Collection Title: Brecon county times, Neath gazette and general advertiser

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
13 articles on this page
Advertising

tar ROBERT WILLIAMS AND SONS, Limited, HAY.^a IIRN FURNITURE DEPARTMENT. ■ LARGE VARIETY ,f Solid of Good twoodii Household FURNITURE. Bedsteads and Bedding. Wire and Wool Mattresses. Carpets and Rugs. Mats and Linoleums. China and Glass. Earthenware. t CHEAPEST HOUSE I for all kinds of ( HARVESTING MACHINES. LARGE STOCK NOW ON VIEW. MOWERS, 1 HAY MAKERS, SIDE RAKES, HORSE RAKES. PLEASE ENQUIRE OUR PRICES BEFORE PURCHASING ELSEWHERE. I COAL! COAL!! COAL! REDUCED PRICES for JULY & AUGUST Delivered Free to all Stations between Brecon and Hereford, at In Trucks 5 to 6 A O f CL Ton Lots 10' 0 Per To11- Once tried, orders repeated. Cheaper Qualities can be supplied if required We sell same quality at Hay Station at 20s. per ton in 5cwt. lots. I GOOD VjCClaUE. I ALL GOODS MARKED IN PLAIN FIGURES. -<

STANDING JOINT COMMITTEE

STANDING JOINT COMMITTEE. SYMPATHY WITH LORD GLANOSK. meeting of the Breconshire Standing Joint Committee was held at the County Hall, Brecon, on Friday. Those present were Colonel Jones-Williams, Major the Hon. W. Bailey, Alderman M. W. Morgan, Messrs J. E. Moore-Gwyn, Owen Price, E. F. Cockcroft, David Powell, C. H. deWinton, Edward Butler, A. Gwynne Vaughan, J. Conway Lloyd, T. Prosser Joues and the Rev. D. A. Griffith. LORD GLANUSK'S ACCIDENT. At the outset of the meeting the Clerk (Mr H. F. W. Harries) remarked that, as most of them knew, their chairman, Lord Glanusk, had unfoitunately broken his leg and could not be present. His lordship hatr written asking him to apologise for his unability to attend. On the motion of Mr Conway Lloyd, seconded by Colonel Jones-Williams, Mr J. E. Moore-Gwyn was elected chairman in his lordship's absence. Mr Moore-Gwyn said that he felt sure they all agreed with him in regretting very much the absence of their chairman, and he would like, with their approval, to propose a resolution that they regretted the serious accident his lordship had met with and hoped for his speedy recovery. (Hear. hear.) The Rev. D. A. Griffith seconded and the resolution was agreed to. A communication was read from the Home Office approving of the new scale of pay for and the alteration in the constitution of the Breconshire Police Force. THE POLICEMAN'S LOT. The Home Office also wrote requesting the Chief Constable to render aid in the case of accidents to aeroplanes or airships. (Laughter.) Mr David Powell Motor-cars, do they come in for anything ? (More laughter.) The Chief Constable was instructed on the matter. The Local Government Board wrote con- senting to the committee borrowing the aura of £ 140 for the drainage of the police station at Ystradgynlais. THE YSTRADGYNLAIS OLIVER TWIST. A letter was read from the Clerk of the Ystradgynlais Rural Council asking for j permission to store fire appliances in police stations within their area. Mr David Powell: We should like it to be done in Brecon. Mr Gwvtme Vaughan And in Builth. The Chief Constable said he would like to know the advantages and what the appliances consisted of. The Clerk was directed to reply asking for further information. j BRYNMAWR SFNDAY TRADING j APPEALS BY DEFENDANTS. The Clerk reported, with regard to certain Sunday trading prosecutions at Brynmawr, that the magistrates had con- victed, and now the defendants had appealed against the convictions. Much importance was attached to the cases in Brynmawr, Ystradgynlais, and other districts, and there was a desire by the Brynmawr magIstrates to be represented by counsel in the appeal. The committee decided that counsel should be engaged to represent the magistrates. o BLENNERHASSETT COSTS TREASURY UNRESPONSIVE. The Clerk read the following letter from Mr Sidney RobinsoD. M.P., re the Blenner- hassett case "I have again seen the Secretary of the Treasury on this matter, as desired, and I evidently misunderstood him when I said that the Treasury never had I paid the cost of these prosecutions. For several years this has been so, and I regret that my special efforts on behalf of Brecon- shire have been of no avail. I enclose two letters from Mr Montague on the subject (26th May and 10th June), and shall be glad if you will kindly return them to me after perusal." The first letter from Mr E. Montague, Treasury Chambers, Whitehall, dated May 26th, stated that he had looked into the Gelligaer case to which Mr Robinson had I Ireferred, and which was similar to that of I Breconshire. In that case the. Exchequer did pay part of the prosecution, but the county paid close on £ 800. In the Blenner- hassett case the Exchequer had to meet expenses amounting to £ 260, and the Breconshire County Council had been treated in the same manner as all other local authorities were now treated in connection "With the costs of criminal cases. The Home Office, the Director of Public Prosecutions, and the Treasury were unanimously of I opinion that there was nothing in the Blennerhassett case to justify exceptional treatment by imposing on the general tax- payer charges which the law prescribed shoud be borne by the local authorities in whose interest mainly the prosecution was carried out. He was sorry not to be able to give a more satisfactory reply, but it was 1 his duty, after careful investigation, to refuse any concession. The second letter, dated June 10th, expressed regret that a misunderstanding had arisen, and proceeded HI find that the information you gave to your friends that the Treasury never has paid the cost of expenses in such cases was not derived from my correspondence with you, but must have been derived from something which I said in conversation." The letter added that it would be more accurate to say that j the Treasury "never do" rather than "never had," for it was upon recent legisla- I tion that they had relied in their refusals to pay the costs of such prosecutions. Whatever might be the general practice, Mr Montague could only say that after most careful consideration, even if precedent permitted extension and the established practice of the Treasury at present could on occasion be departed from, the Blenner- hassett case was not one in which he could advise an extension to be made. He based his opinion on the merits of the case as well as on the practice of the Treasury, and was sorry not to be able to oblige the hon. member in the matter. The Clerk added that he requested Mr Sidney Robinson to raise the matter in the House. His .(the clerk's) attention had been called to a Blue Book report on public accounts, dated May 21st, 1914, in relation to the case of a defaulting official who had bolted to America. There was the following question asked Are the Treasury satisfied j with that ? The answer was Yes, we are satisfied. We considered whether we should prosecute, but the man had gone to America, and it was not worth while to j extradite him." (Laughter.) ( Colonel Jones-Williams I should like to j know why this county is treated diffierently 1 to the way they act for themselves. < Mr Conway Lloyd: Yes, why should they ask us to do things which they don't 1 do themselves ? 1 The Chairman thought they should thank Mr Robinson for his trouble. < Colonel Jones-Williams thought they could f ask Mr Robinson to move a motion in the s House asking why they were treated differently to the Treasury themselves. Mr Gwynne Vaughan: But they com- 'pelled us to arrest him. The Clerk It was the Public Prosecutor who. took up the case. The Rev. D. A. Griffith was understood to say that it was one of the Local Government Board's officers who discovered it. &n. The Clerk stated that it was hard on Breconshire that the whole amount should fall upon the county, inasmuch as Mon- mouthshire was affected as well as Brecon- shire, but as Blennerhassett resided in the Crickhowell district the cost fell upon Breconshire. Mr David Powell did not think it worth while their pressing their application further; they would get nothing. It was no good asking Mr Robinson to do an un- reasonable thing, placing him in an un- pleasant position. After further discussion it was decided to call Mr Robinson's attention to the Blue Book report, and to ask him, if he thought it desirable, to put a question in the House of Commons. STATISTICS OF CRIME, ETC. In his quarterly report the Chief Con- stable (Captain Cole-Hamilton) stated that 253 persons had been dealt with summarily. Of these 60 were apprehended and 193 summoned, with the following results :— Fined 196, committed to prison 17, handed to military 1, discharged or withdrawn 34, probation or recognizances 5, total 253, decrease 39. Fifty indictable offences were reported to the police, for which offences 2G persons (23 males and 3 females) were apprehended and 15 summonad, 9 committed for trial, 14 summarily convicted, 13 dis- charged br withdrawn, 5 placed on proba- tion, total 41, an increase of 3 as compared with the corresponding quarter last year. Seventy-seven persons were apprehended and disposed of as follows :-10 committed for trial, 52 summarily convicted, 9 dis- charged or withdrawn, 5 placed on proba- tion or recognizances, and one otherwise disposed of. Out of f56 3s Old reported to the police as having been stolen or lost £ 25 9s 11 id was recovered. Proceedings were taken against 6 licensed householders, with 4 convictions. Twenty-four persons were proceeded against for drunkenness, with 22 convictions, a decrease of 14. The Weekly Rest Day Act was now working 1 satisfactorily in the county. NOT ALL ON SUNDAYS. J Mr Conway Lloyd asked if the officers had a rest always on Sundays. The Chief Constable Oh, no, we cannot do that; it is impossible for them all to get Sundays.

jCLYDACH

CLYDACH. HOUSEBREAKING. At Brynmawr police Court, on Friday, Wm. Jenkins, labourer, and Maud James, charwoman, of no fixed abode, were charged with breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Morgan, n Z5 n Clydach, for an unlawful purpose. For the prosecution, it was stated that the prisoners were found in Morgan's back kitchen, having effected entrance by breaking the staple of a bolt which fastened the door. The noise made by Jenkins aroused a neighbour, who saw the male prisoner in the kitchen striking matches. Morgan was informed and he turned the prisoners out. Later they were caught in the out house adjoining the Rock and Fountain Inn, by P.C. Parker. The woman said she had left her coat at the house of Morgan, where it was found. Jenkins pleaded that he had been drinking. Jenkins, who had several previous ccnvi(^ons against him, was committed to prison for a month. It was stated that the woman had been committed, in her absence, at Aberavon for fourteen days, and had not been seen there since. She was-diselharged.

Advertising

I Should send 2 stamps for our 32 page Illustrated book ■ containing valuable information Row all Irregularities ■ a nd Suppressions may be entirely avoided or removed SS bysimple means. Recommended byeminent physicians ■ as the only Safe, Sure and Genuine Remedy. Never ■ as the only Safe, Sure and Genuine Remedy. Never Fails. Thousands of Testimonials. Established 1862 ■ P. ^^aD^Lond onjj

1fmWtlut THIS COMES FROM WALES

"'1fmW?"'tl':u.t=: THIS COMES FROM WALES!" And Brecon is Interested. A dispute between South Wales solicitors which came before Mr Justice Joyce in the Chancery Division on Friday has a good deal of interest for Brecon and Breconshire, as the defendant, Mr W. G. Spickernell, was for a number of years ia bé service of a well- known Brecon firm ajhsblicitors. Two motions were before the court in the matter of William Spickett, of Pontypridd, against Walter George- Spickernell, of Tony- pandy. Mr Hughes, K.C., appeared for Mr Spickett (instructed by Messrs Wrentmore and Co.), and Mr Tomlin, K.C. (instructed by Messrs Kenneth Brown, Baker, Baker, and Co.), for the deiaadant. Mr Hughes explained that in this dispute between solicitors, where it was complained the defendant had broken a radius agree- ment not to practice, he had a motion for the plaintiff for an injunction, but Mr Tomlin also had a motion, which was to stay the whole proceedings. Mr Tomlin stated that the parties were solicitors, Mr Spickett carrying on business in a number of places in Wales. He held a I great number of professional appointments and it was his practioe to engage qualified I nell solicitors to manage branches. Mr Spickernell entered into Mr Spiekett's employment in 1909 to manage a business, and there was an agreement not to practise otherwise in the locality. I "I did not know that solicitors did that," remarked the Judge. Mr Tomlin said that a clause said that Mr Spickernell, on the determination of his engagement, should not engage by himself or m c5 in connection with another engage in the practice or profession of solicitor or solicitor's clerk within a radius of tive miles of Pontypridd, Caerphilly, or Bargoed. He was to receive £ 250 a year, and there was a f5 half-yearly bonus, which formed a matter for a counter- ( claim. Mr Spickernell said that a clause I provided for reference to arbitration. When Mr Tomlin pronounced "Pontypridd" there was some laughter in court. Mr Tomlin Isn't that the way to pro- nounce it ? I do not know. I will not express an opinion about it. It is the only way that occurred to toe at the moment. (Laughter.) There is also a restrictive clause in respect of Caerphilly and Bargoed. His Lordship No, Mr Tomlin, indeed- your Welsh is not good. (Laughter). Mr Tomlin I never professed it was, my lord, and I am very sorry if I have done wrong. (Laughter). Mr Tomlin went on to say that the con- sent of the principal was to be the condition of practicising in the prescribed area, and a written consent was to be the prelude to holding a public appointment. Mr Justice Joyce You know this is a very silly agreement. Mr Tomlih Ob, my lord, that is very likely. (Laughter.) Mr Justice Joyce Without any mis- -d conduct, the agreement may be determined I with three months' notice, and he cannot n practise. If people are fools enough to enter I into such agreements they must take the consequences. Is this sort of thing allowed ? Counsel said that after recent decisions in I the House of Lords and the Court of Appeal there might be a question whether it was good in point of law. Z5 Mr Justice Joyce: I was thinking a solicitor might carry on a practice in every county town and employ some solicitor to look after it locally for £ 250 a year. His Lordship said he thought Mr Spickernell was better away from an arbitration. Mr Tomlin It is not very satisfactory for professional gentlemen to air. their disputes in public. I '1:a.w'" p The Judge: The more this is aired the better. Mr Hughes submitted that there was no reason for a stay. There had been some 30 breaches by appearances at Pontypridd County-court and Porth police courts, the latter regularly and habitually. His Lordship: Does he say, "I will do this thing" ? Mr Hughes: He does not say one way or the other. He says the agreement is not in existence and yet he seeks to take advantage of its arbitration clause. His Lordship: Well, well! This comes from Wales. (Laughter.) Mr Hughes proceeded to urge that the question was purely one of law, and, there- fore, not for the arbitrator, who could only in the circumstances send it back to the court. Plaintiff had suffered severe damage. His Lordship How ? Mr Hughes: He has gone, we say, to clients to whom he was introduced, by the plaintiffs' business. His Lordship That is wrong. Mr Tomlin That statement is entirely misleading. The clients are all outside the five-mile radius. His Lordship found that there was no reason why the matter should not go to arbitration, and made an order in accordance with Mr Tomlin's submission. The Act of Parliament provided that the defendant might apply to the court to stay the proceed- ings. After hearing Mr Tomlin he took a rather different view of this matter than he did originally. He first thought there was nothing but questions of law here, but he was very much impressed by the length of time which had been alowed to elapse. There was, he agreed, not very satisfactory evidence with regard to the mutual waver at the termination of the agreement, which would prevent the defendant going on with this motion. There were questions of facts mixed up with questions of law. p

LLANWRTHWL

LLANWRTHWL. GIRL GUIDES' CONCERT. An excellent concert was given in the Parish Hall by the Llanwrthwl Girl Guides and friends on the 7th inst., for which great credit is due to Miss Evans, their trainer. The following was the programme :—Song, "Welcome," the Guides; recitation, "Supposing," Jane Powell song, "Dolly's Birthday," the Guides recitation, "Manners," Betty Hughes; song, "The Little Damoiselle," Miss Nicolls; song, "The Bogie Man," the Guides recitation, "The little Girl who wouldn't eat crusts," Elsie Jones song, "The Rose of Allandale," Mr Hamer; song, "The Welsh Girls," the Guides recitation, "Babykins Teaparty," Gertie Price song, "Eight little Cherubs," the Guides; duologue, I "Cross Questions, Crooked Answers," the, Misses Nicolls; song, "Gather ye Rosebuds," Miss M. Nicolls; recitation, "The Auction," Clarice Prothero song, "You dirty boy," the Guides recitation, "Mr Nobody," M. A. Morgan, song, "Can-y-Milwr," Mr Evans; song, "The Three Duffers," the Guides song, "When the fields are white with daisies," Mr Hamer; song, "Au Revoir," Mr Howells song, "Our Night Out," the Guides song, "Excelsior the Cry," Mr Evans action song, "Mr Bogie Man, Go away," the Guides song, "The Monkey up the Stick," the Guides; song, "Mr Golliwog- Good Night," the Guides; cantata, "The White Garland," the Guides. On the pro- position of the Chairman (the Rev. J. Y Evans, rector), a hearty of thanks was accorded to the performers and on the proposition of Mrs NicoHs (Bryntirion, Rhayader), three hearty cheers were given for Miss Evans. The Girl Guides are very sorry that their popular officer is leaving the place.

Mamawrawwsazs CEFNYBEDD AND DISTRICT NOTES

■■■■M amawrawwsazs CEFN-Y-BEDD AND DISTRICT NOTES. [BY YSPBYD LLEWBLYN."] Some of our local historians are reported to have made an important discovery, which it is hoped will lead to the solution of the problem as to where Llewelyn the last Welsh prince was buried. When Rad- norians were busy discussing the difference between an ancient grave and a kiln, the Cefn-y-Bedd men were searching for the spot where Llewelyn Ap Griffydd was laid at rest in Breconshire soil, and it is said that their labours have been crowned with success, and they hope to be in a position at an early date to disclose to the public the location of the graves of those gallant Welshmen who fell in the battle of Oswryn Bridge as well as that of the brave Llewelyn. Several of the farmers in this locality attended the recent stock auctions at Llan- wrtyd Wells and Garth, and the prices obtained for lambs at these centres have encouraged other local farmers to prepare I' stock for the next sales. I would not be surprised to hear of their organising two or three auction sales at Cefn-y-Bedd-one in the spring, a second in the summer and a third in the autumn, for the disposal of ewes. They seem to be unanimous in their opinion that great advantage may be derived by selling their stock by auction, especially when the auctioneers &e prepared to make arrangements to bring dealers from the busy centres. Those who have studied the market question are convinced- that Garth is one of the most suitable ceotres in Mid-Wales for a mart. The suggestion to hold a sale there originated amongst the members of the Builth branch of the Brecon and Radnor Farmers' Union. To have a successful mart it is absolutely necessary to have plenty of good stock, but the record of Builth Upper District shows that such a demand can be met. The district is famous for well bred cattle and sheep, and the workmanship here on the farms is second to none in Breconshire. Moreover, once a thing is taken in hand the promoters do not rest till it is carried to a successful issue. For example one may take the Central Wales Welsh Mountain Pony Show, with its headquarters at Llanwrtyd Wells, which is this year to be carried out on a much larger scale than usual, as prizes are to be offered for cattle and sheep. Mr Samuel, Bryndynod, has suffered a considerable loss by the depreciation in value of a good two-year-old cart colt. As reported in another column, the colt strayed to Llanelwedd, where it met with a serious mishap by jumping on a spike in an iron fenCe. The accident would have proved fatal at once but for the prompt attention of Mr T S Hamer, who stopped the animal bleeding to death pending the arrival of a veterinary surgeon. Congratulations to Miss Hilda Pugh, New Buildiag, Maesmynis, Miss Catherine M Griffiths, Caermynach, and Miss Mabel Jones, Alltmawr, on their success in winning z, county scholarships. Their position on the list is a credit to themselves and their teachers. The parents and others interested in education in this district are all ready to acknowledge what excellent work is done at the local county school under the careful management of the headmastgr, Mr Itees Thomas. The hay harvest is in full swing, but the I crops are rather disappointing, as they are exceptionally light. Seme of the farmers are holding their hands and will do so for a ¡ week or two, so as to secure heavier crops. t ESEzmammsmB I

Mamawrawwsazs CEFNYBEDD AND DISTRICT NOTES

Now that the ground has been well soaked the grass will grow a good deal in a 17, n n fortnight. The restoration of the historic seat, Garth House, is still in progres and before Col- Wilson takes up his residence the place will undergo quite a transformation. Mr R Meredith, Builth Wells, is in charge of the work and the contract price is over £4,000. The installing of electric light and a new drainage system are being carried out by London firms.

Serious Charge Against a Rhayader SergeantInstructor

Serious Charge Against a Rhayader Sergeant-Instructor. The Rhayader magistrates were occupied I until after seven o'clock on Wednesday last week hearing a case in which Sergt.- Instructor Henry Barker, of the Hereford- I, shire Territorials, was charged with a criminal offence against his nine-year-old daughter, I Mollie Baker, at Rhayader, on June 30th. Mr A L Careless, solicitor, Llandrindod Wells, prosecuted on behalf of the £ ubli Prosecutor, and Mr A J Hughes, solicitor, Aberystwyth, instructed by Mr John Daviest solicitor, Rhayader, was for the defence. Great interest was taken in the proceedings, but the chairman gave orders that the Court should be cleared. On the close of the case for the prosecution the Bench consulted in private, and on their return into Court, the Chairman said they considered the evidence was not strong enough to convict, therefore the case would be dismissed.

Advertising

-COLO-UHOUN Woollen s Dept MGALASHIELS 4 AT mill PRICES. *Reg. Trade Mark. ANY LENGTH CUT. SENT CAJUUAGE PAID. Sent post free on approval, to any lady or gentleman, patterns of All-wool Manufactures, comprising:— SCOTCH TWEEDS VESTIN6S MANTLE CLOTHS SUITINGS FLANNELS RIIGS TROUSERINGS SHIRTINGS BLANKETS SHEETING OVERCOATINGS DRESSES KNITTING YARNS, 4e. ■flffllMHI Own wool made op into any kind of lagCTlfMSr^M woollen goods an a Colquhaun's pat-1 laa&yaiBflMi tarns. Write for particulars now. AGENCIES Fu" 0T spare time agents (either scxlap- m pointed (generous commissiODj.

Honour for Col Venables Llewelyn

Honour for Col. Venables Llewelyn Friday's London Gazette contained the following announcement:—Territorial Force Reserve, Yeomanry Lieutenant-Colonel (honorary captain in the Army) Charles L. Dillwyn Venables Llewelyn, Glamorgan Yeomanry, to be colonel; dated 20th June.

A Word for the Birds

A Word for the Birds. The summer number of Bird Notes and News," issued quarterly by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, is a most in- teresting little magazine. It is worth the sympathetic perusal of grown-ups, but believ- ing that the salvation of birds depends mainly on the education of the young, we would particularly commend it to teachers, especially 1", as there is a school essay competition arranged j in connection with each number. Published from 23, Queen Anne's Gate, London.

Useful for Motorists

Useful for Motorists. Messrs. G. W. Bacon & Co., Ltd., the well-known map publishers, of 127. Strand, W.C., have just issued in two qualities at Is. and Is. 6d. (the latter on cloth) a very useful large print map of South Wales for motorists and cyclists. Drawn to the scale of 5 miles to the inch, the map is easily followed, though it folds neatly enough for a small pocket, and has a helpful index and a still more helpful list of routes.