Collection Title: Brecon county times, Neath gazette and general advertiser

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
6 articles on this page
DRESSMAKING AT HOME

DRESSMAKING AT HOME. By SYLVIA. Girl's Neat Spring Frock. Here, in No. 1,883, is a nice design for a spring or summer everyday frock for a grow- feg daughter, who, as will be seen by the racket carried by the model sketched, is Mncious to keep herself as fit as she can by outdoor recreation. ft. is carried out on the simpic- but becom- ing lines which are so suitable for girls of this age. and is yet at the same time one in which they can play tennis or any other niort, or less athletic games with perfect comfort. The bodice is made with the yoke cut on Raglan lines which is so popular at the mo- mert, and is really most comfortable in wear. •specially when, as in the present case. a con- siderable amount of arm movement is to be alt-owed for. It is. as I know by experience, a much nicer model than the ordinary shirt affair, which is so liable to split when vigürous motions are indulged in. The fronts are open V-shaped, and finished off with a collar, end ire; in revors, or hem- stitched lawn or mu-slin. which can be bought jeady-mad-e, andi either secured to a hand, which will in this case neaten the neck-open- ing. or be sewn to it. Th:* dc-tail (p finish de- PATTERN NO. 1,883.. pends on whether the frock is carried out in • cotton or thin woollen fabric-as in the latter cas-e it would be better for the collar to be separate, so that it can be removed and iigfetly iffearched and' ironed. The skirt, as you see. is a very simple one. and is neither too skimpy nor full-hut is just a nice medium affair, aR we have not quite taken to the very full skirt just yet-tbe younger generation especially preferring the tighter to the new flare model. The deep tuck at the lower edge is a finish the utility of which will appeal to mothers. As to materials, though the sketch shows the frock carried out in fancy fabric, it could; equally well be carried out m linen or gingham or one of the new striped cotton cr £ pe fabrics which can be had for a few ipeuee per yard. Or, a.ga.in, the skirt could be of the plain material—either cotton or woo1!- ler.—whilst the blouse could be carried out in --triped material. To Make Up. When you have cut out the various portions Of the pattern, allowing good turnings, and after ascertaining the exact length required, tack the fronts and back of blou-e. hem the eentres of the former, and gather the upper edges of both. Next turn in those of the yoke, and tack, as this will prevent much stretching, and then arrange over the gathered edges of the blouse, after drawing the gathers up to fit, which should be arranged to have the greater part of the ful- ngs towards the centre, as you see in the sketch, when it can be stitched at both back and front, neatened, and pressed inside. Finish off the neck to prevent this getting Stretched out of shape, and then join the blouse under the arms; also the sleeve, stitch, Beaten inside, make and sew on the cuff, and the, fastenings in front. Seam up the skirt, hem, make the tuck and press; then finish off the placket neatly, secure skirt to waist, also blouse, and finish off. It will take about five and a-half yards of 82-inch material. Underwear for the Small Boy. Underwear for the Small Boy. The two patterns forming the set sketched in No, 1,884, will perhaps please mothers of small boys who are looking out for nice easy f patterns for the small man's underwear. Here then you have two, the lower one of which is one of the simplest models I know for the first combis, or sleeping-suit, as the pattern will do for both at this c-ariy stage, the two tucks shown in; the larger sketch j giving not only a little fulness at the back (as j -t!o smaller sketch shows), but is designed as j i PATTERN No. 1,884. I a simple Mearns of "letting down" the gar- ment. Growth is usually rapid when the child is healthy, and provision must always be allowed for this, as well as for shrinkage, flin-ce1 flannel, and no other fabric, should be eployed The making, as you see, is of the simplest, the garment being joined up at the sides, under arm, and leg-seams by a neat run-and- herring-boned seam. The front is arranged in a flat box-pleat, whilst the back is hemmed, for buttonholes and buttons as fastenings. The neck, leg, and wrist portions are gathered and set into narrow bands. cTTiall shirt is enfc ana made on similar lines, that, is kimono fashion,. with the sleeves all in one. the front al-so having a fairly wide box-pleat in the centre, the back being arranged to correspond and fastened; at the side* "This last, however, if a detail you can arrant as von prefer. 

Advertising

HOW TO OBTAIN PA ITERNS. Oar paper patterns are specially cut for as front «xpre«?lr P'^RED THIS COIUM. »»D tk« eost of ea«h eomplete pattern Is 6|d. poet tree. Address all letters. ^lo?ing stamps to Sylvia." Whltefmars House, CarmellU- street. London, I.C. Be sore and mention the mbir of the pattern required when ordering. Vattoras will be despatched within three tajrv at tb* MDoltofttioo betuf received.

SCTFXCE NOTES AND NEWS

SCTFXCE NOTES AND NEWS. A TABLE OF*P"HIME NUMBERS. The Carnegie Institute of Washington has published a remarkable bo ok which contains a complete iist of ail tin; numbers from 1 to 10,006.721 which are divisible only by them- selves and one. The compilation of these prime numbers, which was the work of yearti, constitutes a valuable contribution to science. Often it is important to know whether a given number is prime, as in the case of developing theorems relating to prime numbers, and if it be of a largo denomination it is often a laborious tiling to determine. The table that has been prepared answers such a question almost instantly, while a glance will show exactly how many primarV numbers exist between any two given quantities. THE FIRST STEAM WAR VESSEL. In comparison with the Dreadnoughts of the present day. the Demologos. the first steam war vessel ever built, furnishes some interesting eontra-ts. This ship was 167ft. I long. It made it- first speed trial on July 4th, 1814, and developed a speed of a little more than six miles an hour, which was thought to be very good at that time. The Demologos never engaged in battle. On June 4th, 1829, the ship was destroyed in the New York navy yard by an explosion of its boilers, which killed twenty-nine persons. Some of the naval launches of the present time have a greater horse-power than that of the Demologos. HOW TO WATERPROOF CLOTHES. At a meeting of the Academy of Sciences in Paris, M. ie Roy described a quick process of waterproofing clothes of any sort. He takes five to ten parts of lanolin, liquefied in chloroform and diluted with ninety to ninety- five parts of petrol. Into this the clothes to I be treated are dipped, without removing the linings or buttons. After being shaken about in it for a few minutes they are wrung out and dried in the open air. GLASS ETCHING WI TH ALUMINIUM. It has been found by a Swiss chemist that designs, sketched on glass or porcelain with a pencil made of aluminium. will become etched oil the material when treated with hydrochloric acid. Before the operation is attempted, however, it is necessary that every vestige of grease or oil be removed from the working surface by rubbing it thoroughly with chalk. In case a design is burnished instead of etched it is said it bears a close resemblance to inlaid silver, A ii A DIAL *B I' X S E X BURNER. A pov.e.fui heating flame is given, says one type of Bunsen burner in which the flames converge into one, by means of several jets arranged in cir- cular. semi-circular. or conical form. The principle is identical with the ordinary Bunsen burner, in which gas is mixed before ¡ ignition with suitable quantities of air, pro- ducing a bluish flame of great intensity, but certain objectionable qualities of the single jet are overcome by the use of the radial burner, which is noiseless, steady, and has no "cool centre." POWER DEVELOPED IN CANNONS. Monsieur le Commandant Regna'ult has calculated the actual horse-power developed during the firing of a projectile by seme modern specimens of artillery. The results are truly astounding. In the ease of cannon of moderate size, projecting a projectile weighing seven kilogrammes with an initial velocity of 500 metres, the deflagration of the explosive lasting about l-100th of a second, we have, during that time, work done to the extent of llo.OMli.-p. For larger artillery, extent of llo.OMli.-p. For larger artillery, I whore the v.r-'gJn of the projectile reaches and surpasses 500 kilogrammes, the initial velocity being 000 metres, we have no less than developed during the ex- than 25,000,0(.'0h.-p. developed during the ex- plosion. These figures/ give an idea of the formidable efforts which the metal of modern pieces of artillery Iras to support. LARGE SEED BEST rOR SOWING. The size of seed a a factor in plant pro- duction has been the subject of a report by M. B. C'ummings. of the Vermont. Asjrieultu- c o ral Experimental Station, in which the author c o ral Experimental Station, in which the author described experiments in planting sweet peas and a number of garden vegetables. There is) on the whole, a decided advantage in -using large and heavy seed. Thus sweet peas from such seed were earlier in blooming, bore more and finer blossoms, and were generally more thrifty. The results were not uniform for all the species tried; but ail showed some effect of the size of seeds, ex- cept garden peas, when harvested as green peas. When these peas were allowed to mature, large seed gave slightly better re- sults than small seed. A subsidiary investi- gation' related to the location of large and small seeds in the pods of peas and beans. In the latter. 49 per cent, of the small seed were found to occur in the basal end, while only 18 per cent, occurred in the middle of the pod. In garden peas the small seeds were almost always found at the ends of the pod". MEASURING STELLAR RADIATION. The development of apparatus for the ex- ceedingly delicate work of measuring the rad,iation from the stars has long occupied the attention of the United States Bureau of Standards. Some achievements in this direc- II tion are reported by W. W. Coblentz in the Journal of the Franklin Institute. He finds that there is little difference in the radiation sensitivity of stellar thermocouples con- structed of bismuth-platinum, and those of bismuth-bismuth-f tin alloy, which have a 50 per cent. 'higher thermo-electric power. A reee-nt improvement is a method of maintain- ing a vacuum by the use of metallic calcium, so that the observing apparatus may be taken to the most remote places without carrying along an expensive vacuum pump. Dr. Cob- lentz has used has instrixmeost in measuring the radiation from 112 celestial objects, in- cluding tihe bright and dark bands of Jupiter, a pa-ir of Jupiter satellites, the rings of Saturn, a planetary neibula, and 105 stars. Its REMARKABLE SENSITIVENESS f is shown by the fact blmt quantitative measurements were made on stars down to the 5-3 magnitude, and good qualitative measurements down to the 6'7 magnitude. It was found that red stars emit from two to three times as much total radiation as blue stars of the same photometric magnitude (i.e., of the same brightness1). The principal object of these observastions was to a what sensitivity would be required in order to be able to observe spectral energy curves of stars. The present apparatus is so sensi- tive that. when combined with a three-foot reflecting telescope, it should give a galvano- meter deflection of one millimetre when ex- posed to a cand/le placed at a distance of fifity-three miles. It wi.ll, however, be neces- sary to have apparatus -about A HUNDRED TIMES AS SENSITIVE us this in order to do much valuable work on stellar spectral energy curves—and this in- crease in sensitivity is said 'to be pos;Ril).Ie iSuch an instrument woul-d be sufficiently sen- sitive to detect the radiation from a candle placed at a distance of 500 miles, assuming the rays not to be absorbed in passing through the intervening space. The writer also describes measurements made to deter- mine the amount of stelflar radiation falling on a square centimetre of the earth's surface. This is so minute that the radiation from Polaris falling upon the area in question would need to be absorbed and conserved continuously for a period of 1,000,000 years in order to raise the temperature of one gramme of water ldeg. Cent. while that of all the stars would require from 100 to 20ti years. The sun's rays are found to furnish the same amount of beat in about one minute.

HINTS FOR THE HOME

HINTS FOR THE HOME. THE OUNCE OF PREVENTION. In damp and changeable weather the fol- lowing precaution against taking cold will be found invaluable: Never lean with the bacic upon anything that is cold. Keep the back, especially between the shoulder-blades, well covered; also the chest well protected. En- deavour always, waking and sleeping, to breathe through the nose. Never go to be:! with cold or damp feet. Never stand still in cold weather, especially, when in a glow after taking exercise; and avoid standing on ice or snow, or where a cold wind blows over you. Never omit regular bathing; unless the skin is encouraged to perform its work cold will close the pores and favour congestion. DON'TS FOR THE NIGHT NURSERY. Don't allow a eliiid to sleep with his head under the bedclothes. Lying on the back is also bad, and causes snoring. The right side is recommended by some authorities as best and most healthful, but a child should be ac- customed to both. Don't let the little ones sleep in a close atmosphere; the windows should be left slightly open all the year round at the top and the bottom. Don't have a dark-coloured paint or paper on the walls. White paint and light, wash- able sanitary paper or distemper are best, both from a health point of view and the artistic one. TO PRESERVE BRUSHES. Some people have a habit of allowing their scrubbing brushes to remain in the water when carrying the pail from one place to another, and when, not being used at the moment. This spoils the brush before it is half worn out, causing the bristles to become soft. The brush should be just dipped into the water when scrubbing, and when done with should be hung up to dry. If this is done regularly li b, when scrubbing, and when done with should be hung up to dry. If this is done regularly brushes will be found to last much longer, and also do better work. CARE OF IRON SAUCEPANS. II These should be cleaned as soon as possible after use, and if anything has been boiled in them put in some soda and boil' this up. If st-archy food lias been cooked in them steep them in cold water, as hot water makes the starchy material stick to the pa.n. The soot should first be removed from the bottom and sides of the outside with an old knife, and when this is done clean both in fide and out- side with soap, using a brush dipped in silver sand. They should then be rinsed thoroughly, first in hot and then cold water, and the pan should be put in a warm place, upside down, to dry. CLEANING HINTS. When cleaning plate and silver, apply the whiting paste or liquid polish v.ith a small paint-brush, leave the article to become dry, then polish with a leather. This will save time and trouble. I Before blacking a stove, rub soap over the I hands and allow it to dry on, then when the work is done and the hands washed, the blacking and soap will come off and the hands will not be stained. I To clean a black drees, take a dozen ivy leaves and steep then, hi boiling water. Leave till cold, then rub well over the stained parts. This liquid will remove all stains and makes the cloth look quite fresh. To clean a soiled carpet, take a pail of hot I water, add a gill of vinegar anu a table spoon- ful of salt. Dtp a clean cloth into this and rub over the carpet. It will ciean and revive the colours. rub over the carpet. It will ciean aDd revive the colours. A cheap scrubbing mixture may be made thus: Take one pound each of [oft soap, sand, and whiting, and put them in an old saucepan with a quart of water. Boil, stirring occa- sionally till thoroughly mixed. Store in an earthenware jar. To use, smear some of the mixture on the. scrubbing-brush and use with very hot, water. u FRENCH COOKERY. The French are not only born cooks, but they take infinite pains to develop the best qualities of whatever constitutes their daily fare—skilfully and economically supplement- ing a meagre supply of meat with a variety of vegetables and various flavouring ingredients calculated to concert commonplace materials into an attractive meal. But while sparing neither tirr;^ nor trouble in preparation and cooking, the expenditure- in hard cash will be -PIP far less than in most British homes of a cor- responding class. Water in overwhelming quantity usually forms the basis of English soup or stew of those in modest circumstances. But why the fetoek-pot should be regarded as the exclusive property of the well-to-do is not. easily ex- plained. says a writer in the Farmer and StiM-khn-exler. especially now that pots of French earthenware are -so very cheap and so easily kept in order. Paterfamilias may. of course, be allowed his chop or cutlet with bone attached, but when serving children it is more frugal to put all bones aside for stock. Crusts of bread, baked and finely crushed, help to thicken soup. Remains of cold potato, scraps of cabbage, cauliflower, or I other vegetable, unsweetened rice or maca- roni. bread or other savoury sauce, no matter how ..naB in quantity, are all con- signed to the thick soup or stew by the thrifty French housewife. And why not? Such economv is commendable. Tllough probably most. English servants would deem such use of scraps the extreme limit of meanness, even in times of scarcity.

SOME FRENCH RECIPES

SOME FRENCH RECIPES. A distlnauifched lecturer on fcod--tuffs r- proaelied England with habitual waste of bread. Bread is rarely wasted here in France, writes the Paris correspondent of the Mendicity Ouarchnu. Surplus bread is kept for a few day- only, and then used up-never thrown away. SIMPLE -p slices of stale bread L"6 S-1 into salted water. Let them boil slowly for two hours. Pass through the sieve, be-at up well, and add a large lump of fresh butter be- fore serving. An onion or two boiled with the I bread makes the panade more tasty. A little grated cheese added before serving or when served is to be recommended. PANADE AT LAIT.—This is an excellent dish for young children and for invalids. Crumble the bread, or break it up very small. Let it soak in milk for half an hour or so. Then boil slowly for two hours in water. Pass through the sieve, add salt, butter, and a little good cream. Set again on the fire, and let simmer for abevt five minutes, stirring continuouslv. PANADE A L'CEUFS.—A light and nourishing sick-room dish is made like- the panade eou lait, with the yolk of one or two fresh egg-a stirred in -before serving. PANADE AT" GRAS.—Soak the bread, then boil it slowly for two hours in good beef or veal gravy. When done pass through the sieve, and add a tumbler or so of good white wine, stirring continuously. Heat up and serve. SOUP A L'OIGNON.—Have your crusts of bread broken into moderate-sized pieces, either dry or lightly buttered. Cut up a quan- tity of onions, and fry them slowly in butter. Add pepper and salt to the onions, put them into a saucepan with warni -water, and boil for five or ten minutes. Pour the result over the bread and add a little grated cheese. Another and often preferred way of making onion soup is to u milk instead of water. CROUTE AU POT.—Break or cut up the bread into equal pieces. Butter the pieces and let them get hot in the oven. Save ready vegetables of any sort you please--carrot, turnips, an onion or two, peas, beans, &c.- braise, i.e., cooked over the fire in a closely- covered pan, with the minimum of water. Put some of the bread-the c routes—into each soup-plate add to it a portion of the braised vegetables. Pour over this in each plate boil- ing hot beef gravy. Serve at once. FAROE A Tj GRATIN.—This is a nice stuffing which can be made with the remains -of bread. Crumble the bread. mix it with bacon fat or with butter, salt, pepper, chopped herbs, and a morsel of finely-chopped spring onions. Pound in a mortar any bits of the white of chicken you may veat hand, or chicken Bver and giblets; mix all together with the yolks of several eggs.

Advertising

i BUSINESS MEN ARE STUDYING ECONOMY. I 11 The War compels them to watch every item of Expenditure most carefully. Some things they are able to dispense with altogether. PRINTING IS INDISPENSABLE. And the only question to be decided is—"Where can one get I ZD "Quality and Cheapness? ¡ GIVE THE BRECON County Times; ¡ OFFICE I A TRIAL. r IT WILL PAY YOU. I [vary description of Printing from a Post Card to Illustrated Book Work. Exclusive Designs. Excellent Workmanship. Prices Right. Estimates by Return. Employers and Servants are having Gratifying Results from "Wants" Advertisements in the Brecon County Times." Numerous letters testify to the great value of this service to the public. The burden of a number of them is "Please discontinue my advertisement for as I am already suited through its appearance in your last issue." Brecon County Times, LTD., Bulwark & Lion St., BRECON. Telegrams: Times, Brecon, Telephone No. 12, Brecon. x f = Smart Up-to-date 'r TAILOR-MADE Cut and made on our own Premises. l COSTUMES I Telephone P.O. 16. Full Range of Spring and Sumrner Patterns now ready. i' • I vn, t* !:X". h K Write. Post free., r¡=-7- .=ï1 D. Morgan & Lewis, I t Ladies and Gents' Tariors, BRECON. & HORNIMAN'S I Full Weight Tea. Why not drink HORNIMAN'S Instead of common tea P IT COSTS NO MORE HORNIMAN'S is "ALWAYS GOOD ALIKE." YOUR GENERAL HEALTH demands the most careful attention in these strenuous days. The times in which we live are such that iL is becoming increasingly difficult to maintain a condition of perfect health for any length of time without some medical assistance now and then. Generally speaking, the first symptoms of trouble appear in the form of stomach or liver disorders. Whenever you realize that these important organs are deranged and out of order, it will be well for you to seek the aid of that splendid corrective medicine- Beecham's Pills. A single dose of this invaluable vegetable compound invariably brings relief and if the treatment is persevered with, in accordance with the directions, you will speedily find that your general health WILL BE BETTER and your digestive powers greatly strength- ened. If biliousness, sick-headache, impaired appetite, want of tone and energy, are making you feel miserable, remember that Beecham's Pills are an old and reliable remedy. People may be found in all classes of society who are able to testify, from actual experience, to a remarkable improve- ment in vigour A-FTFP IJSING this excellent preparation. The mainten- ance of sound health is, indeed, rendered simple and easy by taking BEECHAM'S PILLS. SOLD EVERYWHERE IN BOXES. Prise Is. ltd. (56 pills) and 2s. 9d. (168 pills). 2 _eo SPECIAL B Ii Is an ENGLISH COAL supplied in two sizes COBBLES and NUTS Suitable for DRAWING ROOM and KITCHEN alike; Hot, durable, and reasonable. The Colliery Owners have definite appointed Agents in every district. FOR CENTRAL WALES Braconshire Coal and Lime Go., Ltd. Stocked at all the Company's Depots. Truck Loads to:any station. GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS ♦jSCRGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS JORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS KORGE S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS QSORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS AlII "811! I\ GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PLLFCF GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PIL&S GEOR *E'S PILE & GRAVEL PLLL»J GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL VJJM GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PI#'? GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PIL^ GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PLLL* A HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL REMEDY IS 'NEt^;RGE' i-l IHU^ERAVELf Jfr- 1: j| # II SAFE to take. II PROMPT In action. I I jj EFFECTUAL in results, | FOR UPWARDS OF FORTY YEitRS THESE PILLS HAVE HELD THE FIRST PLACE IN THE WORLD AS A nEMEDY FOR f Piles and Grovel. And all the Common Disorders of the Storaaoh, BoweSSs Liver and SCIcSneys, meh as Piles, Gravel, Pain in the Back and Loins, Constipation, Sup' jression and Retention of Urine, Irritation of the Bladder, Sluggishnest K the Liver and Kidneys, Biliousness, Flatulence, Palpitation, Nervolir less, Sleeplessness, Dimness of Vision, Depression of Spirits, all Prafl* g from Indigestion, &c, THEIR FAME IS AS WIDE AS CIVILIZATION. TESTIMONmb. There is no necessity to despair of relief even 9 though your Doctor gives your case up as hopeless, S Read the following:—After having been under I medical treatment for some time and suffering 3 acute pain, I was induced to try your Pills. One 9 box relieved me and the second completely cured I me. I gave what Pills I had left to a friend of mine-a sea captain, and he has also been cured after long suffering, T. WOOD, Wood Street, Middlesbrol. J THE CONTINUED DEMAND FOR THESE PILLS IS THEIR BEST RECOMMENDATION The Thrsa Forms oi this }'-=;; No. 1.UEORG:¡:;>3 PILE AND GRAVEL PILLS (White abel i. No.GEORGE'S GRAVEL PILLS (Blue label). No.S.GEORGE'S PILLS FOR THE PILES (Red label) Sold Everywhere. In Boxes, iiii & 2/d each; By Post, 1/2 & 2 10* Cropristor, J. E. GEORGE, K,8.P.S.t Klrwain, ihrdars* F GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL PILLS i GEORGE'S PiLr-;&(t k A V FL rI!Ø GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL JFTJG GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL GEORGE'S PILE & GRA VEL r GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL GEORGE'S PILE & GR VEL GEORGE'S PILE & GR VEL GEORGE'S PILE & GRAVEL I