Collection Title: Flintshire Observer

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
11 articles on this page
Advertising

0 ESTABLISHED 1805. TELEPHONE No. 205. i J. BBICKLATSTD, High-class Fish, Game, and Poultry Salesman, BRIDGE STREET, CHESTER. Country Orders receive Special Attention Local Business Guide. HOLYWELL. '4''4" I DAVID ROBERTS, Exchange House. HOLYWELL. Currier & Leather Merchant, Saddler, Harness Maker & Upholsterer. *1* E5TABLISHED 50 YEARS. Competent Workmen kept on the premise?. „ Repairs of.all descriptions. +++++++++f.f#))+++++++++++++++(. .+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++.+.++.. I FRED. E. MORRIS, j § STATIONER arid BOOKSELLER, "Observer" Shop, High Street, HOLYWELL. ZLvHOLIX I J. SAUM, wa^makek," High St. MOLD. § J Best selection of RINGS, Wedding and Engagement. J 5 GOLD AND SILVER WATCHES, SOUVENIRS AND TRINKETS. # + + Stationers and + I THE ARMONIC, Ltd., Book-%ellcrs, + §5^ High Street, MOLD. + X Call and Inspect ou>r Large Selection of Novels by World-famousArathors, J at 4 £ d., 6d. and 7d. #++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++.+++ CHESTER. +++++++++++++++*+++ | JOSEPH MUSGRAVE & Co., I (Successors to Thomas Dixon & Co.) J Timber and Slate Merchants, { Tj6oNo' St. John Street, CHESTER. ..++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++(.+++ I RIDING 21/- BREECHES$ and ail Classes of Tailoring. + — i JOHNS, Northgate, CHESTER. .+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++..+++++.+t J

THE SINGING SOLDIERS OF WALES

THE SINGING SOLDIERS OF WALES. Eisteddfodau in Camps. Around Winchester are the legions of 'Wales. Like the unseen armies of Elishet time, they compass the city about. With Celtic zeal they are preparing themselves against the time when they will take their places in the great war (says a Star cor- respondent). Their days are full of work-hard, strenu- ous business, which is making them as cap- 0 able as any regular that ever stepped. But they seem to have but one hobby, music; and one enthusiasm, Wales. At every breathing space they sing. From Re- veille to Last Post they sing. PLENTY OF SOLOISTS. Almost every battalion has its male voice choir, and every company its quartettes and its madrigal singers, while soloists are m C, plentiful as blackberries. So we have an eisteddfod nearly every week at one or other of the camps. And because there is not enough some of the choirs find their musical enthusiasm overflowing in the shape of charity concerts or open-air recitals. To an outsider going among these sons of Wales it would seem that they have no other thought, after war preparation, but music. z!1 Compared with a bluff English regular they are somewhat shy, but talk to them about music, and see how their tongues will unloose. AT THE CATHEDRAL. They are a church and chapel going lot, too. Most of them are Nonconformists. But they cannot resist the magnificent singing at the Cathedral. They admit it is fine. Just one more picture. At the bottom of the town on a Sunday evening, beneath the shadow of the statue of the great Anglo- Saxon Alfred, a crowd of khaki-clad Welsh. On the kerb of the statue a non-com. Using his swagger-cane as a baton, he leads off with a fine tenor in such a composition as "All the Night," or "Bryn Calfaria," or Hy- irydol." Instantly the whole mass spring to the tune, taking parts by memory, singing the .0 loved Welsh words. "ABERYSTWYTH." No sooner is one song finished than an- other is begun. If one particular tune is omitted, sooner or later it will be called for on all sides. "Aberystwyth next, corporal," "Let'6 have Aberystwyth, corporal," until with a smile the leader leads (iff witli.that weird .melody. The famous University company of the 13tli I JLW.JF. has within the last few days ;lost some of its most popular members. -Some,of them have been commissioned, notably the popular conductor of the choir of the 13th," Private W. J. Owen, who has gone to a Lancashire Regiment. Others, some of them with science degrees, have been drafted to the Engineers for skilled work in munitions at the base in France. A STORY OF A MULE. Humour? Oh, yes, there is some humour about the camps. Of the dry sort, like the Atorx of the mule that ate the bed. A private of the R.W.F.-it was the R.W.F., though other regiments claim the story-woke in the cold hours to find his bed gone from under him that is to say, the soft part of it—the straw. The empty husk lay still beneath him, flat and hard. He anathematised the something thief in a manner becoming the occasion, but he was solemnly assured it was a lop-eared transport mule that had sauntered in and eaten the bed from under him. Said the suffering one, cynically, A clever mule, anyway, for he not only took my bed, but I notice that lie seems to have carefully added it to the beds on each side of me." And that was the beginning of another row.

Military Appointments

Military Appointments. (FROM THE GAZETTE," OCT. 4th.) The Royal Welch Fusilier- Second- lieutenants from the Territorial Force Re- serve, General List, to be second-lieutenants Robert Sampson Rood Pittard, George Gut- '[' tridge, Charles Crapper, Richard Tasker, Alan Richardson.

No title

The latest time for receiving advertisements for the Flintshire Observer and News" is the first post on Wednesday morning; otherwise insertion cannot be guaranteed. Alterations of ad- vertisements should reach us not later than Tuesday.

An Ideal System

"An Ideal System." The heavy burdens of taxation imposed by the Budget on all classes of the community will be cheerfully borne. The people of this country have made up their minds that the war must be- carried to a satisfactory con- clusion, and they are willing to make any sacrifices that may be necessary to ensure the final victory of our arms. Under such cir- cumstances any exhibition of party feeling is to be deprecated. Tariff Reformers do not claim the imposition of import duties on cer- tain competitive goods for the special needs of the moment as a triumph for their cause, nor do Free Traders, with few exceptions, seek to attack these duties from their own point of view. Both parties are willing to admit that the new import duties have been brought into being through the urgent neoes- sities of the situation. They have been ren- dered imperative by the state of exchange and the pressing requirements of the war, The new import duties on motor-cars, motor-cycles, cinema films, clocks, watches, musical instruments, plate-glass, and hats are designed to have a threefold effect. They are meant to decrease imports, and thus help to solve the problem of the American exchange; they are intended to check luxurious habits, so that people may have more money to invest in War Loans; and, thirdly, they aim at raising additional revenue. Small and seemingly unimportant as these duties are, their effect must be far- reaching. They admit the principle that taxation may rightly be used for other pur- poses than to produce revenue. Mr. McKenna, it will be recalled, said, in making his financial statement, If we can by any means by taxation at one and the same tima restrict imports, reduce consumption, and bring in revenue, then, 1 think, for the moment at any rate, we may be considered to have found an ideal system." Mr. McKenna warned the country and the House that at a later time in the year another Budget would be necessary." We may safely assume that, when that time arrives, he will find it requisite greatly to extend the scope of his ideal system," and to bring within its compass many additional articles of for- eign production which compete with British- made goods. In doing so he will, we are convinced, have the hearty co-operation and goodwill of all parties, even of those who conscientiously believe that, in normal times, the policy of free imports is the best for this country. They must recognise, as the Sec- retary of the Free Trade Union admits, in the Pall Mall Gazette of 22nd Septem- ber, that "the Free Trade case is based upon a foundation of international peace." It fol- lows, therefore, that when that foundation crumbles away, a policy must be adopted which is built upon a more enduring and substantial groundwork. When the country sees that the objects aimed at by the new import duties are attained it will probably be of opinion that a system which can stand the stress and strain of a war crisis cannot be a bad system for the nation during normal times. It would obviously be absurd and un- workable to have two fiscal policies—one for peace and the other for war. We have said that the new fiscal policy of the Government will have far-reaching consequences. One of these will be a closer commercial relationship between the Domin- ions and the Mother Country. It may be re- membered that, at the Colonial Conference of 1907, Mr. Asquith refused the request of the Dominion Ministers to give preference to Colonial goods in the British market, on tlie grounds that, in asking us to frame a pre- ferential tariff the Colonies are asking us to introduce into our system a set of duties which do not at present exist, for the purpose not of revenue but for ulterior purposes—the purposes of preference." Mr. Asquith's ob- jection no longer holds good. His Chancel- lor of the Exchequer has introduced into his Budget a new set of duties, for the purpose not only of revenue but for ulterior purposes. It would be quite easy, therefore, on the lines already initiated ,to frame an extended list of dutiable goods on which a preference 11 could begiven to the products of the Dom- inions. This, indeed, is a step which cannot be avoided, and which ought to be gladly taken as a small recognition of the great 0 sacrifices in human life and in treasure made by the people of the Dominions during the war. We do not doubt that the Dqminions, through their constitutional representatives, will again approach the Home Government, and say, You have now a revised and ex- tended tariff, and are im -a position to give us the preferential tariff treatment which we have asked for at every Colonial Conference. We now repeat our requests" It is impos- sible to imagine that such an appeal could be again refused.

Correspondence

Correspondence. WAR RESTRICTIONS AND DRINK TRAFFIC. To the Editor of the Flintshire Observer and News. Sir,—Since the outbreak of the war the British public have endured a series of res- trictions on their personal liberty with a. loyal toleration that indicates a general and praise- worthy desire to maintain the safety of the realm. The teetotal party took advantage of this indulgent toleration to exploit the war to further their own fad, and unless the be- lievers in freedom and fair play bestir them- selves the majority of the population of the United Kingdom will find that their boasted British fair play has been so encroached upon by the minority that it will be non- existent. In his speech at .Bangor Mr. Lloyd George made drink the scapegoat to explain away the delay in the production of munitions of war. Eventually the Central Board (Liquor Traffic) was passed by Parliament under the title of the Defence of the Realm Act (Amendment) (No. 3), 1915. Drastic powers were conferred upon this Couneil. No doubt Mr. Lloyd George spoke in all good faith when he attributed the shortage of munitions to drink. Subsequent events have proved that drink is only a small factor in the misunderstandings that arise from time to time in munition works. Yours truly, W. K. GOULD. 151, High Street, Rhyl.

ORDINATION AT ST ASAPH

ORDINATION AT ST. ASAPH. The following were ordained in the Cathe- dral of St. Asaph on Wednesday week by the Bishop of St. Asaph :— Deacons.—The Rev. R. J. Owen, B.A., University of Wales, Aberystwyth; D. Rees Jones, B.A., Jesus College, Oxford, licensed to Wrexham; R. E. Evans, iB.A., St. David's College, Lampeter, to Rhosllanerchrugog; R. B. Wilson, B.A., University of Wales, Ban- gor, to Llangollen; R. 0. Rowlands, L.D., St. David's College, Lampeter, to Holywell. Priests.—The Rev. J. R. Clarke, B.A., St. David's College, Lampeter, of Ruthin; the Rev. A. G. Jones, B.A., Lincoln College, Ox- ford, of Llanrhos; the Rev. D. H. Williams, L.D., St. David's College, Lampeter, te Holywell. The candidates were presented by the two examining chaplains, the Rev. Chancellor Joyce, warden of St. Deiniol's, Hawarden, and Canon Lewis, Viear of Ruabon. This is the largest ordination held within living mem- ory in the Cathedral of St. Asaph, and the qualifications of the candidates were of a high order. Among the deacons ordained was the Rev. Robert Jenkyn Owen, B.A., of the University College of Wales, Aberyst- wyth, who until recently was a distinguished member of the Calvinistic Methodist ministry in North Wales.

UNCLE SAM

UNCLE SAM. When he heers of a liner blowed up on the sea, He gits mad as a hornet, he does, yes, sir-ree An' he cables acrost-" Wuz thar Yankees aboard? By jiminy! if so, gimme Bunker Hill's Sword But in course, if thar warn't, it's nawthin' tu me, I'm a jestice of peace, an' fer nootralitee; I'm tew proud fer tu fight for ole papers an' scraps, Tho' I mebbe hev signed 'em—gold darn 'em —perhaps Toronto World."

SHOT BY A SNIPER

SHOT BY A SNIPER. Private Harry Bullock, son of Mr. tfnd Mrs. Bullock, 8, Wellington Street, Shotton, was shot by a sniper while asleep, in Galli- poli. He was 20 years of age. Private Bul- lock was in the 8th Battalion Royal Welch Fusiliers,

MEN AND MATTERS

MEN AND MATTERS. The Call to Arms-Men Wanted at Once-- Treasures of Mostyn Hall. Winter Comforts for Troops. The Flintshire Territorial Comforts Com- mittee are making an appeal for mufflers, mittens, and socks for the use of men serving at home and abroad, these articles being ur- gently required. The committee would be glad to get into touch with working parties throughout the Flintshire Territorial recruit- ing area, ♦-—? Recruiting Rally. Recruiting efforts on a big scale were made in many parts of the country on Saturday last. A rally was held at Wrexham, and as a result a large number of recruits were ob- tained. The Lohl Lieutenant of Denbigh- shire (Colonel W. Cornwallis-West), who pre- sided, said that there were 19,000 young men of military age at present in Denbighshire, and that an effort was to be made to get them. Striking addresses were delivered by Mr. E. G. Hemmerde, M.P., Captain the Hon. W. Ormsby Gore, M.P., and Mr. J. H. Thomas, M.P. ■ » » The Worst Excuse. Captain Ormsby Gore referred to the men who said they would not go until they were fetched, and said that was the poorest reason and the worst excuse he had ever heard. It meant, if anything, that they were in favour of conscription, and no man of military age ought to be in favour of conscription unless he was in khaki. 1 Vital Issues. In the course of his speech, Mr. J. H. Thomas said the issues were so vital that he appealed to every man of military age to realise his individual and moral responsi- bility. He was perfectly satisfied that we could procure all the men wanted, and that no appeal would be made to the British worker or British aristocrat that would not be gallantly responded to. Time was all im- portant, and we wanted the men at once. Treasures of Mostyn Hall. The visit of the Flintshire Historical Soc- iety to the home of their esteemed president, the Right Hon. Lord Mostyn, was an event of much interest. About two dozen members journeyed to Mostyn and were privileged to inspect both the ancient hall itself and many of the highly valued heirlooms and other I treasures contained therein. Mr. A. Caradoc Williams, the hon. secretary, first conducted the party through the extensive park to Bycli- ton Old Hall, the home at one time of Thomas Pennant, author of the celebrated Tours in Wales." Here Mr. Henry Taylor, F.S.A., of Chester, mentioned several facts connected with the old Flintshire family of Pennant. The house, dated 1570, is now in an advanced state of decay. 4-—t Ancient Firearms. Arrived at Mostyn Hall, the members were I welcomed by Lord and Lady Mostyn, and at once were ushered into the most ancient park", of the building-the hall, on the walls of which hung trophies of the hunt, and many relics of bygone days. Among them were some firearms used in the defence of Flint Castle in the days of Cromwell. His lord- ship mentioned that one of his ancestors- Sir Roger Mostyn—had been at the head of the first Volunteer regiment in Flintshire. ♦-—. The Flintshire Militia. Mr. Taylor read a short extract from his. pamphlet on the Flintshire Militia," which. contains much about Sir Roger Mostyn, its- first colonel. In 1684 there was a grand re- view of the Flintshire Militia, the chronicle- stating :—" Sir Roger Mostyn's company be- ing all cloth'd with red, lined with red, broad, belts, and white saishes, red stockins and new hatts, edg'd and turn'd up on ye side with buttons, at his own proper charge, being., superneinerary to those of the common cliarge, of ye Countie viz. his own servants, miners. for lead, coal, etc., who deliver in their arms and liveries into Mostyn House and are paid, their wages for their service by him." --+-- Silver Eisteddfodic Harp. Perhaps the chief attractions were the old. manuscripts, books, and relics in the library,, his lordship relating i. e lifitory of each. The:- members were invited to. handle such pre- cious treasures as the silver harp which had from time immemorial been in the gift of his- ancestors" in connection with the Eistedd- fod. They were also shown the original com- mission granted by Queen Elizabeth for hold- ing an eisteddfod at Caerwys in 1568. Here were documents with the Great Seal attached —seals almost as big as a dinner plate. Some of the old Welsh books opened were, it was easy to see, the object of much interest ta several members. A stained handkerchief- was exhibited from one of the cases, the staiiu being the blood of the ill-fated Charles I. Pheasants for the Wounded. Pheasant shooting opened in North Wales- on Friday in fine weather and under favour- able conditions, birds being numerous and strong on the wing. Good bags were made in many of the covers ,and the birds are- being sent to the tnilitary hospitals for the- wounded soldiers in various parts of the Kingdom. --+-- Love-Letters and Diet. At the monthly meeting of the Bangor and Beaumaris Board of Guardians, Mr. Brier- cliffe reported the case of a female inmate* who had gone out of the house without leaver It was recommended to punish her by reduc- ing her diet. The Rev. E. W. Griffith: Is; that the woman accused of writing love-let- ters?—Mr. Briercliffe: Yes.—The Rev. E. W.. Griffith: Well, I think it's hard lines to re- duce her dietary for writing love-letters- (Laughter and hear, hear.)

DOUBLE TRAGEDY AT GREENFIELD

DOUBLE TRAGEDY AT GREENFIELD. Husband and Wife Dead. A startling tragedy was enacted on Wed- nesday week at Wood Houses, a row of cot- tages at Greenfield. At No. 7 lived John Arthur Jones and his wife, Sarah Catherine, and their three young children, but of late the man has been billeted at Bedford, having about six months ago enlisted in the 2/5th R.W.F. On Friday week Jones returned home on leave, and from that time there ap- peared to be considerable disagreement, though it is stated that on the evening of the day of the tragedy they attended the picture palace at Holywell. On Wednesday evening one of the children is said to have gone into the house and failed to waken her mother, whom she found in bed. She became alarmed at the appearance of her father, whom she saw in the bedroom, and running out called her grandmother and aunt. Mrs. Nuttall (the woman's sister), going into the bedroom, was horrified by the sight that met her eyes. Her sister lay dead on the bed, and her brother-in-law was lying in a pool of blood in a corner of the cooin. The police were 6ent for, and P.C. J. Davies, Greenfield, was quickly on the spot. He found the man was alive, and rendering first-aid at once sent for medical assistance, and 'phoned for Inspector Hill, who with P.C. Thomas and later P.C. Chesters were soon investigating the affair. Sarah Cath- erine Jones, who appeared to be fully dressed, I lay on the bed, her appearance being peace- ful and composed, save for certain indications which j^ointed to death by poisoning. In the corner of the room farthest from the bed, huddled against the wall, lay John Arthur Jones, dressed save for his tunic. He was smeared with blood, while blood lay in pools about the room. There was an imprint of his blood-stained hand on the wall. The posi- j tion he assumed in collapsing had the effcet of arresting the flow of blood and prolonged his life. When he was found he was still alive, though in a state of complete collapse from exhaustion. He was attended by Drs. Morris and Jones and assistant, and removed on a stretcher, placed in a wagonette, to thcr Holywell Union Infirmary. His life ebbed- away as he was admitted to the institution* OPENING OF THE INQUEST. The inquest was opened on Thursday morn- ing, before Mr. F. Llewellyn-Jones, county coroner, and a jury of whom Mr. H. O'Beirne was foreman. The coroner explained that he proposed taking evidence of identity only in order to,. grant the necessary certificates for burial. In the case of the woman a post-mortem ex- amination would be held, and the inquiry ad- journed to a further date. Margaret Jane Nuttall, wife of Alfred Josiah Nuttall, of 3, Mount Pleasant, Green- field, sister of the deceased woman, said she had seen the two bodies. She identified that of the man as her brother-in-law, John Arthur Jones, about 32 years of age. He was a labourer, and usually worked at dis- charging iron ore from the boats at Mostyn., Deeps. He enlisted in the 2/5th Battalion: Royal Welch Fusiliers about six months ago. He died on Wednesday night at the Union i Infirmary, Holywell. She identified the body of the woman as that of her sister, Sarah; Catherine, wife of the John Arthur Jones. She was 30 years of age in August last, and was found dead on Wednesday evening at Wood Houses. That was the whole of the evidence taken.. The adjourned inquest was fixed for seven o'clock on Thursday evening. The funerals of the unfortunate couple took place on Saturday afternoon, and were separate burials. That of John Arthur Jones- was from the Union Infirmary, and the inter- ment was at St. Peter's Cemetery. There were a few people present at the service, which was taken by the Rev. E. Lorimer Thomas, Vicar of Holywell. The funeral of Sarah Catherine Jones was from Wood Houses, Greenfield, and the in- terment at the Greenfield Cemetery. The Rev. J. S. Lloyd Jones, curate of Holywell, took the burial service. There were a large number of people present.