Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
13 articles on this page
Advertising

THIS HAPPY COUPLE With the beautiful goods applied by II ELY AN & COMPANY, HOUSE which has been so cimiortably FURNISHED by that well-known Firm I Eucrnjous Selection Newest Designs! free Delivery! Everytl?ii?§ for 1% Aslooisl?ii?§ Prices! Catalogues Gratis! IBEVAN & COMPANY LTD., r -_u & "1 » II* I I I I, I I I I }) ■> ■ IWILPIW|WHWWFL|,L»^W^IFH I I HFFPL M I ML" ? ?.? ? ?7?'/?/? ? y -? ? ?A (? li, Vil FELL DEEPLY IN LOVE And are confidently looking forward to a long and happy life in the The finest array of DINING, DRAWING and BEDROOM SUITES, in the Principality from 3-21 to 35 guineas per suite 'fir' "

PEEPS AT PORTHCAWL I

PEEPS AT PORTHCAWL. I By MARINER. I Naturally the question of bilk-tins troops at Porthcawl is the all-important one now. and people are everywhere talking aboat it. The town is extremely quiet, and we do not like it alter our busy life, hurry and bustle of the last few months. Now the town is practically empty of troops, but there is con- solation in the iact that a few are arriving every day and they will arrive in greater numbers when recruiting is given another stimulus. The raising of the 2nd Batt. of Bantams is proceeding apace, and while we cannot hope for the number of men being made up to 4,000, a thousand or two will do much to help us along until the arrival of the summer season again. Taking all things into consideration, we have not much to grumble a.t. We have had a good share of the benefits that all these military movements mean, for there are still a number of seaside resorts which have not been favoured with troops and the money they bring with them. As I have said before, it has relieved some of our traders from anxiety and has saved from ruin some of our boarding-house keepers, and those who rc-ly upon the summer takings from visitors to carry them through the winter. So let us be thankful for mercies we have re- ceived. • « It will be gratifying to my readers to learn that the popular ex-M.F.H. of the Glamor- gan Hunt, Colonel Homfray, of Penllyne, is to take command of the 2nd Battalion of the Bantams or Welsh Gurkhas as they have been called. The Colonel is one of the most popu- lar men in the Vale of Glamorgan, where, as a landowner, he is held in high esteem, and as a man holds the respect of all classes. He will make the acquaintance of Porthcawl people probably for the first time, but let me at once point out that he is a judge of char- acter and likes no soft-soaping neither is he likely to tolerate obstrusiveness, but he will demonstrate in a practical fashion his appre- ciation of all efforts put forth to make his men happy and comfortable. And I fancy he will see that they get good food and suffi- cient food in their billets. We will all ap- preciate the unsolicited expression of thanks from Lieut.-Col. Davies, of the R.A.M.C., for the treatment the troops received while they were at Porthcawl and reiterate the re- marks in these columns a few weeks back that when the men conducted themselves in the admirable way they did, we could not help but' liko them, and do all that the limited resources at our command allowed us to do for their comfort. < w w Next to the question of troops comes that of the price of bread in the town, and I am glad to learn that the matter received atten- tion at the meeting of the Council- This is a subject about which we need to know a good deal; we have got to ascertain how the economic laws operate; whether the baker is to blame equally with the freighter and the miller; if any of them are to blame; but there is no doubt that there are real and solid grounds for complaint in the matter. There undoubtedly are a lot of profits being made by somebody on the backs of the poor, who, unfortunately are always the first to feel the unsympathetic grabbing hand of those mercenaries on the look out for profits, no matter what moral sins are committed, no matter how much the poor suffer, no matter if the children cry for bread, no matter if the fireplace is empty of glowing embers on the coldest winter day. They are out—they appear to be in the world for one purpose, and that gain. As I have said, the question is to attach the blame, and the remedy is Government action. The whole country is crying out that immediate steps should be taken by those governing the country in this great crisis. Will it step in ? is the one eternal question. We are all waiting before things come to such a pass that a serious situation may arise be- cause of these acts of men who put themselves and money first and their country last. The bakers probably are the catspaw of freigh- ters and millers, but the Government would not be long in ascertaining, and then it should deal drastically with the offenders. Brea/d is not the only thing that is on the increase. We are told that the farmers are hoarding their cereals in the hope of getting enhanced prices in the spring—and in order to get pronta both ways they have increased the price of milk. Coal has gone up. meat has gone up; in fact, practically everything has gone up except wages and employers "generously" keep those down as low as they can. www There is a matter I want to specially refer to this week. and that is the condition of the town conveniences. I know not whether the number of men employed by the Council has been cut down so that ordinary sanitary requirements cannot be attended to. If that is the case, an alteration should take place at once. There is little wonder that the troops have expressed their disgust at the sanitary arrangements in the town by "the writing on the wall," which calls the local administration a disgrace to Wales. The phrase cannot be objected to, for cer- tainly the condition of the convenience in John Street is a disgrace to Porthcawl, and the sooner adequate arrangements are made for remedying matters the better. I am told the Chairman of the Council has expressed the opinion that certain people in the town who go about spreading nonsensical rumours ought to be put in a padded room. I don't know whether to agree with him or not, because I think the rumours he referred to regarding the alleged presence of sub- marines off and aeroplanes over Porthcawl are spread more because of the Britishers love of excitement than anything else. There is no reason to believe that either report, even if true, would create a panic amongst the inhabitants, as he suggested. We are, all too brave for that. even including the members of the Council. Even if a sub- marine was off Porthcawl it would find the rocks rather tough to make a meal off. and an aeroplane ovo-head would. I fancy, create more curiosity than fear. as the bombard- ment of the Hartlepools drew peopl e to the beach to watch the proceedings ir.r-tead of scattering them like rabble. It would give a I splendid opportunity for our Council and to cur local Volunteer Corps to show their pluck. I can imagine the procession. • • • Regarding the rumour concerning an al- leged epidemic in the town, it was right that prompt steps should be taken to give a point- blank denial to it at the earliest possible mo merit. THAT tended to do the town harm. Fortunately, our town has been free from disease of any kind for many years. It is slowly building up a reputation for good sanitation, and when the drainage and the water schemes are completed there will not be the least cause for any veiled insinuations regarding the sanitary condition of the town. Even now it is as good as many seaside re- sorts double and treble the size of Porth- cawl. But as for epidemics: if we have heard what they are we do not KNOW what they are from personal experience. Porth- eawl's name is Breezy,. Salubrious, Healthy Porth caw l, and it is a name we intend to keep. So. seducers of our town, beware! t iiniimiWii—RIWM .AJ. IHIIHI—I

PORTHCAWL URBAN DISTRICTII COUNCIL

PORTHCAWL URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL. THE WATER LOAN GRANTED. SCARCITY OF LABOUR AND THE SEWERAGE UNDERTAKING. The usual fortnightly meeting of the Porth- cawl Urban District Council was held at the Council Chamber on Monday evening, when Mr. T. G. Jones was in the chair, and there were also present:—Messrs. J. Grace, D. Jones. W. Francis, T. James, and D. Davies, with the clerk (Mr. Evan Davies) and the surveyor (Mr. A. J. Oborn). ho' GRANTED. VV ith regard to the resolution passed at the previous meeting of the Council asking a de- putation to call on the Local Government Board and urge upon them the necessity of immediately granting the loan for works in connection with the water undertaking, the Clerk said the Chairman and himself called upon the Local Government Board with re- gard to the necessity of the loan for the new water main, and placed before Mr. Owen the urgent need of sanction of the loan to the Council in order that they might proceed with the work as quickly as possible before the second season came upon Porthcawl. They promised to attend to it. and they had since done so, sanctioning the loan. The Clerk read a letter from the Local Government Board stating that their formal consent was given to borrow £ 8.800 for work in connection with the water supply. No payment should be made out of the loan to any salaried officers of the Council or any workmen in the Council's permanent employ- ment. (Hear, hear.) The Chairman: It is very satisfactory to have the water loan granted. SCARCITY OF LABOUR. The Clerk read a letter from Messrs. Tay- lor and Sons with reference to the scarcity of labour for the main drainage works, and having enclosed a letter from Mr. F. Hodges, miners' agent for the Garw district, stating that in connection with the 50 men required for the Porthcawl drainage work, he had no men available, as the collieries had again got into full swing. PROGRESS MADE. 1, Messrs. Taylor and Sons, the contractors for the Porthcawl main drainage, submitted a report to the Council on the progress made in the work, stating that the work had been satisfactory, considering the number of men employed. They felt certain that everything possible was being done to obtain the men for tnVwork. INSURANCE. I The Clerk brought forward the matter of the insurance of the engineer at the Pump- ing Station, and said he had not carried out the resolution of the Council, as he found that the price quoted— £ 4 10s. per annum— did not include the insurance of the pumps, and the Council were of the opinion that it did. The Surveyor recommended that the pumps should be insured as well as the engines. It was agreed to ask for quotations for the pumps as well as the engines. ISOLATION HOSPITAL CHARGES. I The Clerk read a letter from Mr. J. T. Howell, clerk to the Bridgend Urban Dis- trict Council, stating that the Porthcawl Council was the only constituent authority that had taken any notice of his Council's circular with reference to holding an inquiry into the heavy expenditure at the Bridgend Isolation Hospital, and the Bridgend U.D. Council considered that it was useless to go I further with the matter at present. I J THANKS FROM ARMY OFFICERS. I The Clerk read a letter from Lieut.-Colonel John G. H. Davies, R.A.M.C., of the 2nd Field Ambulance, Welsh Army Corps, as follows :— Sir.—The Field Ambulance under my command have been ordered to proceed to North Wales. May I take this opportunity of thanking you, and through you, the Coun- cil, for the very great kindness you have shown us while at Porthcawl by allowing us the use of the Council Chambers as head- quarters? I cannot tell you how much we have appreciated the kindness that has been extended to us by the inhabitants of Porth- cawl during our stay. Both officers and men have been more than satisfied with the excel- lent arrangements mado for their billeting. I feel sure that wherever we may be stationed in future nothing more can possibly be done for our comfort than has been done by you, the Council, and the inhabitants of Porth- cawl.—John G. H. Davies." The Chairman and the members thought that was a very satisfactory letter, and should be inserted in the Press. I EPIDEMICS, SUBMARINES. AND I AEROPLANES! The Chairman said /1e would express once more the absolute fact that there were still persons sending about complaints about the water supply for the troops. It was abso- !ute?v disgusting- They had done all they could to get troops there, and yet there were these rumours going;) bout. Someone had told him that it was existent in the Rhondda that there was supposed to be a great epi- demic there. He thought it was time that, that class of people should be put into a nadded room. One day they talked about German suhamrines, another day it was an epidemic, and the next day it was the pre- sence of German aeroplanes. It was absurd and disgusting, and created a panic among some people, and there was absolutely nc foundation at all for it. (Hear, hear.) REMOVAL OF TROOPS. I In reply to a letter sent to the chief officer commanding the troops roomtly removed from Porthcawl, asking if anything could have be?n done to prevent the removal of the troops, )1: McKenna stated the removal of the troops from Porthcawl was a question of military expediency, and in any way of any fault being found with tne accommoda- tion in the town. He w'oukl carefully bear in mind the request of the Council to do what he could to get troops sent to Porthcawl. The Chairman said that was quite satisfac- tory NOTIFICATION OF BIHTHS ACT. I Mr. D. Jones moved a resolution to the effect that the Council should adopt the Noti- fication of Births Act of 1907. and appoint the Porthcawl Nursing Association's nurse as their officer for the purpose, according to the requirements of the said Act, at a salary of ¡ £25 per annum. Mr. D. Davies seconded, and it was car- ried. BUILDERS AND THE SAND. I Mr. D. Davies wished to know if the Coun- cil could take any steps with regard to the question of sand in Porthcawl. He under- stood that in the past the builders had been able to get sand from the New Road estate for fillings. That, he found, had been stopped, and it would affect them very much in Porthcawl, for the simple reason that the builders could not get any fillings in the town. He suggested that the Council could approach the estate to sea what could be done. The builders were in a very serious position. Mr. Grace thought the builders had been in the habit of getting sand at the request of the land owners on the estate who were mak- ing a road. He supposed someone had wanted the sand, and stopped it. The Chairman said he had given the buil- ders consent to take the sand on his part, free of charge. Mr. Davies further suggested that the Council should request the land owner to charge a nominal price for the sand, say, 6d. or Is. a load. The charge of 3s. 6d. a load was too much.—Agreed. WATER SUPPLY. r Mr. David Jones said one of the minutes needed an explanation. A committee was formed for the purpose of going into the question of the water supply of the Council with the surveyor. They had met and con- sidered the matter, and a scheme was sug- gested by them to be put into practice. That was done for one day, when, unfortunately, the conditions changed and many of the troops were taken away from the town, and that did not give them a chance of carrying out the suggestion. Therefore it was not satisfactory and the committee were not in a position to report as to the effect of the suggestion. They would have to have four or five days to do that. 0WMWBtgTMBBICTa—M—BWiiW

PRICE GF BREAD AT roPORTHI CAWL

PRICE GF, BREAD "AT roPORTH- I CAWL. COUNCILLORS' COMPLAINTS. I At the meeting of the Porthcawl Council on I Monday, Mr. D. Davies referred to the fact that Merthyr had only raised the price of their bread on Monday, whilst Porthcawl had done so many days previously. He felt the Council should do something in the matter, or some people would say that they were not there to look after the in- terests of the town. Why should Porthcawl charge more than anybody else ? He had got it from the best authority in the town that there was no reason whatever, so far as the price of flour went, that they should get their people to pay more. He went into the matter to see if there was an increase in the charge for Cardiff, and he found that the price of the flour would be absolutely the same in Porthcawl as in Merthyr. He felt it was an important question in this way: people visiting Porthcawl and finding that they charged more for that material than anywhere else, it would go against the town, and the Council should seriously consider the matter. He wished the Council would take the matter up and write a letter to the bakers asking for their reasons for charging more for their bread. Mr. Grace: What is the price of it ? Mr. Davies: 8!d. per 4lb. loaf, I have been j told. Mr. Grace thought it was only wise that a )J resolution should be sent to the Prime Minis- ter on the matter—(hear, hear)—to see why they were not justly dealt with. But was it I a fact that their bakers were selling the same bread at Sid. in Porthcawl and charging 9Id. in Kenfig Hill? The Chairman: This is a matter of public importance, Mr. Davies, and if you propose a resolution, I see no reason why we should not take it. Mr. Davies: Can we not get some informa- tion as to how we are standing' with other districts ? 1 Mr. Grace said the price of a sack of flour I from Cardiff to Porthcawl was the same as that at the ports the extra distance had no- thing to do with it. I Mr. Jones thought the Council should have same explanation from Mr. Davies. Bread in Cardiff had been 8d. since Thursday. | Mr. Davies proposed that the Council find the prices being paid for bread in other dis- tricts and then take the matter up. i Mr. James thought it was not within the nrovince of the Council to do such a thing. They may as well send and ask the grocers why they had cheaper butter in Porthcawl than in other places. Mr. D. Jones did not think they were very much out of place as regards the price of bread. It called for no action on the part of the Council. If Mr. Davies chose to champion the cause of the town, he was at liberty to do so. It was resolved that Messrs. D. Davies and T. James should visit the Chamber of Trade and put the matter before them.

PORTHCAWL GAS ARBiTRA1 TION I

PORTHCAWL GAS ARBiTRA-1 TION. I REPORT BY THE CHAIRMAN. I HGW MUCH ARE THE WORKS GONG II TO COST? j i At Porthcawl Council on Monday, the Chairman, referring to the gas arbitration between the Council and the Porthcawl Ga-, Company, with a view to tho Council acquir- ing the undertaking, said the gas arbitration took place on Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Monday following, Feb. 1st. The Gas Com- pany took the first two days and the Council took the next day, and the counsels for both sides were given the last day to sum' up. The proceedings were conducted very fairly. and as far as the Council were concerned, their witnesses did very well indeed, from the Council's point of view. Their evidence was geoci, and they were unshaken, and he Uieughi the general opinion after the arbi- tration, on both sides, was that from the evi- dence the Council were likely to fare much better than they at first anticipated before the proceedings. The counsel for the Council took two hours to sum up on the Monday, and he dealt with the question very fairly, and. he thought, impressed the tribunal upon the fairness of their claim and also upon the need of getting it at a just price, especially during these troublesome times. So far as the Parliamentary Committee were concerned they did all they could. They had the mains examined, and they had the works examined, and they called expert evidence to prove, the condition of the works and the condition of the mains.. They called for financial evi- dence, but unfortunately they were deprived from calling local evidence, as they could not blow their own trumpet. That was for the Gas Company to produce—such local evidence as they felt necessary. He thought when they received the award in about a month's time they would be satisfied. If they re- ceived the award in a month they had the works in June, and they would pay over in June. The Parliamentary Committee would have a report to make to the Council between this time and the time of the award, and also after the award. The Clerk said there was an application for the time for the arbitration to be extended until the 1st of the month.—Agreed.

THE PORTHCAWL TRAGEDYI

THE PORTHCAWL TRAGEDY I GIRL VICTIM'S COAT FOUND. I Although a vigilant search has been and is being made, no trace has yet been found of the body of Miss Alice Morgan, who, while accompanied by a cyclist of the 7th Battalion Welsh Regiment, named Cousins, wa. during very rough weather at Porthcawl on Wednes- day night week, apparently washed out to sea. Among those who went to the assistance of Cousins and the young lady were Sergeants King and Pettie, of the Bantams Battalion, and also Messrs. Selwyn Price and White, Porthcawl residents. It was only with diffi- culty that they th-emselves managed to get ashore, but they saved themselves. The jacket belonging to Miss Morgan was found on Monday near the breakwater.

A DOUBTI

A DOUBT. I KENFIG HILL COLLIER'S SUCCESSFUL I DEFENCE. I At Bridgend Police Court on Saturday, George Saunders, a collier, of Kenfig Hill, was charged with having been on private land for the purpose of trespassing for game. P.C. Williams said on Monday, 25th Janu- ary, he heard a report of a gun on W. B. Loveluck's land. Witness went towards the spot and saw defendant 'with a gun on his- shoulder and a number of birds were flying away. Defendant had a small gun, which was capable of killing at 30 or 40 yards. Defendant: I was simply trying to shoot a piebald blackbird with a garden gun. It is a was in a garden alongside the road. It is a garden where the children play and the people get water from. The constable recalled, said defendant was 30 yards from the garden. The summons was dismissed.

No title

I At a largely attended meeting of the Taff Vale Railway yard and shop men at the Corv Hall, Cardiff. on Saturday, the following reso- I lution was unanimously passed —"That we demand an increase of 5s. per week to all I graues to alleviate the distress caused by the I increased cost of living through the capitalists I exploiting the workmen by taking • a mean I advantage in this national crisis. That we meet again in fourteen days for the purpose of deciding future drastic action.

Advertising

!!8-1.rza- Up-to-date Appliances for turning out every class of work at competitive prices, trt the II Olamorgan Gazette Printing Worbre. I — ■■■■aWtai ji(|| 'c

1 Gathered Comments ON THE WAR

Gathered Comments ON THE WAR. German Nation's View. The German Conservative leader, Dr. von Heydebrand, speaking at Magdeburg on peace, said "It must not be a diplomats' peace, but one intelligible and agreeable to tho whole German nation, one which wiil assure our position, one worthy of our sacrifices. Nothing could be more terrible than if this vast war were to end in a disapointment for our people. Many a time has the pen lost us what we have won with the sword. Now, when we stand I a lone in the world, we alone must dictate the i final terms." A Judge's Verd:ct. 1 Addressing the Grand Jury at the Here- I fordshire Assizes on Monday, Mr. Justice Avory remarked that the general diminution of crime all over the country afforded a strik- ing contrast to what they were now witness- ing in the conduct of our enemies, who had violated and were threatening to violate every law of God and man. They had also established this paradox: that the highest form of Kultur. in its morality, was lower ( than the lowest form of barbarism. In fact, if this question was tried in that or any other Court, the verdict would probably be in favour of the lowest form of barbarism. Devil Possession. I "It is the 'Kaiser' in each one of us that makes wars possible," says Mr. Arnold Free- man, in a very useful pamphlet. "An Intro- duction to the Study of Social Problems." "It is because we have in every nation, and in every class, multitudes of men and women who neglect the service of their fellow- creatures in a desire for self-indulgence and self-aggrandisement, that this catastrophe has fallen upon us all. It is a case of devil-pos- session, and our only hope is to exercise our- selves of the evil spirit. Our avowed inten- tion is to cast out 'Kaiserism' in Germany by brute force. We must be no less resolute to cast it out of this country by education." When Will War Yield to Peace? The Bishop of Oxford, preaching at St. Margaret's, Westminster, from the text, "Be not wise in your own conceits," said: "We have heard a good deal recently, in connec- tion with a certain German philosopher, about humility, which we are asked to dis- card as a servile virtue. Yet, side by side with charity, it stands as the characteristic excellence of Christianity. It is the only virtue which can really make men free. The time must come when war will yield to peace, and the basis of that peace must depend upon what is real humility as applied to nations, the desire that every race, whether conjoined like Irishmen, Englishmen, and Indians in one Empire, or like the Belgians, a separate people, should have a really free! opportunity to make the best of its soil, its own gifts, in its own manner, so that its own native powers shall have their fullest expression so that no one race because of its power shall I have the opportunity to insult any other race. Sir Edward Grey and America. I Sir Edward Grey, the Foreign Secretary, writing in the "World's \York," says A great nation standing outside this European conflict should use what influence it can on the side of right against wrong. We believe that we are fighting for liberty and indepen- dence, unthreatened by militarism, and to re- dress the cruel wrong done to Belgium. We hope to win a peace that will secure these things. What influence the United States can exercise, and to what end and when their influence should be used, is a question for their own people to decide. But I do not think that this will be a suitable contribution to the dispassionate inquiry made by the editors of the "World's Work" magazine; and perhaps I may explain how impossible it is for a member of a Government who believe that they are fighting for the independence of their country, and that all they care for and believe is at stake, to do anything ex- cept plead the cause of that country and to ask at least for sympathy." I Still Plainer. I Speaking at a meeting of the "From War to Peace" movement in London on Monday, Earl Grey declared that Great Britain would persevere with her task in the war until we had expelled the last vestige of German authority from Belgium and triumphantly vindicated the authority of international law. Every private trader belonging to a neutral and democratic country who in pursuit of gain prolonged the war by sending supplies to Germany was a traitor to himself, to his country, and to the future destinies of the world. Neutral Powers who signed the Hague Convention were apparently throwing away a great opportunity, but he hoped that even at the eleventh hour the call of duty to freedom, humanity, and posterity might find I expression in official proclamations, and that neutral nations might realise in time that a few words spoken in season might save hun- dreds of thousands of lives and untold suffer- ing, and might bring about a far-reaching federation which would establish the peace, security, and greatness of democracy for all time. (Applause.) Kaiser at Judgment Bar. I Mr. Israel Zangwill, writing in "livery- man," imagines the Kaiser at the gr-eat Judgment Bar. "Hearing which, the Judge would-- I imagine-wind up: 'Your punishment, pris- oner at the bar, shall be to be born again, but of Belgian refugees in poverty, and a modern man of genius instead of a mediaeval man of talent. Hence, what you shall strive for shall be Brotherhood, not Empire, and in plaoe of a world of flatterers, and parasites to magnify each mediocre gift, there shall be round you a world of enemies and disbelievers to depreciate, flout and deny you. Instead of the crown of sovereignty you shall wear the crown of thorns. You shall know no glory of triumph, but only the tragedy of labouring in the darkness for a cause that shall seem hope- loss, till at last, fainting and heart-sick at the sight of cities desolated and homes death- stricken, and millions of men turned into manure heaps, you shall cry out: "My God. my God, why hast Thou forsaken me?" And in that moment pereluince through the great blackness thou shalt see the glimmer of light.'

ICENSORED PARAGRAPHS I

CENSORED PARAGRAPHS. I No fewer than 71 deserted wives are receiv- ing relief from the Merthyr Board of Guar- dians. What are the figures for the Bridgend Lnion ? • • • The dividend of the Vale of Glamorgan Railway is at the rate of .H er cent.— carrying forward £417. # «► 9 Flag, day is to be celebrated in Wales on March 1st. • • • The proceeds of the sales will be devoted to the supply of comforts to Welsh troops at houl ald abroad. w < Notice has bsfcli given by South Wales Col- liery owners to dealers that from Monday prices of house coal would be advanced 2s. per tor., « < <* This has been sgid "to be necessary in self- defence," owing to the increase of prices in other districts, which resulted in an increased demand for South Wales coal, which was then selling at usual rates. 4. 9 It will be understood by housewives there- fore that if the South Wales owners were able to sell at old prices with satisfaction to them- selves until other districts increased prices, there was no necessity and no reason for the increase by either. • • • But as soon as miners ask for better terms to increase their purchasing power in view of rises in the price of necessities, there 's a loud outcry and miners are accused of "mili- tant ar.c. unpatriotic action." 0 0 9 What is good for the gcose is surely ;ood for the gander. Housewives in regard to the price of coal are rejoicing in the fact that summer is ing. I The authorities of the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth, have offered free tuition to recruits of the Welsh Army statioucxl there. Over 1,000 have joined the classes. 0 One hundred and fifty-two members of the Glamorgan Constabulary have joined the colours. • • • The Y.M.C.A. is said to require £10,000 a month for its camp work. • « • Another child victim of the German bom- bardment of Hartlepool died on Monday. This wa: the 118th death. • • • It was stated at the Foreign Office on Mon- day that confirmation had been received of Germany's refusal to exchange prisoners of war who are unfit for further military duty. • • • Cardiff has completed its preparations for safeguarding the city in the event of an air raid. The Lord Mayor has intimated that as soon as found necessary the scheme for co- ordinated action will be issued in a proclama- tion. w < A Welsh prisoner in Germany has defeated the censor in the following letter to friends: You will be glad to hear news of old friends. Mr. Bwyd (food) is very bad here. Mr. Bar a (bread) is very much darker than when you saw him, and is quite hard. I never see Mr. Cig (meat), and Mr. Ymenyn (butter) but seldom; he was very bad indeed the last few times I met him. I used at first to meet Mr. Lbeth (milk) every day, but he I has not been here now for some time." • « # It being reported to the Kaiser that enemy aeroplanes were flying for Wilhelmshaven, where he was due to inspect the German Fleet, he immediately returned to Berlin. He will be in a worse predicament when the walls on all sides begin to close on him. 0 0 0 Thirty thousand Scotch miners have en- listed. • • • The death has occurred suddenly at Tun- bridge Wells of Richard Jjatter, a local cele- brity, famous for a beard 16ft. long. Latter was 84 years of age, and was formerly an engine driver. The beard was worn rolled round the body in the form of a belt. Lord Charles Beresford has given notice of the following question:—To ask the Prime Minister whether his Majesty's Government will, for the future, treat German raiders from the sea and air, when captured, as pirates, and publicly hang them for the mur- der of women and children in undefended places, when proved guilty of that crime after I trial by court martial, instead of treating them as honourable foes. < Mr. Asquithi -replying to a question as to the opening by the Post Office of letters, states that such powers have long been vested in the Secretary of State by Constitutional usage, and have been recognised and pre- served in successive statutes. He had exer- cised those powers since the war began in cases where it appeared to be necessary for the safety of his Majesty's forces.

No title

Welsh poultry farmers will be interested to know that according to the latest magisterial decision an egg at the age of eight months cannot be described as "new laid." That may not come as a surprise, but we wonder how many know when a "new laid" egg becomes merely an egg. It was stated in court that an egg ceases to be new laid after nine days

Advertising

HYARCHER&CO.- i GOMMRETURNS 1 | y* -,tit REGISTERED Facsimile of One-Ounce Packet. ArGhefs Geidesi Returns j| Tho Perfection of Pipe ToUacco. r('l"' F'p-\trf\.N.T. —— IMPORTANT TO PIANO BUYERS. —— THE BEST VALtrE CAN BR OBTAINED BY PLACING THE ORDER WITH Thompson & Shackell, (Ltd.), WHO HAVE ALWAYS IN STOCK A GREAT VARIETY OF —— The CELEBRATED BRINSMEAD PIANOS, AND ALSO THE NEWEST MODELS OF Challen & Son, Ibach, Collard & Collard, Broadwood Player Pianos, Simple x Player Pianos, J. & J, Hopkinson, J. H. Crowley, Ernst Kaps, Schiedmayer, Moore & Moore, Justin Browne, Neumeyer, and many others to select from. Large.,1:i Discounts fo Cash. SOLE AGENTS FOR the Celebrated ESTEY ORGANS. Our Terms for Cash are low. ————— Our Hire System is Equitable. ————— Beautifully Illustrated and Descriptive Catalogue eent on application, with full particulars of a splendid selection of SECOND-HAND PIA/NOS and ORGANS, returned from hire and taken in exchange—now offered at. Bargain Prices. Quotations Given for Pianos and Organs by any Maker in the Kingdom. Written Warranty with Each instrumont. Turnings and Repairs a Speciality. Repairs of every description. Estimates Free. THOMPSON and SHACKELL, Ltd., 1, Street, BRIDGEND. ALSO AT 8, High Street, NANTYFFYLON, CARDIFF, SWANSEA, NEWPORT, BRISTOL, ETC W. T. JONES' SALE OF DRAPERY COMMENCES TO-DAY. w »> griy^r vr Tr tr Blouses from i/- each. Heavy Serge Skirts from 3/6 each. Also a variety cf Tweed and Cloth Skirts at greatly reduced prices. Wool Nursing Shawls, Infants Coats, Bonnets, and Eats at Greatly Reduced Prices. Superior Khaki Double Knitting 4/3 per lb. Wool Gloves at half prices. Note Address:- WWWWi- r  6ftNrs MANCHESTER HOUSE, M?L ??L?W?.? NOLTON ST" BRIIJGEND. Not 5 minutes from Station. TEN REASONS Why you should Advertise in the GLAMORGAN GAZETTE  A The LOCAL PAPER FOR CENTRAL GLAMORGAN. BECAUSE it is found in practically every House in Central Glamorgan. BECAUSE it is the recognised medium for all local official advertisements. BECAUSE it circulates amongst people who have money to spend. BECAUSE it secures to every advertiser the greatest possible publicity. BECAUSE it is the Oldest Local Newspaper in Central Glamorgan. BECAUSE its rates are low compared with the extent and character of circulation. BECAUSE it circulates in a densely populated industrial district. BECAUSE no advertising scheme is complete without it. BECAUSE it has been used for years by all the most successful advertisers. BECAUSE it stands in the Front Rank of News- papers as a Business Bringer. — • Rates on application. HEAD OFFICES- Queen Street, Bridgend.