Collection Title: Brecon county times, Neath gazette and general advertiser

edition: Supplement

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 3 of 6 Next Last
Full Screen
15 articles on this page
ZZZZtj11iT t EVAN EVANS BEVAN Esq JP 11 t HIGH SHERIFF 19131914

ZZZZ==- ,j ■■ ■■ T t EVAN EVANS BEVAN, Esq., J.P., 1+1 t HIGH SHERIFF 1913-1914.. R COPYRIGHT. BY EDWIN DAVIES. 11 '1 Those whose particular business it is u. Prepare legal documents relating to transfer of property in a county like hconshire, cannot fail to be impressed With the fact that the accumulation of ealth in great industrial centres fre- ently results in its being distributed k tlie purchase of land, and other j/°Perty, in agricultural districts. When, successive generations, it has become j ssary for the representatives of once I Qr Werful landowners, for some reason r other, to dispose of the ancestral j ^ates, we frequently find that the ^chasers, and founders of new estates, men who have acquired wealth by a e&d application of their talents and u^gies to industrial pursuits. When e great Crawshay and Bailey families, two and three generations ago, had passed millions from the works of f^ntyglo, Tredegar, and Cyfarthfa, they Proceeded to find land, create great ^tates> and bnild magnificent palaces. ^<1 here they established families which, due course, took their places with the JShest in the land, in social standing, in conducting the business of the °Uuty an(i the nation. The repre- ^tatives of the older families passed >>l of the life of the county, and their th es knew them no more. A.nd almost e ? only records we now have of their ^tence are the old deeds, the wills, 1 OFT lists of sheriffs. For the latter te C-e ^as always ^een the hall-mark of ♦jJ^torial possessions and influence. office in Breconshire, for many ars, has been filled by gentlemen who j held high place in the ranks of men esteemed for the parts they have in those enormous industrial fzt erprises, which have made Wales ^ous the world over. The latest addition to this class of pfen is Mr Evan Evans Bevan, the ofesent high sheriff. He is the only son iate £ )avid Bevan, Esq., of Cadox- y Neath, where he was born in the J^.r 1854. Bevan's father was a Cwmavon, near Port Talbot, 5^ Was the son of Mr Evan Bevan, a e-vor holding a very important and qSPonsible position under the old Cwm- Coal Company The High Sheriff's ^other was the only daughter of the late Evans, Esq., of Cadoxton, Neath, ^jpntleman who was most popular with L Masses in that district. He owned celebrated Vale of Neath Brewery at Uh ton» Neath, and with his son-in-law late Mr David Bevan) was joint Q ^Prietor of the collieries at the Grai g, tV03c*on» anc* Rhyddings, Neath. (Je ^a^er gentleman, subsequent to the e of Mr Evan Evans, further fended the Dulas Valley Colliery oper- and to these enterprises the s^Sh Sheriff has devoted himself with abir Untiring energy and conspicuous of that he is now at the head of one tIte he largest colliery undertakings in Ofy ^hole of the anthracite district. He §is?S tlle Onllwyn, Maesmarchog, Seven t)b1 rs> and Brynteg Collieries in the tlr as Valley, and also the Vale of Neath the ery' at Cadoxton, Neath. It will & £ .*efore be understood that Mr Evans *s a very large employer of labour hat part of the Principality. §h c?ides these industries, the High is the proprietor of considerable *Vh estates in Breconshire and else- sjj;ere> much of his property in Brecon- f0 re being classed with the best to be within its boundaries. He is ^P^ted to be a man 0f considerable he and it is pleasing to learn that 3} *s known, in the more immediate trict in which his interests are pecu-4 liarly centred, to be a man who recognises that great opportunities are associated with the possession of a full purse. He is a man of great generosity, but dis- tributes his favours unostentatiously, for which the poor are grateful. He is identified with several philanthropic institutions, and subscribes liberally to their funds. The High Sheriff is a Churchman, and his gifts in this direction, which are on an extensive scale, are distributed with the utmost readiness. His latest benefaction to the Church is the erection of a substantial edifice at Seven Sisters, the living of which he has recently endowed. In politics, the High Sheriff identifies himself with the fortunes of the Conservative party, and as he is a man who only acts after due deliber- ation, it may be taken for granted that his convictions have been formed because he believes in the soundness of the principles advocated by that party. Mr E. Evans Bevan lives at Cadoxton House, Neath, a municipal town of considerable antiquity, possessing, as it does, the remains of a castle which is stated to have been enlarged in 1090, and a Cistercian abbey founded in 1130. Of this Borough, he was Mayor three times, and is also a Justice of the Peace. In this district he is known as a man possessing heavy commercial obligations, which he discharges with consistent fidelity. Being at the head of so many extensive undertakings, and having them all under his personal observation, and almost active management, it follows that the High Sheriff must be possessed of qualities of an unusual character, in order to deal so successfully with them. It has often been remarked by keen business men, who know what they are talking about, that the High Sheriff must have a mind well informed, and is endowed with unflagging industry. He has a clear grasp of all the details necessary in the conduct of every one of his undertakings, and he personally sees that everything associated with them is thoroughly and systematically carried out. Such a gentleman, being one of high character, is bound to grace the exalted office to which he has been elected. Many great and distinguished men have held this office before him in Breconshire, and it has ever been one which county men have aspired to hold, and have endeavoured to hold in such a manner as in no way to detract from the lustre of its associations. Mr Evans Bevan, judging by his past record, will be no exception to this general rule and he may be depended upon to discharge his duties, and the duties of the office, honourably and with befitting dignity. The lady who shares the honours of the office to which Mr Evans Bevan has been elected, is Caroline, daughter of the late Dr. Richard Thomas, formerly of Abernant, Glynneath, afterwards of Llanelly. The High Sheriff and Mrs Evans Bevan have one son and one daughter. During his year of office, Mr Evans Bevan may be called upon to take part in official and social events, and the people of the county will be certain to receive him and his family with the utmost cordiality and good- will, not only on account of the position he holds as High Sheriff, but also because of those wide responsibilities which he has cheerfully embraced, and in which he has been so eminently successful. EDWIN DAVIES. Next Week's Sketch and Portrait— Sir JOHN DILLWYN LLEWELYN, Bart., Penllergaer, Swansea.

GWENDDWR

GWENDDWR. 'r LATB MRS M. LEWIS, EBBW VALE.— Regret to bear of tbe death of Mrs Mary ^'8. of Ebbw Vale, which took place on ^ll^ay last, at the comparatively early age of a°d after a very short illness. The I-Rc-d was a native of the parish, having th!* k°rn in Gwenddwr village) a daughter of bQj 'ate Mr John Davits, blacksmith. The *as brought by train and buried in tbe be8drgatioDal CbspEl, Criokadarn, on Wed. b't¡d} (yesterday). Deceased leaves a hue- %*<} several yonne children, and a brother •Mr ^ter. viz., Mrs E Bevan (Hendy) and thQ Davies (Unicoro Inn), with whom Rt"4,teiit Bvinpathy is felt. Q at SUNDAY SCHOOL.—On Sunday last, fAI41a. L' Parish Charcb, was celebrated the ^'sary of tbe opening of a Church Sanday !in 'he parish, which a few years ago "ardly boast of 20 children. To-day we ;114 a Sunday School with an average attend. attetS1 35> while 10 have made every possible h&v a°ce, and nearly doable that number °Qly cuiBsed two or three times. It is of uotice that the youog people cf this 1 PDt tbe ob°robyard lD order and d the paths, and held a concert to raiBe l^J for the beating of tbe church. The t0 suggestion is to have the roof of tbe church repaired, aud it seems a pity that a branch of tbe C.E.M.S. v0t be started iu the parieb, as every ^Hin Church work is in a flourishing con- > and this would be one means of continued exertions. When the School was started some cynics He* eti tbat ifc won,d la8t foar moDths> ] tyw to-day there are over 50 on the books, ( 8 energetic te.icbers, viz., Mr D Q.^CTyeaovas, the superintendent), Misses py^'iani8, North, A Goodin (Cwm-mawr), J?nes (Garth), all of whom are regnlar Patt*ot in their duties. The order of 0eleLCes. SuDday last was :—Matins and iH0f .at>°u of tbe Holy Communion in tbe a shortened form of Evensong with f P'ayers and hymns and Catechism in 6 h a*ternoon, and Evensong and sermon at the 7-bete good attendances at all M'V'C68' were taken by the Vicar, it joTT188 k Williams presided at the organ. fieoi-B* tbat tbe -^ev- R Jones, organising *°r tl A °' ^bnrcb of England Sunday Sohools Ukn ^rcb^eftoonry, will be able to come and the next quarterly children's service. I

BEULAH

BEULAH. SINGING REHBAESAL.—On Friday evening a rehearsal was held at the Congregational Chapel for the aiinual Festival of the Congre- gational Churches of Llanwrtyd Wells, Beulah, Capel Rhos, Abergwesyn, and Troedrbiwdalar. Mr John Thomas, Llanwrtyd, conducted, and a large number of the members of the consti. tuent churobes were in attendance. ENTERTAINMENT.—Au hour's most fascinating entertainment was given by Mr A Foote ("The Wandering Welsh Boy"), travelling entertainer to the day school obildrtn, at the close of the afternoon session on Toesday week. The performance evoked much laughter, and helpful moral lessons were introduced by the performer in bappy language. KING'S BIRTHDAY.—Tuesday, the 3rd instant, being the King'" birthday, the Union Jack waB hoisted in the school playground throughout the day, and during the recreation interval teachers and scholars assembled round the ensign, and sainted and sang the National Anthem and "Flag of Britain." During the last hour on Monday morning the celebration of the programme for Empire Day observance was gone through, addresses being given by the vicar and headmaster. PERSONAL.—Mr Morgan Thomas, R.S.S., took part in two classes in the shoeing competition at the Bath and West show held at Truro last week; and, considering the very large number of competitors, did very well indeed in securing the fifth place in one class (Reserve) and very highly commended iu the other class. SALE.—A sale of household furniture and otber effects took place at Llwynhowel on Saturday afternoon last. The auctioneer was Mr G V Price. There was a good attendance of buyers, and the articles found a ready sale, satisfactory prices being realised. The occu- piers, Mr and Mrs Davies, are going abroad.

GARTH

GARTH. TORRENTIAL RAIN.—One of the heaviest downpours of rain ever experienced in this locality fell on the afternoon of Monday week. The shower lasted only a few minutes, but the road between Garth and Cilmery was literally scoured. Scarcely any rain fell at Beulab.

Advertising

Fw Cakw, Pastry/Pudding^^Pi^k [BORWICKSI Wbajonqpowde^ -L_

CRICKHOWELL SENSATION REVIVED

CRICKHOWELL SENSATION REVIVED. Mr. Blennerhassett Arrested. Found in British Colombia. A little over a year ago, it will be remem- bered, a sensation was caused throughout Breconshire by the announcement that Mr Irvine Blennerhassett, who for about twenty- four years bad been cierk to the Crickhowell Board of Guardians, was missing from the district, and there was considerable specula- tion in the county generally, and in the Crick. howell district in particular, as to what bad become of him. Mr Blennerhassett held, among other numerous appointments, the clerkship of the Criokbowell Rural District Council. Inevitably many ramours went about as to tht: cause of his disappearance, the gravest of which was a report alleging that the audit of the Union and District Counoil Accounts had revealed serious discrepancies. Then came the sadden announcement of the resignation by Mr Blennerhassett of the various offices held by him and on March 27tb, 1912, the Breconshire police issued the following detailed statement:- Wanted, on warrant, in this county, charged with a aeriet3 of forgeries, whereby the Crick. howell Board of Guardians and the Rural District Couucil have been defrauded of about X550, Irvine Blennerhassett, late clerk to the Crickbowell Board of Guardians and Rural District Council, aged 47 years, height 6ft lOin or 6ft llin, build proportionate, weight about 12-1 st, hair brown, turning grey, bald on 2 11 top, no whiskers, moustache brown taming upwards, complexion fair, eyes grey or blue, receding forehead, dimple in chin, walks erect, rather swaggering in gait, left foot turns a little inwards, and is carried forward with a slight circular motion, has a hacking cough, and generally applies his hand to his mouth when coughing; gentlemanly appearance and address; has frequently officiated as judge at carriage horses and agricultural shows is fond of billiards, generally smokes cigars, is a flaent and cultivated speaker, frequents first- olass hotels, native of Ireland, wife and family reside at Llangattook, Criokhoweil; usual dress white or green trilby bat, grey breeches, black leggings, or light suit, *r silk bat and frook coat. In all probability will be foand stylishly dressed. It is believed be left Llao- gattock in a motor car about midnight on the 20th inst. He will probably try to disguise himself, and it is believed h3 will endeavour to leave the ooantry. It is earnestly requested that every possible search and inquiry for the above-described man will be immediately made at hotels and shipping offices, where he may have booked or may yet book bis passage abroad, and have outgoing boats watohed. If found arrest and communicate with the under- signed, when an escort, with warrant, will be sent for him.—H Hand (Deputy Chief-con- stable). The report that Mr Blennerhassett was missing led to some animated disaussions among the members of the Board of Guardiaus, and the Local Government Bodrd stepped in and informed the Guardians that in view of the fact that they had deferred proceedings for a fortnight, they thought it right to com- municate the facts to the Director of Public Prosecutions, and it was at his instance a warrant was obtained for the arrest of Mr Blennerhassett. During the intervening months the Scotland Yard authorities bad been working diligently. It is reported that it came to their knowledge some time since that Mr Blennerhassett had crossed the Atlantic, and quietly and patiently British and American detectives prosecuted their inquiries in the New World. Some months ago the police bad cause to believe that Mr Blennerhasset bad taken up bis abode in Pittsburg, the great United States centre of iron and steel manufacture. What happened immediately after this discovery is not yet known, bat foe some reason or other it is asserted Mr Blennerhassett left Pittsburg some few days ago; however, be was arrested in British Columbia. With regard to statements that Ut perBans to whom he was intimately kaown are being sent oat for the purpose of establishing identification, and that they will be aocompanied by a couple of polioe officers, whose duty it will be to bring Mr Blenner- hassett back to this coantry, we understand that nothing has been definitely settled. The Western Mail states that the charges which will be made against Mr Blennerhassett will be of a serious character, and will involve forgery, falsification of accounts, and mis- appropriation of public money. Messrs Lewis and Box, solicitors, of Cardiff, are acting in the matter for the Publio Prosecutor. Mr Blennerhassett was not only well-known in the neighbourhcod of Crickhowell, where he started iu business as an auctioneer and accountant many years ago, but he was also a familiar figure in Cardiff and Newport. He is about 53 years of age, and is of a bright and breezy disposition, and food ot all forms of sport. It is expected he will arrive in this country in about a month's time. A Crop of Rumours. Many times during the last year a rumour has spread that Mr Blennerhassett had been arrested. According to statements circulated from time to time be has been in almost every part of the world. It was said at one time that he was in France, then that he went down in the Titanic, and subsequently he was by popular rumour brought to hfe and located in Chili. Rumours were also persistent at that time that his whereabouts were known to the authorities, who, it was said, were ready to lay their hands OR him at an opportune moment. Then it was stated that in response to urgent messages from friends in this country, who scented danger, he made tracks for Peru, where it was said that the difficulty of apprehending him was enhanced by the fact that England has no extradition treaty with that country, The weeks and months went on, however, and, no reliable news forth- coming, the matter was at last almost forgotten by the public. ALLEGED SECRET VISIT TO ABERGAVENNY. At Abergavenny a Press representative has been told an almost incredible story of a secret and hurried visit paid to his wife and family at Abergavenny by Mr Blenuerhassett some four months ago. The story runs that Mrs Blenner- hassett, who up to then bad lived at Llan. gattocK, Crickhowell, had taken a house in Western road, Abergavenny, and to this rather quite place Mr Blennerhaesett is said to have driven up in a cab at four o'clock one morning Where he came from or how he reached the district without being seen are questions which cannot be answered, but two or three local people assert that they saw him. One of these witnesses avers that she saw a man alight from a eab and enter the house taken by the Blenner- bassetts, and is confident that he was none other than Mr Blennerhassett himself. It is said that he stayed one day and left as secretly as he had arrived, and that it was after this incident that he was traced from London to the States. Another story is that Mr Blennerhassett secured a situation as clerk in an office in the States. One morning he was sitting at his desk, when suddenly looking up he was accosted with the query "Hello I How's Abergavenny look- ing ?" With as much composure as he could assume (so the story goes) Mr Blennerhassett replied, "All right," but after lunch he was missing and was not seen in that particular office again.

BUILTH GUARDIANS PBACE DISTURBED

BUILTH GUARDIANS' PBACE DISTURBED. Threat to Appeal to the Local Government Board. A meeting of the Builth Board of Guardians on Monday was characterised by a breezy dis- cussion on the appointment of the Boarding- out Committee, and a threat by Mr J Jones (Gelynen), to appeal to the Local Government Board if he were not furnished with a satis- factory reply. There were present Mr Thomas Davies, Vronolen (presiding), the Revs. H A Crosbie, D Owen, and W A Williams, Messrs E D Thomas, Evan Button, H Evan Thomas, Thomas Davies, S Aubrey, Tbomas, James Jones, W Protbero, John Jones, E Probert, T Pugb, Wernfawr; John Price, John James, W Jones, J L Davies, D Jones, Roger Powell, J B Richards, C W Woosnam, Edward Owen, Rees Davies, and William Powell, with Mr Reginald J Owen (clerk), and other officials. The Master reported that during the past fortnight he had relieved 156 vagrants, against 232 for the corresponding period last year, a decrease of 76. The inmates numbered 29, as compared with 29 in the corresponding period last year. Thanks were tendered to Messrs. Alfred Seymoor and William White, both of Builth Wells, for sending parcels of magazines for the use of the inmates. The Breoon Board of Guardians wrote asking for the appointment of delegates to meet representatives of the other Breconshire Unions to discuss the administration of relief to casual paupers. An important question, the Clerk thought, was how to deal with tha feeding of people who were genuine "out-of-works, as distinct | from the regular tramps. Carmarthenshire and Pembrokeshire Unions were about to establish food stations. The Clerk remarked that some so-called casuals were abusing tbe Insurance Aot. They begged sevenpence, stamped their cards, and thus evaded the tasks at the several work- houses. The Chairman. Mr E Aubrey Thomas, and the Clerk were appointed delegates to attend the conference. Mr Roger Evans reported on the advisability of subscribing towards the funds of the pro- posed Nursing Association for Llanwrtyd Wells. He held the opinion that all poor patients within the district would be attended by the nurse. The Clerk was authorised to write to the effect that the Board would subscribe to the Association funds, bat that the amount would not be fixed until the institution had been formed, and in working order. AN UNPLEASANT INCIDENT. Mr J Jones, cne of the Guardians for Builth, objected to the Boarding-oat Committee, on the grorcnd that it was self-appointed, and not elected in open Board meeting. One member of that body, he noticed, was rejected by the ratepayers some time ago, and he believed was in reoeipt of payment forbia duties. The Clerk absolutely denied Mr Jones' state- ment. The gentleman referred to was Mr John Pierce, and be had. Dever received a single penny for acting as honorary secretary of the Boarding-out Committee, but had done the duties withoat any remuneration whatever, whilst other Boards of Gaardians paid for such services. The Chairman: I hope, Mr Jones, wo shall go along peaceably here we have for a long time. Mr J Jonee: Yes, as long as things are done openly at tbe meetings of this Board. If I cannot get satisfactory replies to my questions | here I shall go to tbe Local Government Board. ( The Chairman: This body has been eleeted in the ueual way, nnd as required by the Local Government Board. Mr Pierce was appointed an the committee because he bad done con. j siderable work gratuitously. Mr J Jones: Why don't you appoint persons who are on the Board on the committee ? I have been sent bere with 227 voters behind me, and I am going to see things are done properly and openly. The Clerk: The committee was formed on the recommendation of the old Boarding.out Committee, and confirmed by the whole Board at the last meeting. Mr C W Woosnamr who rose to a point of order, remarked that the Board's time should not be occupied by false statements, and the gentleman who bad jast made them should have been called to order. They had impor- tant basineea to deal with, and be suggested they should proceed with it. The matter then dropped.

BRONLLYS I

BRONLLYS." CHURCH DEFENCE MEETING. A Church Defence meeting was held at Bronllys, on Monday evening, the speaker being Mr Hughes, of Bangor. There was a large attendance, in- cluding Alderman Mervyn Davies, Lower Porthamel, who presided the Rev. T H Bevan, rector of Bronllys Rev. W S and Mrs Probert, Talgarth Vicarage, and Mr Probert, senr. Mr, Mrs, and Miss Mills, Tyrbryn Dr. and Mrs Hubert Williams Mr T Price, C.C., Tre. phillip Mr W James; Mr and Mrs R 0 Rees, Bradwys Mrs Evans, Bronllys Castle Mr Mr and Miss Edwards Misses Royston, Villa Mr and Mrs Penry Thomas; Mr Williams, Parkybran Mr J P Prosser, Trevithel Mr Turner, Pentresolars etc. The Chairman, in introducing the speaker, pointed out that Church people were not the attacking party, but were on the defence, defending their own rights.—Mr Hughes, in the course of an able address, said he had asked a Nonconformist the meaning of Disestablishment, and his answer was To improve the Church." (Laughter). There were only two clauses, on Disestablishment in the Bill, however, which would be no good to any denomination. The Irish Church Bill was better than the Welsh. The Irish Church was established by the State, who had taken away what they had given, allowing the Church to keep 15s 6d in the JL The position was different in this country. It Was not the State who had made the Church, bnt the Church, by their unity, bad made the State. The Church in Wales was doing good work it was a healthy Church, and was not a decreasing Church. This iniquitous Bill was backed up by the inaccurate statements of ministers of religion. They all remembered the evidence of a professor from Brecon before the Church Commission, and he was sorry to say that was not the only case of the kind. If this Bill passed it would mean a fine of X50,000 a year on the Church in Wales. The lecturer instanced the case of the curates, and asked would any trades union allow them to be cut adrift without any compensation. He also pointed out that in Radnorshire the Nonconformist ministers were to be found principally in the towns where there was money to support them. The Church ministered to the poor in the villages.-The Chairman announced that the lecturer would be pleased to answer questions, but none was forthcoming. Mr Hughes proposed a vote of thanks to Mr Davies for presiding, and the Chairman proposed a similar compliment to the lecturer.

I I HAWKSTONE OTTER HOUNDS

I HAWKSTONE OTTER HOUNDS. Coming to Brecon. The Hawkstone Otter Hounds are coming to Brecon district next week. On Monday there will be a meet at the Castle Hotel. Brecon, and on Wednesday and Friday there will be meets in the district. The Wye Record. Sport with salmon was so good during the week ended May 25th that there was lisbed what is regarded as a double rt-cord—!or I number of fieb caught and individual weight. Returns forwarded to tbe Wye Board of Conservators show t'mt no fewer than 391 fi~h were killed with the t -c), or 120 more t,taii irj | the previous week, wuicb in ith turn estab- lisbed a record and tbe heaviest weight now j recorded is that of a fine specimen turning the Iscales at 47flbs, taken ic the Lydbrook district. Among the takes reported for the week ended May 25tb were the following:— Mr J Arthur Hutton, 9 figb, 22 £ lbs., 12 £ lb?., Ililbs., III-lbs., lllbs., 10|lbs., 1041bs., 9|lbs., 8!lbB. Mr H. L. Bebrens, 11 fisb, 13-Ilbe., 1211be., 121ba., 121bs., 121bs., 121bs., ll^lbs. Ililbs., lOflbs., 9|lbs., 9lbs. Mr R Beddington, 2 fish, 10lbs., 10Albs. 4 2 Mr G. F. D. Fallerton, 3 fish, 231bs., 19^1bs., 911bs. Mr H. Woolliams, 9 fish, 23ilbs., 16ilbs., 13Ib., 12!b8., llbs", lOflbs., lOjlbe., lOlbs., lOIbs. Mr Piokerell, 1 fisb, 8ilbs. Mr J. Cockburn, Pennoxstone Court, 3 fisb, 261bs., 201be., and 141bs. The takes of troat, etc., fcr the week ended May 25th included 184 troat and 14 coarse fish in the Garth district, and 6 trout at Three Cocks.

CEFN COED

CEFN COED. PERSONAL.—Mr Roger Vaughan, the new chairman of the Vaynor and Penderyn District Council, took his seat on the magisterial bench at the Penderyn Petty Sessions at Cefn on Thursday for the first time. After takisg the oath he was warmly welcomed and congratu. lated by his confreres on the Bench. OBITUARY.—The death occurred, on the 28th ult., of Mrs Mary Ann Prosser, the wife of Councillor John Prosser, of Vaynor villas, at the age of 40. Mrs Prosser had suffered for many years with rheumatism and later on with heart disease, and death must have come as a bappy release. The funeral took place on Saturday last at the Hen-dy-Cwrdd burial ground, a large number paying their last tribute of sympathy and respect. The Rev. J. Carrara Davies and the Rev. Jacob Thomas officiated. POLICE COURT.—Thursday, before Colonel J. J. Jones (chairman), Messrs David Evans, J. Price, T. Jones, Dr. LJ. Jones and R. Vaughan. —Mr Hodge, the Breconshire taxation officer, summoBed David T. Jones, Llysiog farm, Cwm. taff, for keeping three dogs without licenses, and defendant was fined 79 6d and costs.-David Powell, of 11, Fairview terrace, Cefn, having a previous conviction recorded for a similar offence, was fined 25s and costs.—Richard Lloyd, builder, produced a license which showed he bad obtained it 40 minutes after being informed, and was ordered to pay costs.—Edgar Kemys, of Pontneathvaughan, for being drunk at that place on 10th May, was fined 10s and costs. P.C. Joseph said defendant was help- lessly drunk and he had to take him home.— William James, alias Oliver, was charged with using abusive and threatening language on 19th April at Cefn bridge. P.C. Owen stated he had great difficulty in getting James away. He was very abusive to passengers coming out of the tram-car.—John, Harding, of Pantygessel farm, Llanwynog, Montgomery, was fined 2s 6d and costs for riding a bicycle without a light. It was stated that he gave a wrong name and address. VAYNOR PARISH COUNCIL The monthly meeting of this Council was held at Cefn on Friday last, Councillor James Price in the chair. Councillor John Morgan, who bad been ill for some time, was heartily welcomed on his reapr earance. A vote of sym- pathy was passed with Councillor John Prosser upon the death of his wife.—A letter was read from the County Roads Surveyor stating that in the event of the projected road improve- ments being carried out, the right-of-way near 214, High street, Cefn, would be preserved.— The Council were informed by the Cardiff Post Office Surveyor that no change could be made with ref rd to the present postal arrangements, as he considered there was very little Incon- venienc. caused by the present system, Thurs- day beilg the half-holiday and little business being done that day also, with regard to the position of the telephone box, it was placed in the best place in the office, and it had now been fixed so as to secure more secrecy.—Councillor Evans said they were in a better position to know the needs of the inhabitants than the Cardiff Surveyor. It should be an easy matter to send a relief man on a Thursday-it was not the desire of the Council to stop the present officials' half-day.—Councillor Gould still main- tained that the telephone box was far from being private, and the fact must be emphasised and their demand, a very reasonable one, insisted upon.—Eventually a deputation was appointed to interview the Merthyr Postmaster on both points.—The work of painting the seats on Cilsanws mountain, allotted to the members, was reported to be nearly complete.— The Clerk stated that his seat had been used before the paint had qufte dried, notwithstand- ing that he had written a notice "wet paint" and stuck it on the back.—Amusement was caused by Councillor Meredith's faeetious remark that the clerk should have stuck it on the front, as that was where people usually sat.—A detailed report from the parish roads was given by Councillor Harris, which showed they needed immediate attention.—Councillor Evans sug- gested sending to the District Council a copy of the report and asking them to attend to the matter. For the heavy payments made the parishioners were surely entitled to better roads than they had. The footpaths were constantly under discussion—the main roads were even more important.—Councillor W. Meredith, in reference to the projected Vaynor road improve- ments by the District Council, said they were running into expenditure which might be avoided, and that it should be dropped for a while.—Councilor Hughes suggested that the Surveyor be invited to discuss the matter.— Some discussion arose as to the reasons for granting an increased salary to the Surveyor at the last meeting of the District Council. All that was known was embodied in the report of the last District Council meeting, the extract being rpad out from the "Brecon County Times."

CLYDACH

CLYDACH. ASSAULT BY HUSBAND AND WWE.-WilliaM Jones, Mill View, Clydacb, and his wife were charged, at Brynmawr Police Court, on Mon- day, by George Allen with assault, Mr W. J. Everett, Pontypool, represented defendants, ) and Mr Gibson Harries, Brynmawr, was for the complainant. Allen, who is a collier, and a neighbour of Mr and Mrs Jones, said the former struck him on the nose. They closed and fell. Witness was Oil top. and defendant put the half-nelson on him. Then Mrs Jones bit a piece out of his ear and kicked him on the nose and knee,-William Jones said I there was trouble through witness having received notice to quit the bonse. Allen struck I' at him, and subsequently blows were exchanged then they clinched and fell. Two cyclists pulled complainant off witness. Complainant was holding witness's hands and striking at him. —Mrs Jones denied assaulting Allen.-The Bench found both defendants guilty, and fined Mr Jones 20s and costs, and Mrs Jones 5s and costs.

HAY HOUSING PROBLEM

HAY HOUSING PROBLEM. Urban Council make a Fresh Start. The monthly meeting of this Counoil was beld on Monday last. Present:—Councillors T J Stokoe fin the chair), James Evan", Sidney Williams, Juo Morgan, F- Cadman, E H Cheese, and Rev J J de Wintou, with Messrs R T Griffiths (clerk), A E Smith (sur- veyor). FIRE BRIGADE UNIFORM. Arising out of tbe minutes, tbe Fire Brigade Committee reported rha; in liea of the pro- viBion of new undress uniform, they recom- mended that the members should be allowed 10/. each towards the purchase of trousers.— Agreed. HOUSING QUESTION8. The Rev J J de Wi utoD, referring to the housing cluestio.), said he hoped it was not going to be dropped. He was anxious to support any scheme that might be brought forward by any of their number, for it was a very important question, and one that should not be delayed any louger than could be helped. The Chairman having suggested a com- mittee to consider the condition of the boasing in the town, Mr de Winton agreed, and added that be did oot necessarily suggest that a Bcbeme should be brought forward, bat it would be well to encourage someone to build. Mr Morgan thought it would be better to let the matter rest for a time, as be considered that things were moving round to sait them nicely. He spoke, not to pat a break on matters in any way, but that be hoped the question woald work out itself. It was resolved that the whole Council be a committee to consider tbe question. EEJBCTRIC LIGHTING. A letter was read from the Hay Gas Co stating that the matter of electric lighting was under farther consideration, aud they woold meet the members of the Counoil later. TIPPING ON RIVER BANK. The Hay Gas Co wrote further that the matter of tipping on the river bank was being considered by them. HAY GROWS ON ONE. Mr H Garnett Rolt wrote thanking the Council fer their letter of appreciation for what be bad done in trying to improve certain spots in the town. He had not been a resident in Hay for long, but he had become very fond of the town, and woald always he ready to do anything for its good. COUNCILLOR RBSIFTNS. Mr H T Lewis wrote resigning his position as councillor, he having left the town. The Clerk pointed oat that the resignation was not a good one, as it was not accomapanied by.f.1, and the Council had no power to remit the same. The Clerk was instructed to write and inform Mr Lewis that bis resignation could not be accepted unless the £ 1 accompanied it. FAIR TROUBLES: A DIFFICULT QUESTION. A claim for 10/- was sent in by Mr John Mannd, of Oxford road, on account of damage alleged to have been done to a flower bed by the erection of one of the shows at the recent fair. He also complained of show vans being allowed ta block up his front door. Mr de Winton said be had bis attention drawn to the matter. Mr Maaad and his family were certainly pat to great incon- venience, having to crawl under a platform to get to the front door. Damage was also done as stated. Mr Stokoe said he had been interviewed by Mrs Maand. The Surveyor said his attention waa called to the matter aft-er the show had been erected. He woald have had matters altered but that he thought the proprietors of the show and Mr and Mrs M&aud were on saoh good terms with one another. The proprietor told him that he bad "put it all right with Mrs Maund." Mr Cheese tboagbt Mr Maund should be recompensed. Mr James Evans asked if there were any otber complaints ? The Chairman said that some people com- plained that the shows were too near, and others that tbey were too far off. The Sarveyor remarked that one person was complaining to the County Council as well as claiming. It was resolved that while the Council did not admit liability, they would pay 5/- for actual damage done. BUOOESTED PURCHASE. Mr J Ferris, stationer, of High Town, wrote that he bad recently been effecting some im. provement at the back of bis premises, and it bad been suggested that it should be taken down altogether. He wished to inform the Council that be was willing to treat with them. Resolved that the matter be referred to the Streets Committee for consideration. TOLLS, &C. The question of tolls and of advertising for the seoond fairs in Aognst and 8antember was referred to the Markets and FairVCommittee. WATER SUPPLY. The Surveyor reported having gauged the water supply as follows:-Weri2 Wilk House, 35,000 gallons Llangwathen, 40,000; gallons; New Forest, 12,800 gallona in 24 hours. He recommended the fixing of an air valve at a certain point in connection with the Llan- gwathen supply, as there was certainly some. thing wrong in that main, at a cost of 25/ It was deoided to have the air valve fixed, on the proposition of Mr de Winton, secon.ded by Mr Morgan. TOWN CLOCK A STJUQ: QVGSTIDN. The Surveyor reported that Messle Gillett and Johnson had found it necessary to fix a new going line to the clock owing to tbe old one having been fixed with two kinks ia it, which had caused it to wear so much that the weight would have dropped soon. Mr Cadman remarked that 12 years ago it was replaced with one half the thickness. The Surveyor Had it not been fixed badly last time it would have been as good ats new now. The last time it cost £ 5. Mr Evans proposed and Mr Cheese seconded that the fixing of the new going line be ap- proved of, and it was resolved accordingly. The Chairman said that when the clock was in working order again he hoped they woold have something like standard time. To per- sistently have the clock fast was no belp to anyone, but often was a source of great annoy- ance. Mr de Winton proposed, and Mr Cheese seconded, thitf the clock be made to strike the boor and half-boors only. Mr Morgan proposed, and Mr Evans secon. ded that it be made to strike the hour and quarters. The original proposition was carried. MARKET STREET, The Surveyor said that be estimated the cost of pitohing and rolliog Market street at £34. It was resolved that the matter be left for the present. GROUND LETTING AT FAIR. The Surveyor reported that a sum of 134 10s 7d was received for the lettiug of ground at the recent fair, a difference of 3'- as compared with last year. REPAIRS TO FIRE ENGINE. The Sorveyor further reporttd that ibe cost of repairing the fire engine was £ 12 14s 2d. COST OF ROLLING. Tbe Surveyor also reported that the total cost of rolling of tbe roads wasi201 5s, which was a little in exoess of last year. REPAIRS TO PAVEMENT IN HIGH TOWN. The question of the repairs to the pavement in High Town, the Surveyor said, bad not escaped bim, but he was waiting to get cheaper kerbing than was obtainable at present. EGYPTIAN DARKNESS. Mr Cheese suggested that the Scrveyor be given discretion to light the lamps on very dark t igbts in the sammer, when they h" a good maDY visitors in tbe town, tor tbe gloom wis sometimes as great as Egyptian darkness. Mr de Winton was against doing anything in that way for so short a time; it was not worth it. It vvaq decided to take no action, as the extra ligbtiug last year cost a cooperatively large sum. HOUSE IMPROVEMBNTS. The lospeotor reported that the owners Of Sickville Cottages and 1, 2. and 3 Bear street bad agreed to proceed with the necessary im- provements, in fact, the of Saokrilla Cottageu had already started. ISOLATION HOSPITAL. Mr Morgan reported that the coat of the patieot in the Isolation Hospital amounted to Y.6 3a Id, and it was decided that the bill should be sent in to the Guardians.

LLANWRTYD WELLS

LLANWRTYD WELLS. PER^NAL.—Mr Roger Evans, jnr., of Tyn-y- maes, who some fortnight ago was the victim of a rather serious accident at Llangammarch railway station is now making satisfactory progress and hopes are entertained of his beiog restored to his usual robust health. VISITORS.—The increase of visitors to our Spa during the last week is marked, and the trains on Saturday last discharged a host of "week enders," there are also many motorists. The Dolecoed and Victoria Wells Pump Houses are the chief attractions to those who pin their faith in the healing properties of the "waters." LONGEVITY.—Healthy Llanwrtyd possesses in one short street of three hout-es four inhabi- tants whose ages aggregate 320 years, and within the Urban District alofie there :,re 10 persons who have attained the ,ge of b0 yw*. SCRIPTURE EXAMINATION. The annual Scripture Examination in connection with the Irfon Valley Association was held at the Council School on Tuesday morning, May 27th. The school was examined by Miss Phillimore, Llwynmadoc, and Miss Lilian Evan-Thomas. Cae'rwnon. The children in their respective groups showed great readiness and aptness in answering the searching questions given, and the teachers are certainly to be congratulated on the fruits of their labours during the pad twelve months. Before dispersing the cbiktrea were presented with buns and oranges and a holiday granted in the afternoon. SPORT.—There was a large gathering at the pigeon shoot held on Saturday afternoon last in a field on the Beulah road, the property of Councillor J R Hope-Davies, Neuadd Arms Hotel. Many of our best shots were present, and the fact that only four misses were recorded in the open class for live birds is proof of tbe excellent shooting accomplished. There were between thirty and forty entries, the first and second prizes in the open class being divided between Mr Hope-Davies and Mr Tom Williams, Derw House. In the clay pigeon competition Mr D T Price took first prize, Mr Tom Williams the second, and Mr Tom Davies, Glen View, the third. The shoot, which is to be made an annual affair, was a great suocesa. Amongst those present were Councillors J fi Rees, J.P., E Saunders Morgan, D I Williams, W Jenkins and Evan Price. ANGLING.—Angling pursuits during tbe last week have not been unattended by incident, whilst some large baskets have been the result of the skilful weilding of the rod and line. Mr T Howell Harries landed a raooster tr"ot weighing 21bs, but in an exciting moment missed his footing and was rewarded with tbe "order of the bath;" Mr Stanley Davies and Mr Caradoc Davies were successful in hookiag fish weighing over a pound, and a leather bat taking a fancy to the "fly" cf Mr Stanley Davies, was eventually hooked. Mr Luther Ingram, fishing in the river pool, was raiher unlucky. After he bad spent a long time playing a giant fish, the strain found tbe weak point in his line and away went fisb, book, aud line. The incident created much merriment, but Luther laughed good hutnouredly, though when an onlooker suggested that be should throw the rod after the line and then jlHDp the bridge, be manfully resented the sarcasm, to the great delight of many visitors. MOUNTAIN POKIES—"Eppynt Flyer," tbe property of Councillor W Jenkins, Brighton House, has this. week been sold to the Duchess of Newcastle, Clumber, Worksop. "Eppynt Flyer" is a. dark grey stallion, rising 3 years old, and standing 12 hands, very fast, good action, with plenty of bone and at the Entire Horse Show at Llandovery in Apri! last was awarded second prize. Mr Jenkins, who has had considerable experienco in. Birmingham as a horse breeder, and was seldom beaten it shows, has bu-t lately taken an interest in mountain ponies, and be is therefore to be congratulated, as we understand the pony changed hatids at a first class figure.

CWMTAFF

CWMTAFF. PROPO-ED CANCELLATION OF LICENSES.—In dealing with the report of the Waterworks Committee of the Cardiff Corporation meeting last week, Alderman Beavan called attention to the fact that the rents for two of tbe liceusd8 houses acquired by the Corporation in coiineo- tion with the new Llwynon Reservoir scheme would in future only bring in about f20 each, and io face of that fact he suggested that the Corporation should "fire ahead" in tbe cancella- tion of licenses by giving them up. He did not like to speak of the matter from that standpdmt, but it was worthy of serious consideration-— Alderman C. H. Bird (chairman of the com- mittee) pointed out that one of the two houseel in question-the Red Lion-would be under water as soon as the reservoir was complete, and the Farmers' Arms, another roadside licensed house, would also be submerged. The Millers' Arms would be left, and the Corporation might consider tbe fate of that license.

ITALGARTH

TALGARTH. CRICKET.—On Thursday last week Captain D. Hughes Morgan played for Llandovery Town against Llandovery College and knocked up 22 runs. He also took four wickets for the Town team. The game resulted in a draw. RAINFALL.—The rainfall for May, as regis- tered by Mr Fred Morgan, local observer to the British Rainfall Organisation, was as follows — 2*32 inches on 18 days. This fall compares with tbe May falls in previous years as follows 1912, 1-38 inches, on 10 diys 1911, 1-40 on 7 1910, 1-88 on 16 1909, 1 2'2 on 7 1908, 2 39 on 14 1907, 3-45 on 18 1906, 2-07 on 17 1905. -20 on 4 1904. 1 65 on 15; 1903, 3-41 on 15 1902, 2 41 on 19 1901, -97 on 9 1900, 310 on 11. Total rainfall for tbe year, 19 42 days on which rain fell, 91 dry days, 61. Boy SCOUTS.-On Friday las.t the Talgarth Troop of Boy Scouts, with their Scout Master (Mr A G Phillips) were inriteu by Dr. R and Mrs Pugh to visit Chancefield. Upon arrival tbey found tea had been provided on tbe lawn and after they bad done justice to the good* things spread before them they adjourned to tbe Cricket Field, where sports were held. The high jump was won by Scout B Harris, and the race was won by Scout W Davies. The prizes were presented by Dr. Pugh, who also addressed the troop. Hearty cheers were given by the Scouts for Dr. and Mrs Pugh for their kindness in providing such an enjoyable evening. CHURCQ PARADE.—On Sunday evening there was a Church parade of the Talgarth Teari- torials, members of the National Reserve, and the Talgarth Troop of Boy Scouts, under the command of Lieut. D Jones. There was a good muster. Four of the old veterans who had joined the National Reserve paraded in uniform their combined service is nearlv 140 years, the least service being 33 years. Tbe sermon was preached by the Vicar (Rev. W S Probert) from Luke, 11th chapter, 21st and 22nd verses, and appropriate hymns were sung. The Scouts were in charge of their Scout Master (Mr A G Phillips). After the service they marched back to the Armoury and then dispersed. The National Reserve at Talgarth now number over 20.