Collection Title: Brecon county times, Neath gazette and general advertiser

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 7 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
23 articles on this page
Advertising

-n y-u IIiWARCH ER«(^1 il I IGO10EKRETORMSM lm.3JtEGlSTEaED Facsimile of One-Ounce Packet. Archer's | Tho Pcrfcctioa of Pipe Totacclo, (X;OL, SWEET AND ri.\J. J'I' !A.JM.ø-j

TROUBLE IN THE SWANSEAI VALLEYI

TROUBLE IN THE SWANSEA I VALLEY. Foreigners at Abercrave. A drastic decision was comp to at the Anthracite Miners' District meeting held at Swansea on Saturday over the "lost 5 per cent." question, and the methods of employers in dealing with the wags question on tbe Dew standards, Mr W. Walters, Abercrave, presided, and also there were 53 fiel, present, repre- senting over 15,000 roinerR, It was Atr;ed that some of tha coalownars had added 45 per cent, to the old standards, others 4578, others 43 per cent., and others over and above 46 per cpnt., and that this bad been done without any consultation with the workmen, It w:is Btro»«ly held that they had not altered the anthreoit- standard wage so as to make it correspond to tbe 1879 standard plus 50 per cent. The meeting unanimously decided to ask the coalownera to pay upon the baei* of the old standards, pins 91i per cent., until the lost 5 per cent." ioqu'ry shall have taken place, and unless they ca/j see their way to do on next pay-day, that the whole of the collieries are to pot down their tools next Monday. It was arranged that Mr Richards and Mr Wiustone sbould meet the Abercfave Colliery Company with regard to the large percentage of foreigners employed at those collieries. Ic the coarse of the proceedings it was stated that the feeling of the workmen em- ployed at the collieries was that they should down tools until such time hs the company dismiss the foreigners, whose number was alleged to be continually increasing, and whose presenoe underground >s a source of danger to life and limb. It was said that about one in five of tbe men employed at those collieries are foreigners, mosily Spaniards and Portu- guese, and that about ten were added to the number last week, who came direst from Spain, not knowing anvthing of the English language or of the Mines R^go'atfou Act. Iu reply to a question, Mr J. D. Morgan said these men might be considered qna'ified miners ifÍ their own cou etry, but the language diffi culty a very serious one here.

Advertising

%ABACHE,TOOTHACHEjfi^L I AKB NEURALGIA f% TT* The QUJCKEST and MOST CERTAIN CURE R& £ \J i 2'each scl% Stores J.MORCAM JONES &Co, LLANELLY.

POULTRY KEEPING

POULTRY KEEPING. A PROFITABLE HOBBY. BY "UTILITY." COMFORTABLE AND CLEAN PERCHES. When it is remembered that during some parts of the year fowls spend as much M fifteen hours out of every twenty-four on their perches, it will be agreed the perch is ft very important part of the hen-house. The two great points about the hen's night quarters are comfort and cleanliness, and they apply particularly to the perch. A perch should never be placed too near a door or en- trance-hole so that the birds are in a draught. Fowls want plenty of fresh air, but draughts are likely to cause all kinds of trouble and seriously reduce egg yield. In spite of years of domestication, fowls still retain the in- stincts of the original jungle fowl, and will always try to perch as high as possible. But the best height from the ground is between eighteen inches and two feet. This quite satisfies their primitive instinct, end yet they will not injure themselves flying to it. If more than one perch is required, a space of not less than eighteen inches should be between them, and they should be on the same level. An old fashioned method of putting up perches was to arrange them one above the other, the bottom one about a foot from the floor. The fowls with their instinct to fly high for eddy wonld all try to get on the upper pe-ph, with tr.e result that they would be b :.dly crowded, and often they might injure themselves so severely that broken breast -'e' bones and bumble foot would result. This is why perches -ouid ail be ou the same level. Peeled branches of trees make as good perches as any kind of wood, provided they are straight and about two to two and a-half inches in diameter. If the perches are too thin the fowls held them too tightly, and their toes often become cramped; and if the perch is too flat or wide the fowls can never get a comfortable hold. Another excellent perch can be made of the deal that is known as "two by two," but in this case the top edges must be rounded off. To keep the perches as clean as they should be kept, let them rest in slots, so that they j can be taken down once a week, well scraped and treated with paraffin, or with some re- liable disinfectant fluid. Red mite will soon become terribly prevalent if this is not done, and spoil the fowls for laying and eating pur- poses by tormenting them at night. Dropping 1 boards should be placed a few inches beneath the perches, and they should be cleaned every day and dusted over with dry earth.

A BACKYARD BREEDj

A BACKYARD BREED. This is the day of white varieties; but though one may £ ee some beautiful whites kept quite successfully in strict confinement, it is generally found that they get unpleas- antly dirty in appearance when kept in towns. This gives an opportunity to the blacks, which, beautiful as they are, especially with the sun on their glossy plumage, do not look | quite as showy as whites or other light- coloured varieties on grass runs. The Wyandotte family is now world- famous for its general utility qualities, and the white variety is now kept probably in greater numbers in this country than any other pure breed of fowls. But backyard poultry keeping is making rapid headway, and so the demand for the Black Wyandotte should grow fast. I have found the black quite as good, on the whole, as the white, and that is saying much for it. It is an excellent winter layer of a very nice brown egg. Some go so far as to say they lay the largest egg of any variety of Wyandotte. As table birds they are quite as good as any general purpose fowl. Some people object to yellow-legged fowls; but if they have been well fattened Wyaudottes are quite as deli- cious as any others, and make a very fair pro- portion of flesh. It is for this reason I advo- cate Black Wyandottes for the backyarder, in BLACK WYANDOTTB PULLBT. I preference to Black Leghorns or Black Mijioreas-botli splendid egg-producers, but comparatively poor fatteners. As a show bird the variety we are discuss- ing is not so popular as it was a few years ago, when there was quite a boom. This may be on account of the difficulty of getting any- where near perfection in type. The plumage must be a sound black, with a beetle-green sheen, and black right through to the ekin, not whitish underneath. The shape must be strictly a Wyandotte shape; but the blacks I are frequently more like black Plymouth Rocks. The beak and the legs and feet must be bright, rich orange-yellow; the eyes a bright bay; and the comb wattles and ear lobes a bright red. On account of the difficulty of combining these features some breeders adopt the system known as double-mating, which means that one pen is mated up specially with the object of breeding cockerels, the j pullets being rejected so far as show purposes are concerned. Another pen is mated up in similar fashion specially to produce pullets.

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. M. G. H."—GUINEA FOWLS. Both the eggs and the flesh of these birds are rich and of delicate flavour. The eggs, though small, fetch as much as the best fresh and large hens' eggs, and the birds make about 3s. 6d. each, and sometimes much more. The flesh, which somewhat resembles that of a pheasant, is produced in very fair proportion to the bone and other waste; but as the birds so much dislike being confined it is useless to attempt- to fatten them artificially, as they will lose flavour, and will not repay the extra cost of the food. E. R. W."—How TO PREVENT CROOKED TOES.—Although the contrary opinion is often expressed, I do not think that there is any evidence to prove that this defect is inherited, but it can easily be proved that it is due to the use of rearers with a hard floor, and to young birds roosting on shelves without bed- ding or broad perches. In order to develop the foot muscles properly, the chickens must from the first run on rough surfaces. That. is I why it is particularly important to provide better bedding wherever the floor is hard and unyielding. "Interested. "-STIMULANTS AND EGG LAY- ING.—The stimulants most commonly used axe laustaa-d and capsicum, and tests show thai- the former is better. It is a mistake to give too much. of them, but if used carefully there seems no doubt that they have their value. They should be mixed with the soft food, specially on cold mornings, and the amount that is recommended to be given should not be exceeded, as the manufacturers can he trusted to advise the largest dose that is safe. S. T. A."—USING BREAD SCRAPS.—With bread at the price it is, no one wants any waste that. can possibly be helped, but there are times when it is impossible to avoid a cer- tain amount of waste, especially where large quantities of bread are used. In such circum- stances the waste can be profitably utilised1 for poultry by mixing two parts of it with one part by weight of bian, two patfs middlings, and a quarter part of dried meat meal all well scalded and mixed to a crumbly mass. This makes a well-balanced ration, but if the scraps were given in ¡Cc:1t9Ir proportion they would not be so suitable a food for laying birds.

Advertising

All correspondence affecting this column should be addressed to "Utility," care of the Editor. Requests for special Information must be accom- panied by a stamped acMrvssed envelope.

DRESSMAKING AT HOME

DRESSMAKING AT HOME. BY SYLVIA. An Artist's or Worker's Overall. Overalls and protective gannents have as- sumed a new and great importance of late, now that so many women are occupied in war work, or have taken up professions wheste such additions to their garb are imperative. There is, therefore, no need for any apology in illustrating another model this week, in No. 1,923, which, though depicted in the sketch as intended for an artist, is equally well suited to any other professional worker. It has several points to commend it, the first being its "coverall" nature, and the second the simplicity of its arrangement so far as slipping on and fastening are con- cerned. These details can best be seen from the pattern, though I will try to make them as clear as I can. In the first place, the straps which fasten in front are extensions of or can be joined on to the back of the yoke, and are then brought round and fastened in front, Hè. you see from the sketch. This add.s very much to the comfort of the overall, which I PATTERN NO. 1,923. can be slipped on and fastened "in a jiffy," recommendat-ion that is sure to find favour with a busy housewife, as well as' its pocket of ample .size at the right side. The yoke, I may add. is of the Magyar type, with the sleevee cut all in one with it, so is very easy of con- struction. Another purpose for which this design could be easily adapted would be that of a morning gown for the youthful matron, who, if she wishes, can easily reverse the process of fastening, and make this, come in front in- stead of the back. In this case the straps or extensions w.,uld ')e at the ends of the front of yoke, which, of course, would be open, in a line with the front of skirt, and the V-shaped finish of the neck would be in the front in- stead of at the back.

Materials and Cutting Out

Materials and Cutting Out. For these overalls gingham aiadl casement cloth are about the most useful and popular choice of fabric, and as to cQlour a wide latitude is allowed; but for really useful pur- poses butcher or navy blue is selected, whilst khaki and light brown are very frequently chosen by war workers, and, from experience, I can recommend these colours as very neat and workmanlike. To cut out the pattern place the centre-front of apron to the fold, and the front of side widths to the selvedges. The yoke is best cut lengthways of the material, but if more econo- mical to cut it the other way do so, and place the centre-front to the fold. The straps can be joined on to the yoke or anywhere in their length.

To Make Up

To Make Up. Having marked round, cut out the pattern, an-d\a]lmy ample turnings, particularly for the hem; proceed to join the front and back widths, make and st tch on the pocket, and stitch the hem at foot-part. Now mark centre-front, also that of yoke; stitch the under-arm seams, gather upper part of overall, turn up lower edge of yoke, arrange to overall, keeping centres an-d, sides even, stitch and ne,aten inside. Join on strap, which may be single or double material. If the latter, the edges must be stitched togetheT to face; if the former, they are merely hemmed,, but should! be faced at erodis for button and buttonhole. Now make the collar, sew to neck and r-eaten, then finish off the sleeves- with the cuff-bands a.nd fasten off firmly. The overall will take about 4 yards of 36- goods.

An Underbodice for the Matron

An Underbodice for the Matron. H 4, quite time to to think about warm underwear, and an underbodice is of first conr sidera-tion. I have, in No. 1,924, selected one for matronly figures, as these patterns always seem popular. The pattern sketched is a par- ticularly easy one to cut out and make up. It is cut with only a front and back-pieces, and has no darts, though these, can, be inserted; if PATTERN No. 1,924. preferred. As to materials, longcloth or ciii be chosen, but I have intended it for something warmer, such as wincey or nun's-veiling. In the smaller sketch I have shewn it with the front opening so many prefer, and the V- sh-uped neck which accords with the blouses of t'.e moment.

To Cut Out and Make Up

To Cut Out and Make Up. If made as in the large sketch, place the centre-front to the folid and) the centre-back to the selvedges. If as in the smaller one, simply reverse the process. When cut out, seam the backs and front together by n-eat run-and,-f-ell, or stitched teams, turn in and.1 hem the backs, which hems must be stitched and provided with the neces- sary fastenings, then: turn and neaten neck, and sew on the lace edging. For the sleeves, hem lower edge and sew on lace and insertion, then join, arrange in the armiides, sew in firmly, and fa-rten- off. Lastly, ifurn up and hem lower edge, and run a ribbon through to tie with. About 2 yards of 36-imch material wiH be required.

HOW TO OBTAIN TFK PATTERN

HOW TO OBTAIN TFK PATTERN. Our paper patterns are speei illy cut for us from designs expressly prepared icr this column, and the cost of each complete pattern is 6c1. post free. Address all letters, enclosing stamps for patterns, to Sylvia." Whitefriars House, Carmelite- street, London, E.C. Be "pre and mention the number of the pattern reqiired when ordering. Patterns will be despatched witbin three days ill the application being r"oived.

AGRICULTURAL NOTES

AGRICULTURAL NOTES. BY A PRACTICAL FARAIER. THE YIELD OF NEW OAT VARIETIES. A branch of useful work which might well received more attention tiian rj lias at aSricultural experiment stations. is .he com- parison of varieties. The results of such especially if made ov:i number r, years, appeal very much to prae!eal men. SUch a comparison is being made in regard ir ^at varieties by the Edinburgh and East oi Scotland College, and the results of the fir-si jeir's trials just- reported -are particularly in- vesting because of the .success of the new *rieties tried Of the thirteen varieties in tm selection, -Ole, such as Potato ad Abundance, are known. Others, such as n-or, Wide- j^ake, Beseler, Waverley, and Storm King, f!ave -already undergone considerable trial. On jj1- other hand, Crown, Victory, Golden Rain, **eeord. and Leader are quite new, and some p them were on trial for the t time. Srown, Victory, and Golden Rain were r°ught direct- from Sweden The plots- were each a half-acre in extent, all the newer varieties were grown in ^plicate, and. four pilots of potato on is ere placed in the a.re;i. so as to oiler ecra- Parison. In seeding, principle adopted J'as that of an equal m- e,' r of seeds per -acre J fi°r all varieties, the aaru^ falling between and six. bushels. The average yield of the twelve and a-half 'crt's occupied by the plots was -ovor llqr. of dressed grain per acre; and the natural "'E:lght of the grain, which, with the single ex- j^Pcion oi Leader, was 441b. or over per C Ushel, several being over 461b.. h; an indioa- l°n of the high quality of the product. In the rder of yield of dressed grain,, the four varieties head the list. Titer .?e?i'p:r»cl I? acre each, and their average yie'ld ie over qr. per acre, or fully 3qr. more than "i2i -C'l'ng-e of the four plots of potato oats «at were put down -as a standard. It is gene- J ahy assumed that potato 'oats surpass the e\ver varieties in the production of straw; J*t in these tests, while the potato" oats j jpve a high yield and surpassed s.ome of the I ^v>~ varieties, three of the four h-eavy grain Producers at the head of t-lis li.it .have also | ^ne bet-ier in straw by several owns. per acre.

THE QUESTION OF QUALITY j

THE QUESTION OF QUALITY. L In view of the lead taken by some of the c«.t varieties in the yield of grain, the ality and .the characteristics of the product 4re important. Two objections are frequently f^sed against the new varieties. Their large being usually enclosed in a somewhat ?hick husk, it is generally assumed that they ve a hi,hcr percentage of husk than f. potato" oats, that they are therefore in- I d.r:"T n eo;iiosition to these, and that they 110c give stfch a good yield of meal. The states that the varieties under con- »1(J< i\ation are at present being tested for defect by a member of thei College rr, who is subjecting them to -analysis. v tV meantime it may be stated that Ul- Jj^gations made at other centres indicate at s as they appear to be, their use would I material]v add to the food supply of -the f ^Untry. Un try.

COOPERATIVE INSURANCE

CO-OPERATIVE INSURANCE. ¡ Insurance premiums nowadays form quite » J^Pectable item of farmers' expenditure. One v^tirnr-s hears insurance men .say that farm pR-rfy is amongst the least- profitable of all to insure; but when one remembers a. g-e proportion of farm fires are caused by itps and other careless or wilful incen- it does not look as if the farmer is to j tbcre is anything in this complaint k; judging by the experience of the Agricul- :i1 and General Co-operative Insurance () el-ety since it war, formed in 1S08, it does appear that the insurance of farm pro- I -Av is so very un pro fit able, after all. should be understood that the business of tlf 1", society is practically confined to members I k Agricultural co-operative societies, who are ^i^onaily recommended by the societie-s to ^eh they belong. This recommendation v, Ts k> improve the quality of the risk from j ^insurance point of view, and it is said that society has a greater immunity from than ordinary companies. The practice the society is, after its accounts have Audited at the end of each yejir, to de- a if there is a sufiieient surplus paying all claims and expenses. l' tllg. bonus is allocated amongst the mem- In proportion to the premium which 1,1 has pcid the society. In the year 1911, In ^nus of no less than 35 per cent, was paid. ver, no bonus was paid, as the I Was remarkable for the number of fires IIoblh occurred; even in this year the society d have afforded a moderate bonus, but it thought best to put away the surplus for Last year the losses were small, j ^iia°ug^ the number of policies and the pre- inco me have both increased; con so- I a bonus of 15 per cent, was paid. This °f course, equal to 3s. in the £ Hr> Uer 3s- is paid as commission to societies fic. recommend the policy holders; 3s. also working expenses of the Insurance -V) and of the remaining Its., 2s. go to tQ¡¡tilJayrnènL of interest on capital and the for- \toe On of reserves, while the remaining 9s. ruireZI for the payment of claims.

INCREASED COST OF MILK

INCREASED COST OF MILK. Wilfred Buckley, of Basingstoke, s to point out that it is a simple matter *ost sS!t as follows: Man- s- 6d. hay, 30s.; S'lraw, 15s.; decorti- ^^otton cake, 60s. and oats, 93s. per .I'ri v"ich result in an additional cost of 8es gallon of milk. The milkers' w € risen such an amount as to add ft ^itio PGr gallon, making a minimum ^'1 on r'a^ cost of slightly over 2Jd. per fd- per quart. .^rs have to pay perhaps £ 7 per head .°r their cows, whilst if they rear them i 1 8 the extra cost of feeding-stuff for &t°-ck. When the additional cost, of ° cows vrhcTi not in milk and other considered, it is clear, says Mr. tha,t milk producers are not "un- who ask an additional |d. per dairyman's expenses have risen TvJ-e^0re' ^ev ^rt is n°r'; an im" 8«J^PiaisS1Ce. ^OT the ordinary grade of milk. with the price of other foods this U ^ipjj. when remeanbers that a quart lhS equivalent in nutritive value to beef or ten eggs. If more ^consumed the national food bill] OWer. <

ZEPPELINS LONDONI AGENCY I

ZEPPELIN'S LONDON AGENCY. We have not yet been privileged to leara whether the authorities whose business it is to protect us, so far as may be, against hostile aircraft are making any more at- tempts to declare London a prohibited area, tempts to declare London a prohibited area, and sweep the Germans out of it, as has al- I ready been done along the East Coast. As noted last week, there are some 6,000 enemy aliens still at Large in London, free to act as signallers and guide the destroyers upon their way; and doubtless this freedom has been ex tensively employed by quite a number of these faithful sons of the Fatherland to act as London agents for Count Zeppelin and his men—slayers of the innocent. For a fortnight or so with these moonlight nights we have probably little to fear from these aerial raiders. If during this respite popular indignation against this monstrous slackness of still permitting the alien enemy to go free in his thousands in London should grow and increase in determination and in- tensity, as it bids fair to do, then we may lock forward to something being done to right this amazing wrong. On the night of the last Zeppelin raid upon London Germans were seen and heard openly rejoicing in the murder and destruc- tion wrought- by thru- countrymen. Since I then—it is vouched for on irrefutable testi- mony—Garma-ns have made it a practice of going out on "joy rides" in parties to re- joice and gh thanks together by making a tour round localities wilei-L, the bOllbs and incendiary Is. were dropped. And, so far as one can L '1], they go forth, gloat upon the destruction jeer at these stupid, helpless Britishers, and return again with sharpened appetite and in excellent spirits— quite unmolested. We are used to calling ourselves a lon-g-smfTering people. Heady, if this kind of thing is allowed to go on, and London is not quickly cleared of this deadly pest, it will shortly be time tn call this Chris- tian quality of long-suffering ■ by another name, and to say that as a people we are courting merited disaster because of our in- curable sloth and stupidity in realising the deadly peril that is upon us. This menace and national disgrace, of a multitude of alien enemies still at large in London, the heart of the Empire, is intolerable-

THE GERMAN CHURCHES

THE GERMAN CHURCHES. As already noted, owing to the spirited lead and example of the Anti-German Union, the German church at Forest Hill is closed to worshippers from the Fatherland; and their Hymns- of Hate and other "religious" exer- cises of a like order will resound there no more. The Union, which is gathering ad- herents by the battalion as it goes upon its aggressive way, has already marked down other Teutonic places- of worship, also secular haunts where the alien enemy is in the habit of foregathering; and in due course these will receive the like orderly but determined attention that was bestowed upon Forest Hill with such excellent results. Let the provinces make a note of this. Onoe given the driving power of popular indignation, and a few lead- ing spirits to give indignation guidance and objective, and the enemy will soon come by his deserts. Popular resentment is being thus mobilised and put in action all over the coun- try. We are learning at heavy cost to look upon the enemy alien as the farmer looks up". ti c wasp in his fruit-orchard—and none too soon.

OUR GERMAN AGRICULTURISTS

OUR, GERMAN AGRICULTURISTS. Thanks to the fearless and patriotic action of the Globe, we have been made aware of yet another plague spot the German farm colony founded some years- ago for the relief and instruction of indigent. Germans, and now declared, upon excellent authority, to be a danger to the community. Our gentle kins- man from across the North Sea or German Ocean, bringing his kultur with him, is once again faithful to his tradition—of biting the haifd that fed Piid- nourished him in his ad- ve;v.liy. This farm colony is at Libury Hall, near by ihe village of Munden, and some six and tbroc-ouai'ter miles north of Hertford— also in convenient proximity to a peculiarly vulnerable- stretch of the Great Northern main line, for the Welwyn viaduct is close by. This agricultural training school and refuge for the impoverished alien has acquired such a sinister reputation for devot- ing itself to other than agricultural pursuits t• y* as usual after long delay, a guard was &et upon it, and it was called- a place of in- ternment. But these who should know declare the guard to be utterly inadequate, and that, to all intents and purposes, the students of the gentle art of tillage are practically as free as heretofore to play the spy and traitor, and are making the most of their opportunity. A local resident vouches for it that, for instance, Herr Miiiler, head of the colony, visits Lon- don once or twice a week, unattended, and that he made one of his journeys on- the day following the last. Zeppelin raid upon London. Also, the same deponent tells us, Herr Kanoihfi, manager of the settlement, is still a regular attendant at local markets, where he is free to puy and sell, and no doubt to trans- act such other business as may be helpful to the Fatherland, as any Englishman. Anyhow, here is a case, since the authorities still persist in playing their well-tried part of dormice—for the general public to make its feelings known in. an effective manner. Th< I Anti-German* Union is now engaged in focussing the popular and, growing indigna- tion; and. as in. the case of the German church and a score of other cases, it is hoped that very soon, on Saturdays and Sundays, demonstrations will be held: at the settlement itself, and -at neighbouring towns and villages, so that this singularly mean and contemptible example of enemy evil-doing may be put a stop to.

THE ANTIGERMAN UNION

THE ANTI-GERMAN UNION. Thus, day by day, the Anti-German move- ment gathers force and headway, and is already well upon the way to the attainment of its objective, to destroy this poisonous growth that in our blindness and fatal generosity in times of peace we have suffered to fasten its hold upon us. The evil is every- where; and by consequence every loyal citizen may, and must, bear a hand in rooting it out. To remain idle and make no endeavour is to be untrue to one's country in her hour of need, and unfaithful to the men who are laying down their lives that we may r.etruin our heritage of freedom and security. In reply to a number of questions on the poiiit-at any meetings, wheresoever held, which are called together by the Anti-German Union, no -casuat collection of funds is authorised. All are invited to join the Union; and for all membership fees, donations, and subscriptions a formal receipt will be given. All communications should be addressed to th •« Hon Secretary, Aiiti-GetrmaiHUnion, 346, Strand, London, W.C.

Advertising

Printing PDsters, Programmes, Pamphlets, Catalogues. Cards, etc. County T i mesCKiMce BRECON- —A——^NAA——MBK? ]UUH8TERED TUDE MARX. ED RADilM BATH SALT added to your ordinary Bath gives you a RADIO-ACTIVE BATH at Home. Both Nervous and Muscular omplaintJ such as Nerve Exhaustion, Depression, Insomnia, Rheu- matism, Gout, Neuritis, &c., yield to a course of RA-BA-SA Baths where medicines fail to give relief. 1/- per packet or box of 7 for 5/9. Of all EXTRACT FROM "THE LANCET. Stores and leading Chemists, or, if unable "We have tested a solution of the Salt to obtain, post free on receipt of P.O., from with the electroscope, and it certainly Radium Salt Co., Ltd., 21, Farringdon-ave., shows ionising properties. The method London, E.(J. Booklet, "A Bathful of appears to be an ingenious one of preser- Health," free on receipt of name and ving the radio-activity of the salt, and address. affords a means of observing the thera- to obtain, post free on receipt of P.O., from with the electroscope, and it certainly Radium Salt Co., Ltd., 21, Farringdon-ave., shows ionising properties. The method London, E.G. Booklet, "A Bathful of appears to be an ingenious one of preser- Health," free on receipt of name and I ving the radio-activity of the salt, and address. affords a means ot observing the thera- peutic efocts of a radio-active Bath." RA-BA-SA BATHS GIVE SOUND, EFaSHJG SLEEP. Local Agent: W. GWILLIM, M.P.S., M&dical Hall, Brzsson. I —■"T.—■——„— B — „

THE BRITISH NAVYS ACTIVITY

THE BRITISH NAVY'S ACTIVITY. SOME "LITTLE FACTS." [From f;, WelAJ Correspondent.] The drift. of a single ofcraw will iDdicftSe the direction of the wind; and the eorrobc-rstive evidence of isolated facts, which, in Hi tin sol fee, may be deemed trivial and inRigoifieanf, may RstRbtifb fcbri nciversaliSy of a epecifis law. It was fcbus f-bat Nawtoh beheld, behind a par- ticular phyHic--i! pbenomeuoQ, the physical law thsfe governs oor Uoiverge. Lot rs consider <» few of the details oi 41 War News" of sha ) Iftst few days; sraali facts thab may well b* overlooked in the rcidsfc of the greatest conflict co? world has ever experienced bnt small facta that nevertheless point in an unmistak- able manner to the secret of Briuuu's strength. Some little while ago, & newspaper correRpon- demfe of S>he nsme of Archibald lefi New York for the purpose of ths Earope.io battle- field. He was an American citizen, and so fsr as t hi, cooatry was concerned a "friendly" neutral. The American passport which be carried wan a guarantee for his safety and pro- tection. But Mr Archibald was cob quite so "friendly" as this country and oor AlIi, s had a rigbt to expect him to he; and this fact was (31 SCO Vi] WiiUJ. papetb which ue cat;i«d came to be ExaminEd by the British antborities. Those "papers" have 1)0, been published by the British Government, and they are worth lookit/g at. One of tbo papers which Mr Archibald carded was a despatch f,-on D' Damba, fcbe Anstrian Ambassador ai Wasbingbon, to bis chief sn Vienna. Tb"J f ct that Dr Damba should be at pains to find Rome" safe way of (•finding bis despatches from America to Austria is in itself significant of mccb. Yea may almost Reuse the iong arm of the Bri&i&b N&vy even here. Thp reasoninK is thus: How can I," said Dr Domba, "send my report from America to my Government in Vienna and make quite sure it won't fall into the clutches of the British, whose Navy is keeping watch and ward in oil the seas?" SJ Archi- bald, who is going to Enrcpe under the pro- tection of a friendly passport, becomes the Bafs courier of Dr Dnmba's secret despatch. Now, without going into details, Dr Dumba's despatch convinced even the American author- ities that Dr Dumbs bad abused the hospitality of the United Sbafces for the porpuse of benefit- iug Austria and Germany in their warlike I operation? and of injuring Great Britain end ¡ ber Allies; bot, principaily, that Dr Dumba's activity was highly ^etrnnenbal to the trade and commerce of the United Sttes themselves. Some people have been saying name very nasty things aboat the way in which the United States have taken the insults" of Germany "lying down." No one has said these nasty things in a more oeustic way than, has Theodore Roosevelt. However, when the President of the United States was quite patis- fied that Dr Domba bad conspired to injure Uncle Sam in his pocket, the President imme- diately intimated to the Austrian Government that Dr Dumba mtisb be recalled-" That means that Dr Dumba, the Austrian Ambassa- dor, must quit the United States and find his way home. The position at present is that Dr Dumba bus requested the President to find him a safe conduct." That's worth thinking about. Dr. Dumba, the accredited Ambassador of the Anstrian fourt to the Government pf the United Statep, wants to go from New York tc, say, Rotterdam. But before he gets on board the e* for tbr era voyage he to go* the President's word for-it that he will he clJowed to reach bis destination. The President of the United States can pledge bis word for the "safe conduct" of Dr. Dnmb's only after tho President has asked Sir Spring Rice, the British Ambassador at Washington, and Sir Spring Rice must first of all consult the British Government. If the British Govern- ment bells Sir Spring Rice that Great Britain is not at all interüRtcd" in wb&t becomes of Dr. Dnnabs, then Sir Spring Rice may tell the President of ths United States that be may pledge bis word for the safe conduct" i of Dr. Dombs through the lines of the British Navy. If Sir Spying Rice had to intimate to the President tbat the British Government had a little account- of its own to settlB with Dr. Dumba, it is qaite certain that Dr Dumba would not dare to start on any sea voyage from the United States, which he is ordered to quit, Actions E-ipeak looder than words. Ad- miral Vou Ticpilz, Couiii; Reventlow, Captaiu Persies and other spokesmen on behalf of the Gasman navy raay uso what blaster they like about the prowess of their fleet. Dr. Dumba in his distress has had it brought home to him that it is not bluster but Britannia that roles the waves. The British Navy daring the past twelve months h.^s escorted millions of men across the wide and the narrow seas and has defied Germany to interfere with their "safe conduct," The combined fleets of Gesmsny and Austria cannot guarantee the safe condoct of one Dumba But look again at the "papers" that Mr Archibald carried. The German Ambassador to the United S'ates is Gonrt John B^mfitorflf; but it does not appoor that Count Berustorff was so indiscreet as to confide any secret report to his Government to the keeping of Archibald, although Bernetorff was well aware that Archibald waa carrying secret despatches. All tho German papers which were entrusted to Archibald emanated from one Captain Von Papen. who has been one of the mosi active mischief-makers ou Coons Berest-ciff'^ staff. Von Papen's papers reveal the fact that thig $ger.t of Germany in the United States has bupJed himself iu baying up all sorts of snch cheuiicai iagredienifs m go to the preparation of explosives aud other warlike materials, Ilia object in doing this was to prevent Great Britain and her Allies from purchasing fcbem. ■TO'iid be toe tkv ceetsie? of Germany. A! thus be epent millions of German money in order to get posssBeion of the goods. But, the pathesic part of Von Pe.pen's story to bis Government is this that having bought the stuff be is tryiog to dnmp it on N otway and oth,,lr "iieuitral" as I!o confesses, be can not send the stuff to Germany, much as Germany msy need it or would benefit by Th:i? is worth thinking about Although German muey may be .fepent in millions for materials of war those warlike materials become, in Von Paper's view, the prizes of the B.^stish Navy m soon 35 they pat out to sea That's how Britannia rates the waves. j Now, look at the other side of the shield. According to a statement maie by one of tbe highest officials of the Post of London there sever was a tims when the L ctJÚlHI docks and the who'.<» of ¡b,. river were ao fuli of vess' is filled with all kiuds of prococe brccght to thin country for the l1Gr.¡ of oor population. TiJ" report sajs that e> touch of roniauce is added to th? occ iH'oa by the f »ct tb-it many of these vessel? bave o-.Ego.'S which wero destined for the enemy. Exclude the cowardly U80 of tbe submarine rwd it is the ha-e fact that the ex- iatsnca of tbe enemies' navies ba1 no influence ai; an in olFtructiog or aven diverting tbe even flow of onr sea. borne trade. And' the of t,)tl most cowardly, JR quite inconsiderable com- pared with the volume of our ses-goiog trade, We ask no one to guarantee the ,l safe conduct" of either race, or moozy on llii.rCi1Q,ÚO¡Sl\. L tberp is anything that we would ask it-might ) coue, '-ii;abiy be coustraed as a boast. But is; Would certainly be something in tbe nature of a ieqatsj to Gerujtiiuy Toooh it if yon dare 1" And yet, while the Bdtisb Navy is keeping its strangle hold" on Germany and on Austria white it is k, -"I)it"g tr", se-is free for the whole of tbe British Empire and for our Allies in tbis great world-war while it is keeping the German fl et in sefe custody we read how onr ships of war are activeiy taking their part in the actuci fightin,, from the coast of Belgium, through t-he-Mediterrane^o even to tbe coasts of Menopotamia which eksrfi the boundaries of the I-Gardc-a cf EJD." No wonder that Britoes the worl i over ara Dread of the British Navy. It in to-day tho "moRt perfect and best prepared fighting machi'ie in the con- flict that stirs the world, and it must be particularly gratifying to those who have labooped for tbe up keep of a soffiaient and an efficient British Navy to fiad that their work has found so ample a rewarl I-: is impossible to contemplate the work of scch an organisa- tion as the Navy Leegue without being filled with a grateful appreciation of its prudent and timely activity.