Collection Title: Brecon county times, Neath gazette and general advertiser

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
7 articles on this page
AGRICULTURAL NOTES

AGRICULTURAL NOTES. BY A PRACTICAL FARMER. SPRING MANURING OF AUTUMN WHEAT. Land under autumn wheat which received ten loads or more of dung per acre usually needs no further manuring in spring, and the Mute holds good where the wheat follows a tfeliman-ured potato or root crop or a good tkvd crop. The exceptionally wet weather of fch*- past few months must, however, not be •»eriooked; and probably, as the Journal of the Board of Agriculture reminds us, a large smiko,tint of soluble plant food has been washed awai-. This lose, coupled with the inability of plants to establish their roots favourably ill pwter-logged soil, will place tin* young wheat coop at a disadvantage to start when growing treacher sets in, A further consideration, edikh must be borne in mind is the prospect flf an enhanced price of wheat. There is thus -elf-ery likelihood that a moderate dressing of Wtificials this spring will he ampfy repaid. The most important mativirial element for t at this stage is nitrogen. I will, as ft rule, be most suitably applied m the form of nitrate of soda. From lewt. to Jwt. per sere, according to circumstances, should be tivien as soon as the risk of f-fverc frost ia put. If more than lewt. of nitrate of soda Is being applied, it is desirable to give the manure in two dressings at an interval of not les* than a fortnight. If nitrate of soda is skilfully used, a-, much as 2cwt. per acre may often be profitably applied. With a view to hantaaing maturity a.nd improving the quality of iamw and grain, about 2cwt,. per acre of anparphosphatt- might be applied any time in •»«Mty spring wh-re this is deemed advisable. THE PRICES OF MILK AND CHEBSE. This and other kindred subjects occupied Hie attention of 7iuTnfrous members of the Midland Farm- rs' Association recently, and ki-, Edwrin Smitiie! general secretary of the ftneociation, in -vlvi^ing that contracts should only be made lr.)r months, said that there was a great fiM- i! of milk, -v'sK-h on station platforms for several months had fetched from lis, iS-'is'. ;1. par imperial gallon, and even higher prices. The question of chee-e lia,t an important bearing on the of milk. Cheddar had recently been r\ H>h.e»»<< oM C!!{.shir" :-< SO 87S. 6d. A large firm i;r..('(. merchant in Liverpool informed him that- they had no Canadian cheese in stock, nnd were  travel an unsound sfcaMion. U can be maá ;:nprofi;t/a.bLe to do so now, if mare own^r.* wouM only re-fnse to use a StaBioir which .ØI. not bt-ttit registered for currexnt v~»a.r; but, unfortiunaAely, many autre ow«re •or.l'V consider the ajnoumt of Claefe ami tibe soundinews of the station. The iniereeaoi-it; support giveai to the regis- tration scflnenii.?- Ls ^^vidence tha,f. a certificate bw,"a commoroiaJ vaJue. This is most satis- factory, am-fl it i." hopeod thai mare owaiera will do their til-ir, to increase thi-s vahie by -•wiqBing to use- w:y stallion that is not regis- tered. Ofaciad Zfairem ^how fcliat of the 1,220 titaHkXUs registered m. 1913-4, 636 were Sbiajes, 200 th">roug(hbre« this year, for lie waa glad to see other districts iiid counties coanmig it aad following suit. The first society to take advantage of the rriarket was tihe Branlsby Society in. York- shire, who seat1!; up 93,0711b. in 1914, which realised £4,J21 7s. 2d., a result which pleased the. Londers. The actual expenses of the Braoisby Agricultural Trading Associa- tion that yeaa* waa only 9167 3s. lid., oi approximately Jd, a. pound, Last year the Wf>ol brokers Q\Iliy required a 10 per cent, sample of the bulk, and if a Lincolnshire Association joitn-ed in the saute rufe wouilid apply. This year much larger &uppiies. woulid be seiut in, and wooJ, would be coming fron: Hampshire. Dorset, Suffolk, and severe, counties ia Wales, be aides Yorkshire. The mOIre English wool that wei;t there the greater would be the price, for people were finding out tibey could use it for making ■oldiers' olotbring, blankets, and many other thinly iAi. Griat expkiioed that members world FtqtiK a central depdt for stocking •rool, aara an expert from Loaxloa woo! broker to etawify it.

THE WJfiifiK S UAKiKNINa

THE WJfiifiK S UAKi»KNINa. A deep, rich, and rather moist soil, in which there is a fair supply of thoroughly decayed auumire, suits garden peas best. They also like any sort of chanred material, such as wood ashes. and the frequent application of liquid manure after they show blossom will prove beneficial. When the roots are near the surface, they suffer severely in dry weather, and the drill, being a little below the level gives them a better chance of enduring it. When the seed is sown cover it with a couple of inches of fine mould. Ououmbers intended to be cropped in frames should be induced from the first to grow sturdily by sowing the seeds singly in small pots in a brisk heat at. the end of the month, transferring the plants to larger pots, so. as to have them quite large, yet vigorous, at planting-time. Telegraph is still one of the most reliable varieties to grow. Watercress ij a favourite salading. and can be .grown easily in the garden. Dig out a trench 18in. deep and 3ft. wide of any con- venient length. Put in Sin. of decayed ma'nure and 4in. of ordinary soil on top. In this sow seeds thinly and rake them in. Keep the soil moist by frequent waterings, and then in two or three months a. plentiful supply of delicious cress will be available for use. Several varieties of corn salad, or lamb's lettuce, are cultivated on the Continent for salad, a;H1 they are found to make a very acceptable addition to the kinds more com- ntouly grown. But they are seldom grown in this country. Those who are not acquainted with the various kinds of this plant should obtain some seeds of one or other of the im- proved types and give it a trial in the open ground. A" soon as cauliflowers have been thoroughly 0 hardened off they may be planted out at the first favourable opportunity, for preference on a warm border. In the event of rough weather intervening after they have been planted out. the protection of hand-lights is desirable; but-, failing these, a few evergreen twigs would afford cauliflowers nrueh shelter, and enable them to make headway without check. The small side-shoots or trimmings which were removed from old seakale plants before forcing can now Iw inserted to provide crowns for forcing next season. A deeply dug and I wen-manured piece of ground should be chosen. Plant- them with a dibber in rows t. apart, and allow 15in. between the roots. If more than one shoot appears from each. ) disbud to a single growth. They will need little subsequent treatment beyond being kept clean and free from weeds by a frequent I hoeing. I The ma'in sowing of onions in the open may now he made. The ground should be trodden to render it firm, and shallow drills drawn 15in. apart. Distribute the seed thhdy and evenly, and rake over t1. surface of the bed that it may preserve a tidy appearance. I It is a good plan to give a light dusting of 1 soot before sowing, and, of course, the work should be done the soil is in a dry and good working condition. 1 Good bulbs will be obtained from winter onions if they are now transplanted into ground which has been enriched and well- worked. They must be planted in rows seven I or eight inches apart. Stretch a line across, tread along it so as to form a blind drill, and "lei out the seedlings along it about eight j inches asunder. Take care to let the real ) roots into the ground as deep as they will go, I and make them firm. I Brussels sprouts are quite an indispensable vegetable in the winter. To have sturdy I plants early in the season, sow seeds now in a 1,ox or in a cold frame, and prick off the plairte when large enough 4in. apart each way to obtain vigorous plants. They should be planted in fairly light, rich soil, which should be made firm to encourage sturdy growth. When the plants are ready to put out a How 21ft. each way, and. water during dry weather. Badly-ripened wood on fig-trees which can- not bear fruit, as well as surplus growth, I should be cut cut, preserving only the short shoots with hard and well ripened wood, These should be nailed up close to the wall, but not too thickly. Many of the young shoots ¡ grow above the walls of gardens, and should I be cut close back. If this undesirable growth is repeated during summer, the beet way to bold it in cheek is to root-prune the tree? ¡ in autumn. A waR of flbricks and mortar, one brick thick, is the best means of confining the roots within the limits of a narrow border. Border carnations, which should be planted out now, do best in a good rich loam in a sheltered .border, but not a shaded one. Good I ordinary garden soil of sftrong character may I be rendered a very suitable compost by en- riching it in moderation witih very old staiblc manure and leaf TiHyuki. But the manur-e must not be added in suck proportions as will over-stimulate the plants. If the growth is too luxuriant, the flowers will not be numer- ous and fine. Few hardy perennials are more effective I than the varieties of tree lupin when they I have attained the size of large bushes, and are laden with spikes of fragrant flowers from July to September. Tree lupins require a well-drained, light or medium soil, and are specially acta-ottd for growing in bold masses on sunny slopes or in dryish, warm. sheltered nooks. In damp or heavy soils, or in exposed positions, they are apt to perish in cold winters. They readily rep on < e themselves from seed, or'may be reared from seed sown in a sunny border in April. Young shoots of heliotrope taken from the old plants will readily root in pots or pans filled with a light sandy compost, and make I nice plants for the summer. Keep the young plants growing in a warm, moist house, and stop them occasionally to induce a bushy habit. A sowing of auricula seeds may now be made in boxes, and should be covered with an eighth of an inch of finely-sifted soil. Pots I are sometimes used, but unless care is applied to watering many of the seeds perish. In boxes the seedlings are less liable to become died out. The seeds germinate quite wt-11 in I a cold frame. An early opportunity may be taken of pre- paring beds or other ground for Jresh planta- tions of violets, especially where the intention is to force them, or grow them in frame-s dur- ing winter for the production of an early supply of bloom. The ground should be manrured and deeply dug. Select runners or young rooted pieces, and plant them firmly. Use a trowel for taking out the holes, in order to spread out the roots evenly. ) For this purpose violet plants that have already been forced or grown in frames are not suitable, and should not be used a second j time, 90 that new plantations should be made from plants grown entirely in the open. It will be found that they are far less liable to I disease than those which have once been grown under glass.

THE WEEKS WORK

♦ THE WEEK'S WORK. Plant border carnations. T,rim box edgings. Plant (hardy perennials. Make sowings of salad plants. Sow Brussels sprouts. Lift and replant mint and tarragon. Sow early cabbages for souner use. Prendre land1 for beetroot. Sow mainerop peas. I Train loganberries. Blake nem strawberry plantations. i -1 ■»—

POULTRY KEEPING i I

POULTRY KEEPING. A PROFITABLE HOBBY. BY "UTILITY," RECORD WINTER EGG YIELDS. The outatanding feature of the first four months of the Utility Poultry Club's Laying Competition is the wonderful performance of a pen of White Wyandot.tes, which has m&de a world's record. The figures are as follows: Total eggs. 523; average eggs per bird, 87'17; total value. £ 3 Ita, Tljd. average value per bird. 12s. 6d.—as against. the previous best, also at the Harper Adams Agricultural Col- ke 1913-4 Competition, when for the corre- epond'ng period .of sixteen weeks the figures for a pen of White. vv'v&ndottea Total eggs, 492; average per bird. 82; total value, 13 lis. 5 £ d. average value per bird, lis. lld. The regularity of the laying is f-een by the following figures: First, month 128, second month 137, third month 128, fourth month 130. The consistency of the productiveness of each bird is evidenced by each individual con- tribution of the six birds, namely, 87, 80, 96, 90, 81. and 88, which, with one unreoorded, total 523. and aver-ige 87'17 per bird. The results are a striking teetimony to the value of "mtrain," and only careful and scien- tific breeding could ever give such splendid returns. The owner of this pen .of Wyan- dottes may be congratulated on such fine record. HOUSING GROWING CHICKENS. There is almost no end to the making of variou3 types of poultry houses, and in the aecommodation of chickens no less than older birds ingenuity of construction seems never failing. The sketch shows a design which has proved very satisfactory where tried. Among its various features may be mentioned the sliding bottom to the house. This is so arranged that it can be taken out and cleaned, and undoubtedly allows of a much more thorough cleaning than is possible when the bottom is fixed. Or, ifpcelerred, the bottom can be removed altogether and the house used without. A small slide is fitted inside to stop any draught when there is no floor. The house is fitted with loose perches, which, of course, are only introduced when the chickens are old enough to perch. There is a large door at one end, and at the other end is a door large enough to allow hens as i CHICK KX HOND BUN. well as chickens to pass through, while a little door for the chickens is provided in the side of the run. The top cover of the run is fixed on pivofa, so that it can be moved over on either side of the run, thus enabling the birds to be shielded against sun, draught, or rain as the case may be. At one end of the house wheels are fixed, and a handle at the oppo- site end of the run permits of easy movement. "BLACK 3EAD." Yeimg turkeys between the ages of two weeks and four monihe are often attacked by a disease one of the usual symptoms of which as a discoloration of the head, wbach gives the common name to the disease. Nearly all affected birds die sooner or later, hut in some it assumes a clwonie form, which may last many months. The disease is doe to a minate parasite, which is usually picked ap with tike food, and sets up diarrhoea and weakness. Later the liver is attacked, and greyish-white patches are formed. A remecfy worth trying is sulphate eI iron ten grains in a gallon of drinking water. Epsom salts or castor oil should also be given. The treatment of a large number of ailing birds is aet likely to meet with much success, and preventive saeemires an iaore definable. fStaqueoi changes of ground UI8 necessary, and the soiled runs should he wefl sprinkled with kne. All pens, drinking troughs, incubators, &c., should he thoroughly cleansed and dis- infected. The parasite, may be introduced by purchased eggs which are used for incuba- tion, and1 it is suggested that each egg olkolad be wiped with an 89 per cent, solution of alcohol before being placed in the incubator or undar the hen. WJIøe only a small num- ber of birds are kept it would be advisable to ftfll and burn all the eefBases. ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDIRNTS. "8. T. S. "-AN UNCERTAIN- SITT.Iome birds, specially those which have traces of I Leghorn, Minorca, or other "light" blood, are apt to prove unreliable sitters, but if at the end of three or four days the hen grips the hand, when placed on her breast, with the wings, and shows no desire to leave the Met at any time except once a day for feed- ing, He is generally safe to trust. If a bird proves erratic afterwards, it may almost al- ways be traced to the fact that insects am swariaing over her, giving her no peace night £ r day. Hence the importance of cl nests nd of allowing her to have a dust bath daily. "A Variety Fancier."—WHAT AIUI ORPING- TON DucKal-Theoc are comparatively new introductions, and are bred in two varieties, the buff and the bhae. They have proved to be very good layers, hardy and easily reared, and quick growing. They have no less than five different breeds in their aomposition, and eomibine the good qualities of all to form a generally useful duek. S. T."—HATCHING UHDCR A 000. Geese are not very much used for sitting pur- poses, as owners naturaHy want them to lay as many eggs as possible. The Toulouse is not at all a reMable sitter, but the Embden is safe to trust with her ogg* if so desired. She sits twenty-eight to thirty days, and when the goslings have hatched she is best confined with them to a coop on short turf after the first twenty-four houra. I saw it stated the Other day that she traapks on the e- breaking the shells when they are due ta hatch, but cannot confirm this. "P. D. Y."—PETIT pougaiNs.-Theise are small chickens about a month or six weeks old. and weighing from 6oz. to 8oz. They are in season from the present time to the middle of June. Peed for the fisst four or five dap on hard-boiled eggs, finely chopped up wilb the shells and mixed with biscuit-meal, moist- ened with milk. Then discontinue the egg diet, and at the end of ten days give oat- meal, barley meal, middlings, or ground oats, well soaked in milk. Feed six times a day during the first fortnight, and supply grit and green food. Starve ten or twelve hours be killing. "T. H. D."—WHEN TO PBKSIRV* EGGS.— Eggs ire atill eo dear thoa it is tempting to sail all possible; but we must remember that they will not go any cheaper, so far as we can see; and it is very economical to have pro- perly preserved eggs in the autumn and win- ter. April and May are quite the Best months to put eggs in water glass; and it is always beat to use perfectly clean and fresh eggs from pens in which there has been no male bird for a fortnight. "F. W.Uss OF POULTRY M,YNUK«.—I will endeavour to deal rather fully with this question next week. Meantime let me point out that it is important to keep it as dry as possible, in order to prevent waste of its valuable fertilising properties. "B. S. S."—ARTIFICIAL BROODER.—The date when the lamp may be put out depends upon the vitality of the birds and the state of the weather. Some varieties are extremely hardy, and can dispense with artificial heat when five weeks or even a month old, whereas there are other breeds that require the lamp until they are ten to twelve weeks of age. Frequently remme the brooder to freeh ground, for chickens taint the soil very quickly. At least twioe a we k, and thrice it possible, the brooder should be removed.

No title

All correspondence alfsaklas this column shonld be addrssMd to Utility, care of the *dltat aeqp&su for special tafonnatlon mast be ICC411- panted by a stamped addreassd envslops.

A BALLROOM FLIRTATION

I {Vopyrtght.) A BALLROOM FLIRTATION Mr". Dane-Barton looked up with a vexed expres- sion from the letter she was reading. "II >\v annoying!" she ejaculated. j "What is the matter?" asked her husband, unconcernedly, chipping the shell of his second egg. He was used to his wife's little worries, and did not intend they should spoil his breakfast. "Young Montgomery has written to say that, owing to a tiresome old uncle's death, lie cannot come to the ball and there is absolutely not another dancing man available "Couldn't you order a few ipeii wholesale from somewhere ? asked Mr. Dane-Barton, vaguely. Mrs. Dane-Barton looked thoughtful. "You are absolutely brilliant for ouce, Tldwin. 1 believe, now on mention it, that BlacLJey's do supply men." ery well, your whole difficulty is solved," said Mr. Dane-Barton, rising and pushing his chair buck from the table. "I litink we will order one," said Mrs. Dane- j Barton, as if she were speaking of a leg of mutton for dinner. "I don't at all like doing it, but we must have somebody to take Montgomery's place." So the letter was written, and in due time the answer arrived. A young man would be sent down to Great' Mnddleton early on January 201It, in time for the ball. Mrs. Dane-Barton breathed a sigh of relief. "We must introduce him as a friend of Cecil's—a tea-planter, or something of the sort, just o\er from < 'eylon. Cecil—a phlegmatic youth of washed-out com- plexion—was the Dane-Bartons' eldest son. It was in honour of his coming of aze thar the ball was being given. Mrs. Dane-Barton cherished a secret scheme in her mind. She hoped that this ball would be the means of settling matters between Cecil and Nesta Dellow—an only daughter and an heiress. "Now, remember, Cecil, you niunt propose to her, or you will llnd she has slipped through your fingers,. said Mrs. Dane-Barton. The day of the ball arrived, and with it the young man from Blackley's. He was tail, dark, and of distinguished appear- ance. Mrs. Dane-Barton decided on the spur of the moment that, instead of the tea-planter, he should be Captain Ferguson, on leave for a few weeks. 1 will introduce you to one or two ladies, she said, giving him a few parting instructions before she went to dress. "Of course, you will do your best to be agreeable and—er—nil that ? The young man bowed, and resolved that the labourer should be worthy of his hire. Nesia, radiant in white, with diamonds in her hair and round her neck, was decidedly the belle of the ball. "Who is that man over there ? she asked Cecil. Oli. him said Cecil, whose grammar, or lack of it, did not do credit to a 'Varsity education. "He's Captain Ferguson, home on leave, you know! "He looks awfully (Jittingut," said Nesta, "and he dances divinely. Introduce me." I-I don't know what the mater would say," faltered Cecil. Nesta opened her eyes. "In-deed!" she said, haughtily. "Well, if you won't introduce me, I shall get; somebody else to do so. I am going to have one decent dance to- night, which was cruel of her. There was nothing for it, so Cecil brought the soi-discint Captain across, and went through the necessary mumbling of names, which is supposed to immediately place people on a friendly footing. Nesta plunged into conversation, and kept him by her side, whereat the young man trembled inwardly. He was there for the purpose of making himself agreeable to wall-flowers," not to a beautiful rose- bud of a girl like Nesta. You are the only man in the room who can dance," said Nesta. What could he do, then, less than ask her "for the pleasure, &c. ? "You shall have as many as you like," said Nesta, generously, obvious of Cecil's lowering brow. So he scribbled his name down on her programme for a waltz and a quadrille. They danced the former and sat out the latter in the conservatory. "Do you know," Nesta observed, softly waving her fan to and fro, "I am sure I have seen your face before, but I can't think where." He certainly possessed a strikingly handsome face, and a small mole just above his left brow was not in the least disfiguring. "Perhaps you have seen somebody like me," sug- gested Captain Ferguson, happily. Nesta shook her head. "Tell me about your adventures. Have you been abroad ? Have you ever been wounded ? "Oh, I haven't seen much active service." He had not, except behind a drapery counter. "Bat I've been abroad." He had-to Boulogne, and was dreadfully sea-sick coming back. "Are you staying with the Dane-Bartons for long ? went on Nesta. No I only came down for the ball." "We are giving a little dance next week. You must come down, will you ? "Should be delighted," murmured the young man from Blackley's. "Only, you see, I am rather a wandering star; I haven't a settled address at pr "t. "Well, we could send the invitation to your dub." She produced a pretty yink pencil to write lown the address. "Yes, of course." What should he say ? "The —the Junior Conservative," he stammered. Mean- while Cecil had gone in search of his mother, whom Ie called aside for a minute. Nesta's carrying on a deuce of a flirtation with hat Blackley's man,m he said, plaintively. Mrs. Dane-Barton looked horrified. "How ireadful 1 It can't be permitted I Cecil, I will go and get him away somehow. Then you muSt nanage to be alone with Nesta and propose." When Mrs. Dane-Barton entered the oon- lervatory, she surprised the man from Blackley's ,n the act of picking up a flower Nesta had dropped. He pressed it to his lips, and she actually gave him a smile and a blush. Mrs. Dane-Barton nearly 1st the secret out then* 3he was only saved from doing so by the fact that if it became known she would be ostracised by Qreaf Mnddleton. "Nesta, dear, I have been looking for you every- where, she murmured. "Captain Ferguson, I believe Mr. Dane-Barton wants to speak to you." The Captain" murmured some excuse, and vanished precipitately. "l'oor Cecil is feeling so miserable," said Mrs. t) tne-Barton. Nesta elevated her nose disdainfully. When Cecil proposed to her half-an-hour later, she said "No," politely. Perhaps if he had asked her before she met Cnpfain Ferguson," her answer might have been different. Th man from Blackley's took his departure early the next morning. "I believe it's all his beastly fault," growled C'il. referring to his rejection. Mr?. Dan?-l>irton wrung her hands in distress. Should she tell Nesta ? But she dared not face tier indignation. A fftw rbiv* !!I.r. Ncita went up to town on a ■shoupi-itc expedition with her mother. They slUmterNlt hrollGh Oxford-street and Regent- 'r, 

Advertising

I I ¡ 1 j WE HOLD j THE AGENCY i FOR THIS. DISTRICT FOR Moccasins for Men. — MOCCASINS ARE ENTIRELY BRITISH, MADE IN NORTHAMPTON, IN 350 Varieties AND STYLES, FIT FOB ANY & EVERY OCCASION. WE HAVE A FULL STOCK, ALL MADE ———————— 6 SIZES TO THE INCH. No FOOT TOO DIFFICULT FOB US TO FIT. PRICES FROM 10/6 TO 21/ 1 I GARRATT, High St., BRECON. 1- TEA DUTY 8d. per lb. COMMON TEAS AND HIGH-CLASS TEAS ARE TAXED THE SAME. Why not have HORNIMAN'S instead of common tea. IT COSTS NO MORE. HORNIMAN'S is your tea. Pull Weight Without Wrapper. YOUR GENERAL HEALTH demands the most careful attention in these strenuous days. The times in which we live are such that it is becoming increasingly difficult to maintain a condition of perfect health for any length of time without some medical assistance now and then. Generally speaking, the first symptoms of trouble appear in the form of stomach or liver disorders. Whenever you realize that these important organs are deranged and out of order, it will be well for you to seek the aid of that splendid corrective medicine- Beecham's Pills. A single dose of this invaluable vegetable compound invariably brings relief; and if the treatment is persevered with, in accordance with the directions, you will speedily find that your general health WILL BE BETTER and your digestive powers greatly strength- ened. If biliousness, sick-headache, impaired appetite, want of tone and energy, are making you feel miserable, remember that Beecham's Pills are an old and reliable remedy. People may be found in all classes of society who are able to testify, from actual experience, to a remarkable improve- ment in vigour AFTER USING this excellent preparation. The mainten- ance of sound health is, indeed, rendered simple and easy by taking BEECHAM'S PILLS. SOLD EVERYWHERE IN BOXES. Prise Is. lld. (56 pills) and 2s. 9d. (168 pills). Printing. Every kind of Printing Cheaply and Promptly Executed at the BRECON COUNTY TIMES. PFLADIES Send no money We will forward you post tree a sample of GAUTIERS' FAMOUS PILLS which are without doubt the most certain remedy ever discovered for all female irregularities. They are un- equalled for Women and are safe, sure, ana speedy. Also our valuable 50-page Booklet and Guide to Health on receipt ot a Post-card or a letter. BALDWIN & CO., Herb & Drug Stores Only Address—ELECTRIC PARADE, HOUOWAY, LONDON, N Sold in Boxes, 7id., 2/3. Extra Strung 4/8. GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS (tjSORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS 3EORGE 8 PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS lEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS -A GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEOR E'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS A 1, HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL REMEDY IS /^ORGEWfV } 1 (|lLE^GRA^ i I SAFE to take. I PROMPT In action. EFFECTUAL In results. FOR UPWARDS OF FORTY YEARS THESE PILLS HAVE HELD THE FIRST PLACE IN THE WORLD AS A REMEDY FOR Piles and Gravel, And all the Common Disorders of the Stomach, Bowels, Liver and Kidneys, Such as PDes, Gravel, Pain in the Back and Loins, Constipation, Sup- pression and Retention of Urine, Irritation of the Bladder, Sluggishness oi the Liver and Kidneys, Biliousness, Flatulence, Palpitation, Nervous- ness, Sleeplessness, Dimness of Vision, Depression of Spirits, all Pains vrfoing from Indigestion, &c. THEIR FAME IS AS WIDE AS CIVILIZATION. TESTIMONIb. r\ There is no necessity to despair of relief even though your Doctor gives your case up as hopeless. Read the following :-After having been under medical treatment for some time and suffering acute pain, I was induced to try your Pills. One box relieved me and the second completely cured me. I gave what Pills I had left to a friend of mine-a sea captain, and he has also been cured after long suffering. T. WOOD, Wood Street, Middlesbro'. if THE CONTINUED DEMAND FOR THESE PILLS IS THEIR BEST RECOMMENDATION. Tho Threo Forms of thif No. l.-GEORGA'B PILE AND GRAVEL PILLS (White abel)* No. 2.—GEORGE'S GRAVEL PILLS (Blue label). No.3.—GEORGE'S PILLS FOR THE PILES (Red label) Sold Everywhere. In Boxes, tflt & 2/9 each; By Post, 1/2 & 9/10. Proprietor, I E. GEORGE, M.R.P.S., Hlrvain, Murdara. GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GE -RGB'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILIP GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GR WEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS