Collection Title: Flintshire Observer

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 8 of 8
Full Screen
22 articles on this page
Advertising

LLOYDS I The Latest NOVELTIES AND FASHIONS are displayed in our various Departments. SEE WINDOWS. COMPARE PRICES. I Albert House, HOLYWELL, I

FLINTSHIRE AND THE WAR

FLINTSHIRE AND THE WAR (Continued from page 7). Recruiting in Whitford Parish. COMMITTEES FORMED. The Whitford Parish Council on Satur- day evening, at the Whitford Schools, held a meeting to which a number of local gentle- men who had interested themselves in re- cruiting were invited, for the purpose of con- sidering what steps should be taken to carry out the request to canvass the district for men of military age, in connection with Lord Derby's scheme. Mr. R. H. Jones presided, and there were also present the Rev. Ellis Davies (the Vicarage), Messrs. W. H. Has- ler, Roger Williams, J. T. Bithell, Isilmael Jones, D. Jones (Ap Rhydwm), R. T. Price, T. Bagshaw, etc. Mr. J. S. Lloyd (clerk to the Council) ex- plained the purpose of the meeting, and read the correspondence received from the Parliamentary Recruiting Committee. The request was made that the recruiting canvass be completed by the 15th inst. The Chairman said the question was how to arrange the best method for canvassing the district. The late recruiting committee had worked hard, but had not made much progress. Now Lord Derby's schente was being put forward. He considered it was the duty of the Council to follow the lead given by Lord Derby and to do what they could for the welfare of the country. They could not all be soldiers, but each one could do something that would be helpful in raising the men necessary to bring the present crisis to a successful termination. It was the duty of the Council to support the resolu- tion adopted and submitted from the ,Lold recruiting meeting, and to make it a success c' cl in Whitford parish. He did not think there were many likely recruits in the parish, but the Council might do what it could to induce what men there were to join the Army for the defence of their homes. Mr. R. T. Price agreed that the Council &hould take the matter in hand and with the assistance of local gentlemen form a committee to carry out the scheme. He pro- posed that the committee be formed. Mr. W. H. Hasler seconded the proposi- tion, and agreed that the Parish Council should be made the heart and core of the movement locally. Mr. Roger Williams hoped that the move- ment would be better supported than the last recruiting committee were. It had not been fair to those who took an interest in the recruiting up to the present. The Chairman said the committee for the lower division of the parish attended almost every meeting, but he could not say that of the committee for the upper division of the parish. That committee did not get any support from the parish councillors with the exception of Mr. Price. The resolution was carried unanimously. On the proposition of Mr. R. T. Price, seconded by Mr. Ap Huw W illiams, it was de- cided that committees be formed for the upper and lower divisions of the parish. It was afterwards decided to appoint sec- retaries. for each committee, the chairmen to be selected by the several committees at their first meeting. Mr. Hasler was sugges- ted as the secretary for the upper division, but that gentleman said it would be impos- sible for him to undertake the work, ae he would shortly be absent from the parish. On the proposition of Mr. R. T. Price, secon- ded by the Rev. E. Davies, Mr. Roger Wil- liams (Bedw) was asked to take up the duties. Mr. Williams said he was willing to do whatever he could for the success of the movement in the parish. It was decided to ask Mr. C. F. Malbon to undertake the duties of secretary of the lower division, and Mr. Bithell was deputed to see Mr. Malbon" with that object. It was j also agreed that in the event of Mr. Malbon being unable to undertake the secretaryship Mr. Bithell act as such. The clerk was desired to communicate the decision of the Parish Council to the Flint- shire Recruiting Committee, and that the committees be convened as early as possible, so that the canvassing of the eligible men may be commenced. The circular on war economy and thrift was read, and it was decided that the ladi-es who worked so well last winter in providing comforts for the soldiers be asked to take steps to carry out the ideas contained in the circular. a v

LOCAL WAR ITEMS

LOCAL WAR ITEMS (Continued from Page 7.) Private Jack Roberts, 12768 (Connah's Quay), 9th Battalion Royal Welch Fusiliers, with the British Expeditionary Force, and eight of his pals would be glad to know of a friend who can send them a melodeon or concertina. to help them to pass away the time on winter nights. The Flintshire Comforts Fund has made provision for an adequate supply of plum puddings for the 1/oth Battalion Royal Welch Fusiliers now serving with the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, and these have al- ready been despatched. At a meeting of the committee held at Mold it was decided that an appeal be made to the county for a sup- ply of puddings for the 2nd and 3rd Line 5th Battalion R.W.F. Private Evan Hughes (21), of the Royal Army Medical Corps, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Hughes, 7, Chapel Street, Mold, re- turned to his home on Saturday after an absence of fifteen months with his regiment in France, having been granted a few days' leave. He acted as stretcher-bearer in the battles at Mons, the Marne, Ypres, Hill 60 and Loos, and haG witnessed some terrible sights, but he himself came through those engagements without a scratch. He has had a slight illness,'but is looking remark- ably well considering what he has passed through. He enlisted at the same time as Private Reginald Parry, of Mold, who was one of the first to be killed. Before joining the Army two years ago he was a postman.

Flintshire Casualties

Flintshire Casualties. KILLED. PRIIATE THOMAS HOOSON, CONNAH'S QUAY. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Hooson, of Chapel- street, Connah's Quay, have received the sad news of the death of their only son, Thomas Hooson, who was killed in Gallipoli, on Sunday, October 3rd. The news was con- veyed in a letter from one of his comrades, Lance-Corporal Price Hughes (Golftyn), who described the death as having occurred soon after the platoon had come down from the firing line to the reserves. It was when fetching water in the dark that Hooson got hit with a stray bullet. He died instantly. His comrades buried him in a grave which is marked with a cross. A tribute to the dead soldier is paid in a message which reads "He will be missed in his company, he was well liked, and was a true British soldier." WOUNDED. PRIVATE W. T. JONES, FLINT. Private Willinm Thomas' Jones, of Flint, has been wounded while serving with the 10th Battalion R.W.F. in France. His parents reside at 10, Holywell btreet, Flint. PRIVATE LAWREXCE FERGUSON, HOLYWELL. Private Lawrence Ferguson, of the 1st R.W.F., Machine-Gun Section, in France, writing to his cousin, Miss Kate Ferguson, Fron Cottages, High Street, acknowledges the receipt of smokes," and says he has now a fair supply. He adds:—"I had the misfortune to meet with a slight mishap—a bullet wound in the thigh—on Sunday, the 24th October. Otlier wise I am in good con-

Flintshire Casualties

dition. While I am in a position to do my duty nothing else matters. We underwent some very hard tasks during the last battle." PRIVATE WALTER JONES, MOLD. Private Walter Jones, of 15, Alun Bank, Mold, a member of the 5th Battalion Royal Welch Fusiliers, was wounded in action in 'Gallipoli on the 10th August, and has been in hospital ever since. Recently he was in- valided to England, and is now in hospital at Bristol. He is making good progress to- Z, 0 wards recovery, and expects to be home within a few days. Jones is 19 years of age, and prior to the war worked at the Brom- field Colliery.

Advertising

V Bring your Club Tickets. We give 2/- in the £ Bonus, and Good Value. Winter Coats, Millinery, Blouses, Skirts, Underwear, Gloves, Hosiery, etc., etc., in great variety. Have you seen our CHILDREN'S CORNER? WALTER LOCK, Wrexham House, HOLYWELL

PRIVATE W J ASTBURY BUCKLEY

PRIVATE W. J. ASTBURY, BUCKLEY. Mrs. A. Stephens, of 16, Mill Buildings, Mill Lane, Buckley, has received information that her nephew, Private William James Astbury, of the 1/5th Battalion Royal Welch Fusiliers, was seriously wounded on the 15th August. He was returning to the trenches after four days' rest when he was shot by a sniper in the left leg. He was conveyed to the General Hospital at Alexandria, where amputation of the limb was found necessary to save his life. After a stay of two months at the hospital it was deemed desirable to move him to England, and he is now in et- ley Hospital, near Southampton. A tele- gram was received at Buckley on Tuesday afternoon stating that Astbury's condition was improving. He is expecting to be in- valided home shortly. Private Astbury is 20 years of age, and prior to enlistment he worked for Messrs. Powell, earthenware manufacturers, Buckley. I _„ MISSING. PRIVATE D. J. DAVIES, MOLD. Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Davies, 9, Conway Street, Mold (late of 13, Garden Place), re- ceived an official letter from the Record Office, Shrewsbury, on Monday morning, stating that their son, Private David John Davies, of the l/5th Battalion R.W.F., who was wounded on the 10th of August last, is missing. His parents last received a letter from him on October 16th, and are naturally anxious as to what has become of him. Prior to joining the l/5th Royal Welch Fusiliers Private Davies served for two months in Kitchener's Army, and before enlistment worked as a collier at Bromfield.

CAPTAIN W E TRICKETT RETURNS HOME

CAPTAIN W. E. TRICKETT RETURNS HOME. Captain W. E. Trickett, of the l/5th Bat- talion Royal Welch Fusiliers, who was wounded in Gallipoli in August, returned to his home at Mold on Tuesday evening. It will be remembered that Captain Trickett re- ceived a severe gunshot wound in the thigh. He is now well on the road to recovery, and hopes that he will soon be able to return to duty. Altogether he has spent about twelve weeks in hospital, and for the past CAPTAIN W. E. TRICKETT. Photo] [S. H. Greenway. three weeks has been at a Manchester hos- pital. He says that he cannot speak too highly of the attention given by the doctors and nurses to the pafients. Captain Trickett paid a warm tribute to the gallantry of the Territorials in action. He declared that they did their work admir- ably under tremendous difficulties.

WAR BONUS FOR SOLDIERS

-+-¡. WAR BONUS FOR SOLDIERS. Auditor's Objection Overruled. Acting on the suggestion made by the Government, Colwyn Bay Council recently granted a war bonus to each enlisted em- ployee. The Council's accounts have recent- ly been audited by Mr. A. Carson Roberts, London, who raises objection to the bonus system. He instances the case of a workman with a wife and family, and says that the Army wages and allowances and the Coun- cil's bonus make the income of this family double what it waa in peace time, and says it appears to be unreasonable, as well as un- lawful, to charge the rates with the Coun- cil's gift of 10s. a week. Several cases," the auditor adds in his report, "have re- cently arisen in which the military pay ex- ceeds the former wages, the excesses amounting to nearly 200 per cent. in two cases." The Council have appealed on the matter to the Local Government Board, who have ruled in their favour and sanctioned the payments.

No title

►> The Rev. F. C. Stamer, vicar of Bas- church, has undertaken munition work in Sir Watkin Williams-Wynn's factory.

Advertising

Tel. 427. Tel. 427. Don't forget to visit STARKS 91, 93, 95, foregate St., CHESTER, FOR LADIES' WINTER GOATS in Nap, Blanket, and Tweed Cloths, from 12/11 to 63/- New Millinery, Furs, Costumes, Children's Coats, Millinery, Fur Sets, Ladies' & Child- ren's Underwear in great variety. SPECIAL PURCHASE of LADIES' & CHILDREN'S WOOL Eosm at last year's prices, KHAKI HOSE for our Soldiers. WOOL SCARVES for our Sailors. Household Drapery & Linen, Dress Mater= ials, &c., &c. W -2-b 9 OTI-IL 91, 93, 95, Foregate St., CHESTER. THE | j CHESTER OFFICE SUPPLY Co, 17, Newgate Street, Chester. j TYPEWRITERS, all makes ( Bought, Sold, Repaired and | Exchanged. I Remingtons, Yosts, Smith Pre- | miers, Empires, Olivers, 

No title

8. mm I < Sergeant E. J. Jones, Mumforth Street, Flint, of the l/5th R.W.F., is now in St. George's Hospital, Stockport, and on Mon- day last was visited by his relatives. They were struck by the comfort and care bes- towed on the large number of men in the hospital and with the beautiful surroundings. Sergeant Evans—who had an attack of dys- entery and other ailments—was very pleased to see his mother and sister, to whom he gave a graphic account of incidents in Gal- lipoli. He and four others were told off to fetch water—but only he and another re- turned. His companions were practically riddled with bullets. He expects to remain in hospital some weeks, and afterwards to proceed to a convalescent home.

The Battle of Loos

The Battle of Loos. SIR JOHN FRENCH'S DESPATCH A despatch from Sir John French, deal- ing with the operations of the British forces up to and including the battle of Loos, was issued on Monday night as a supplement to the "London Gazette." Details are given of the big advance at the end of September in co-operation with the French forces to our right. The great move was phoned after a full discussion of the military situation by the British and French commanders, and Sir John French sets out the arrangements made for a joint plan of attack. Three generals fell in the fighting. Major-' General Sir T. Capper, commanding the 7th Division, was severely wounded on the 26th, and died the following morning, and on the 27th .L -,tjor- General G. H. Thesiger, commanding the 9th Division, was killed. On October 2nd Major-General F. D. V. Wing, commanding the 12th Division, was ZD killed. Sir John French deeply regrets the heavy casualties incurred in this battle, but does not think they were excessive, wllile the proportion of slightly wounded is very large indeed. The losses of the enemy were very heavy, and thousands of prisoners and many guns were captured. I Tlte repeated use by the enemy of asphyxi- ating gasses in their attacks compelled us to resort to similar methods, and, isays Sir John French, although the enemy was known to have been prepared for such reprisals, our gas attack met with marked success, and produced a demoralising effect on 6ome of the opposing units. Reference is made to the strong reinforce- ments the Army has received, including the addition of numerous batteries of heavy artillery, and to the effective work this arm of the service has accomplished. Sir John French also refers in his dee- pash to the device adopted by the enemy for driving jets of burning liquid into our trenches. Surprise and temporary con. fusion were caused on the occasion of its first use at Hooge, on July 30.

BUCKLEY MAN WOUNDED

BUCKLEY MAN WOUNDED. Lance-Corporal Edward Peters, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Peters, 3, Frith Villas, Buckley, was recently wounded while serving with a Scottish regiment.

NO POLITICAL WARFARE

NO POLITICAL WARFARE. Mr. Bonar Law's Assurance to Kinsmen Beyond the .5eas. Writing to Mr. Bonar Law, on October 27th, Sir John M'Coll, Agent-General for Tasmania, called attention to comments ap- pearing in Australian and New Zealand lews papers suggesting considerable unrest and an uncertainy of outlook as the result of cables describing the recruiting campaign in Great Britain, and asking for a statement from the Secretary for the Colonies, in order to prevent an exaggerated view cf the situation being accepted by the Pressi and the people of Australia. Mr. Bonar Law, replying on the same date, said :— Dear Sir John M'Coll,—I am much obliged to you for calling my attention to an extract from the 'Melbourne Argus' to the effect that the political warfare in England is calculated to injure Imperial solidarity. It would be a great misfortune if it were to be supposed that at such a time there is political warfare in England. I have now been a member of the present Cabinet for more than four months, and I can say with absolute confidence that during the whole of that time no political issue of any' kind has ever been raised. This is true of the Government, and, so far as I can judge, it is true also of this country. The whole na- tion is absolutely united in its determina- tion to carry the war to a successful termin- ation, and the only difference of opinion among us is as to whether the strength which ought to come from this material unity, is being most efficiently used in the prosecution of the war. From this point of view there is. much criticism of the Government, in regard to which, as a member of the Cabinet, I can say nothing, but one's kinsmen beyond the seas can be sure of this, that there is no weakening on the part of the Mother Coun- try, and I may add that greatly as we at home prize and honour the sacrifices which have been made, and the splendid heroism which has been displayed by our Colonial fellow-subjects, I, as a Colonial by birth, may be permitted to say that in my opinion the rest of the British Empire has a right to be proud of the part which is being played in this war by the men of the Old Country.—Yours sincerely, A. Bonar Law."

No title

Snow fell in Cumberland and WeEtfuorland on Tuesday.

Advertising

150 GUINEA-GOLD WEDDING RINGS T»r THREE SHAPES -Round, Half-round & Flat All Sizes; from 15s. upwards. Useful Present. Private Room. BUTT & CO. (Ltd.), 32, EASTGATE ROW. 20, EASTGATE ST., CHESTER.

Family Notices

Births, Marriages and Deaths. DEATHS. I MORRIS.—On the 26th ult., at Nant Aluii Mill, Rhydymwyn, Mary Morris, aged 41 years. EDWARDS.—On November 1st, at 6, Chapel Street, Mold, William Edwards, aged 69 years.

Advertising

MEMORIALS in Marble, Granite, Stone and Alabaster. Brasses. Established 1774. Telephone 161. W. HASWELL & SON, KALEYARDS, CHESTER. Estimates & Designs free on application W. H. & Son were entrusted with the Queen Victoria Memorial and the late Duke of West- minster's Tomb, both at Chester. I l HENRY A. CLEGG & SONS. MASONS, Brook Street, CHESTER. Memorials in GRANITE, MARBLE AND STONB. Designs and Prices on application. Large Stock of Memorials on view tA No. II, Brook Street. Telephone No. 412. THOMAS LUNT & SON, Monumental Sculptors and Masons. Monumental Show Room I GROSVENOR ROAD, CHESTER. (Electric Cars pass the door). Residence and Works :— THE NOPTHOATE, CHESTER. All kinds of Monuments, Tombs. Tablets, Pulpits, Fonts, Headstones, Crosses, etc., in Granite, Marble, Alabaster, Stone, etc. Existing Memorials removed, engraved, and cleaned, etc., in any Churchyard or Cemetery. Estimates and designs free, enquiries invited. A large number of Memorials always on view a-t. our Showroom in Granite, Marble & Stone. ——— FUNERALS. E. 00TI0M & SONS, Complete Funeral Furnishers, 30, Frodsham Street, CHESTER I Coffins made & delivered at a few hours' notice. MOTOR GLASS HEARSE for long journeys on hire. ¡' Rubber-tyred Glass Hearses and Broughams. I First-class Black Horses supplied. Stables: Union Walk, Chester. j Tel. 141 Chester. I

Military Appointments

Military Appointments. FROM THE GAZETTE," OCT. 28th. Royal Welch Fus.—Temporary. Second- Lieutenant Edmund B. Potter, from a ser- vice battalion, to be temporary second- lieutenant; to be temporary second-lieuten- ants, Nathan Leonard Harris and Trevor Alyn Lewis. Territorial Force—Denbighshire Hussars Capt. Watkin R. K. Mainwaring is seconded

V BEAUMARIS WOUNDING CHARGE

V BEAUMARIS WOUNDING CHARGE. At Beaumaris Police Court, on Saturday, Hugh Williams, labourer, Beaumaris, was charged with wounding Edward Gibbons, licensee of the Prince of Wales Inn, Beau- maris. The alleged offence was committed on Oct- ober Kith, when defendant picked up a stone and flung it at Gibbons, hitting him in the right eye. As a result Gibbons v.-as laid up for a fortnight. Defendant said Gibbons assaulted him and what he did was in self-defence. He was committed to the Anglesey Quarter Sessions, bail being fixed at £10.

No title

♦ Sir Alfred Keogh (Director of Medical Ser- vices) on Monday opened the largest Volun- tary Aid Detachment hospital in England. The hospital is at the Grange, Southport, and accommodation is provided for 300 wounded soldiers. Another Voluntary Aid hospital at the Woodlands, Southport, waS opened a few weeks ago. Printed by the Armonic, Ltd., and pub- lished by the Flintshire Observer Co., Ltd.* I at 15, High Street, Mold, in the Countjj of Flint..