Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
10 articles on this page
Advertising

if you are not joining the British Forces for the War why not ENLIST FORTHWITH IN THE GREAT MATRIMONIAL ARMY ? You may depend that the sooner you do so the more money you will save. Timber has doubled in price! Plateglass is almost unobtainable I All Furnishings are rapidly advancing! But notwithstanding these important facts BEVAN & COMPANY, Ltd., CARDIFF, SWANSEA, &c., Have made GREAT REDUCTIONS in all Departments prior to their ANNUAL STOCKTAKING for the SALE Now Proceeding J. Immense Reductions Vast Stocks must be Cleared ';JíLmC' _I,

PeeDs at Porthcawl

PeeDs at Porthcawl; By MARINER. I Three days more and the election will be 11.pon us. Despite the war there is a consider- able amount of interest being displayed by the electorate, and this week the candidates have been very busy to keep them in that state of mind. Meetings have been held by all the caimdidates at-Wt there is evidence that my prognostications will be correct, and that the popular curate, the Rev. D. J. Arthur and the Y.M.C.A. Sec., Mr. D. J. Rees, will have a fairly easy win. It is a very peculiar thing, and I was only made aware of it thfc week, that both Mr Arthur and Mr. Rees are "David Johns." The coincidence to superstitious people might lead them to believe that the return of "the name-sakes" is certain. I have had that belief for a long while, and on Mon- day night I will be able to say whether that belief was well grounded, as at present, as a result of getting amongst the electors, I have every reason to think it is. It is a usual thing for candidates to hold a card up their sleeves till the last moment, and then rush it on to the electors. It has be- come a popular practice during the last few years, but I think it is a practice that is hardly .s fair to the ratepayers, who are, as a result, given a very few hours to make up their minds on a matter that may be of tremendous im- portanoe to the town and to the people that live in it. This election dodge may be prac- tised this year, but whichever side tries it, de- serves to lose. I will not take the part of any candidate that adopts this method of securing vote. It cannot be called proper if it can be called smart, for in itself it seems to be an admission that the topic or election cry is of such a character that it will not stand the test of argument, and so is rushed out at the last moment in order to catch votes. < I have seen the addresses of the men that are now seeking the suffrage of the ratepayers, and I think that those by Mr. D. J. Rees and the Rev. D. J. Arthur are both excellent ex- amples of what election addresses should be like. One is short and sweet and the other is somewhat longer, but full of facts. "The little curate," as people are beginning to affectionately call him, tells us that he is "not altogether strange to the work of public bodies, having served on the Vaynor and Pen- deryn District Council, and also on the Mer- thyr Board of Guardians." "Efficiency and Economy" is his motto. It is a businesslike address and he makes no promises—they are so often made and so often broken after elec- tion. < w Mr. R ees' address is an exceedingly in- teresting piece of literature, and because we know the man and have a knowledge of the work he has done during his connection with public affairs, we can believe that what he promises he will attempt to perform. His in- terest in the poor and in the working class is too well known to need comment; his work on their behalf on the Bridgend and Cowbridge Board of Guardians is a standing testimony to his energy and devotion to the cause that has brought him before the public. The working men know they have a friend in Mr. Rees, and all classes will have little doubt that his efforts will be directed to a wise and resource- ful government of the town that is bound to put it and keep it on the road to prosperity. w w < All the candidates now asking for vote must pledge themselves to do all they can to make the gasworks pay. It is now a municipal con- cern, or shortly will be, and there must be no bickerings and no divisions on the Council concerning its working. Able and experi- enced men must be put to work it, and made responsible for its financial position. The appointments will have to be made by the new Council, and undoubtedly the positions will be advertised. The Council should then pick the best men, -and by paying adequate salaries ? there should be every incentive for officials to place the Porthcawl Gasworks among one of the paying municipal undertakings in the country. The Council as a Council will, I am sure, direct their energies to that end. I notice Mr. D. J. Rees deals with the matter in his address, and says it will be his pleasure and duty to "use every effort to make it a paying concern." < < The same candidate touches upon the need of public conveniences and cloak room accom- modation, and describes it as a crying shame that these matters were not attended to long ago. Ever since the Editor gave me charge of this column, I have persistently called at- tention to this sore point with visitors. The lack of lavatory accommodation has done the town more harm than* anything else, and no matter how much the public has protested, the Council have made no effort in the matter. "Soniv years ago," says Mr. Rees, "there were only four in the town, to-day there is only one." 0 0 0 This is the last word I I(ha11 be able to have ,concerning the election this year, and as it is a particularly important time in the history of Porthcawl, and as there are good candi- dates before the ratepayers—I must say the i-etiring candidates have done good work for us, but I feel that the aspiring candidates will make successful competitors—I am sure all will do their utmost to get to the poll, and so make it a record one for our town. < The question of the new station is causing tremendous anxiety amongst many tradesmen of the town whose premises are situated near the present station. The proposal of the Great "Western Railway is to place the new structure down at the Docks, but I don't know whether the intention is to make it a permanent station. It may be used for a few years, and then expansion of the Great Western Railway business may necessitate a change, or in a few years time Porthcawl may be considered im- portant enough to be given the status of a main line town. However, the fact remains that the present proposal and apparent inten- tion is to put a station at the Docks, and whether the petition that has been extensively signed is too late in the day or not, there are legitimate reasons why the tradespeople of the totfn and private residents too should ask I the Railway Company to think over the mat- ter fairly and considerately. it. is of vital im- portance to the tradesmen in the first place. A number of them have staked their all in the premises they new occupy. Some of them are owners of their premises. All the shopkeepers cannot move their premises into the confined area the Docks locality provides. The moving of the station to the Docks will mean nearly ruin to many tradesmen, while if it is not erected at the Docks no one will be ruined or damaged in any way, for no business premises are in that locality.. The Great Western Railway put forward the argument that the property upon which they propose to build the station is their own. and they must utilise it in some way. Naturally they must consider their own poc kets. Public companies do not throw their money away, and people out for favours cannot expect them to, but the proposal put forward by the tradesmen in this case is that the value of the Dock property in its present state is consider- a ble. It would feteh a handsome price in the market. With the proceeds from a sale of the property land of greater area could be pur- chased in the direction of Major Coath's quar- ries. The advantages of such a situation it is said by the tradesmen would be: The present level crossing would be done away with and what has for years been a nuisance to the town sent into the limbo of the past instead of being perpetuated and made a source of greater inconvenience in consequence of increasing traffic. Then a station in the direction sug- gested would mean that all visitors would pass through the whole of the present main thoroughfare to the Front, whereas if they were taken to the Docks they would feel in- clined to remain by the sea or wander on to- wards the Rest. It would be central and more convenient for the people of Newton and Nottage; a Docks station would be right out of their way. As will be seen the tradesmen have cause for concern, as it will undoubtedly mean, if the Great Western Railway carry out their present intention, that John Street will be- come a thoroughfare of secondary importance, and will no more be what in most seaside re- sorts is popularly called the High Street. During the past week I am told there has been a decided improvement in the rate of recruiting for the 18tb (Glamorgan) Service Battalion the Welsh Regiment, under the command of Colonel H. R. Homfray. Every day recruits are joining in in- creasing numbers, and the prospects are that very soon the battalion will be at full strength. The men are still making good pro- gress with their training, to which Colonel Homfray and Captain and Adjutant C. W. Pugh are paying the closest attention. The battalion is frequently being taken out for route marches, and as they swing along the roads they win the admiration of all fo rtheir smartness. It is certain that the battalion of Welsh Gurkhas will be one of the smartest battalions in the Welsh Army Corps. Porth- cawl people are beginning to love them.

I MILITARY PROSECUTION

I MILITARY PROSECUTION. I MEN SENT TO GAOL FOR FALSE I DECLARATIONS AT PORTHCAWL. I At Bridgend Police Court on Saturday, John Smith, Bridgend, and Thomas Evans, Swansea, were charged with having made a false declaration on their attestation papers with a view of joining the Army, on 14th March. Sergt. Rose, attached to the Bantams Bat- talion, said Smith's answer to question 7 on the attestation papers, Have you served in any branch of His Majesty's Service be- fore?" was false. He had been a member of the same Battalion before, and was dis- charged on the 17th February as medically unfit. Defendant said he thought he was justi- fied in joining another regiment. He did not know he was doing wrong; he thought he was joining the "pick and shovel" regiment. In regard to Evans, Sergt. Rose said, having recognised Smith, he (witness) was told that Evans had previously served. Wit- ness asked him if he had served before, and he admitted that he had and that he was dis- charged as medically unfit. An officer from the regiment said he had been instructed by Colonel Homfray to ask the Magistrates to deal severely with defen- dants. In London men had joined several regiments in one day, receiving Is. 9d. in each case. They were billeted and received food. Smith had joined the second time under the name of Shadrach. Both men were sent to prison for 14 days.

JMILK PRICES

J MILK PRICES. At the Glamorganshire Milk Producers' Association at Beddau Schools, near Llantri- sant, the following resolution was pas:- In consequence of the exti-aord-i nary rise in the prices of all feeding stuffs, and the excep- tionally high prices of milch stock, which have seriously affected our business of milk producing, and in face of the fact that we have not made any increase in the price of milk this winter, but have striven to supply at the usual price, which means at a loss, so as not to cause an increase in the usual winter price to the consumers, we cannot afford to make any reduction to the retailers this coming summer from the present winter price, viz., lOd. per gallon." The summer season comprises the months May to Sep- tember (inclusive).

LLANTWIT MAJOR J

LLANTWIT MAJOR J FAT STOCK SALE.—One of the most suc- cessful sales ever held at Llantwit Major was held last week by Mr. John David. The large entry consisted of 66 fat catties, 4 fat bulls, 10 calves, 3 cows and calves, and 450 fat sheet and pigs. A Sortliorn bull, the property of Mr. Jenkin Hopkin, realised £40. while Hereford bulls of Messrs. 1. Williams, O. L. Howells, and Thos. Williams made JC38, £a7, and £36 respectively. Fat cattle made up to £ 30; calves to -tO; cows and calves, £ 19; yearlings to "os.; ewes, 77s. and porkers to 103s. The total of the sale amounted to over £ 2,800. j

PORTHCAWL URBAN DISTRICT I COUNCILI

PORTHCAWL URBAN DISTRICT I COUNCIL. I THE NEWORAILWAY STATION. I A meeting of the Porthcawl Urban Dis- trict Council was held at the Council Cham- ber on Monday evening. Mr. T. G. Jones presided, and there were also present Messrs. D. Jones, W. Francis, T. James, D. Davies, R. E. Jones, and T. E. Deere, with the clerk (Mr. Evan Davies) and the surveyor (Mr. A. J. Oborn). I THE BILLETING QUESTION. The Chairman reported that Mr. James and himself called upon Colonel Homfray with reference to the question of overcrowd- ing, and also the question of billeting in the town. Colonel Homfray told them that whilst he regretted the removal of the troops from any part of the town that wanted them, it could not be helped, and however much the Council, or he, would like to send the men to billet in the poorer part of the town or upon the people who wanted them, it could not be done at the present moment. It was a military reason absolutely, and he wished it to go out to the public that no blame was attached to the Council or any officer. They had to get the men placed in companies and in a certain area. But Col. Homfray said in a few weeks he hoped to see the battalion filled, which would mean sending them out, and the more equal dis- tribution in the town. During the time that he was building up his battalion, they had to get billets that were together afid near the Esplanade. The Clerk read a letter from the War Office with regard to the Council's applica- tion for the billeting of troops in Porthcawl. in which it was stated that the question of placing troops at Porthcawl was before the chief officer commanding. General McKinnon also wrote stating that he did not think the Welsh Guards would be billeted in Wales at all; therefore he could not see any1 hopes of the troops being sent to Porthcawl. He reminded them that Porthcawl had been well treated during the past few years, and he hoped it would be possible to send troops there during the camping season. General Sir Francis Lloyd (commanding the Welsh Guards) wrote stating that the head- quarters of the Guards must be in London; they must be near Buckingham Palace. After the war, whenever that might be, there would be the question of where to put the men. The Council decided to thank the writers of those letters. The letters were also re- ferred to the Camping Committee for consi- deration. I THE GAS COMPANY'S PROFITS. I The annual report of the Porthcawl Gas Company was before the meeting, the net I profit being placed at £ 2,405. I THANKS. Mr. J. L. Lambert wrote thanking the Council for their expression of sympathy in his recent illness. He was glad to say he was slightly better and hoped to be removed from hospital soon. I THE NEW STATION. » Mr. D. Jones called attention to the fact that the Council had passed a resolution at a previous meeting of the Council requesting the G.W.R. Company to carry out the work at the docks entrance, and to put over a temporary bridge. He under- stood that, according to the Local Government Act, that was contrary to law, and it would require them to have tenders for the work or works if that work amoun- ted to over £ 50. The work was considerably above that sum, and he for one had that in his mind when they moved that Messrs. Taylor and Sons be asked to go into the matter. There was no doubt that the G.W.R. would be able to carry out the work so he thought the matter should be re-con- sidered before they asked the clerk to send forward the resolution, as he understood it had not yet been forwarded., Mr. Francis thought it was a fact that they did ask the G.W.R. to go on with the work, but he understood they would ask for tenders, and so that would satisfy all con- cerned. The Clerk read the minutes of the last meeting, which stated that the Council should write to the G.W.R. Co. respectfully stating that they would be glad to know that the Company were going on with the new station, and were proceeding with the works at the docks, and at the same time to ask whether the work could be completed simultaneously with the new station, inas- much as there would be a lot of trespassing and great danger to the public, and, also whether, in the event of the work not being finished by Whitsun, they would throw gir- ders across and make a bridge? Mr. D. Jones proposed that the matter be referred to the Works. Committee for re- consideration, and the committee could bring a report at the next meeting. He was sure they were all anxious to take the right course, and not to be wanting in their duty. This was seconded. The Chairman said he quite agreed with Mr. Jones, but what he thought was if they decided upon a course they should act upon it. Mr. James thought it was unfortunate that the price of the work was made known be- fore. However, he thought Mr. Jones had shifted his ground a little bit. The point that he raised before. was that they should have an expert engineer's report on the mat- ter. If he could stick to that now, he would support him. Mr. G race said the resolution before the meeting was the same resolution that he raised before when he was out-voted. He took no objection to the G.W.R. having the work, but his point was he wanted the Council to have 'independent advice on the subject. Then. when they went for the loan. [ they could call that man forward to approve of the work and the price. Mr. D. Jones thought it was very unfair of Mr. James to make the suggestion that he had shifted his ground. He simply put the matter before the Council that con- tracts should be advertised for or expert opinion obtained. The resolution was agreed to. THE COUNCIL AND THE LATE CLERK. I Mr. Grace drew attention to a certain re- solution asking the late clerk (Mr. W. Cliorley) to write to the Public Works Loan. Board, on certain matters, making an appli- cation for an instalment. of a loan. That, had not been done, and he thought if the Council made arrangements with their officers to make an application to the Loan Board, they should do it. Now they wanted the money. It was taking upon themselves rather too much, and he did not like it. f The Chairman said he quite agreed with that, but it was apparently their own fault;, they did not ask for the loan. It was for him (Mr. Grace), if he complained of a cer-i tain official taking upon himself too much, to-- see that it did not happen again. Mr. Grace moved that application'be made for the next instalment of the loan, and they should see that they got it. The Chairman said the Council had not blundered; Mr. Grace simply complained of a certain member taking upon himself the authority of saying they did not want a loan when they did. Mr. R. E. Jones askedwas there t-he possi- bility of the Council saying they did not want it. Mr. Grace said he did not want to go into a debate over the matter, but the Council had certain reasons for getting the loan on a certain day, and although they did not actu- ally want it that day, they wanted it at their back. The matter was referred to the next meet- ing of the Finance Committee. THE EASTER EXCURSIONS, In response to a, letter sent by the Clerk with reference to the suspension of half-day and day excursions, letters were read from various people. The G.W.R. stated that the suspension of the cheap tickets had been made by- the Railway Executive, and therefore they could do nothing to alter that. The Council should not overlook the fact that cheap tickets had been made from Porthcawl to Cardiff on two days every week, but even those facilities might have to be suspended at any time. The Chairman: They are trying to teach •people economy, that is all. Another letter was read from the General Manager of the G.W.R. stating that the suspension of cheap tickets was not confined t, Porthcawl district, or to the G.W.R. It was entirely brought about by the excep- tional circumstances of the working of the railways. The Chairman said it was the intention of the Federation of the British Health Resorts to send a deputation to the Railway Executive Committee asking them to help the health re- sorts by granting cheap tickets wherever it was possible. I THE EASTERN SEWERAGE LOAN NOT I ) GRANTED. The Local Government Board wrote with reference to the application by the Council for sanction to a loan of t2,600 for the works of sewerage at the eastern portion of the district. The Board were satisfied that the proposed works were very desirable, and under ordinary circumstances they would not have had any difficulty in granting the loan at once; but under the present excep- tional exigencies the Board thought the would should be postponed for the present, and therefore they did not propose to sanc- tion the loan at the present. The Chairman said, personally, he thought it was quite all right, but it was a very pecu- liar thing that Mr. Rhodes, a representative of the Local Government Board, had cross- examined him for about half an hour on that particular scheme, and had expressed him- self most pleased to hear that they were going on with the eastern section of the sew- erage. This was simply a question of the war, however. I EMPLOYEES' WAGES. The Surveyor handed a letter to the Chair- man, which was addressed to the chairman and members of the Porthcawl Urban Dis- trict Council. It stated: We, the under- signed employees of your Council, beg re- spectfully to ask for an increase of wages, as the cost of living, etc., has greatly advanced in price since the outbreak of the war. We therefore find that our present wages are in- sufficient to meet the extra cost of living." Then followed the names of many of the workmen. The Chairman: I should like to know how this letter got here? The Surveyor: It was handed to me last Friday evening. The Chairman: Just as it is now? The Surveyor: Yes. The letter was referred to the Finance Committee. NEW RAILWAY STATION. A petition, signed by a number of rate- J payers, was submitted to the Council regard- ing the proposed new station, and asking them to urge the G.W.R. to seek another part of the town, as the present proposals would do considerable harm to many trades- men. The petition was referred to the Works Committee.

rPENCOED

r PENCOED. FREE CHURCH DELEGATE.—The Pen- coed and District Free Church Council was represented at the meetings of the National Free Church Federation held at Manchester. The delegate sent was the Rev. David Davies, minister of the Welsh Baptist Church at Pen- prisk. Mr. Davies has been secretary of the local Council since the departure from .the district of the Rev. R. J. Jones, and has suc- ceeded in well maintaining the organisation and activities of the Council. RETURN FROM SOUTH AFRICA.—Mr. Emrys Pearce has returned from South Africa. Mr. Pearce went out first to Aus- tralia and New Zealand. Afterwards he proceeded to South Africa. At Enlanslaagte he was injured by being crushed by the cage I in the colliery where he was employed. Last year Mr. Pearce joined the Natal Light Horse, and saw active service for a period of J five months. Here again he was unfortun- ate enough to have his foot injured, and after returning to duty to be thrown off his horse, this time receiving injuries to his back. He still suffers from the effects of the latter accident. f

HOW RUSSIA HAS SOLVED THEI DRINK PROBLEM

HOW RUSSIA HAS SOLVED THE I DRINK PROBLEM. By the Rev. J. T. RHYS, Swansea. I Though a very great deal has already been said and written concerning the drastic measure adopted in Russia for dealing with the liquor traffic, there exists nevertheless a considerable amount of misapprehension as to what has actually been done and what have been some of the most beneficial results. I propose, therefore, to explain in this article as briefly and as clearly as I can the nature of the 'steps taken and their effect on the national life. It is important to remember at the outset that most nations have their favourite alco- holic beverage. In France and Italy the popular beverage is wine; in Germany and Great Britain beer is the favourite drink; in Norway brannvni; in Denmark brandy or spirits. In Russia the popular drink was spirit in the fotrm of vodka. So little wine was con- sumed that the Government never thought it worth while to publish the quantity, while the average consumption of beer was only four litres as against on hundred and thirty in the United Kingdom, while there were four litres of spirits as against the same quantity in Great Britain. Hence in dealing with the drink problem in Russia wine and beer were negligible factors, and thp serious problem was how to deal with vodka. It was to this that the Government turned its attention, feeling that a death blow to them would mean vir- tually the solution of its da-ink evil. How did the authorities deal with the sale of intoxi- cants. They proceeded by several stages. (1) The Government first decreed that during the period of mobilisation the sale of intoxi- cating liquors should be absolutely prohibited throughout the whole of Russia. The only exceptions made to the rule were that officers were permitted to drink a little light beer, and that a few leading restaurants and large hotels in Petrograd were allowed to sell wine and beer. It was a novel, a daring and a dras- tic experiment, but its good results exceeded | the expectations of the most sanguine. In September, 1913, the sale of spirits amounted to 9,233,011 kegs, while in September, 1914, it amounted to only 102,714 kegs, or a little more than one per cent. of the previous years sale. Drunkenness was almost stamped out; hooliganism decreased in Petrograd by 75 per cent; crimes decreased, while mobilisation was completed a week earlier than anticipated by the Russian and German officers, to the grati- fication of the former and the confusion of the latter. (2) The effects of the prohibition or- der were so astonishingly good that a second decree was issued in September extending the prohibition of spirits for the whole period of the war. (3) In October a further decree was issued empowering all local, municipal and provincial Council-, to take steps to secure the complete stoppage of the sale of all intoxicants in" their districts. These powers were very generally used, and local option was estab- lished in some places till the end of the war, and at others permanently. Other minor regulations followed this, all intending to still further restrict the traffic; then (4) to the delight of the Russian people and the amaze- ment of the civilised world the Czar issued the historic decree prohibiting for ever the manu- facture and sale of spirit in Russia. That the Government is thoroughly con- vinced of the need of crushing the liquor traffic is proved by the severe penalties threatened to all who may attempt to stultify the pro- hibitive law. The illegal sale of beer, porter, wine and spirits is punishable by a fine not ex- ceeding 3,000 roubles, or three months' im- prisonment, closure of the restaurant or saloon, a perpetual disqualification to hold a license. Persons found intoxicated or in- capable on the streets, or in public places are liable to a fine of 100 roubles or three weeks' arrest. What have been the result? It is fre- quently alleged by opponents of temperance reform in this country that restrictions of the liquor traffic do not promote sobriety, or in the language of "The Trade" that prohibition does not prohibit. It is, of course, too soon to estimate approximately the beneficial effects of prohibition in Russia, but certain Consequences have,, in addition to those al- ready stated, made themselves manifest. One other result is in the sobriety of the Russians, both civil and military. "The Times" Warsaw special correspondent recently stated The soberness of the Army is beyond question. I have not seen a single tipsy or disorderly soldier or officer. A writer in "The Statist" offers the same testimony. "The writer of this article 'was in Russia during the time of the mobilisation, and nothing could have been more striking than the sobriety of the nation. There was never a drunken peasant or soldier to be seen." Profefesor Gregory, who hr.s recently travelled across Russia, has stated, knowing the Russian reputation for drunkenness, "My greatest sur- prise during our long journey through the Russian Empire, from the Chinese frontier to the coast of Finland, was at seeing only one intoxicated man, and he was not a Russian. These testimonies could be multiplied con- siderably, but enough has been said to prove that prohibition does prohibit and that re- strictions of the liquor traffic do promote temperance. But sobriety is only one consequence. Cur- ses follow in the wake of intemperance, and temperance has other results than mere sob- riety. On the 25th of January the Treasury Comptroller, speaking in the name of the Minister of Finance before the Budget Com- < mittee of the Duma on the economic position of the people of the Russian Empire, quoted statistics in the National savings as follows: December, 1913 £70,000 j December, 1914 £2.910,000 I Without qualification the- éomptrolJer attri- buted these increased savingss, together with the generally favourable economic conditions now prevalent, to the prohibition of the sale of vodka. Again it has been computed that if the people of Russia continue to abstain from alcoholic drinks theiv nation will be able in ten years to make good a loss of 500,000 men in the war. I It is often argued in this country that the abolition of the drink in Great Britain would impoverish the National revenue. As in Russia the sale of vodka was a state monopoly and it is obvious the loss was very great. It I is impressive, however, to read that the Rus- sian Minister of Finance is in no way dis- turbed or alarmed by the disappearance of the liquor revenue. He knows the apparent loss is a substantial gain. Comparisons are said to be odious, and a comparison between Russia and Britain in the matter of dealing with the drink traffic is cer- tainly odious. Indeed the two countries can- not be compared they can only be contrasted. The Government of this country has tackled every problem since this. The strongest Gov- ernment of modem times is kept at bay by the Trade. The Government may be willing to wound, but it is afraid to strike. For these reasons I submit that no sincere temperance reformer ought to support any candidate for Parliament who is not prepared to support actively and aggressively the abolition of the liquor traffic, and when that fails the aboli- tion of vested interest in the traffic.

Gathered Comments ON THE WAR

Gathered Comments ON THE WAR. Five Years' Study. I Presiding at a lecture on the war, deli- vered in London by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Viscount Haldane said in this campaign the enemy was dealing with the British Army, the command-in-chief of which, to his (Lord Haldane's) intimate personal knowledge, had been studying the possibilities of a, conflict, like this for five years before, or more. Sir John French's chief interest was that he might have to command an expeditionary force, and he had given the closest study of his life to the possibilities of the future. We must have an absolutely united nation at this critical period of our history. I Labour and the War. I Mr. J. H. Thomas, M.P., of the National Railwaymen's Union, speaking in London with reference to the Government's appeal for workers, pleased for fuller news of what was taking place at the front, in order to bring home to the workers direct their individual and moral respon- sibility. He could conceive of no difficulty at a time like the present which ought not to be capable of adjustment by negotiation. He was certain that now the workers had been brought face to face with all that was involved they would give of their best to see that lives were not unnecessarily sacrificed. Regarding the drink problem mentioned by the Chancellor of the Ex- chequer, any statesmanlike effort of the Government to deal with the question would receive .the whole-hearted support of the I Labour movement. Casualties Amongst Officers. I Speaking at the annual meeting of the Kensington and Fulham General Hospital on Thursday, Lord Claud Hamilton said he did not know whether those present were in the habit of studying the casualty lists, but they could see that the papers were not giving the full lists of the losses in Belgium. His own regiment, the Grena- dier Guards, lost their colonel and sixteen officers killed and wounded, and out of 1,100 men, the finest in the Army, only 300 had survived. The Camerons—well, they seemed to have been totally wiped out. Their lists of officers killed and wounded were something appalling. The system of con- ceaJment on the part of the military authorities was most ridiculous, and he was afraid it would have the effect of pro- longing the waT. If these terrible losses among ofifcers were to continue it would be impossible to get competent men to take their places. The British "Tommy." fine, brave, noble fellow that he was, and the best soldier in the world, could hardly take the place of an oiffcer. The Soldier and God. Preaching at the dedication of All Saints' Church, Ammanford, the Bishop of St. David's said he was talking to three Army chaplains who worked among their Welsh forces not long ago, two in England and one in Wales, and the three of them told him, what he was very glad to hear, that it was simply marvellous and something they never could have expected, the signs of reverence towards God, the humility, the realisation of God, that was growing among our troops. He had also heard it from a chaplain at the front. It was a difficult thing to realise the healthy, manly state of mind of our sol- diers and sailors. They had heard of the greatest soldier of our time who was guilty of the old-fashioned habit. of family prayer, and they also knew that those who were at the head of our Army and Navy began their day's work by going to church to say their prayers. If the chaplains were right, the large number of men who were with the colours now, and the still larger number who were about to go, would be different when they came home. That forgetfulness of God, that lust for pleasure, that greed for money would not he in the future what it had been in the past. I The People. Mr. Arthur Ponsonby, M.P., at a meeting of the Cardiff branch or the Union of Demo- cratic Control at Windsor Place Congrega- tional Church Schoolroom, said that after the war there would be colossal problems left for solution. They did not want to see the war end with a patched-up peace; they wanted to see something more than a mere adjustment of territory; they wanted to see a more .enlightened relationship between the nations of the world and a better method of composing differences. They wanted open competition for the civil service now drawn from one class of society; they wanted a foreign affairs committee to see that no treaty was signed or ratified without the formal consent of Parliament, and they wanted treaties brought up tor revision and renewal every ten years. It was the people on whom the country depended in times of peace and in times of war, and to ignore was not merely bad statesmanship but crimi- nal folly. To consult them and to take them into their confidence was not only com- mon sense, but the highest wisdom, because it would lead to a real advance in civilisa- tion and the destruction of those artificial barriers which had too long divided the na- tions of the earth. (Applause.)

Advertising

—— IMPORTANT TO PIANO BUYERS. —— THE BEST VALUE CAN BE OBTAINED BY PLACING THE ORDER WITH Thompson & Shackell, (Ltd.), WHO RAVE ALWAYS IN STOCK A GREAT VARIETY OF —— The CELEBRATED BRINSMEAD PIANOS, —— AND ALSO THE NEWEST MODELS OF Challen & Son, Ibach, Collard & Collard, Broadwood, Player Pianos, Simplex Player Pianos, J. & J. HopkinsQD., < J. H. Crowley, Ernst Kaps, Schiedmayer, Moore & Moore, Justin Browne, Neumeyer, and many others to select from. Zjargest Discounts for Cash. SOLE AGENTS FOR the Celebrated ESTEY ORGANS. Our Terms for Cash are tow. Our Hire System is Equitable. ———— Beautifully Illustrated and Desoriptive Catalogue sent on application, with full! particulars of a splendid selection of SECOND-HAND PIANOS and ORGANR, returned from hire and taken in exchange-now offered at Bargain Prices. Quotations Given for Pianos and Organs by any Maker in the Kingdom. Written Warranty with Each Instrument. Turnings and Repairs a Speciality. Repairs of every description. Estimates Free. THOMPSON and SHACKELL, Ltd., I 1, Wyndham Street, BRIDG END. ALSO AT .— 8, High Street, NANTYFFYLON, CARDIFF, SWANSEA, NEWPORT, BRISTOL, ETC A LARGE VARIETY OF RELIABLE WELSH FLANNEL From 1/2 per yard. Plain & Stripe Fawn Shirting. Plain & Stripe Grey Shirting COLOURED DRESS FLANNELS. Cream Stripe Shirting and Blouse Flannels. Home Made Shirts from 5s. each ■QBSk. BOYS' SHIRTS from Size 1 to 9. P?nty of Patterns to iI ? l\ LjZjJrJ Choose from. HUNDREDS IN -TOCK. f\f ? ? /J ? ? STOCKINGS and SOCKS of all kinds from 6d. per pair ? ? JT J M ?? PANTS and VESTS from Is. eacb. Fleecy ad Merno. -?J! ??y wi hrtr Also a variety of Cashmere Pants ?nd Ve?ts from -13 each.   'v y Ijlj ? NOTE ADDRESS: ? ?/ ?/ Jjm W. T. JONES. Manchester House, C??"? Not5mmatesfromSt&tnm. BRIDGEND. TEN REASONS Why you should Advertise in the GLAMORGAN ? t?????tr)!?? GAZETTE The LOCAL PAPER FOR CENTRAL GLAMORGAN, BECAUSE it is found in practically every House in Central Glamorgan. BECAUSE it is the recognised medium for all local official advertisements. BECAUSE it circulates amongst people who have money to spend. BECAUSE it secures to every advertiser the j greatest possible publicity. BECAUSE it is the Oldest Local Newspaper in Central Glamorgan. I BECAUSE its rates are low compared with the extent and character of circulation. BECAUSE it circulates in a densely populated industrial district. I BECAUSE no advertising scheme is complete BECIUSE no advertising scheme is complete, I without it.. ?' BECAUSE it has been used for years by all th$ most successful advertisers. BECAUSE it stands in the Front Rank of News- papers as a Business Bringer. Rates on application. /t' HEAD OFFICES— Queen Street, Bridgend. (