Collection Title: Brecon county times, Neath gazette and general advertiser

edition: Supplement

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
17 articles on this page
CHURCH DEFENCE MEETING AT SENNYBRIDGE

CHURCH DEFENCE MEETING AT SENNYBRIDGE. Liberal and Nonconformist Speeches. On F rjdi

News and Notes from Trecastle

News and Notes from Trecastle. [BY NOVUS HOMO 1 mvaSSm A competitive meeting was held at the C.M. Vestry Room the other evening and was largely attended by people of all denominations. The chair was taken by Mr David Davies, Drainduon Villa, Trecastle, whilst Mr Thomas Price, Rhiwbrygoch, adjudicated on the musical Y, part of the programme, and Mr David Price, Giynmeddig Cottage, acted as ad- judicator on recitations, &c. Appended is the list of prize winners :—Recitation, under 10 M A Thomas duett,for children Ronald and Megan Davies, Red Lion Inn solo, under io, M A Thomas; English spelling-bee, Annie Jones, Llwyncor; solo, under 16, prize divided between Francgon Davies and Lizzie Gwen Davies recitation, Gwladys Davies; impromptu speech, Mr Sidney Pow 11, Caer Villa, Trecastle reading at first sight, Mrs Davies, Red Lion Inn, Trecastle impromptu speech for chil- dren, Morgan Evans, Cefncray; hymn tune by any two voices, prize divided between Mrs Davies, Red Lion, and Mrs Evans, Black Horse, and Mrs Davies, Vicarage Road, and Miss Lizzie Thomas, Trehowel. A most enjoyable evening was spent. These fortnightly competi- tive meetings are a great attraction in the place and are the means of getting the young people together to compete for honours in music and literature rather than troll ng about our streets aimlessly wasting their time. We understand that there will be no contest in the County Council Election in this division, and there are no signs of a District Council Election in the two hamlets. In one hamlet, however, great preparations are already evident regarding the coming Parish Council Election. The present seven members are well tried councillors and have, during their long term of office, done good work by keeping down the rates as much as possible, but it seems that the new progressive party has already seven persons of no mean abilities ready to come out for Parish Council hon- ours. I should advice them to pause before taking such a step, as to throw the old Council out of office without good reason shown does no good, and is likely to increase the already high rates. There are prospects of a very success- ful competition next Saturday, at the 20th annual matches of the Llywel Ploughing and Hedging Society, to be held on Bronyddmawr Farm, if the weather will only be favourable. We anticipate a large gathering of com- petitors as well as spectators. As a rule there is much excitement amongst the latter about the live and dead weight guessing competitions. The programme includes six different prizes for horses, so it is nearly as much a show of horses as it is a ploughing and hedging competition. A large num- ber of horses have already been entered according to the rules of the Society set forth on the posters.

Advertising

liptt Flp!zb(,sTPptebel Prl trrrTF vlr'") r teblep trie pt. 'ifs. .1 (,,9

LLANWRTYD WELLS

LLANWRTYD WELLS ACCIDENT. —Mr Llewellyn Williams, Hamstead Villa, Llanwrtyil, whilst cycling to Llandovery, m "t with a s(,ri,-us accident." His brother, Mr T. Williams, who was also motor cycling to Llandov- ery. took Llewellyn in tow by attaching the ordin- ary bicycle to the motor with a piece of rope. All went well until nearing Oynehordy, when the rope broke,and Mr Llewellyn Williams was thrown off his machine, sustaining serious injury to his knee. He was assisted to Cyngbordy station, and returned home by train. FISHING. -Councillor Saunders Morgan, fishing on the Irfon last Saturday, landed four brace of fine trout, the two largest weighing If lbs. each. I This is the first catc"i uf the season in the Llan- wrtyd district. SUCCESS. Hearty congratulations to Miss Bron- wen Richards, Lisburn House, on her passing with first class honours the Junior Division, and securing the certificate of Trinity College of Music, London, amougst 48 pupils. Miss Richards is a pupil of Miss J. Thomas, Rock Cottage, Llandovery. ST. JAMES' C HURCH.- kV, ediiesday, Feb 12th, was duly observed in St James' Church as a day of humble prayer and inter- cession on behalf of the Welsh Church. The day opened with a celebration of the Holy Communion at 8 a m., with special I collects, epistle and gospel; there was morning prayer at 11 a.m with the special form of service, and evening prayer at 7 p.m with the special form of service The services throughout the day were remark- ably well attended by a devout and earnest congregation of faithful Churchpeople I NOTICED—That, although rather early for our district, many young lambs have I already been seen.-That the spoil of the I Irfon and Towy hounds is up to the present 23 foxes.—That Tom Williams has donned the scarlet coat and velvet cap. That it is a good fit for a fitting man —That Miss Glynn Thomas is organising a concert and sketch in aid of the funds of our football club.

BUILTH WELLS

BUILTH WELLS. I WILL OF Ma REGINALD GILBERT.— Mr Reginald Gilbert, of the Pentre, Abergavenny, formerly of Llanelwedd Hall, Buiith. who died a Bombav oa December 23rd, aged 61 years, left etl & e of the gross value of A42,311, of which the neL personalty has been sworn at 128,756. To HELP THE CHURCH.—Mrs J. Ward and a band of faithful supporters are hard at work with their weekly teas in aid of Llandewi'r-cwm Church. Last week's tea I was given by Miss Prosser, Bryntirion, and was well attended. FUR AND FEATHKR—A meeting of the I Builth Vv ells and District Fur and Feather Association was held last week, when the finances of the association were carefully considered and arrangements to square up matters were agreed upon. The opinion was expressed that an increased interest in poultry breeding might be expected in the near future, on account of the great rise in prices, and that under the circumstances it would be possible to run a local show. TROUPE OF MINSTRELS.—It is rumoured that a local troupe of minstrels are about launching forth at Buiith Wells. In the past a minstrel troupe has always been well patronised, and first-class talent can be secured ST. DAVID'S DAY—The Welsh Com- mittee is making extensive arrangements for a celebration of St David's Day. The I' speeches are to be in Welsh, and a very successful gathering is expected. The secretary of the committee is the Rev. W. 0. Williams.

CLYDACHI

CLYDACH. ENTERTAINMENT.— On Monday last the monthly entertainment was held at Nazareth Sunday School. Book prizes for regular attendance were presented by Mr Gwilym Williams. The enter- tainment was presided over by Mr D. Jones and the accompanist was Mr E. Gunter LECTURE.—On Monday last in connec- tion with Bethlehem Church, a lecture was delivered by the Rev W. D. Nicholas entitled "Wit and Humour of the Pulpit." Mr H. Rosser, D.C., presided, and there was a good attendance. OBITUARY.—Death has removed an old and respected inhabitant in the person of Mrs J Williams of Glan- sychnant Cottages, who passed away on Monday last, after a long illness. The deceased who was 76 years of age had lived at Clydach for nearly the whole of her life. She had been connected with Siloam Congregational Church from childhood. WIDOW'S DRATH AFTER A FALL On Tuesday, at the ock and Fountain Inn, an enquiry was held by Mr R. H. A. Davies (district coroner) concerning the death of Mrs Caroline Roden, aged 68, of Old Post Office, who died on Saturday. Millicent Cook, wife of Richard Cook, said deceased was her sister and had lived with her for some time. Deceased had been suffering from bronchitis and had been attended by Dr Pritchard. She fell in her bedroom on the 5th inst. and cut her forehead very badly. She suffered from giddiness and had pre- viously fallen. Dr Minihan said he saw Mrs Roden on the 6th inst. and found a large wound in her forehead, reaching nearly to the bone. Death was due to shock following the fall, bronchitis, and weak heart. The fall accelerated death. The jury returned a verdict in accord- ance with the doctor's evidence.

LIABLE TO 800 FINE

LIABLE TO £ 800 FINE. Cwmtwrch Farmer and His Sheep. David George, Sarnfan, Cwmtwrch, was summoned at Ammanford police- court on Monday for breach of the Sheep Scab Order by allowing sheep to stray after receiving isolation notice. Deputy Chief Constable Evans said it was found that certah sheep had strayed and come in contact with other sheep after isolation notice had been served. The number of sheep in ques- tion was 160, and a fine of £5 per head could be imposed. He was under the impression that defendant had not tried to keep the sheep in, as the hedges were in very bad repair. The Chairman said it was a very serious case, and they could fine defen- dant ^800. They, however, would only fine him 63, including costs. loan Davies, Caelliau, Cwmtwrch, for a similar offence in respect of 59 sheep, was fined £2 inclusive.

Advertising

Lljwel Ploughing and Hedging Society will bold the 20th ANNUAL MATCH. at BRONYDDMAWR FARM, on SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22nd, 1913. Particulars on Posters. O. T, HAARYS HOWELLS, Hon. Sec.

IBUILTH FARMERS ORGAN IISATION

I BUILTH FARMERS' ORGAN. I ISATION. -0- Secretary's Resignation Protest. The annual mef,.tliig )f the Buiith branch of the Brecon and liadnor Farmers' Union was held at the Swan Hotel, Builth Wells, on Monday last, and there was a fair atten- dance. IVi r J Ll. Davies proposed a vote of thanks to the retiring chairman, Mr (I W Davies, who would not be able to serve again, having been promoted to the higher office of chairman of the Brecon and Radnor Farm- ers' Union.—Mr Thomas Davies seconded the motion. In replying, Mr < W I )avies expressed his confident belief in the value of the Union, and emphasised the importance of farmers joining it. He went on to propose that Mr Thomas Davies, Vronoleu, be appointed chairman of the branch. Mr G Webb seconded, and it was unani- mously carried. Mr J LI. Davies then proposed a vote of thanks to the secretary and treasurer, which was seconded by Mr Thomas Lewis, and supported by the chairman and Mr 0 W Davies. The two latter spoke in terms of the highest praise of the work of the secre- tary, for which he had received no payment. Messrs C Vaughan Weale and George Webb were elected vice-presidents of the THE SECRETARY SPEAKS HIS MIND. branch. Mr J Ll. )avies proposed, and Mr E Morgan seconded, that Mr Morgan Davies be re-elected secretary. Mr Morgan Davies said that under the existing circumstances he did not feel in- clined to continue the duties. He disagreed with the method adopted for the appoint- ment of the general secretary for the two counties at Talgarth. He was of opinion that the method was most unfair, and it suggested that there was not a man in Breconshire or Radnorshire who could do the work. The matter was cut and dried before they met, and when Mr Davies, Vronolleu, suggested that tenders should be invited, and only one besides the chairman was in favour of adopting that plan. He expected the members of the Union to sup- port the suggestion they had decided to put as one of their questions to the members of the County Council, viz., to make appoint- ments on tenders. If that method was the right one it should have been used at Tal- garth. But it appeared to him that they had Mr D J Griffiths ready, and that they had fixed the salary at £10 per annum. He maintained that others ought to have had a chance to tender. He felt no ill will against Mr Griffiths, but he thought they should have appointed a man from one of the two counties. Mr O W Davies said as chairman at the Talgarth meeting he was quite powerless, but he was sorry that the appointment had been made in such a way. fie was prepared to say, however, that the newly appointed secretary was an excellent man. The Chairman said the Builth branch was not responsible for what happened at Tal- garth. It was thought that the general secretary should be a business man who attended fairs and markets, where he would come in touch with the farmers. He hoped that they would be able to look at it in that way. Mr D J Griffiths said he was not a Here- ford man, although he lived at Hereford. All his business was in the counties of Brecon and Radnor. He attended nearly every market in the two counties, and he would make it his duty to watch the interest of the Union in the two counties. Mr Morgan Davies repeated that he had no bad feeling towards Mr Griffiths, but they knew that the speaker at the Talgarth meeting knew where to find him. He declined to act as secretary and he would sever his connection with the branch. Mr Williams, junior (Dolinwydd) was afterwards appointed secretary for the ensuing year.

TALGARTH FARMERS UNION

TALGARTH FARMERS' UNION. A meeting of the Talgarth branch of the Brecon and Radnor Farmers' Union was held in the Town Hall, Talgartb, un Monday evening, Mr M. Davies, Lower Porthamel, presiding. Amongst the members present were Mr Price (Trepbillip), Mr Rees (Bradwys), Mr Price (Llan- elieu), Mr Evans (Great Hovse), Mr L. Ricketts (Trebarried), Mr D. Hopkins (Bronllys Court), Mr Prosser (Trevithel), Mr Jones (Drain), Mr James (Wholehoase), Mr Walters (Gwrloddy), Mr Gwillim (Fostill), Mr Howis (Wernfawr), Mr Turner (Pentredaroe), Mr Jones (Minfield), Mr Price (TredoBtan Hall), Mr L. Powell (Trevecoa fawr), Dr. Hobert Williams, Mr Griffiths (sac. to the Brecon and Radnor Farmers' Union), Ac. After discussion on the advisability of altering the date of tbe financial year, on the recommen- dation of Mr Griffiths, Mr Hopkins proposed that the year should end on the 31st of December instead of the 31st of May, and it wag carried. Mr Prosser proposed, Mr Reea seconded, and it was resolved that all offioera should serve until then. Mr Price, Trephilhp, and Mr Davies, Lower Porthamel, were appointed representatives on the executive ommittAe for the two counties. Mr Griffiths, the new county secretary, addressed the meeting on questions of organisa- tion. He emphaslsed the fact that the Uniou was not antagonistic to land lords, and assured them that in South Herefordshire the Union was sup- ported by the landlords, who encouraged he movement as all landlords should do, being interested in agriculture. They now had several members of Parliament who were taking keen interest in agricultural questions, and these gentlemen looked to the Farmers' Union to give the views of the tenant farmers. (Hear, bear). Mr Griffiths went on to speak of the need for increasing the membership in Breconshire and suggested members in each district to solicit their friend to join. This suggestion was adopted and the following gentlemen were appointed to act in She districts in which they reside Mr Thomas (Wemllwydd), Mr Merwyn Davies (Lower Portb- amel), Mr Price (Tredustan), Mr Jones (Drain), Mr Jones (Lower House, Llyawen), Mr Walters (Gwrloddy), Mr R Price (Upper House, Tre- domen), Mr J Reea (Gilfach), Mr Morgan (Trewalter) Mr Edwards (Glanant), Mr James (Wholehoose)] and Mr L Ri°ke"s (Trebarried). Afterwards a discussion took place as to two members contesting the same seat on the County Council. At no arrangements could be made, it was decided the Union oould not interfere, but it was stated that Mr Price, Trephillip, was the nominee of the Farmers'Union, The Secretary, Mr Thomas, said that he intended standing as a farmers' candidate although eince also obosen by the Talgarth Liberal Aosocitsti n

TALGARTH1

TALGARTH. 1 loroo Piena'a SmaTy -At the Calvinistio Methodist Chapel Mr J. Phillips, auctioneer, of Cardiff, gave an address on his recollections of Talgarth people in hill school days. There were a large number present, with Mr J. J. Pngh in the chair. The address was illustrated by lantern viewe of old residents and houses at different plaoes in and near Talgarth about forty years ago, and the interest of She address was heightened by the fact that some of those present knew the characters mentioned. The lecturer was acoorded a hearty vole of thanks.

Great Sport With The Irfon and Towy Hounds

Great Sport With The Irfon and Towy Hounds [ BY BOG TRAMPER_] After a successful visit to the Caio district, I the ti-foti aiid Towy Hounds have returned to the home kennels at i >ir>;is Farm, I Jan wrtyd Wells. There bave been rnanv -uc cet-sful runs, the following two days being noteworthy- n On TuesHny, 1 1th inst., hounds met at Alltfelen, Llwynmadoc, a good field of 30. A move was made to "atitycelyn Wood, and a vixen was found at Garnwen and pounced upon so suddenly that she was practically killed on the spot. Mr T. P. Hope received the brush Hounds next found at (Jwmyr- anell,and ran right away to Bwlch-gor-llwyn, where their fox doubled back down the valley into Llwynmadoc Wood. Facing the open he ran p-11 mell over the top to Pencoilan Quarry, from thence to Cwmcam- march and up to (Jarreg-genow Reaching the top of the mountain, he doubled again, heading for Pantycelyn Wood. Crossing the valley near Tyncwm, he ran up to Lofty bar, where it was evident he was slightly mixed. When near Cefncendy he made a sudden double to Caegwyn, and raced to the top of Fronrydd, crossing to Bwlchmawr and Pistillgwyn. The gallant fellow was now lagging, though quickly he doubled again to Bwlchmawr Wood, but he shot his bolt in Fronrydd Dingle, and was killed after a ding-dong run of I hour and 20 minutes. Mr George, Pwllbo, had the brush. Hounds met on Saturday last at Llanfi- hangel-nantbran, a field of 20 Several covers were drawn without success, but a fox was eventually found at Bedwdyon, and with some difficulty was forced to the open. He ran with a ringing Tally-ho through 1' the dingle, making for the top of the moun- tain. Hounds rattled him along to Pentre- felin, where he doubled back to the top and ran along the mountain side to Penbryn, and crossed the brook at Cwmllen. Re- freshed and with much dash he crossed the Common, and then headed for the Railway Bridge, where a slight check occurred. Hounds regained the scent and were now making things very warm for their quarry, who, on reaching Park Farm, obtained a second refresher in the river Usk. Still game Reynard made his way along the banks of the river Cilienie, up to Derry Bridge, crossed the road, and over the brook to Cefnisaf Wood. Forced to the open, he crossed the Eppynt. to Cwmcynog, with hounds in full cry, and bravely struggled on to Cwmcynog Farm, but here he paid forfeit, after a hard run of 1 hour and 40 minutes. Mr Price, Llwynteg, received the brush, and Mr Davies, Brynmynherin, the mask Next meet on Saturday next at Clynsaur (Sugar Loaf) at 9 a. m

LLANAFANFAWR

LLANAFANFAWR. FUNNUAL -G,. IT sympathy is felt with Mr and M. to; Willifms, Bwlchcilian, oDd family in th", 1 OM th.-y have ;tig by ti, -i-atli of tbeir t! ird nou, Ivor Tb<>rn&p, at tie- early age of twelve vcira. h r Thomas had b ei "D invalid for home years, but the immediate cause of death was an attack of nieiHlep, which is very pre-alent in fch < 'liritrict The funeral took place on Thursday last, At Ttoedrliiwda- lar, io the pre-eoce of a large company of friends. Thp service at the house was con- duoted by thR Rev. D A Griffith (pastor). At the chapel a htlpfol sermon wfis delivered bv the Ro-,v. D A Griffith, b.iseil on Romans 8-28, and the service was taken hy the R-v. T James (Pisgah). At the graveside the pervioe was conducte1 by the RI>VR, D A Griffith and J C OweD (vioar). The chief mourners were the father and mother, two brothers aud two sifters Mr Margin Williams, Cwmfadoy (ri-hi dtfither) Mrs Thomas, K IH,,3 (aunt), Mrs Puyh, W vnuf;: wr (aim t), Mrs Jost pli. Bwlch. WHO ( ), Misses William*, ) 'n, (, g (a-ntfi). Tito f >l!owing acted as hr arors — Mt cfirs T Williams (father), Emryp Williams (I)'other), T Payh (coasio), ana John Williams 1 QMiisio). Amorit; those pretext wer" :—Mr Jot,ei, (Ddderwen), Mrs pfI!¿l. (Cribarth), Mrs Po.h (Frouwen), Mr Davies (BrYDNI)- ), Mr a-ni Mrs Lt wi.~< (Dolfelin) Mr Daves (Mae-iy- yroe ), Mr and Mrs Powell (Llanerehlwyd), Mr D i vies (Nantyfarddu). Mr Lewis (Gianes gob) Mr AHRER! Williams (Llethrdu), Mr LtwiR (Cduhawrhr), M Isaac Heavan (R'.ivs- Iog), Mr Fred (P re), Mr Joces (Ovm- t hwefri), Mr Prio, Bowci (Aberuefel), Mr Rees Evans (Pt-nlau), Mr D Blytbe (Bwlchadwynt), Mr .;wj Mrs Jooes (Owmcrooau), Mr Richards (DoL-elle), Mr T Jones (Glancelle), Mr Bowen ('Cwmdidas), Mr Davie- (Navitg-yn), Mrs Daviis (Gelynen), Mr Jones (PeDrhiwmoch), Mr Protheroe (Tyocofl), Messrs E 'wards (School Hone"). Rhyn Davies (Gwt rumytmeh), Ni-ah Edw-irds (GorRwen), Williams (Llwyn. oanol), Philips (Esgairgoch), Samuel (Llanercbpasge), and Willie Davies (O'kfield). The funeral arrangements were ably oarried out ny Mr Prion, Benlab. PERSONAL.-COUgrat,,il4tiinF4 to Mr Charles Tortoni, wbo, with tbH tearu belonging to Mr E Davies, Llanaf-oi farm,-ncceeded in winning the third prize at Builth Ploughing March.

CRAY

CRAY. PARISH COUNCIL SATURDAY.—Present Messrs. D. W. Price, Nantyrharn (chair- man) David Davies, I^lynhir John Thomas, Bailygwern and Thomas Price, Tygwyn, together with Mr Thomas Thomas, clerk. A precept was drawn on the overseers, and several bills were passed for payment. The term ot the representatives of the Parish Council on the body of managers Cray Council School having expired, Messrs. D. O. Thomas, Llwynneuadd, and W. Jones, Cwmuchaf, were unanimously re-appoint- ed for another term of three years. Mr John Thomas, Bailygwern, was elected on the Cray Piano Committee. The membership of the latter committee has now been filled, Mr D. O. Thomas having been appointed to represent the school managers. FUNItRAL.- The funeral took place on the 12th inst. at Cray C. M. Churchyard of Mrs Margaret Jones, of Swansea, for- merely of Creigian, Cray, and Trecastle and Pentrefelin, at the ripe age of 92. Deceased's husband, who had prede- ceased her about 32 years, and was buried at Cray. was for many years in service at Nantyrharn. The ministers officiating at the chapel and graveside were Rev. D Rhys, C. M., Devynnog. and Rev. W. O. Davies, Vicar of Cray. The principal mourners were entertained at the chapel vestry by Mr and Mrs Price, Nantyrharn. ANNUAL RIS"DDPOD.-On all hands the Bisteddfod which took place on Fri- day last at the Conncil School was pro- nounced to be the most successful ever held in Cray. The schoolroom was un- comfortably packed, but the tactful Chairman (Mr D. O. Thomas, Llwynneu- I add. !> p t tiling- without a hitch. He was supported on the platform the Rev. W. O. Davies, Vicar of Cray Ti ;i t- adjudicator lor music was Mr W. T Davies, Talgarth, while Mr G. T. Jones, (Midog Fychan) Brecon, adjudicated 111 the literary sections. Both were greatly ple-.ised with the high standard or the competitions. Mr David Lewis, Cwm- padest, was an energetic secretary, and Mr Tom Davies, was treasurer; and the accompanist, Miss L. A Williams, Cray Reservoir, was untiring'at the piano. We were pleased to note the debut of an- other young pianist in the person of Miss M Davies,Aberrhuddnant,Cray, of whom we hope to hear more in future. Miss Williams also adjudicated the prize-bags, and awarded a consolation prize to the second best in the competition. Awards etc. :—Solo for girls under 15, Clyw ni, fwyn Waredwr"- I, Ellen J. Evans, Gochgarreg. Craig; 2, Phoebe M Thomas, Nantddu, Cray. Recitation, under 10—Peter M. Davies, Tygwyn, Cray 2, David T Price, Tygwyn, Crav. Solo for those who had not won a prize, "Teyrn y Coed"-i, D. H. Thomas, Bailygwern, Cray; 2, Dan Jones, Pen- yrynys, Cray. Solo under 10, Goleu'r dydd sy'n pallu "—Equal, Margaret H. Jones, Penyrynys, Peter M. Davies, Ellen J. Evans. Recitation under 15. "Gwna bobpeth yn iawn "-i, Katie Price, Castledu, Sennybridge 2 (equal), P M Davies and Marghretta Price, Castledu, Sennybridge. Soprano solo, •' Hen Iaith fy Mam "-i, Miss Price, Cefnygof, Llandilo'rfan. Duett, tenor and bass, Beth, wyliedydd, an y nos?"—Messrs T Price and T Phillips. Prize bags-I, Miss Price, Sennybridge 2, Miss Jones, Meuty- fechan, Cray. Solo for boys under 15, Difyrwch y Bienen "—i, W B Davies, Tygwyn, Cray 2, P. Davies, Tygwyn, Cray. Quartette, "Mi garion fod yn angel "—Brychgoed Quartette Party. Tenor solo, Bugeiles y Glyn"- Tom Evans, Black Horse, Tre- castle. Open recitation, Araeth Brutus "-D Rees, Marchogdir. Essay, Samson" equal, W 0 Thomas, Cwmneuynydd, Cray, D Lewis, Cwm- padest, Cray. Sight-singing test-I, Tom Davies, Brynmill, Cray; a, H Jones, Cwmuc iaf, Cray. Poem to "Cray's New Poem "-D Lewis, Cwmpadest. Mixed choir, Dyma y Dydd "-Cray Choir, conducted by Mr J Jones, Post Office. Male voice choirs, "Awn tua'r Gadfaes" —Trecastle, Llandilo and Cwmdwr United, conducted by Mr T Evans, Trecastle.

WORK IN THE GARDEN

WORK IN THE GARDEN. BY AN F.R.H.S. SMALL, BUT VERY TROUBLESOME. Greenhouse pests are capable of enormoua damage, and, valuable pi Ante always seem to be the most favoured objecbs of attack. I have previously dealt with the methodb of fumigating which, on the whole, are the sim- plest and moat efficacious ways of keeping them in check. But the fact that several reader* have uked questions on the subject suggests that rather more detailed informa- tion on the principal paste would be of use and interest. On the whole, the worst greenhouse pest 18 the minute red spider. Large red spiders which are often seen running about the soil need not be confused with this, for it is no larger than a pin point, and is almost in- visible to the naked eye. It does damage by racking the sap, and eo gradually weakens the plants, causing them to sicken. The 134AI breeds most readily in a hot, dry atmosphere, and plants suffering from drought at the roote are specially liable to attack. They are much checked by damping down walk, walks, and benches when the weather is hot and dry. If all plants can be removed from the house for the time being, sulphur fnines will destroy any red spider left behind. Much syringing should remove the peet from the plants. Another troublesome pest is mealy bug, which ie easily distinguished by its pink body being covered with a white meal. The bugs are not very active, but they will, neverthe- less, crawl about a great (leal, and do a lot of injury by puncturing the epidermis of the f « THBKifi GKKENHOTTSE PESTS. X. Woodkmse. 2. Red Spider. 3. Mealy Bu £ > leaves and -stems, and extracting the sap. The females lay their eggs in small groups and) cover them with a fine cottony substance. This insect multiplies very rapidly, and is difficult to eradicate when once it gets thoroughly established in a greenhouse. If it infests grape vinos it v. ill give much trouble, as the bugs will get i)]o the bunches and quite spoil their appearance. If tireated early it can' be eradicated by touching each mealy spot with methylated spirits on & bit of sponge. The common woodlouse is usually not taken very seriously, but it can do much damage by eating seedlings, flower buds, ripening fruit, orchid roots, &c. In the day they harbour under any rubbieh, and come out to feed at might. Trapping with unwashed flower-pots filled with hay, moss, 

Advertising

k, BORWICKS^ I BAKING POWDER I

POULTRY AND PETS

POULTRY AND PETS. PROFITABLE HOBBIES. BY "UTILITY." UNFERTILE EGGS. These are a great disappointment to t,h() who require the eggs for incubation, and if the complaint continues it means that there will be very few spring chickens. Unfertile gg" in purchased sittings arc generally understood—unless otherwise stipulated— to be replaced once, so that they are to be avoided if anyhow po^«sible by those who "ell them as well as by tho-, who want to hatch them. A common cau « of the complaint is that the hens or the male bird. or both, are ill v too fat a condition. At the beginning of the breeding season the birds are often fat, and in such a conditi ,n they are unlikely to make satisfactory breeders. Fat hens not I only produce a large percentage of unfertile eggs. but they are leas prolific than are those in lean, hard condition. Fat birds, too, are generally It, iiargic and laS!, with the result that they do not perform their work in a satisfactory manner. Too many hens with the male bird frequently re- sults in unfertile eggs, and if it is found that these are bnng produced the number should be reduced. Breeding stock which are the progeny of related parents are usually rather apt to produce sterile eggs. POPULAR BANTAMS. Bantams are very interesting little crea- tures, and give a good deal of pleasure to their breeders; but it is, of course, absurd to say that they have any particular utility, and hence it is only possible at rare intervals to deal with them specially in this column, al- though I am always pleased to give advice oO them whenever it may be needed Among the most popular bantam varieties are rosecombs, which are bred in two colours, viz., black and white, although attempts Among the most popular bantam varieties are rosecombs, which are bred in two colours, viz., black and white, although attempts have been made to introduce other sorts. Va- doubtedly the chief beauty of rosecombs is is their headgear. The head is broad and short, the comb long, square-fronted, level on top, crowded with small regular spikes, tapering towards the leader, which is stout at the base, long and straight, and terminates in a spike. The ideal comb rises slightly from the front to the extreme end of the leader. So WHITE ROSECOMB BANTAMS. r far as the rest of the face is concerned, the ear-lobes are round, thick, and smoc.ii, those of the cock being not smaller than a sixpenos or larger than a shilling, and of the hen not larger than a threepenny piece. The body is round and cobby, the back short, the wings long and drooping, the tail, carried w«I back, consisting of broad feathers, the cock's sickles being long, broad from base to end, and well circled with a bold sweep. The legs are short, the shanks round and fine, and the toes well spread. Specimens which are to attain success is competition must essentially possess eorreot headgear, following which in importanos come type, L ¡¡, and condition, then colour. THE WONDEIRFUL SUSSEX FOWL. In the Year-Book of the Table Poultry Club, to which I referred recently, Mr. S. C. fiharpe, of the Uckfieid Agricultural College, writes that with every confidence he can re- oommend the Siissex breed as an all-round general fowl for winter egg production and for table chickens. He adds: We know the Sussex must be a good winter layer, or we should not bee the hundreds of chickens early in the spring in the fattening coops through- out the large fattening districts in this coun- try. In my opinion, there is not very much difference in the varieties of Sussex for table use; they axe all excellent, but for laying in winter I do prefer the light Sussex, and they make capital mothers for bringing up early broods, and, having plenty of feather, they are well adapted for this purpose. "Now, as to the Sussex for table chickens, their good points are many. First, and per- haps the greatest feature, is their hardiness and quick growth. If we are going to have a breed for rearing table chickens, we musl have something which will be ready for mar- ket at the earliest possible moment, and having tried a good maony breeds and varie- ties in my time I can say there is nothing which groove so fast and strong as the Sussex. They feather quickly, and this is, of courss, a point in their favour. They are exoe(>» tionally hardy and easy to rear. I mean by this, they are a class of chicken which can be reared on a clay soil or in bleak situations, a-nd not seem much the worse for the dis- advantage. I have many times seen 1: b Sussex chickens collected by the higgler' and paid for at 3s. 6d. each, the birds bsinf under the age of twelve weeks." 1 ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. | R. T. W." — SINGLS-COMBED BIRDS 8M often to be found in a hatch of white wyea- dottes and other roeecomb breeds. Their utility qualities are not likely to be affected, but do not breed from them. "W."—To PREVENT BIRDS FLYING TM simplest plan is to fix aloM the top of the aoi Or fenoe either two or wttee wires or some wire netting which inclines inwards. Failias this the hens must each have six or seven ol the flight feaitbers of one wing cut off clean at the quills. It is necessary to take strong measures to prevent fowls getting into neigfr bours' gardens. I I B. C. G. "GuxwxA FOWLS, if kept under suitable conditions, prove very profitable. They require plenty of space, however, and it is useless to attempt to confine them in rune. They almost invariably steal their nests, and it is inadvisable to interfere with them in any way during the period of incubation. The he are extremely wild, and if they think their nests have been discovered, they nearly ahmY8 forsake their eggs. N. H." --STORING FERTILB EGGS for a few days before the number required for a sitting can be made up is a common practice. 1 The eggs should not rem-aiii in too dry a place, but be stored in a small box in the bottom of which is plooed a square of fresh ] grass turf to prevent low of moisture. The eggs should be turned daily to prevent the yolk settling. The longest time that egge may with safety be kept depends whether natural or artificial meame are to be employed in the hatching process. Egøa may be kept three I weeks or even a month before putting under a hen, but with an incubator the sooner after being laid the better. Chickens are stronger in proportion to the freshness of the eggs. Po,.ie.THE LAYING OF LARGI EQo. re- sults from careful selection and breeding, combined with good methods of feeding. Small eggs may often be traced to the very common error of breeding from precocious, heavy-laying pullets that have had no chanes to mature. The progeny of these is likely to be small and weakly, and their eggs are gene- rally on the small side. The size of eggs can best be maintained by breeding from mature hens in their second season, and by specially selecting those hens that lay good-sized eggs, providea thsy are consistent ana fairly prolue. TO CORRESPONDK. At eerreeoondenoe affecting this sdwi should be addressed to "Utility," esrs of the Iditor. Requests for special information must bs MH» pealed 1w a stampsd addressed envelops. i