo-French troops continue to make an orderly retreat in Macedonia. The retirement of the British forces from Lake Doiran to a position further west was greatly helped by the gallantry of the 10th Division, which included several Irish regiments. Eight guns had to be abandoned, and our casualties amounted to 1,500 men. The enemy bulletins give highly coloured accounts of the Bulgarian pursuit and of the demoralisation of the Entente forces. The Athenian newspapers in touch with German circles report that out of consideration to Greek susceptibilities Bulgarian troops will not cross the frontier in pursuit of the Allies, and that their place alongside of the Germanic armies will be taken by three Turkish divisions. In the Black Sea Russian destroyers have sunk two Turkish gunboats. President Wilson has sent a strongly-worded Note to Austria with reference to the sinking of the Anoona," demanding the disavowal of the outrage by the Government and the punishment of the com- mander of the submarine. The State Department has asked the Allied Em bassies for a safe-conduct for Captains Boy-Ed and Papen. General Castelnau has been appointed Chief of Staff to General Joffre. Tuesday. STRUGGLING ON THE FRONTIER The Greek military authorities in Salonika are beginning to carry out the various measures de- manded by the Allies. King Constantine, it is said, has given personal guarantees which are regarded as satisfactory. Diplomatic circles in Athens dis- credit the statement circulated by the Germans to the effect that Bulgarians will not pursue the Entente troops into Greek territory. Doiran and Ghevgeli on the Greek frontier have now been entered by the Bulgarian General Todo- row's forces. According to the Germans two Eng- lish divisions were wiped out in the recent battles on this front. The Turks, after prolonged artillery preparation, made unsuccessful assaults on General Townshend s positions at Kut-el-Amara in Mesopotamia. Rein- forcements far the British troops are beng pushed forward. The Belgian Government's powder works near Havre have been blown up. 110 persons have been killed and over 1,000 injured. Washington is discussing the possibility of a rup- ture of diplomatic relations between Austria-Hun- gary and the United States over President Wil- son's Ancona Note. Wednesday. COMING BATTLE ON THE WEST FRONT. The Greek troops on the Allies' line of opera- tions have been removed eastwards, so as not to interfere with the operations. All Greek ships and L cargoes held up in -the Entente ports have been released. Meanwhile, the Greeks are seriously concerned at the chances of an invasion of their soil by the Bulgarians, the hereditary enemy," as King Constantine recently called them. Accord- i ing to the Paris Tejpps" General Todorow's forces have actually crossed the border. The Turks have "no news" to report from Mesopotamia. The British vessels on the Tigris which they destroyed turn out to have been three lighters and a tugboat. The Morning Post" Special Correspondent at the British Headquarters deals with the rumours about a coming German move in the West, and draws attention to the secrecy with which the enemy are developing their intentions. Owing to the sh" cage or unequal distribution of foodstuffs in the Fatherland, discontent is gTowing, and there aje signs of the revival of a class war. Herr Liebknecht put certain questions in the Reichstag with reference to peace and the food supply, and received very little satisfaction in the repliesL There has been a vigorous artillery duel east and north-east of Ypree. Mr. Schroder, the editor of the "Telegraaf," has been acquitted of a charge of baying endan- gered Dutch neutrality by his articles. J Thursday. Sir John French has resigned his command on the Western front, and has been created a Vis- count. He is succeeded by Sir Douglas Haig.

WAR JOTTlIGS

WAR JOTTlIGS The boys of the 4th Welsh and Royal Engineers are still having plenty of work at Gallipoli judging from letters to hand from that inhospitable place. Nurse Nance Isaac, ot Bankyfelin (daughter of Mrs. Isaac, Carmarthen Cafe, Swansea), sailed for Serbia recently. Prior to her departure, she acted as nursing sister at Swansea Hospital. The Whitland Great Western Railway employees have voted the sum of E14 from their war fund to provide a warm winter garment to each of the 33 Whitland men serving at the front. Mr. D. LI. Jenkins, Railway-terrace, Henllan, has joined the Laboratory Section of the R.A.M.C. Mr. Jenkins was a student at the Carmarthen Training College. Staff-Sergt. D. Jones, Waundesrwen, Henllan, writing home from somewhere in France, says he is quite contented and happy. His father has also commenced work at a Munitions Works. A room has been opened at Burry Port to be used by a Labour Exchange official to register the names of women who are prepared to take up positions as munition workers. Mr. C. H. Mounsey, late county surveyor for Carmarthenshire, who emigrated to Canada, has joined the Canadian forces, and hopes shortly to visit this country before going to the fighting line. We hear that the second son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Richards. Long Acre, Carmarthen, has now ob- tained a commission. His brother Stanley re- ceived his some time back. Another of the Caio boys have joined the Colours, viz., Mr. Dan Evans, Maesglas, who left on Tuesday to join the 22nd fompanv Rnyal Welsh Fusiliers, stationed at Wrexham. Good luck, old boy! The Salvation Army friends at Carmarthen are anxious that it should be known that at their "Citadel" they have excellent accommodation for soldiers to rest and write and read. Soldiers are very welcome to make free use of it. News has been received of the arrival of the 15th Welsh (.the Carmarthenshires) somewhere in France." All the men are in fine fettle. In a cheery letter one of the officers says:—"We are in the pink of condition, and expect to be in the firing line shortly. The men are anxious to get to close quarters with the enemy, and may be de- pended upon to do their duty like brave soldiers." Lieut. Frank Smith and Sergt. W. Hughes, of the Royal Field Artillery, were home during the week-end on their last furlough, prior to proceed- ing on active service. Both were formerly on the reporting staff of the CABMABTHEN JOUKNAL. Lieut. Smith is a son of Mr. Thomas Smith, Priory- street, Carmarthen, and Sergt. Hughes is a Llan- llwni boy. Both looked very fit, and -on Tuesday morning returned to rejoin their regiments with the best wishes of their numerous friends. Several ladies and gentlemen have very kindly sent us subscriptions towards the cost of sending the CARMARTHEN JOURNAL weekly to soldiers at the Front. The small sum of 3s. 3d. pays for the dis- patch of the JOURNAL to a soldier anywhere abroad for six months, and we shall be glad if there are any others of our readers who would care to make this very acceptable present to our boys in the fighting line. We may say that already we send a number of copies at our own expense. Mrs. Mary Ann Harries, living at Incline-row, Dafen, Llanellv. met with fatal injuries on Mon- day night when seeing her son, Private David John Harries, of the 3i4th Welsh Regiment, off from Llanelly Station. When the train started rhe fell between the platform and the carriages. The train was immediately stopped, and Mrs. Harries liberated and taken to the hospital, but she died on admission. The following is an acknowledgment from a Carmarthen man at the FrontI am in re- ceipt of your great kindness for sending me the JOURNAL, for which I thank you. Please convey my sincere thanks to Mervyn Peel, Esq., for his great kindness, as I very much appreciate such a favour. I am glad to inform you that I am quite well, and sincerely hope you are the same.—With kindest regards and wishes, yours very faithfully, Charles Thomas." We have to acknowledge with gratitude the re- ceipt of the folowing sums collected in JOURNAL boxes towards the purchase of smokes for our soldiers:—Wine and Spirit Vaults, King-street. Carmarthen, Nov. 13th, JE1; Dec. 14th, £1 7s. 6d. Each of these sums have purchased parcels for the Carmarthen boys at the Dardanelles. We are also glad to acknowledge the receipt of 21 5s. 6d. from Miss Joyce Evans. Cresseliv Arms, King-street, Carmarthen. We hope this splendid record will be imitated in other places where collecting boxes have been placed. Pte. T. James, Queen's Royal ""est Surrey Regi- ment, attached to the 53rd Welsh Division, son of Mr. and Mrs. James, Brondawe, Nantgaredig, has been home on sick furlough, prior to rejoining hip- regiment. Pte. James contracted a severe attack of dysentry at the Dardanelles, and for the past three months was a patient at the Canadian Red Cross Hospital, Taplow. Bucks. He looked exceedingly well, and his many friends wish him the best of luck and a safe return from the trenches. The many friends of Mr. T. R. Griffiths will be glad to hear that he has been promoted to the rank .of sergeant in the C Squadron of the Pembroke- shire Yeomanry. Sergt. Griffiths is a highly respected young man, and is to be heartily con- gratulated upon his well-deserved promotion. He is the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Griffiths, London House .Llansadwrn, whose daughter. Miss K. Gri- ffiths, also is busily assisting in nursing the woun- ded at the Red Cross Hospital,' Llandovery. The report that Captain R. L. Thomas (Whitland). medical o cer to the 1/lst Welsh Horse at the Dardanelles has been wounded is contradicted. The captain, however, is in hospital at Alexandria suffer- ing from a severe attack of enteric, contrasted at Gallipoli. His stepson, Lieutenant J. G. Hutchinson. of the same regiment, is also in hospital suffering from enteric. News has been received in Carmarthen this week of the death of Private Myrddlin Phillips, of the 8th Battalion Royal West Kents Regiment. He was wounded on September 26th, and died of his wounds on October 6th. He enlisted at the out- break of war. but had only been out in France since the end of August. He WAS the second son of Mr. and Mrs. Phillips, 10, High-street, Aber- gwynfi, and grandson of Mrs. Phillips. grocer, 56, Water-street. Carmarthen, with whom the deepest sympathy is felt. Among those recently invalided home was Corpl. J. W. Davies, who was at one time on the staff of the National Provincial Bank at Carmarthen. He joined the 4th Welsh, and was shot through the knee. After having been in hospital at Birming- ham for over two months, he was discharged. There was an interesting reremony at the mili- tary depot. Cardiff, last week, when Sergt. Long- den, D.C.M.. of the 2nd Welsh (who is now en- gaged at the recruiting office at Carmarthen), was presented with the medal of the Order of St. George (First Class), which was awarded to him by the Tzar of Russia for gallantry on the field of battle. The medal is a gold piece containing the name of the recipient and a. Russian inscription, and in addition to its being a highly coveted honour, is a beautiful decoration. Pte. Pullen, also of the 2nd Welsh, was presented with a medal of the Order of St. George (fourth class). awarded to him by the Tzar for gallantry. The presenta- tions took place in the presence of a large gather- ing of wounded and invalided soldiers. Pte. David Daviea, of the Australian Contingent, now at Carmarthen on leave, is the son of the late Rev. Edward Davies, of Priory-street. He left Carmarthen 13 years ago on the 8.8. Merthyr, and afterwards emigrated to Australia. He has been wounded, but looks well. The following verses were composed by soldiers at Carmarthen:— Once I was as happy as the dickies in the trees, That was, when I wore a "civi" suit, and I was quite at ease. I used to sit for hours in my favourite little pub, And have my pint of beer, which is as good as grub"; But now I've joined the army, well, it fairly gets my goat, And makes me think, OH!" what a fool I was When I donned this "KHAKI COAT. But now I've joined the colours, Boys, It seems to me a sign That Britain's going to the dogs, When the pubs are olosed at nine. But never mind my beer, boys, The same old things applied, Its Tommy here not There" when the troop- ship's on the tide, And when I'm in the trenches, Stuck tight within the line, What will yon" say when I down tools, And say, It's just gone NINE." And why should I wh-o've done my bit, And still am doing right, Be turned out from my favourite pub By NINE o'clock at night. Carmarthen, 26/11/15. TOMMY ATKINS. Trooper W. C. LEWIS. Trooper LL. JONES. Trooper W. Cooper Lewis, Welsh Horse, news of whose death in action at the Dardanelles on November 20th, was received at Carmarthen by his brother (Mr. T. Hodge Lewis, 66, Lammas-street) on Thursday in last week. Deceased, who leaves a widow and two little children, lived in St. Catherine Street, Carmar- then, and prior to enlisting on the day when Eng- land declared war, worked as a stoker a tthe Carmar- then Gasworks. He served throughout the South African War with the Welsh Service Company, and was awarded a medal with five clasps. Trooper Lewis was an all-round athlete, and was a promi- nent member of the old Carmarthen Football Club. He will be remembered as being responsible for a plucky act on the occasion of the fire at the Towy Sawmills a few years ago, when, at great risk to himself, he rushed through the flames and turned off the valves of the boiler, and thus averted an explosion which might have had very serious conse- quences. He was a brother of Detective-Sergt. H. Hodge Lewis, Llanelly, and the youngest son of the late Mr. William Lewis, cattle dealer, Sunny- side. Carmarthen. Trooper Llewelyn Jones, 1st Welsh Horse, killed in action at the Dardanelles on November 20th, 1915. He was the son of Mrs. Jones, Llainwen, Llangeler.

Advertising

When you are sending your next parcel to the boy in the fighting line, don't forget to put 1n a box of Eli Mari'r Wern Useful for Sore Feet, Blisters, Insect Bites, and all Skin Disorders. Possessing wonderful Healing Cooling, Soothing, and Antiseptic Properties. Read what a C.C. sayt of it: I have used ELI MARI'R WERN for many purposes. It is positively the most healing Oint- ment I have ever used for the house and the farm. I keep a box handy for each place. I had some Cows with sore teats that gave us a lot of bother to milk. One application only made them better. You can publish this because I think it is my duty to let the public know what good resultii I have derived from it. Sold in Jars, 6d. and 1/- each, to be obtained at the Manufacturing Depot-T. DAVIES, Chemist, Guildhall Square, CARMARTHEN. Agent for Lla.n- ellv JOHN DAVIES, Pharmaceutical Chemist, Step- ner Street. Llanel!

VELINDRE

VELINDRE FUNERAL OF MRS. LEWIS. Brondeg Mills.—The funeral of Mrs. Lydia Lewis. Brondeg Mills, took place on Saturday, the interment being at Saron burial ground. The following ministers officiated: -Revs. W. Davies. Rehoboth.; T. Davies, Drefach; E. S. Davies, Capel Drindod; J\ Hughes, Closy- graig; J. Symlog Morgan, Newcastle-Emlyh; Morgan Jones, Whitland; J. G. Owen, &oar; and Tom Davies, St. Clears. At the gravesidle the members of the Bargoed Teifi Party rendered Y Delyn Aur," led by Mr. D. Jenkins, C.M., Velin- dre. At the, chapel a very large number of letters from various ministerg and friends were read. The chief mourners were: Mr. Daniel Lewis (husband); Mrs. Jones. Dolwyon Mills (daughter); Mr. John Lewis. Wimbledon (son); Misses Lvdia and Agnes Lewis (daughters) ;Mr. David Lewis Lewis (son); Mr. John Lewis. J.P.. Meiros Hall, and Mr. David Lewis, Cambrian Mills (brothers-in-law); and a large number of other relatives. The coffin was covered with numerous beautiful floiral tiributes. The funeral was one of the largest seen in the dis- trict, there being present representatives of all classes. At Drefach on Sunday evening, a funeral sermon was preached by the Rev. T. Davies. FUNERAL OF MR. D. JONES. Gaitref.—On Wednes- day, at Henllan, the mortal remains of the late Mr. David Jones, Goitref, were interred. The officiating clergy were the Revs. D. Jenkins, Pen- bovr: Canon Jones, Lampeter; and E. J. Davies, B.A.. Henllan. The chief mourners were: Mr. and Mrs. Davies. Glyn-neath (brother-in-law and sister); ylr. and Mrs. William Hindes, Velindre (brother-in-law and sister); Misses Maggie Jones, Zillah Jones, and Edith Jones (sisters); Mr. John Jones (brother). A beautiful wreath was placed on his grave by his friends from St. Barnabas Sunday School. ST. CLEARS. As joint organising secretaries of the Red Cross Sate, held at St. Clears, which represents St. Clears, Pendine. and the neighbouring districts, we desire to express our warmest gratitude to the very many kind friends who so generously contri- buted towards the excellent results achieved, to all who helped, including the auctioneers, canvassers, flag sellers, ladies engaged at the tea stalls; Mr. E.' John and Mrs. Ellis, Frondeg. who managed the war trophy exhibition: to the promoters of the concert, the artistes, and to all others who may have assisted in any other way.—S. G. A. Jones (Llanmiloe. Pendine). and Arabella Harries.

HUNTING APPOINTMENTS

HUNTING APPOINTMENTS. The Carmarthenshire Foxhounds will meet on Tuesday, Dec. 21st, at Cwmfelin Mynach, and on Friday, Dec. 24th. at Plough and Harrow; each da.v at 10.45 a.m. The Neuaddfawr Foxhounds will meet on Mon- day, Dec. 20th. at Esgwdawe, and on Thursday. Dec. 23rd. at Castel Howel; each day at 10.30 a.m. -e-

LLANYBYTHER

LLANYBYTHER. XMAS SHOW.—A meeting was held in connec- tion with our annual Christmas Show, under the presidency of Mr. J. Lewis, Pantsaeru. Mr. W. M. Davies, London City and Midland Bank, was unanimously elected hon. treasurer; also Mr. J. Jones, Cloth Hall, was re-elected hon. secretary, but Mr. Jones declined the honour unlese he had a co-partner, and it was decided that Mr. G. T. Davies, Febrica, would co-operate with Mr. Jonee.

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. J.G.B.-Thank you very much for your kind ap- preciation. We are glad to have given you some pleasure. We quite agree with you as to what you say about the success of our paper in the Llan- dovery district, and the work of our esteemed repre- sentative there.

MY PEOPLE

MY PEOPLE." [To the Editor of the CARMAHTIIBN JOUILNAL.) Sir, My People," the book recently published by Mr. David Caradoo Evans, appears to have created quite a sensation, echoes of wliioh have from time to time resounded in the JOURNAL. The studies of Welsh life here presented certainly merit sympathetic consideration from all those who love their country, and not unreasoning opposition. Now, what does Mr. Evans seek to do in his book? With real piercing insight he discerns certain ten- dencies in Welsh life which he judges will be pro- ductive of evil results, and He has painted a picture of these tendencies in the hope that effective measures will be initiated to check their growth. Others may not be able to discorn them, but they exist nevertheless; blindness of vision does not prove their non-existence, any more than does the fact that the majority of people prefer a barrel organ to a sonata of Beethoven prove that there is no such thing as music. Mr. Evans knows the virtues of his countrymen, and no one, I am t'ure, is prouder of them, and it is perfectly certain that he would not have published his studies had he not been pro- foundly convinced of their truth. It can give him no pleasure to write unpleasant things about his country- men, but truth and honesty demands it. The picture is drawn not by an enemy, or an alien, but by a patriotic Welshman—a moral indignation over- powers him at what he sees and experiences and he cannot hold his peace. Unfortunately, it has been the custom now for some considerable time to extol and praise the virtues of Wales. They have so frequently been the subject of eulogistic Buttering remarks on the plat- form and in the press that the unpleasant side of Welsh life has been forced into the background and overlooked. So much so has this been done that now, when attention is called to it, it is impossible to recognize it. The unfortunate habit accounts for the opposition which Mr. Evans is now receiving from those who are suffering from self-inflicted blindness. Still this does not alter the truth of his arraignment, neither is it a sound reason for deny- ing to him the title of patriot, nor for questioning the reality of his prophetic insight. Demosthenes, the great Athenian patriot, sketched (in De Corona) the ideal of a single-hearted patriot and statesman in the following words:—"to dis- cern events in their beginnings, to be before hand in the detection of movements and tendencies, and to forewarn his countrymen accordingly; to fight against political vices, from which no state is free, of procrastination, of supineness, of ignorance, and party jealousy; to impress upon all the paramount importance of unity and friendly feeling, and the duty of providing promptly for the country's need." Judged by this ideal Mr. Evans has every claim to be a patriot of the highest order. Again, the mere fact that he does not speak com- fortably and utter pleasant and flattering platitudes does not rob him of the title. Would anyone have the temerity to assert that the Prophets of Israel spoke only comfortably to Zion? And yet, were they not the grandest of patriots? But like the real patriots in all ages, they were blindly opposed by the mass of their countrymen. The author of "fy People" has warned Wales of its peril; he has graphically portrayed certain evil tendencies, and Welshmen owe him a lasting debt of gratitude. He makes his appeal to the convictions and patriotic sentiments of Welshmen, but I fear he is only meeting with the fate of the true prophets of all ages. What I would plead for is a calm, sympathetic, and unbiassed investigation of the indictment in this outspoken book—an investigation conducted under the seeptre of truth in an atmosphere unpolluted by party spirit, sectarian zeal and political mania.— Yours truly, OXONIENSIB.

AN APPEAL

AN APPEAL. [To the Editor of the CARMABTHEN JOURNAL.] ^ii", Permit me to appeal to generous friends in Carmarthen and district not to iorget altogether local claims for a little kindness at this season. I know they are doing nobly for our brave soldiers in various centres on the Continent, and those pre- paring to go forth; and for those who already have done their little bit and have returned wounded and I would not diminish an iota their interest and sympathy in this direction, but let not the poor who are always with us" be altogether left out in the cold. There are the inmates of our workhouse- most of them old, infirm, and far on the weary journey of life, and the children in our Cottage Home who will be delighted to see a few luxuries- 15weets, pictorials, toys, &c., to cheer tuem at Christ- mas: our Infirmary patients, too. There is also a sanatorium at Alltymynydd with 82 patients, most of them young manhood, in the grip of the fell disease, in their lonely situation, who will be greatly cheered by a little thoughtfulness. It was my plea- sure to spend last Sunday week in their midst, con- ducting a service for them in the morning, and a Bible class in the afternoon, and chatting with them individually on Monday; and I think I never spent so happy a time all my life. They are well cared for and attended to by Dr. Patterson, one of the most skilful and efficient tuberculosis physicians in the country; and Miss Mount, the experienced matron, and a patient and courteous staff. All that can be done is being done to grapple with the disease, and many are the signs of hopefulness. Marvellous is the air of cheerfulness and content which pervades the establishment, and many are the letters which reach the doctor thanking him for benefits received by patients, and assurances of com- plete recovery. All I ask is a kindly remembrance of these old interests, but no diminution of benevo- lent consecration to the new, which, God' grant, may soon pass away, with the echoes of the angel=' song, Peace on earth and goodwill towards men." FULLER MILLS.

PATRIOTISM OF PENCADER

PATRIOTISM OF PENCADER." [To the Editor of the CARMARTHEN JOURNAL.] ^i1'. Ihe truth of certain notes which appeared recently in the JOURNAL has been called in question by "Pencaderian." In the first letter which appeared on November 12th. the writer (at that time hiding behind a noin- de-plume) says, The recent attacks on the Patriot- ism of Pencader are absolutely untrue," &c.. &c. Will "Pencaderian" kindly quote the parts which are untrue, or if she insinuates that the whole is untrue, say so definitely. It is no use losing sight of facts, and indulging in sarcasm, but if there is any untruth, prove it. and an apology will be forthcoming. If not wait and see." Let. me again draw "Pencaderian's" attention to the notes which refer to the action of a certain section at Pencader." Is this not perfectly clear. The facts are:—A sewing class has existed since the early days of the war. (The composition and the circumstances under which it wa", formed are well known locally.) This class has done noble work, which has been acknowledged in the JOURNAL en various occasions, but was not under the management of the responsible (sic) persons at Pencader. This was the great fault, and it was decided to set up another class in its stead. in which these persons could hold the reins." Pencaderian was a member of the old class. I believe, and knew the "routine" of the class. She is now secretary for the new love." Perhaps she will tell us the reason for the change. The old class was ignored in the new arrangement, and no attempt has been made to defend this action, although there are a few who know the reason for the change. "Pencaderian" enumerates rather vasruely what has.been done at Pencader since the beginning of the war (this has not been in dispute1, and admits that these things have appeared in the JOURNAL, thus contradicting her own suggestion of unfairness on the part of the correspondent. The reference in the letter to gentlemen, com- parative strangers" (she calls them "things" in last, week's letter) deserves an explanation. F plead guilty to being implicated in the arrange- ments for war entertainments." (These were in 7 bhe nature of a welcome to soldiers home on fur- lough.) These were carried out under the auspices of the old sewing class, who, according to Pen- caderian," were not responsible" (sic) persons. I was INVITED to take part in these arrangements. I also plead "guilty" to taking part in the re- oruiting meeting. ("Pencaderian" took part in the procession in connection with the rally, so cannot plead ignorance in these things.) I also did my best to state the position in connection with the European crisis at the meeting. (This was organised by the Parish Council and local recruiting agentJ I know I am of military age, and have been attested, thus showing my readiness to take my turn, even in the firing line if required. Can the "responsible persons referred to by Pencaderian say the same'/ Again, i^ffeaying that their very entertainments were but known to a few," "Pencaderian" might account for the crowded meetings (" war entertain- ments") which resulted in presentations to Private Tom Evans and Lance-corporal Jack Evans. I had the honour of acting as secretary for these war entertainments," and also for the concert, to help the funds of tne sewing class, which did not get the support it deserved. Tnis may account for Pen- caderian's reference to the gentlemen, compara- tive strangers." I may also add, though not for the purpose of advertisement, that I have acted as secre- tary for the Pencader Mixed Choir, which held two concerts, as a resuit of which j320 was forwarded to the Welsh Hospital. I have taken a keen interest in the social life of this district for over ten years, and acted on the show committee, &c.. so that I also can reputiate Penoeaderian' s" remarks regarding "comparative strangers." No, "Pencaderian." if you examine the position calmly, you will find that the inaccuracies (I won't call them by another name) are not to the credit of-yourll, &c., Llanfihangel-ar-arth. GEO. H. THOMAS.

IINTERESTING MILK CASES AND MILK STANDARD I

INTERESTING MILK CASES AND MILK STANDARD. [To the Editor of the CARMARTHEN JOURNAL.] Sir,—In your last week's issue a report appeared in which a respectable Llangadock farmer was fined £ 2 at Ammanford for an alleged 7 per cent, added water. The farmer at Darlington for selling milk with an alleged 11.53 per "cent, added water was dis- charged though it contained 4.53 more water than the case at Ammanford. Other cases may be stated as well. Four dairymen were summoned at Dover recently in respect of milk deficient in fat to tne extent respectively of 17.6, 16.9, 15.7, and 18.9 per cent. The bench accepted the evidence that the milk had not been tampered with and dismissed all the four cases. We are quite confident that the evidence given by the Llangadock farmer was quite as reliable ae those farmers of Dover and Darlington. The reports of the Agricultural Colleges are in perfect accordance with his statement. There is a general feeling that some action is badly needed to correct tae anomalies of the decisions arrived at by benches of magistrates. We all wish to see the law put on such a footing that wilful tampering shall be put a stop to, while the farmer who produces a fair article, which ie, however liable, from certain causes—explainable or unexplainable- to fall below man-made limits, should be protected and not to be put in a position of a criminal for no fault of his own. Pure and genuine milk is often below the pre- sumptive standard. We quote the highest authority on this matter. At the Royal Agricultural Society held last June at Nottingham samples of miik were taken during the period of three weeks between June 4 and June 25, and in no case was a competitor aware when his milk would be sampled. We find the following astounding report by the society:—" Judging by the presumptive standard, the milk of not fewer than 44 herds out of 98 was liable to come under suspicion of being adulterated." A Peer of the Realm sent three of his best cows to a show the milk of two was found below the standard, and, if sold, would be liable to be prosecuted. Experiments conducted at the Agricultural College of Newcastle:— The cows were fed on pasture and supplied with 21bs. of soya bean cake and 21b. of cotton cake each day. The percentage of fat varied from 2.7 to 3.9. Twelve tirnes in six weeks the producer would have run the risk of prosecution if the milk had been sold and sampled." The University College at Reading in their bulletin state that in seme butter fat tests 16 samples were under 3 per cent., the variation being from 2 per cent. to 3.90 per cent. The number of milk stock in the L nited Kingdom has during the past year decreased by over 100,000 head. No wonder therefore that the price of butter and milk have so greatly advanced. The price of milk last week in the large towns was from 17 to 21 pence per imperial gallon wholesale and even at this price supplies were very short, notle being available for platform sale on several days. A large number of farmers are giving up milk- producing on account of the wild and reckless charges brought against them, and when matters I are brought before the courts, in many instances scarcely any regard is paid 10 the evidence brought forward in their defence, as it is taken for granted they are guilty, when they have no more control over the matter complained of than they have over the condition of the weather, which statement is clearly proved by the reports of the agricultural colleges. When the analyst state-s added water," it should be taken that the milk is poor in quality, but it is not a proof that the water wa.s added to the milk by the farmer or by the cow herself. Cows do very much and are often found to give 14 per Cent. added water." It is common to find cows giving milk Below the limit in non-fatty solids, and the analyst in reporting upon such cases generally states that this indicates" added water." Such statement is often misleading and carries with it the impression that the farmer is at fau:t, and not the cow. Is the analyst justified in his report to state so much per cent. added water" on pure presumption when it has been proved in hundreds of cases, over and over again, that not a drop of water has been added to the milk by the farmer or the seller? The milk may certainly be poor in quality: wny not state the simple and sure fact, that it is deficient in non-fattv solids so much per cent. w: 'thotit casting a baseless slur and stigma on the character of the dealers thereof by the words added water which cohvev to the general public 'hat the milk has been tam- pered with. It is of the highest degree detrimental to the interest of the nation that the supply of milk should be curtailed and the price 'o increased as to bring it less within the reach c.f +he poor classes. We are of the same mind that the circumstances attending milk production are quite dissimilar to those of any other food, and at present the cowkeeper is made to suffer for the errors of the cows. We further agree that special courts should be held, presided over by judges who have made a special study of the difficulties of miik production; by this means uniformity of treatment would be assured to the producer. Llangadock. W. LEWIS.

THE DEVILS CONSCRIPTION

THE DEVIL'S CONSCRIPTION. [To the Editor of the CARMARTHEN JOURNAL.] —May I through the columns of your JOURNAL give expression to what, -In my opinion, can be fitly termed "The Devil's Ocn'-cription." I am referring to the enlistment under the Group System at Newcastle-Emlyn last Thursday, December 9. and to those young men who. to my knowledge, were almost driven on a few hours' notice to enlist blindfolded, as it were. My heart bleeds for these, who were led to do that which they never dreamt ù: doing. I know of a good number from the district of East Cilrhedyn who went to be attested, not with the least intention to enlist, but in order to have a right of appeal to the recruiting tribunals. I am willing to grant that Lord Derby's scheme is fair enough, but. I am positive that the method employed in carrying it out in this district was very unfair. I do not condemn the recruiting agents. No, I believe most of them did their work conscientiously. but very few, if,any, of them knew what they were about. May I ask why should there be two opinions as to what the young men ought to do? Why were those who signed their names advised to do so. while others who did not sign their names were advised to be attested only and then run home? It L& here the mischief oomes in. This is nothing else than the blind leading the blind. I have nothing against any young man doing all in his power to assist the country in this hour of trial aud peril; in fact, I have done my very best to encourage every young man the district can spare to enlist. But I am filled with holy indignation when I find false measures taken to secure the suoceas even of Lord Derby's scheme. I cannot say what will be the harvest that our country will reap from this scheme; but I know this much, that it has suc- ceeded in having from our district a good number of slaves, but not a single young man. Now where will this dirty work land us at East Cilrhedyn? It will deprive us of our industrious farm workers— tnoee who are most indispensable to our country in this grave crisis. It is to be hoped that the Board of Agriculture will see to these things and protect those who can serve the country better by remaining at home than by joining the forces. Shall I ask, Would it not be more to the credit of our Government to adopt conscription pure and simple than to adopt methods which I consider to be the Devil s Consoription? I pity the man who adopts fale measures to realise his purpose, be that purpose good or bad. Who is responsible for thie devilry? Not the recruiting agents; but someone must be responsible for it. We are praying to God to be on our side in this tembie war. We are asking him to give us the victory. Can we all approach Him with clean hands? REFORMER. [It difficult to understand what our correspon- dent s point i, We can hardly believe there has been "dirty work at East Cilrliedyn or anywhere fV1^ d°es n°t give us some idea of what the .alse measures are?—ED., JOURNAL.]

CARMARTHEN CADET COMPANY St Davids CLB

CARMARTHEN CADET COMPANY (St. David's C.L.B.). [To the Editor of the CARMARTHEN JOURNAL.] ^'e bluiU b,e extremely obliged if vou will t^naiy allow us a short space in your valuable paper to solicit the kind support of your numerous readers for the above corps. Funds are urgently needed and the usefulness of the movement will be gathered from the following letter sent by Lord Kitchener to the Mayor of London in November last:- War Office, November 2, 1915. Dear Sir Charles Wakefield,-The Cadet Force. as an organisation supplementary to the Army, the authorities of the County Associations. It ;s recognised by the War Office. As the Uo\ernn:ont cannot at present admit any claims for fin,-i -ci 'I assistance beyond the small grants to county associations to be used for the development of the organisation within their counties, the cadet move- ment must rely for support on the patriotism of private persons. I consider that the county and cadet associations are doing most useful work in providing naval and military training for the youth of the nation, and in passing large numbers of cadets as officers, non-commissioned officers, and men into the Regular and Territorial Forces. In assisting the cadet units, financially ac ) thef- wise, private citizens are, therefore, giving mitenal assistance to their country and are helping to pro- Army301116 be8t material for the Navy bud It is not necessary for me to commend the work of the association to you, as you have been identil. d with the cadet movement since its initiation. I kne,w that I am assured of your active co-operation. Ycurs very truly. KITCHENER." Subscriptions will be thankfully received by the undersigned.—Yours, &c., J. CALEB HUGHES, Capt., O.C. 24, Picfon-terrace, Carmarthen. W. DAVID THOMAS, 2nd Lieut. Upcott, Myrddin Crescent, Carmarthen.

Advertising

ASTONISHED CARMARTHEN When the first Carmarthen case was published in the local papers, Carmarthen was astonished. But now Carmarthen cases like the following are given here every week. They inspire confide-ice. On February 16th, 1914, Mr. J. Thomas, of 5, Tanerdj, opposite the River, Carmarthen, said:— I was troubled at one time with sharp, cutting pains in my back. It was Tory difficult indeed to bend about at work. There was a gravelly sediment in the water, so there was no doubt but that my kidneys were the cause of the trouble. I was advised to try Doan's backache kidney pills, and I must say they did me good. I took a box of these pills, and by that time I was free of the pain and the urinary system was cleansed. I think Doan's pills a very good kidney medicine indeed, and am pleased to recommend them. (Signed) J. THOMAS. On April 12th, 1915 OVER TWELVE MONTHS LATER-Mr. Thomas said: "Doan's pills did me a world of good, and I shall always speak in their favour. I am quite weil now, I am glad to say." Doan's backache kidney pills relieve the kidneys and bladder like ordinary medicines relieve the -ow el bowel?. They drive out the uric acid which is the great cause of backache, rheumatism, and lumbago, and they release the accumulated water in cases of dropsy and retention. They are perfectly safe to use in ail circumstances, and a certificate of purity aoc-ompanies every box. Of all dealers, or 2/9 a box, from Foster- MoClellan Co., 8, Wells Street, Oxford Street, London, W. Don't ask for backache or kidney pills,ask DISTINCTLY for DOAN'S backache kidney pills, the same as Mr. Thomas had.

DEATH OF PROFESSOR DAVID JENKINS

DEATH OF PROFESSOR DAVID JENKINS The death occurred on Friday night at his resi- dence, Ca>teil Brynchan, Aberystwyth, of one of the foremost musicians in Wales, in the person of Mr. David Jenkins, Mus.Bac.. professor of music at the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth. He had for the past 40 years been an outstanding figure ir the musical life of the Principality. As a composer, conductor of singing festivals, and as an adjudicator, he wa-t known in every part of the country. Born at Trecastle, Breconshire, in 1848. Professor Jenkins worked as a tailor in his youth. Very eariy :n life he displayed a passionate love of music, and it is recorded of him that at the tender age of nine years he entered the arena at Myddfai as all alto ,:1 the ehoir. In a duet competition the follow- ing year he won his first prize, and right up to the age of sixteen, when his voice broke, his name con- tinued to figure in the list of successful competitors it p>t-t!dfodau. Mr. Jenkins continued to applv himself closely to the study of the subject that so entirely absorbed his interests, and mastered the principles of the tonic sol-fa svstem. It is here worthv of note that he was the "first A.C. in Wales. In 1874 he entered the staff of the college where he was ue^tinea later to hold such an honourable posi- tion, and studied under the tuition of the late Dr. Joseph Parry, who at that time was professor of music at the college. From Aberystwyth M'. IOTT Wt'llt to Cambridge, where he graduate-' il 1378, obtaining his Mus.Bac. degree with first osi- tion on the list. Subsequently he was appr.nted conductor of the Aberystwyth College A,(Isicai Society, eventually, in 18^9. succeeding to the p. si- tjon of professor in music at the University College Notwithstanding his manifold activities Professc Jenkins found time to write a considerable numbe of compositions. Indeed, his outburst of son glees, part-songs, male voice choruses, anthems, cantatas, &c., was prolific, and his work was verv popular throughout the Principality. Profe s^or Jenkins^ had also compiled and edited a Calvinietic Methodist hymn-book. For some years he o