Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 8 of 8
Full Screen
25 articles on this page
Mr Hartshorns Patriotic Appeal I

Mr. Hartshorn's Patriotic! Appeal. I TO MINERS ON THE NATIONAL II CRISIS. I WHAT THE MEN WOULD NOT I HAVE DONE HAD MAGNATES ACTED HONOURABLY. MEN READY TO DO THE!R PART AGAINST THE POTSDAM LORD. t THE DANGER OF DRINK. I A mass meeting of the colliers of Nlwstkor was held at Maesteg Town Hall on Friday evening, for the purpose of allowing the I agent (Mr. Vernon Hartshorn) to support Lord Kitchener's appeal to the colliers to re- sume work immediately after the recognised Eastor holidays., and for other purposes. I Mr. W. Gall presided. Mr. Hartshorn said never in his experience or in'his lifetime had they been faced with such a critical situation as they were faced I with that day in the Labour world of this country. The price cf foodstuffs and the cost of living had gone up enormously, and it was estimated that the cost of living was anywhere between 20 per cent. and <30 per I cent. more than it was before the outbreak of war. That was the fact that was making I, itself felt very severely in the whole of the lives of the workers in this country. It was a matter that required rectification; it was a matter which the organised workers of the country must see to, and get put right at the earliest possible date. The South Wales employers had made a proposal to the workers that if they would not seek a revi- sion of the existing agreement, they would give them a 10 per cent. increase in their wages. There were two or three things to be borne in mind in connection with that proposal. The first was when they talked I about a 10 per cent. advance of wages, it did not mean that the workers were to have 10 per cent. more than they had had in the past, because the 10 per cent. would be put on the standard, and it would only mean a 6:i per cent. increase on the present actual earnings. If the owners said they would give them 10 per cent. advance for the time being, then they would go on discussing the new wage agreement and the terms that would be agreed to. They wanted an imme- diate advance, substantially in excess to what had already been offered by the employers. The Miners' Federation of Great Britain meeting in London last week had decided that they should demand a 20 per cent. ad- vance in wages. That did not mean 20 per cent. increase on the standard, but 20 per cent. on the total earnings of every class of workman employed in the mines. (Applause.) There could be no doubt that the mining in- dustry could well afford to make that con- cession to the men. It was a standing scan- dal that the colliery owners and coal mer- chants should have utilised this war-this great national calamity—for the purpose of forcing up the prices and realising huge divi- dends. The workers would not have sought an advance in wages; they would not have attempted to force up the prices, had not the shipowners and the coal magnates and wheat trusts driven up the prices. The workers would rather that the Government had intervened at the earliest possible moment and controlled the mines and the prices, and said to the workers that during the continuation of the war they should have a fire in their homes at the same price as formerly, and buy their bread at the same price as before. If the Government had said that, the workmen would never bare attempted to have forced up the wages. At the outbreak of the war, the sanction of the colliers was asked by the Admiralty to work on Sundays; a thing unheard of in the his- tory of Welsh mining, and a thing which they would never have dreamt of considering under anything like ordinary circumstances and conditions. However, the colliers agreed to work, and they did not attempt to get extra payment for their work, although they could have secured it had they desired. He hoped employers would act towards them in the proper spirit, and would realise that while the miners and workers generally were exhibiting a loyalty which was a marvel to the world, that they on the other hand were expected to recognise the just claims of the workers and consider them without industrial strikes. ADVANCE IN WAGES. I They intended to have a substantial advance in wages, which he hoped they would get with- out friction. He didn't know whether the workers were following the trend of events. Now that the prices had reached such a high point and the workers were beginning to de- mand an increased wage in order to meet it, movements were being set afoot to deprive Trade Unions of the powers they had possessed in the past, to enforce their demand by the withdrawal of labour. That was what he meant when he said he considered they were oft the verge of the most critical situation that the workers had been faced with during their lifetime. If the employers of South Wales were going to offer 6-41 per cent. increase in their wages and workers were to be de- prived of the right to get anything more a very serious situation would be created. Con- ferences had been held in London during the week and amongst other proposals put forward was one that there should be no strike and no stoppage of work and no discussion during the war. Any man who understood the position of the country to-day would hesitate before advising the stoppage of work, however serious might be the position to the workers themselves. But that the employing classes should be left in the position to exploit the workers whilst the workers were to have taken from them the rights and powers of liberty whie-h they had en j o, which they had enjoyed in the past, was some- thing which the miner at any rate would resist. Collective bargaining was a principle which had been won for the workers by enormous sacrifices and suffering by those who had gone before, but collective bargaining was not worth a tinker's curse, except in so far as it was backed up by the right to withdraw labour in order to enforce demands. The colliery owners would, of course, realise the seriousness of the situation, because any attempt to enforce such a thing would have a result very different from that intended. He hoped that the Govern- ment would see that this was not tlw time for indulging in heroics; he wanted to say quite seriously they would offer to do their part against the Potsdam Lord interfering with their liberties, and that they would resist any attempt on the part of anybody in this country to do the same thing, even though they be enemies or friends. The Government was res- ponsible to the workers, and the employers had a responsibility towards them also. When they talked about their existence and about maintaining their rights and privileges they should not forget that their exis- tence would only be justified when the workers could stand and say they had rendered loyal service of which no man could complain. They were prepared to do their part in the defence of the country or in preparing the wherewithal for those who were defending the country. It was because he realised the seriousness of what was placed before him that he wished to make an appeal to the miners that wherever there had been a laxity in the past, to see that there should be no laxity in the future. All sorts of suggestions had been made in order to make up the defi- ciency in the output of coal for the nation's needs. It had been suggested in certain quar- ters that child labour should be employed and that women should be brought into the mine. (Laughter.) It was also suggested that they should work the extra sixty hours provided them under the Eight Hours' Act. and that the Eight Hours' Act should be set aside alto- gether in order that the workers should have greater freedom to work longer hours than ¡ they had been working in the past in order to I meet the requirements of the nati4-,i. But men must realise that the nation would not continue its war; the men at the front could I not go on fighting; the Navy could not do its work in protecting the shores; manufacturers could not go on producing clothes and boots and all kinds of munitions; ships could not carry imports and exports; trains could not I run, without an adequate supply of coal, and I the Government would be justified in taking what steps would be necessary. WHAT THE MINERS CAN DO. But they must be certain that they were justified in any action they might take. Liberties had been won for them, and it was for the men to decide whether those liberties should be taken from them, even for the length of the war. He was one of those who believed that the men in the pits to-day could produce all the coal required to meet the needs of the nation, if they cared to do it. The bulk of the men put forth their best efforts, and put it forth regularly, and a very large number of them exerted, unfor- tunately, more energy in their work than their system was able to stand; but there was a section of the miners, as in all other classes of workers, who were given to losing a considerable amount of time. In the South Wales 9oalfields there was from 15 to 20 per cent. of absentees every day of the year. About 4 to 5 per oent. of those were accounted for by sickness and accidents, and there was at least 10 per cent. of the men who were losing time which could be avoided. If they were going to keep their Eight Hours Act; if they were going to be relieved of working extra hours, if women were to be kept out of the mine, the men who were los- ing time must do their duty to their country (Applause.) Working in the mine was as es- sential to victory as fighting in the trenches. Without their labour the world could not con- tinue. Lord Kitchener had asked that the miners should cut their Easter holidays as short as possible. The men wanted a holiday, and ought to take one, but once they took the holiday he wished them to return to work so that there would be no scarcity of fuel as a result of the miners extending their holidays. The Executive of the Miners' Federation of Great Britain had decided to send out an appeal to all the coalfields and ask them not to take more holidays than necessary; and at the request of Lord Kitchener the men's leaders were asking the men to return to work immediately after the appointed holi- days. (Applause.) He had promised to make the appeal, and that was why he was there addressing that meeting, to ask them to do that, not to please the Union, but to please Lord Kitchener, because Lord Kit- chener knew that the necessities of the situa- tion required regularity of work, because the men on the battlefield who were fighting the battles required that this should be done. He urged them to do their duty to their country. He (Mr. Hartshorn) strongly com- mended that appeal to the miners, and asked them to realise that the lives of thousands of our brave soldiers, and perhaps the fate of their own country, depended upon the regu- larity and energy with which they worked in this great national crisis. He asked the steady men to use their influence with those who were disposed to drink, and urge upon them their duty to their country and to their fellows fighting for them in the trenches in France. (Loud applause.) A resolution was passed pledging the men to act on Mr. Hartshorn's advice.

NEW CHURCH AT BLACRMILLI

NEW CHURCH AT BLACRMILL. I ————— el ————— OPENING CEREMONY BY RURAL DEAN. I The new Church of All Saints, which has been erected at Blackmill, in the parish of Llandyfodwg was dedicated on Monday by the Rev. Z. P. Williamson, Rural Dean and Vicar of Margam, in the presence of a large con- gregation. Included among the clergy present were the Rev. William Edwards, Lie., Divt., Vicar of Llandyfodwg, the Rev. David Phillips, B.A., V icar of Newcastle, Bridgend, the Rev. A. J. Edwards, M.A., Vicar of Og- more Vale, Rev D. Richards, Rector of Llan- harray, Rev. Horatio R. Prothero, B.A., Tondu, and the Rev. George Llewellyn, M.A., harry, Rev. Horatio R. Protheroe, B.A., sided at the organ. The Rural Dean preached an eloquent ser- mon and congratulated the Vicar and Church people of the parish upon the splendid and commodious building which had been erected, and hoped with the help of God it would be a boon and blessing to the locality. The structure, which has a half-timbered appearance, consists of an entrance porch, nave, chancel and vestry, together with the usual out-offices, etc., and is erected in brick- work on oement concrete foundations; the roof is covered with red "Eternit" tiles with bell turret etc., and the interior walls are divided into panels, which give a very pleasing effect. The Church, which will accommodate about three hundred persons, has been designed by and the work has been carried out under the supervision of Mr. J. Morris Wil- liams, architect and surveyor, Blackmill, and the contractor was Mr. W. Cearns, Carpen- ter's Road, Stratford, London, E. The seat- ing "and furniture was supplied by Messrs. Wake and Dean, of Yatton, Bristol, and the electric light was supplied by Messrs. Solomon Bros., Cardiff.

LLANTWIT MAJOR MENI

LLANTWIT MAJOR MEN I IN HOSPITAL. I A post-card received on Monday from Mr. J George, Chantry House, Llantwit Major, from a hospital in France, intimated that he had been wounded but was going on well. The wounded man, David George, is in the Irish Rifles, and had been in the firing line since the beginning of the year. INVALIDED HOME. -1 Edmund George, son of Mrs. M. George, of West Street, Llantwit Major, is in hospital I at Southampton, invalided home from France suffering from heart trouble.

A PUZZLE FOR THE DOCTORS I I

A PUZZLE FOR THE DOCTORS RARE CASE AT BRIDGEND COUNTY COURT. A case of some interest was that brought at Bridgend County Court yesterday (Thursday) by Walter T. Davies, collier, against Messrs. Norths Navigation Colliery Company, for 18s. 4d. per week, from December 16th last, less 3s. 2d. a week which had been paid to him as compensation in respect to an accident which he received at the Coegnant Colliery on September 4th last. Alderman E. E. Davies appeared for the applicant, and Mr. A. Prosser for the respon- dent Company. Applicant said he lived at St. Michael's Road, Caerau, and was 22 years of age. He was a collier, although at the date of the ac- cident, September 4th, 1914, he was really working as a spare haulier. About 12 o'clock that day he was coming down an incline with two full trams. He had got to the bottom, and was taking the sprags out of the wheels when he was squeezed and -doubled up be- tween the tram and the wall owing to the horse bolting. The master haulier came along and released him. After a little rest he finished his turn. He did not work on the following Saturday and Monday. He went to work on the 8th September, and worked that day out, but stayed away on the Wednes- day.. He was examined by Dr. Woods, and the Company paid compensation until the 18th .November. About 8 weeks after he asked Dr. 1 Woods if he could do any light work, and he said he should try it in the house. On the 1st December he had a letter from the Com- pany asking him to restart work, as they would be unable to pay any more compensa- tion. He went to the colliery on the 2nd December, and made arrangements to start work the next day. He was not able to go, however, as he had pains in his back. He did, however, start to go, but later went to the office and reported that he could not go. He was then asked to see Dr. Woods the next day, which he did. The doctor ex- amined him and said the case was very curious to him, and he would continue the compen- sation until the next examination. In conse- quence he went to the office on the 7th Decem- ber for the compensation, but the coiiipensa- tion clerk said he must either do light work or see a specialist. As a result of that he was examined at his house by Dr. Barry on behalf of the Company. He asked witness if he was willing to do light work and he said "Yes, if he could; he had asked Dr. Woods be- fore if he could and he had refused." Dr. Barry then asked witness if he would try the following Monday and said he would inform Dr. Woods of the case and witness said he was willing to try. On the 16th December he went to the office to get the compensation, and was given a note to see the manager with re- gard to getting light work. He went to the manager who told him he could have light work fining timber into trams in the yard. He started that the next day, but after Ii hours of that work he was asked to push trams about to clear the pit top. He did that for about half-an-hour, and then the pains in his back were so bad that he could not bear it. He reported that to the manager, and he told witness to go to Dr. Woods and tell him that he had failed to do the light work given him, and there was no other work he could give him. He saw Dr. Woods on the 18th Decem- ber and he refused to examine him. The Company also wrote the same day stating they could not pay compensation after December 16th, as they could not see any reason why he could not do the work offered him by the Company. He also saw his own doctor with regard to the matter. Witness still got at- tacks of nerves and terrible pains in the back and left side and left leg. Cross-examined by Mr. Prosser: You were with other men, and you were lifting timber into trams r-Yes. That is the only attempt you have made to work ?—Yes, sir. His Honour: What caused you to stop that work after Ii hours?—I was stopped and put to do something else. Mr Prosser: Do you think you could do the timber job?—No, sir. You are not fit for any work, are you Not the present. Did you say to Mr. John: "I have tried and failed, and can't do any more, and now I am going home" ?—Yes, sir. SHIVERING FITS. I & + ou did not get any shivering fits when you were doing the work ?-No, sir. Supposing you were offered work to-morrow, could you do it ?-I would do anything that I could manage. Do you go to football matches?—I went to a part of one match, but could not stjck it out. Re-examined: He had attacks of nerves once every day before he was given the light employment, but had had them twice daily since. I Dr. Henry Sinclair, Maesteg, said he exam- ined the witness on the 9th September last, and had been attending him since. He was still suffering from attacks of myoclonus—that was rapid and chronic contractions of the muscles of the legs. He had seen him in quite a number of the attacks. There were practically no signs of an injury on the 9th September, but just an insignificant bruise on the lower left side of the back, about the size of a shilling. The man complained of severe pain, and called to see witness frequently. The complaint* was hardly a mental complaint, but rather a nervous disturbance. An in- jury to the spine or the back, and the shock, might produce the condition he was now in. He did not thitik he was capable of doing any- thing but the lightest work. After 'the at- tacks which he got he had some difficulty in controlling the movements of his legs. The attacks would last about an average of 20 minutes. He always complained of pain in the back after the attacks. Cross-examined: When did you first see him?—Five days after the accident. Have you known of a case like this before ? -No; it is a very rare case. Whatever these attacks are, in the intervals between the attacks, is he able to do any work ?—Oh, no; his condition would not allow that. What is there you can put your finger on | and say he is suffering from, when he has no attacks ?—There is nothing you can place your finger on. Is he well nourished ?—Yes. His physical condition is good ?—Fairly. He is muscularly good ?—Yes. In the intervals between the attacks could he work ?—He might do a little work, and then he could do no more. I suggest the very best thing for the man now, as he is, to work or have exercise ?- Some exercise would be good for him, but he could not do work. Are these attacks to a great extent due to the mental aspect ?—Of course, everyone knows that to get the mind off a thing is good, but I don't think this case is entirely mental. Dr. Stevens, of Cardiff, said he had seen the man in quite a definite attack, and it could not be simulated. For some time after the complaint he was very unsteady. COMPANY'S CASE. For the Colliery Company, E. Benjamin John said he was in charge of the surface at the Coegnant Colliery, and on the 17th De- cember last Davies came to do the light work. He was put to load 63ft. posts into a trolley from the trams on the pit top. There were four men loading, of which Davies was one. It was usually the work which was given to the compensation men. There was a man there with only one arm, and he could do the work. The men started at 7 in the morn- the work. The man started at 7 in the morn- witness, "I have tried and I have failed," and he then went home. That job had been open to him ever since. Alderman E. E. Davies: How far have they got to bring the timber to the trolley ?—It is by their side. His Honour: What is the weight of the, postsP-Th,ey run from about 561bs. to 601bs., and the French timber is very much heavier. His Honour: Each man carries his own tim- ber to the trolley ?—Yes, unless it is very heavy. What do you call heavy ?—Perhaps a hun- dredweight, and then two to carry it. Alderman Davies: What about the man being taken off his job and put to push trams? —I have only just heard that. It was at that work he failed ?—He said so. Did you send him?—No. Were you the man to do so ?—Yes. His Honour: How far did they have to push the trolley?—About 60 yards. Alderman Davies: Was the man trembling' at all when he came to work ?-No, sir. Did he say what was the matter with him? —No. NOT MALINGERING. I Dr. W. H. O. Woods said he examined the man on the 16th September, but at that date there were no marks and the next examination was on the 28th September and then again on the 12th October. The man then said he could not raise his legs up when he was sitting in a chair. Witness asked him to unlace his boots and he did it in the normal way, and in the course of that he raised his legs in the usual way. Witness saw him again later and suggested work would be the best thing for him. He had seen the man in these tremors on six different occasions. He thought if t. man was put to work without anybody looking on he would be all right. He thought the attacks were brought on by calling attention to the fact that he had them. Immediately upon calling the attention of the man to his condition he would have an attack of tremors and become incapacitated. He saw no reason why the man should not do the work he was put to; in fact it would be the best treatment that could be adopted. Alderman Davies: You said he had an attack to-day when you saw him ?—Yes, he did. You believe the facts are perfectly genuine? —Yes. So there is no question of malingering ?-No suggestion at all. Dr.. W. J. Barry, a specialist, said he saw the man on the 12th December, and he sug- gested the man should go to work. There was a slight functional disease, but there was no spinal injury, and it was without doubt a case of myoclonus. He considered the man was physically fit to do any work except where he was actually exposed to danger should an attack come on'. Work was the treatment for the man's ultimate recovery. He could not account why the man had pain, but the man was quite honest. His Honour said the medical evidence showed that the best thing for the man was to get some work, which he could do, and al- though it was practically clear that the at- tacks the man complained of were genuine he was not at all sure that he did not exag- gerate or imagine things that did not exist. Applicant was awarded 3s. 2d. a week.

I GIFTS TO SOLDIERSI

GIFTS TO SOLDIERS. To the Editor. oir,—1 shall be much obliged if you will publish the following letter which I have re- ceived from Commander Hunter, R.N., Royal Naval Depot, Crystal Palace, in acknowledg- ment of gifts of comforts supplied by Nolton Parish Work Parties and the County Red Cross Depot:— Madam,—I have to thank you in the name of the battalion for the splendid gift of goods, which have arrived. Will you please convey to the ladies of Bridgend and also of the Red Cross, the sincere thanks of both officers nd men of my battalion for the great kindness and interest that has been taken for their comfort ? Yours very truly, (Signed), H. N. HUNTER. The gifts included 50 shirts, 50 pairs of socks, 20 helmets, 2 pairs mittens, 20 scarves. I feel sure that the ladies who have so kindly contributed will be pleased to learn how very much the gifts have been appreciated.— Yours, etc., E. D. NICHOLL. I Merthyrmawr, March 24th. I

ST MARYS CHURCH PONTYRHYL I

ST. MARY'S CHURCH, PONTYRHYL. I To the Editor. I Sir,—In the report of the Ogmore and Garw Council in last week's "Gazette" there was an erroneous statement concerning the above church. The churchyard never has been flooded, for the simple reason that its geographical position would not allow it. How ready people are to cast mire if there is any possible chance of so doing. The officers of the church are more alert than to allow mat- ters to reach such a point. Another person .in the Council meeting stated that the Vicar had no idea of time. What is the infer- ence? The church has been built a good many years over the 20, and never has there been a complaint until now. Have not we had heavy rain previous to this winter ? The fact of the matter is the leakage is elsewhere, and the Church as usual comes in for a fair amount of abuse. Let thQSe in authority visit the supposed trouble, and they will find that matters are not so bad as some people would make them out to be. The church at Pontyrhyl, as in many another place, is doing her fair share in grappling with difficulties both spiritually and morally. Why not give her a chance and lend a helping hand ? Nay, rather, there are followers of the same Master who will do everything to thwart and hinder her in the good work she has begun. Let those who are such busybodies set their own houses in order, and then make their observa- tions of others.—Yours, etc., REV. W. J. WILLIAMS. I Pontyrhyl. I

No title

To a young able-bodied man who appeared in the Cardiff Bankruptcy Court on Monday the Official Receiver suggested that now he was out of employment there was another sphere of labour open to him, meaning of course the Army. The debtor shook his head and smiled. "Why not?" asked the Official Reoeiver. Oh, I got a job three days ago—behind the oounter."

Advertising

Up-to-date appliances for turning out every I class of work at competitive prices, at the "Glamorgan Gazette" Printing Works.

BRIDGEND RED CROSS HOSPITAL I

BRIDGEND RED CROSS HOSPITAL. -I The Matron acknowledges with thanks the following gifts for the wounded in the hos- pital :— Mrs Graham Clarke, tooth brushes, shaving brushes, and magazines; Mrs. W. H. John, butter and eggs; Mrs. Biggs, cakes and eggs; Mrs. Woods, postage stamps; Mrs. Thomas (Queen's Head Hotel), crutches; Mrs Day, plants and flowers; Mr. Edward Robin- son, Boncath, 6 rabbits and 60 eggs; Mrs. Board, eggs; Mrs. Chapel, Wyndham Street, magazines; Rev. T. Davies (Hope), volumes of "Punch"; Miss Davies, Ocha Draw, eggs; Boys' Council Schools, eggs and fruit; Old- castle Boys' School, potatoes, leeks, and fruit; infants, Oldcastle School, flowers and vegetables; Girls' Oldcastle 'School, vege- tables and sack of potatoes; Roman Catholic School, apples and potatoes; Laleston School, lfowers; Board School Girls, 2 sacks potatoes, fruit and flowers; Dr. Price, Southerndown, newspapers. The following have kindly entertained pa- tients to tea and supper:—Mr. and Mrs. Johnson, Derry Park; Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd, The Heath; Mr. and Mrs. Biggs; Mr. and Mrs. Thomas, Brynonen; Mr. and Mrs. Grant, Coychurch Road. In answer to Mrs. Nicholl's appeal for funds, the following donations have already been received :—Mrs. Williams, Plas Coedy- imwstwr, £;3; Mrs Graham Verity, JE1 Is. and 1 doz. eggs weekly; the Misses Wayman, £1 Mrs. C. Edmondes, Old Hall, Cowbridge, monthly subscription 10s.; Mr. W. S. Howell, 5s. the Star Te,a Co., 3s. per week in goods; Mrs. Geo. Hitt, 10s.; Archdeacon Edmondes, L5; Mr. W. Hopkins, Brecknock Villa, jE3 3s.; Mrs. L. D. Nicholl, Laleston, L3 3s.; Mrs. Woods, sardines, sausages, and tobacco; Miss Dodwell, cake; Miss Lisle John, eggs; Mrs. Harris, tea and eggs; Mrs. J. 1. D. Nicholl, cakes, eggs, and cigarettes; Miss Prichard, Bryntirion, papers; Mrs. S. H. Stockwood, cigarettes, chocolates and maga- zines; Mrs. Verity, eggs; Mrs. Craws hay, daily papers; Dr. Price, magazines and papers; Laleston School, flowers; Roman Catholic School, fruit and potatoes; Coy- church School, fruit; Penybont Girls' School, eggs, potatoes, and fruit; Penybont Infants' School, spices; Penybont Boys' School, eggs and fruit; Miss Mumford, loan of violin; Mrs. Biggs, cake and eggs. On Wednesday eve- ning Mr. Leyshon, assisted by Madame A. Rees-Perkins, Mrs. Leyshon, Miss Doris Davies, Miss Ermyntrude Mumford, Mr. Tom Hopkin and Master Hopkin gave a most en- joyable concert in the hospital, which was very much appreciated by the patients and staff.

SOLDIERS AND SAILORS FAMILIES BRIDGEND

♦ SOLDIERS' AND SAILORS' FAMILIES' BRIDGEND. Mrs. Hopkins, Is. 3d.; Mrs. Evans, 10s. Miss Verity (Sheppard JE2), t2 Is.; Mrs. Sly, 3s. 2d.; Coychurch Lower War Fund, 13s.; Miss Jones, 2s. 6d.; Mrs. Emrys Thomas and Miss May (Thorns, 10s. Merthyrmawr, L2 8s. lid.; Mrs. Andrews, 17s. 6d.; Miss Stockwood, 7s. 2d.; Mrs. Hopper, 2s. 6d.; Hurst, Nelson, P-2 5s; Mrs Lambert, 9s.; Mrs. Phillips, 14s. 6d.j total, jEll 5s. 6d.

IMAUDLAM NEIGHBOURSI

MAUDLAM NEIGHBOURS I At Bridgend Police Court on Saturday, Sarah Parry, Evergreen Cottages, Maudlam, Pyle, summoned Catherine Hobbs, her neigh- bour, for having assaulted her. Mr. W. M. Thomas prosecuted and Mr. D. Llewellyn defended. In the course of his opening Mr. Thomas said he had sent a letter to defendant con- cerning her behaviour, but she only threw the envelope into complainant's garden, and stuck the letter up in the wiitdow for people to read as they went by. Complainant said defendant came to her house and kicked the door. She called out and asked complainant if she had stolen any more quilts. The next mdrning when witness was getting water from the well defendant made use of p.n offensive expression, and as witness was getting over the stile defendant struck her, and called her "yr hen aster jowl" and "yr hen gossiper jowl." Mr. D. Llewellyn: Did you first challenge defendant to come out to fight? -No. Did you accuse defendant of stealing things from peoples houses where she assisted as a midwife ?—No. At the pump did you turn round and spit in defendant's face ?—No. Wm. Taylor, labourer, Maudlam, said he was watering some cows near the pump and was a witness to the assault. Defendant told witness that she would "drown the old Police-constable Williams said a oomplaint was made to him by Mrs. Parry, and when witness saw defendant she admitted having struck complainant after complainant spat in her face, and also admitted using bad lan- guage towards her after Mrs. Parry used bad language towards her. Defendant said when she got to the pump complainant spat in her face. All witness did was to push her. She denied using any bad language towards her. Mr. W. M. Thomas: Why did you go to her back door and kick it ?-She hasn't got a back door. The Chairman said the Bench were satisfied that an assault had been committed and de- fendant would have to pay 10s.

No title

A spirited appeal to President Wilson is made by Paul Fuller in the first article in the Atlantic Monthly." Can the American people," he says, "divest themselves of all moral sense and give even the tacit approval of silence to the massacre of Belgium ? We appeal to the President to look over the field again, to consider anew the baleful in- fluence upon the cause of peace, upon the enlightenment of nations, upon the mitiga- tion of the horrors of war, of such a pro- ceeding as the invasion and the subsequent devastation and desolation of an unoffending country. We beg him to look over this America which he loves so well and to take heed of the strong and universal sentiment which prevails throughout the land, of pro- test against this latest and most flagrant dis- regard of international justice. He will find that it overshadows all other considerations concerning this war. What right have we to expect that the Allies will in the day of their blood-bought triumph turn for an impartial judgment and for a wise balancing of the arguments regarding the compensa- tion due to Belgium, to the great democratic republic which paralysed its own conscience and looked with dumb indifference upon the unexcused violation of her soil?"

LLANTWIT MAJOR I

LLANTWIT MAJOR. I WEEKLY MARKET.—The stock market I on Monday was well attended by butchers and farmers. There was a good supply of fat sheep, which realised high prices of gid. to 10jd. per lb. The supply of beef was not large, and consequently realised a high figure of 9-Jd. to lOd. per lb. Pork was scarce and reached 12s. 6d. per score. The supply in the Vale fairs to meet the large demand, and as a consequence prices are still on the upward grade.

LETTERS FOR ABROAD I

LETTERS FOR ABROAD. I NEW REGULATIONS. I A supplement to the "London Gazette," published on Wednesday, contains the text of new and amended regulations under the De- fence of the Realm Acts, made for the pur- pose of giving effect to the recent amended acts. These new regulations empower the Admiralty and the Army Council to take over and use factories for war purposes, and they also amend existing regulations respecting areas of residence for aliens, the 'possessions and usp of wireless telegraph apparatus, the transmission of letters abroad, and the pro- cedure against persons accused pf offences under the Acts. The regulations concerning the requisition of factories are in the following terms:— It shall be lawful for the Admiralty or Army Council to take possession of any unoccupied premises for the purpose of housing workmen employed in the production, storage, or trans- port of war material. For the purpose of as- certaining the amount of output of any such factory or workshop or any plant therein, the Admiralty or Army Council may require the occupier of any such factory or workshop, or any officer or servant of the occupier, or where the occupier is a. company, or any director of the company, to furnish to the Admiralty or Army Council such particulars as to such out- put as they may direct, and if any such per- son fails to comply with any such requirement he shall be guilty of an offenoe against these regulations. The Admiralty or Army Council may take possession of any factory or work- shop, or of any plant belonging thereto with- out taking possession of the factory or work- shop itself, and may use the same for his Majesty's navy or military service at such times and in such manner as the Admiralty or Army Council may consider necessary or expedient, and the occupier and every officer and servant of the occupier of the factory or workshop, and where the occupier is a com- pa.ny, every director of the company shall obey the directions of the Admiralty or Army Coun- cil as to the use of the factory, workshop, or plant, and if he fails to do so he shall be guilty of an offence against these regulations. It shall be lawful for the Admiralty or Army Council (a) to require any work in any factory or workshop to be done in accordance with the directions of the Admiralty or Army Council, given with the object of making the factory or workshop or the plant or labour therein as useful as possible for the production of war material, and (b) to regulate or restrict the carrying on of the work in any factory or workshop or remove the plant therefrom with a view to increasing the productions of war material in other factories or workshops. For the purposes of these regulation the expression "war material" includes arms, ammunition, warlike stores and equipments, and everything required for or in connection with the produc- tion thereof. RESTRICTIONS ON CORRESPONDENCE. I Regulations coming into effect on April 5th read as follows:—No person shall, without lawful authority, transmit otherwise than through the post, or convey to or from the United Kingdom, or receive or have in his pos- session for such transmission or conveyance any letter or any written message for any other person. And if any person contravenes this provision he shall be guilty of an offence against these regulations. (Shipowners' let- ters and such letters and messages as may be exempted by order of the Secretary of State are not included in this regulation). If any person sends from the United King- dom, whether by post or otherwise, any letter or other document containing any matter written in any medium which is not visible unless. subjected to heat or some other treat- ment, he shall be guilty of an offence against these regulations. TRIAL BY JURY. I The regulations as to trial for offences under the regulations provide for persons who are not subject to naval or military law claiming the right to trial by judge and jury, instead of by court-martial.

PRUDENTIAL ASSURANCE CO LIMITED

PRUDENTIAL ASSURANCE CO., LIMITED. Records have again been broken by the Prudential Assurance Company. The Chairman of the Board, Mr. T. C. Dewey, at the annual general meeting held at the chief office, Holborn Bars, London, said that the outbreak of the war was of momen- tous interest to the Company. With 21,000,000 policies on lives, comprising all classes of the population, and drawn from all parts of the United Kingdom, and with in- vested funds of over C91,000,000, the difficul- ties which faced the Company at the outset could hardly be overestimated. 'That a large number of its policy owners would be engaged in the actual fighting was inevitable. There was every reason to believe that the dangers which would be incurred by combat- ants would be much greater than those ex- perienced in previous wars. With these facts before them it was a grave responsibility to decide whether the condition on the policies excluding war risks was to be waived or not. The directors, however, considering the ques- tion from a national standpoint decided not to charge any extra premium to existing in- dustrial policy holders. That the Company should voluntarily have made this concession is evidence that it is shouldering its full share of the burden that has been cast upon the oountry. The surplus in the ordinary branch is £ 1,794,953, and after deducting the amount brought forward, viz., L153,,230, the profit for the year is shown as £ 1,641,723. This surplus would have been more than sufficient to pro- vide a bonus at the same rate as last year, but in view of the uncertainty of the outlook it was decided that a substantial amount should be allotted to the investments reserve fund, and an increased amount carried for- ward. Having thus so far as possible guarded against all contingencies it was felt that a bonus of £1 10s. per cent. on the sum assured could be safely declared. Should the course of events prove as favourable as our belief in the justice of our country's cause, leads us to anticipate the conserving of our resources must be a source of additional profit in the future. A summary of the report appears in another column. The local superintendent is Mr. D. J. Davies, 35, Coity Road, Bridgend; assistant superintendents, Mr. J. Davies, Brynheulog, Pontycymmer; Mr. J. Williams, 10, Gorwyl Road, Ogmore Vale; Mr J. W. Simmonds, 51 Park Street, Kenfig Hill.

Advertising

LADIES. BLANCHARD'S PILLS Are unrivalled for all Irregularities, etc., they speedily afford relief and never fail to alleviate all suffering, etc. They supersede Pennyroyal, Pil Cocnia, Bitter Apple. Blanchard's are the Best of all Pills for Women. Sold in boxes Is. lid., by BOOTS' Branches and all Chemists, or post free, same price, from LESLIE MARTYN, Ltd., Chemists, 34, Dalston Lane, London. ftmple and valuable Booklet poIIt free 14.

OGMORE YALE GUNNERI

OGMORE YALE GUNNER I TELLS OF THRILLING EXPERIENCES I AND A CLOSE SHAVE." DEFENDING THE GUNS. I I Gunner Douglas Blinman, of Ogmore Vale, who belongs to the Royal Horse Artil- lery, and is now on invalid furlough, had some exciting experiences at the front, and at least on two occasions had really miracu- lous escapes from death. One of the outstanding features of this unique war is the decisive importance of artillery, and this fact makes the experi- ences -of our artillerymen peculiarly in- teresting. Gunner Blinman joined the Army at the outbreak of war, and was drafted to the front with his battery soon afterwards, at a time when the British Expeditionary Force, by a series of wonderfully rapid strategic move- ments, was filling up the open gap between La. Bassee and the North Sea to prevent the hordes of Germans pouring through to the capture of Calais, and perhaps the invest- ment of Paris. Gunner Blinman took part in very hot work around Armentieres. Relating his ex- periences to a press representative, he said that on one occasion the Germans in great strength made a furious charge on his bat- tery for the purpose of capturing the guns. The charge was so determined and made in such force that the capture of the guns seemed almost certain. The artillerymen disabled the guns, and snatching up their rifles, and fixing bayonets, they crouched be- hind the guns and any other cover that was available, determined to sell their lives as dearly as possible. On came the Germans, yelling furiously, and as they came the gal- lant artillerymen shot down as many as they oould, but the enemy were numerous and charged up to within three yards of the guns, which seemed almost certain to be lost. But at this supreme moment, rousing British cheers were heard and reinforcements dashed up to the rescue of the hard-pressed battery. The British soldiers made a brilliant counter- charge on the Germans, slaying numbers of them with the bayonet and scattering the sur- vivors in headlong retreat. The next morning," remarked Gunner Blinman grimly, "I helped to bury many of the Germans that we had shot down when they thought they were going to take our guns." On another occasion this young artillery- man from Ogmore Vale had a most miracu- lous escape from ebing blown to pieces by a big shell. He was in a house when a shell fell on the roof and demolished the building, but curiously enough he sustained no injury, but this adventure was almost immediately followed by another in which he had the closest "shave" that he experienced while at the front. He was making his way to a safer place, and had only just passed through the gateway of the wall around the house when a big shell came along and, striking the ground at that spot, burst, carrying the gate clean away and throwing up hugh masses of mud and earth and broken stone. He was knocked down by concussion, literally buried in the debris scattered by the shell, and plastered with mud all over. At first his comrade thought he had been killed, but by a miracle he had escaped practically without a scratch. Speaking of the work of the artillery, Blinman told how useful the aeroplanes were in finding the range for the guns. The aero- planes would fly over the German positions, and through a system of signalling by means of dropping various coloured lights would tell the gunners what the range was and whether their shells were getting the mark. Gunner Blinman spoke with confidence and soldierly pride of the efficiency of the British artillery, and seemed to have no doubt of their ability to gain the mastery of the Germans, who seem to regard themselves as the master-artil- lerists of the world. He said the Germans made a big display with their "Jack John- sons," but the British were now matching them at the big gun game, while as to the directing of fire, and the serving and handling of guns, he thought the Germans were not anything like so efficient as the British artil- lery ofifcers and men.

PONTYCYMMER

PONTYCYMMER. CHAMBER OF TRADE.-A meeting of the Chamber of Trade was held on Tuesday. The chief business was to appoint ofifcers. The following were elected :—President, Mr. J. Morgan Owen; vice-presidents, Messrs. T. O. Morgan, and Jenkins; treasurer, Mr. Mor- gan Hughes; hon. secretary, Mr. Arthur F. Pugh. A collection towards the Prince of Wales' and local funds made for the month of February, realised C5 lis. It was resolved to collect monthly. CYMRODORION.-At the Ffaldau Insti- tute on Friday last, under the auspices of the Cymrodorion Society Glenydd y Garw," an excellent address was delivered by Mr. James Clement (Skewen), on "Proffwyd Glyn- eithinog," and comnients, were afterwards made by Rev. P. Williams (Pedr Hir), of Liverpool, Rev. W. Thomas (Blaengarw), Rev W. Saunders, C.C., and Rev. D. Mardy Davies (Pontycymmer). The chairman was Mr. Jonathan Maddocks. At the close Mr. Samuel Harris moved, and Mr. David Thomas seconded a vote of thanks to the chairman. BETHEL C.M.—A competitive meeting was held at the Bethel Vestry on Thursday even- ing, under the auspices of the Sunday School, when Mr J. J. Morgans, B.A., presided. The adjudicators for the. evening were :Music, Mr. David Davies; literature, Mr. David Richard Jones. Awards:—Solo for children under 10: Eiluned Morgans. Solo for girls under 13: Divided between Doris Morgans and Katie Davies. Solo for boys under 13: 1, Ebenezer Davies; 2, David Wm. Jones. Solo for girls under 21 Divided between Miss M. A. Thomas and Miss Bronwen Evans. Solo for boys under 16: Dan Davies. Open solo: Divided between Messrs. Dd. Thomas and Dd. Richard Evans. Literature: Children under 10: Divided between Ann Davies and Eiluned Morgans. Children under 13: 1, Iwan Mor- gans; 2, Doris Morgans. Children under 16: Dan Davies. The accompanist for the even- ing was Miss Maud Edwards. v

COWBRIDGE I

COWBRIDGE. I POLICE COURT.—At Cowbridge Police Court last week, David L. Griffiths, farmer, Welsh St. Donats, was fined 7s 6d. for having left a horse aiidetrap unattended; William Fitzgerald, Cowbridge, for having ridden a bicycle without a lighted lamp attached, was fined 5s. Henry Golden, Cowbridge, was or- dered to pay the cost, 7s., for having kept a dog without a license. mmmtmgmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

No title

The funeral took place at Mardy of Mr. David Evans (Eos Dar), the well-known penillion singer of Merthyr, who sang before the late Queen Victoria and King Edward, and King George and Queen Mary. There was a large attendance at the funeral, the Cymrodorion Society and National Eistedd- fod Committee being particularly well repre- sented.

MAESTEG

MAESTEG. PROMOTION.—Mr. Digby Dredge Owen, only son of the late Mr. N. Owen, formerly manager of the L. and P. Bank, Usk, Mon., and of Mrs. Owen, Overdale, Salisbury Road, Maesteg, has been promoted to the Claygate (Surrey) Branch of the L. and P. Bank. PREACHING SERVICES.—The anniver- sary preaching services of Siloh Chapel, Nant- yffyllon, were held on Sunday and Monday (morning, afternoon and evening) of both days. The officiating ministers were the Revs D. D. Walters, of Newcastle Emlyn, and W. E. Daniels, B.A., of Neath. There were very good congregations at the morning and after- noon services. The evening services were ex- cellently attended, and the preaching throughout was of a high order. Collections were made at the close of each service towards the chapel debt. PROPERTY SALE.—At the Castle Hotel, Maesteg, on Tuesday, Mr. George Thomas offered a number of leaseholds. No. 13, Com- mercial Street, Maesteg, let at R65 per an- num, held for 99 years from 1894, ground rent JE5 16s., was sold at £1,000 to Mr. D. L. Powell, Bridgend, for a client. Nos. 38 and 39, Grove Street, Nantyffyllon, let at 20s. each per lunar month, and held for 60 years from 1858, at the ground rent of 15s. 2d., were sold—No. 38 at R37 10s. to Mr. J. T. Francis, Tonna Road, Caerau, and No. 39 at jE38 10s. to Mr. Henry Evans, Nantyffyllon* Ashley House and Berkley House, Railway Terrace, Porthcawl, let at 20s. each per lunar months and rates, held for 99 years from 1890, at the ground rental of C4, were sold-Ashley House to Mr. J. Mordecai, the tenant, rut £ 187 10s., and Berkley House to Mr. J. Law- rence, 131, Caerau Road, Caerau, at E170. Mr. J. R. Snape, Maesteg, was the solicitor for the vendors.

a CAERAU

a CAERAU. HONORARY MEMBERS' INITIATION CEREMONY. — On Saturday evening, the Caerau Lodge of the Bristol and West of Eng- land and South Wales Provident Society met at the Lodge Room, the Parish Hall, when am initiation ceremony was performed by the Vicar of Caerau (Rev. R. Davies), who was also the chairman. The Chairman, in his opening remarks, expressed the hope that the day was not far distant when every respon- sible person would be a member of a benefit society. Man must cast off selfishness and realise that he was only one minute unit in the vast millions of humanity, and that he could not stand alone; that he needed the band of brotherhood. Addressing the three new members—Messrs. G. H. Howells, Ben Jones, and R. Protheroe—the Chairman said You are now about to be initiated honorary members of the Bristol, West of England, and South Wales Provident Society, a society that had its origin in the ancient city of Bristol in the year 1873. It was started by only a few working men, and the initial years of its existence were fraught with adversity, which seemed likely to wreck the movement. To- day, it has thousands of members, and thou- sands of pounds in funds, and we have to thank the pioneers for their unswerving and indomitable determination to succeed. Who can attempt to fathom the amount of good which has been done, or the amount of dis- tress alleviated since the Society's existence? Widows and orphans. have had cause to bless their society. Many men aim at Parliamen- tary or municipal honours; but what nobler work can man do than assisting in a move- ment which has for its object the well-being of fellow-men. History tells us that socie- ties are centuries old, and who will gainsay but that they have been the means of the uplifting of man, morally, socially and finan- cially. By their provident work they are to- day the most important and powerful institu- tions in the kingdom, and- he who has sacri- ficed his time and energy in carrying on the good work is entitled to the greatest honour. It is with greatest pleasure, continued the Vicar, that I, on behalf of the governing authorities, invest you with this collarette, trusting you will be long spared to wear it, and become practical and useful members, and when the opportunity is afforded you to assist in carrying on this noble work, that you will find it a work of pleasure and of love. Be- lieving that your presence here is practical proof of your interest in our movement, w* ask you to solemnly and sincerely promise you will, upon all occasions, remember your bro- therhood, and act towards every member of the society as you would in similar circum- stances he should act towards you; that you will be just and upright in all your actions, and that you will maintain and uphold the dignity of the society of which you have this day become a member. We hold out to you the right hand of fellowship, and you may depend upon the good will and support of every member of this powerful organisation.— The three new members gave short addresses,, and expressed their determination to help for- ward the work. The following gentlemen; also spoke:—Mr. H. Williams (treasurer), Mr. Griffiths (secretary), Mr. F. Pritchard, Mr. F. Stentiford, and Mr. C. Starr. The Chairman then invested Mr. F. Pritchard, who was the means of bringing in the three new honorary members, with a collarette, and referred in eulogistic terms to Mr. Pritchard's good wo-rk on behalf of the Society. A hearty vote of thanks was proposed by the Secretary, and seconded by Mr. F. Pritchard to the chair- man, who, up to that evening, was the first and only hon. member of the society

1 TONDU AND ABERKENFIG

1 TONDU AND ABERKENFIG. ANNIVERSARY.—On Sunday and Mon- day anniversary services in connection with Carey English Baptist Church were held at the chapel. The Rev. E. W. Probert, of Maesteg, preached at three services on Sun- day, and the Hev. B. Gray Griffiths, B.A., of Cardiff, on Monday evening. Special hymns and anthems were rendered by the choir, as- sisted by friends, under the conductorship of Mr. D. C. Whittingham, with Miss Jeanes aa accompanist.

IPENCOED

PENCOED. FUNERAL.—On Tuesday the funeral took place at Salem Chapel of the only child of Mr and Mrs. Alfred White. The little one passed away after an illness of very short du- ration. The chief mourners were: Mr. and Mrs. Alfred White (father and mother); alee relatives of both families. The Rev. D. W. Howell officiated. REHEARSAL.—On Sunday evening a re- hearsal was held at Rhiwceiliog Chapel. Al- though the chapel is about two miles away from Penooed several choristers from the lat- ter village were present. The conductor of the rehearsal was Mr. William Lewis, Pen- ooed. Portions of the programme for the ap- proaching musical festival of the Bridgend dis- trict were gone through.

Advertising

Up-to-date Appliances for turning out every class of work at competitive prices, at the Glamorgan Gazette Printm<» Works. Prin" and Published by the Central Glamorgan Printing and Publishing Com- pany Ltd., at the "Glamorgan Gazette," offioes, Queen Street, Bridgend, Glamor- gan FRIDAY, MARCH 26th, 1915.