Collection Title: Brecon county times, Neath gazette and general advertiser

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 3 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
13 articles on this page
PLOUGHING AND HEDGING AT UPPER CHAPEL

PLOUGHING AND HEDGING AT UPPER CHAPEL. Famous Champion Beaten by Local Men. The interest taken in the trials of skill promoted by the Merthyr Cynog and Llan- fihangel-fechan Ploughing and Hedging Soicety, by those for whose immediate benefit the competitions are intended, proved to be so strong that the committee decided to hold their 23rd meeting this year, instead if abandoning the contests on account of the War, as many societies have done. The result was a successful meeting from the point of view of excellent work done and Encouragement given to farmers' sons and farm bands to persevere in the perfecting of their knowledge of the farmer's craft; but financially success could hardly be looked for, as the society missed a good deal of outside help usually forthcoming, and the Entries, whilst very satisfactory, under the circumstances, were not up to record. Both the ploughing and the hedging were remark- ably good, and the day was noteworthy for the defeat of a famous ploughman, champion of a wide district (Mr Wm Vaughan, of Brecon), by two local men, the better of "hom had a clean lead from his noted rival. The contests took place on Wednesday, the 17th inst., in most favourable weather and on very suitable ground, on Pontmaendu Parm, Upper Chapel, by kind permission of r D. Davies, who also hospitably enter- tained visitors. It is noteworthy that it Was at Pontmaendu that the society's first conapetitions were held. Mr David Powell, Caedryssu, was again the president, a Post he has for some time occupied with ^jstinct advantage to the society, and Mr ^owell Powell, Brecon, was the vice-presi- ^6nt. Mr J. Probert, Tymawr, and Mr J. *Ward, Rose Cottage, were still found at their old posts as treasurer and secretary rtspectively, offices which they have ably glied for many years. Capable judges were found in Mr Levi c°oes, Cwmcamlais, and Mr John Jones, ^eoleinion, for ploughing, and Mr Morgan, ij*ilau, Sennybridge, and Mr C. Davies, ytingwyn, for hedging. The following acted as stewards:— Roughing—Messrs M. Davies, Bailybrith Pritchard, Pantgwyn; T. Williams, J^Bgago Isaac Probert, Tymawr; D. ^viee, Pontmaendu; J. Prytherch, Cwm- ^»lir; J. Evans, Sychnant; J. M. Beavan, Pper Chapel; A. Williams, Cwmfforch Pugh, Llwynrhydill. Hedging-Mesers £ Davies, Bailybach; E. Thomas, Tydu K* Parry, Tyisha; T. B. Williams, Penlap. |>,ve weight competition—Messrs J. Evans, Ycbnant, and J. M. Beavan, Upper Chapel. tiie following awards were made:- PLOUGHING. I 'II!I 1, all comers—1 David Thomas, Tydu, r Chapel; 2 Ll Morgan, Pantycorred; JS Yaaghan, Dinae, Brecon. encita 2, farmers, farmers' sons, and waggon- eL, Hot having won two first prizes in a similar Kj.—1 Jobo Williams, Cwinfforch; 2 D (.fjiams, Upper Cwmtydn 3 R Davies, Cefn- CIR6 8, open to men not having won two first 1 .hzes in a eimilar class—1 J. Pogb, Llwynrhy- tr ^TPPer Chapel; 2 J. M. JameB, Brynhillin, Pper Chapel; 3 W Griffin, Dancrug. i yiass 4, lads under 20 years of age, not ) won two first prizes in a similar class— Pritchard, Bailybrith 2 A Jones, Glan- > '» Pontfaen; 3 J Thomas, Coedmawr, -er Chapel. HEDGING- ttQ-,Ims 1, all comers—1 W Kinsey, Troedy- Brecon 2 J Davies, Corneli-fawr, Upper r1- 2, local champions, not having woo two V Prizes in a similar class—1 T Evans, Tir- CI Pontfaen; 2 T Griffin, Peudre, klerthyr >«• Nh to men not having previously first prize—1 and 2 divided between D. ^jh?rgao, Ynysmynach, Pontfaen, and Edward c i*p8, Cornelifach 3 T. Home, Colmouth y Divies. 'L 4, lads under 21, not having won more It one first prize—1 T Williams, Upper 4t ydu 2 J Phillips, Nantygroes. LIVE WEIGHT COMPETITION. iQ (correct weight 841 lbs)-Prizes divided between J Probert, jon., G C Probert, Miss Davies, Cefncoedbacb, 841 Ibs; W Jones, Noyadd, W. J. Jones. Mynachdy, Miss G Davies, Tyrgawen, S Roderick, Pwllacca, J Wil. liams, Tynwern, 85 lbs A Williams, Cwm. 4 fforcb, Wm Thomas, Battle, 85^ lbs, THE DINNER. II At the Plough and Harrow Inn, Upper Chapel in the evening the Misses Jones served I an excellent dinner to a numerous company. The President occupied the chair, and in the unavoidable absence of the Vice-President, Mr Levi Jones occupied the vice chair. I u proposing 11 The King and Queen and the Royal Family," the Chairman spoke of the keen interest his Majesty took in agri- culture and his anxiety for the welfare of those serving at the Front as shown by his visit to the trenches. The toast of The Army and Navy was next given from the chair. Mr Powell remarked that when we thought of the sufferings and hardships which the troops were enduring in the trenches-for us and for our homes, not for themselves—we ought to be very grateful to them. If there was any young man present or in the neigh- bourhood, fit to serve, who could rest con- tented at home whilst those men were fight- ing for us and our wives and children, that young man was not doing his duty. It was pleaded that the work on the farms had got to be done, and we often heard of "business as usual," but he agreed with what Mr Lloyd George said Less of business as usual, but more victories, please." (Hear, hear). We had been fighting something like eight months and had not driven the Germans very far back yet. There was still a great deal to be done, and there was need for the help of every man who was able to serve. (Applause.) The presentation of the prizes followed, and the President congratulated Mr David Thomas on his victory in the champion ploughing class. He recalled the fact that Mr Thomas's father won the championship many years ago-the first time it was won in the district-and it had not been won in the district since until that day. In proposing Success to the Society," the Chairman said it was most gratifying that their society had wea- thered the storms of 23 years and, notwithstanding the exceptional times, was still in a flourishing position. He did not know, if he had been consulted, that he should have been quite agreeable to holding the competitions this year. People's re- sources were taxed so very much at the moment inconsequence of the War that they were not able to subscribe to local societies in the way that they had done in the past; but he was very glad to hear from the treasurer that their finances were in a fairly healthy condition, and if they could weather through this year, there was every reason to expect great success in the future. He was also delighted to hear that the whole of the proceeds of the live weight competition were to be given to the Belgian Relief Fund; it showed a nice feeling, and they could not give the money to a better cause. (Ap- plause.) The names of the Treasurer and Secretary were coupled with the toast. Mr Havard, in replying, stated that the committee seriously considered the desira- bility of not holding the competitions this year, and had two meetings before they came to a decision. The young men com- petitors were very much in favour of having the contests, and the committee finally decided that, as they had been successful in past years and had accumulated a little money, they could manage to carry the meeting through without asking for very much from the gentry of the county. (Hear, hear). They remembered that although we were passing through one of the most critical times in the history of the world, agriculture was an industry that must be upheld, and that whatever the result of the War we should have to look to agriculture in the future. He was glad to say that they had had a very successful competition that day, at the place where the society first began its work. It was at Pontmaendu I Farm 23 years ago that the society was originated by a small company-he believed it was only a hedging match then-and their friend the treasurer had been connected 1 with it from the commencement. (Hear, hear). He (the Secretary) had had some- thing to do with the society for 15 years, and he could safely say that, taking each | class, both in the ploughing and hedging, | they had had some of the most excel- lent work that day they had ever had in the neighbourhood. It was a great thing to see such work done by the young men of the district. Probably they would not have so much in hand as in previous years, but they would stand fairly well after all. (Applause.) The toast of The Judges was accorded musical honours. Mr Levi Jones, in responding, said the society had brought out a couple of plough- men that day who had beaten a champion who had been ploughing 35 years. (Ap- plause.) The winner of the champion class did a very good piece of work and had a clear lead, but the other four competitors were very equal, and the judges had some difficulty in choosing the second and third. Mr Jones proceeded to criticise the work in the ploughing classes in detail. Referring to the boys' class he remarked that the winner ploughed exceedingly well. He remembered that two years ago this boy did excellent work, but last year he did not plough well, and they had a bit of sauce because they did not give him a prize. (Laughter.) That day he was about the best ploughman in his particular field. The judges were very pleased with the work on the whole, and in several of the classes it was too equal for their liking, as it caused them a great deal of difficulty. (Applause.) Mr Morgan, dealing with the hedging, said the work was generally very creditable indeed. The first prize winner in the boys' class, if careful, would make a very good hedger. The third class was the best on the ground. There were eight competi- tors, and the work was a credit to the district. There was a good deal of difficulty in awarding the prizes in this class, as the competition was very keen, and the judges had to divide first and second. Altogether the judges were very proud with the hedg- ing, and he always thought they saw as good work done at Upper Chapel as in any part of the county. (Applause.) The health of the President, given by the Vice-Chairman, was received with musical honours. A comprehensive toast to the Vice-Chair- man, Treasurer, Secretary, Stewards, Mr and Mrs D. Davies (for placing ground at the disposal of the society and their hospi- tality), and the Misses Jones for their capital catering, concluded the toast list.

Advertising

II SPECIAL B II Is an ENGLISH COAL supplied in two sizes COBBLES and NUTS; Suitable for DRAWING ROOM and KITCHEN alike; Hot, durable, and reasonable. The Colliery Owners have definite appointed Agents in every district. FOR CENTRAL WALES Braconshire Coal and Lime Co., Ltd. Stocked at all the Company's Depots. Truck Loads to any station.

No title

SOUTH AFRICAN WOOL-RECORD CLIP.-It is reported that a farmer in the Catbcart District of tbejCape Province has jast shorn 280 bales of wool from a flock of merinos. This is stated to be a record clip. EXPORT OF SOUTH AFRICAN MEAT.—At the request of the Government the Municipality of Darbao have placed the services of Mr Barnes, the Municipal Abattoir Direotor in that city, at the disposal of the Agricultural Department for the purpose of inspecting and furnishing an export certificate for meat which the Agricul- tural Co-operative Liniou intends sending shortly to London.

Advertising

If the German Army were 0 in Manchester. IF the German Army were in Manchester, every fit man t in the country would enlist without a moment's delay. -Do you realise that the German Army is now at Ostend, only 125 miles away—or 40 miles nearer to London than is Manchester ? How much nearer must the Germans come before YOU do something to stop them ? The German Army must be beaten in Belgium. The time to do it is NOW. 1 "fill you help ? Yes ? Then enlist TO-DAY. GOD SAVE THE KING. Telegrams Nott's Garage, Brecon. Telephone 110, 111 and 112 (Private Branch Exchange). 0 tt parage, tffiip at." Brecon. I ====== CAR AGENCIES BEDFORD, FORD, HUMBER, PERRY, STUDEBAKER, &c. Any Make Gar To Order at Current Prices. ACCESSORIES OF ALL KINDS. Tllotor *€yefed Cash or Deferred Payments. I T HE I-FNIVERSAL CAR FORD CARS SSI PRICE AT WORKS (MANCHESTER) TWO-SEATER, JE115. FIVE-SEATER, £125. FORD VANS PRICE AT WORKS (MANCHESTER) £ 120. TYRES IN STOCK AVON, DUNLOP, WOOD MILNE, &c. I OILS & GREASESI i— tm f -HOUGHTON.SPRICE, I I..W VACUUM, GASTROL &c., &c. Vulcanizing (HARVEY FROST). Accumulators Charged. Carbide In Tins or Bulk. CARS FOR HIRE, ————— j iL—. FORD OR ANY OTHER MAKE CAR SUPPUEO ON _|i I1"* EASY PAYMENT TERMS BY ARRANGEMENT. WRITE OR CALL FOR PARTICULARS AT- 0 tt PCI arrage Mip eft4 ÝJreeon.

The Rector of Yaynors Visit to Norway

The Rector of Yaynor's Visit to Norway. LETTER No. 5. Resuming my story, we arrived at Trondh- )D jem, the old Viking capital of Norway. We 0 drove to Fjeldsaeter, which stands on a hill some five miles away, and commands a mag- nificent view of Trondhjem town and its Fjord and surroundings, at an altitude of 1,200 feet. We refreshed ourselves with luncheon at the Fjeldsaeter Hotel, which is really a kind of sanatorium. Trondhjem has wide streets and large squares, with almost up-to-Cefn-date electric tramcars running through the streets and in Olaf Trygvesson's Gade (street), Nfordre Gade, and Munkegaden, we saw the principal shops, where we found tempting us to purchase beautiful furs, silver ornaments, and other souvenirs, such as models of Viking-ships, reindeer-sledges, and carrioles (carriages) in t5 Z5 wood, ivory, or silver, besides, of course, picture postcards and photos. Flowing down from Lake Selbo to the Trondhjem Fjord is the river Nid, in a sharp serpentine bend. The town presented to our view some other very fine buildings— the cathedral in particular. We learnt that the oldest part (the church built by King Olaf Kyrre) is probably hidden in the great Romanesque transept, built in the eleventh century. The cathedral was reported to have been completed in all its glory in the year 1400. But history repeats itself over and over again. As was the case with Rheims Cathedral, through the ruthless hands of the Germans theother day, Trondh- jem Cathedral suffered greatly at the hands of warring troops in 1600-by the Swedes, who occupied the town, and are even said to have stabled their horses in the choir, as was done by Cromwell aud his followers during el the Commonwealth. But it was partly restored in the 1 .)th century, and the work was expected to be finished last year, though huge scaffoldings Z5 Z3 were seen by us in July. There was also pointed out to us in the town a technical school, one of the finest in Northern Europe, opened in 1910; also, a museum of the Scientific Society, containing zoological, min- eral, and archaeological collections. There was also the Industrial Arts Museum, having on view interesting collections representing arts and crafts, such as embroidery, weaving, painting, Sic. Having roamed about the town for some hours, and finishing off by attending a social sort of concert, we retraced our steps to the ship about midnight-12 o'clock—but perfectly right. The next morning we landed again to visit ZD el the Torgatten Mountain, a very rocky height on the island of Torget, which is the name of a family, who, as far back as the 14th cen- tury, held the farm of Torget on the island. Torgatten means the Hat of Torget," the mountain having the appearance of a broad- brimmed hat. In climbing it, at half the height of the rock (825 feet high), we came to an opening in the mountain, through I which the light was seen. The hole might el have been caused by the eating away of the rock by the sea. The whole length of the tunnel is about 540 feet. Some of the most daring of us passed through it,and descended a precipitous rocky gorge into a green z, t5 meadow near the shore, where the owner de- manded half-a-kroner (about sixpence) from each one for the privilege of walking through m El the grass growing for hay. We walked back r5 to the ship by the edge of the sea, ready for c a further excitement that evening (July 2nd), with all on board at midnight on tip-toe look- ing for a view of the Midnight Sun!" We were in Vaag's Fjord, somewhere among the Lafoden Islands, in latitude 68-51, N., slowly steaming over a glassy sea. All assembled on the fore part of the ship,where we were photographed in two groups, a few minutes before 12 at night (though not night). Then we patiently, but excitedly, waited for the grand spectacle of the Mid- night Sun and saw it under the most perfect and ideal conditions. And snap! snap! snap! went the kodaks all round, and we all burst out singing the Doxology ( Praise God from Whom," &c.), led by my clerical rectorial friend from Norfolk, to give vent to our thankful feelings. It was the most sub- lime natural sight, which I, personally, had wished to see for many years. The sun was shining with dazzling splendour, without a cloud to hide its brilliancy. The air was balmy, the sea was calm, and the light so clear and wonderful that we stayed on deck a long time after the great event. The diffi- e5 el < culty was to make up our minds to leave the scene and retire to our berths. To descend from the sublime to the ridiculous, invited by two Australian fellow-travellers, some friends accompanied them to the smoke-room of the Arcadian," and celebrated the occa- sion with a "whiff" of something by way of a change for the sea breeze. So it was the following e:,dy morning ere they retired. But the nigi had not come, and like child- ren we could plead for that to come first before going to bed. el

Advertising

Theqnickestantl rn,3st I for HEADACHE, TOOTHACHE, J. IffORGAN JONES CO. id, Ilo,7sr,

Freedom from Headaches

Freedom from Headaches. Some lucky mortals could count their head- aches on the lingers of both hands. Others, whose lot is less happy, would need a ledger almost to record the times they have been afflicted. The former class, it is safe to say, consists entirely of people of good digestions. To sluggish bowels, the impaired action of the stomach, or torpor of the liver is very frequently owing that out o'-sorts feeling, the commonest characteristics of which is headache. Mother Se'gel's Syrup has proved a welcome friend to countless men and women. It maintains the digestive organs in a state of healthy activity Thus. this popular herbal remedy has helped to keep these people largely free from the innum- erable headaches of which formetly they were the wretched victims.

No title

SOUTH AFICAN TRADE. Daring the mouth of Jauaary, 1915, the imports ir-to the Union totalled ill,715.722. Exports for the same period amounted to £ 795,4-S9. FOOD GROWING CRUSADE IN CANADA.—Doring the month of February the Dominion Depart- ment of Agriculture lannobed its campaign for greater production on the Canadian farms The first agricnltnral conference was held at I the Ottawa Winter Fair, and was addresBsd by the Mtuistprs for the Dominion and for Ontario. Farmers throasbcnfc the country I everywhere are h'-iug urgfd to produc- tion to ths greatest r-xfctui. possible. Iu this connection ifie Department of Agricalture has issued a special noblicstion entitled "Agrhtll. fcnral War Book."

BUILTH WELLS

BUILTH WELLS. ARTISTIC.—Portraits of the King and the British Naval and Military Commandera, the Flags of the Allies, the Escatobeon of Wales, and the Trenohes of the Troops are included in my Patriotic Illuminated Address. This can be executed on Vellam, Bristol or Mill Board, and framed complete. Pictures cleaned and restored. Paintings from any photograph. Estimates free. Referees for latest work-the late Vicar of Ailtmawr, Miss Lewis, Church Hoose, Mydffai (on behalf of Major Gwynne, S.W.B., who is on duty), and Mr Walter Webb, Llanganten.—F. D. B. GEORGE, Builth Wella. A GOOD EXAMPLE.—Among those who have recently joined the Colours from this district is Mr Jack Pratt, the youngest son of Mr and Mrs J. A. Pratt, of Penclawddu, Llanfaredd. Mr and Mrs Pratt have three sons, and all are now in the service-of the King. Lieut. Pratt, of the Coldstream Guards, has seen a great deal of active service, and is still at the Front. Mr Tom Pratt is with the British Fleet in the North Sea, and Mr Jack Pratt, who had taken farming as his occupation, has now joined the 2nd Welsh Regiment. CONFIRMATION. — A crowded congregation joined in the service of confirmation, held at the Parish Church on Wednesday, the 17th inst., when about sixty candidates from Builth and the surrounding parishes were confirmed by the Right Rev Dr Fariar, Bishop of Honduras. The Rev S. H. Wenbam (Vicar of Builth) acted as Bishop's chaplain, and the candidates were presented by the Rev E. G. E. Davies (curate\ Among the clergymen present were the Revs J. L. Bryans, R D. (St John, Builth Road), S. H. Wenham (Builth), D. Lewis Davies (Lianel. wedd), J. H. Lloyd (Aberedw), D. Griffiths (Cregrina), C. J. Owen (Llanafanfawr), H. Davies (Llanganten), A. S. Thomas (Maesmy- nis), W. E. Jones (Alltmawr), David Owen (Lali Alltmawr), Gordon Williams (Gwcnddwr), Gosmond Pbillipps (Crickadarn), and E. G. E, Bavies (Builth). The choir was in attendance, and Mr Sydney Phillips played the organ and the bright service was greatly appreciated by the congregation. The Vicar of Builth and Mrs Wenham, with their usual generosity, enter. tained all the cocfirmers to tea at the Church Ball. COUXTKY TRIUMPHS OVER COUNTY.-A few days ago the Radnorshire steam roller was at work in the parish of Llanelwedd, near the Builth Wells bridge, when a recruiting officer came along and managed to convince the driver that his country was in need of his services. Straightway the man give up his work, and without any delay he was on his way tp join the Colours. It is only now that some of our young men are beginning to realise that their Country needs them, and that the service of every able- bodied man is required to make England victorious in this great war straggle.

Advertising

J. THOMAS W) General Draper, General Draper, 17, Castle St., Brecon. NEW STOCK I NEW STOCK Specialities. B Cheap and Stylish Millinery. I Ladies' Tailor-made Costumes. and Up-to-date Ladies' Shirt Blouses. 1 Latest Suitings R Fashionably-Cut Breeches made oa I the premises. B Latest Suitings R Fashionably-Cut Breeches made oa I the premises. B "OROGEIAMMES ot every kind a npecial feafcore at the "Brecon County Titers" Office. Sports, Dinces, Entertainments, WtJist Drives, 911 distinctively catered for at lowest prices.

BOYS ON FARMS

BOYS ON FARMS. Two Points of View. A recent number of the "Church Times" contained the following article on the question of employing boys of school age o2 farms daring war time :— The question whether, daring war time, boy« of school age shoald be withdrawn from school for agricultural work ie not quite so simple as it looks. Certainly it ought to ba argned without beat. In some quarters WQ have seen it objected that farmers have oolv too gladly Reized tbe opportunity for obtairing ° P wb'ch may possibly be the case bere and tbere, but wbiob we oannot believt to ba generally true. In oonseqaeuoe of the wair there is a great shortage of labonr, and tto rhftnT'fh8 ai,0B8 t0 8QPP1y »• otherwise than by the employment of boys. The Biebop of Oxford, writing to the Times" of the .3t.h inst., gives it as his belief that this a dirag. tronsly reactionary way of meeting the diffi. culty. Moreover, be makes what seema ty aa a distinctly strong point when be savp that it is hopeless to expect the men now serviua with the ooloura to retnrn to the laol. Tbey are tasting what seems to them a more inter- estiu life than they knew before. Whatever tiiey bc-come after the war, they will not return to what they were. It is therefore not a tern- porary but a permanent shortage of labour that has to be wet, and it moat be met, nc: by employing cbildreu of school age, bat by ita- provln wages and conditions 80 as to atrract laboor to the country and he adds that thii improvement bad better be begun at once auct on a systematic scale. We submit, on the other band, but witb no desire to dogmatize, thau tbfre are many country boys wbose scbool education ungbi be ended at an early age wb:re it is 8pon tbat their tastes aod mental aptitude are unsnited for further sshool le%m. inq. oacb boys on a farm might ba of invala- able use, and it seems futile to keep them tied to a school desk idling when tbey would cheer- fully work in tbe fields or in the byre."

No title

QUEBEC'S NEW RAILWAY BRIDOK: Loi e SPAN IN THB WORLD.-The rebuilding of the giguntio railway bridge acroea the St Law- rence, opposite the mootb of the Chandier-j Carve. near Quebeo, which collapsed in hVfl, is progrt ssmg satisfactorily. The piers bavo all oet-u place.i in position, and are of mai-Eiri masonry, being built of tbt3 ot-lebrated R^ier.j a Pierre granite. The steel supsratrQctDre is now being placed in position, and is of a much heavier nature tban that of the former br;dge. 1 be central cantilever span will he 1,800 feet in length, as compared with 1,710 fee, which iq the span of the oantilever bridge ove: tha Firth of Forth-till now the largest Rpf. D fij existence. The Quebec bridge will thetefora be one of the engineering wonders o: tba world. 1.8 value to Qabeo cannot ba crer- esiimated. It will be tbe mean9 whereby fisva railways from the sooih shore of tbe St. Law- rence will enter the city, autf will give '.oar railways on tbe north side aooess to tba at nth, It shonld prove as beneficial to Qoebeo at tho Vieforip and Lachina bridges have bets to Montreal, whose prosperity they have betli sa instrumental iu boildiog up.

Advertising

E. LICHFIELD (Late Hannah Price"), Fishmonger & Game Deafer CASTLE STREET, BRECON. tfreaa Fieh :wico Daily. Agent for Palethcrpe's itcfal Hr-mbrii^ Springfield Potted Meats, & i ESTABLISHED 17?b. Felephone.P.O 75. Telegrams, Liobtiald.Brecom