Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 8 of 8
Full Screen
31 articles on this page
MAESTEG SECONDARY SCHOOL

MAESTEG SECONDARY SCHOOL AN ASSISTANT MASTER'S APPOINT- I MENT. The monthly meeting of the Governors of the Maesteg Secondary School was held on Friday afternoon at the Plasnewydd Board Room. Alderman E. E. Davies was in the chair, and there were also present: Rev. W. H. Thomas, Mr. J. Griffiths (Abergwynfi), Mrs. Hartshorn, Mrs. D. C. Howells, with the inspector (Mr. Rees), the headmaster (Mr G. S. Griffiths), and the clerk (Mr. J. R. Snape). The Headmaster reported that Mr. Saun- ders had commenced his duties, but on ac- count of the Higher Elementary School at Pontycymmer being under-staffed, he had to return, by arrangement, for a few days. He expected him back again on Monday, and hoped nothing would interfere again in his regular attendance. He had some reason reason to think there was a movement on foot-to get Mr. Saunders back to Pontycym- mer, and. in fact, he questioned him about it. Mr. Saunders was under the impression that he would get promoted sooner from a Higher Elemen ary School than from a Sec- ondary School, so he told him if he had any intention of adopting that course, he should make his arrangements through the Gover- nors in the proper way. However, he thought he would be back again on Monday. HOLIDAYS. The Clerk (Mr. snape) said he had received a letter from the Education Committee ask- ing for the observation of the Governors as to the advisability of arranging co-terminus holi- days for Secondary Schools throughout the county. Inspector Rees said he had communicated with the Headmasters' Association asking the Association if they could suggest a scheme by which all the schools could close and re-open together on the same dates. They promised to give the matter consideration, but noth- ing more had been heard from them. He then brought the matter before the commit- tee, hence the reason for the letter. The Chairman thought a universal scheme would be beneficial for the county. The teachers themselves ought to welcome the movement. As a rule teachers of one school were friendly with the teachers of another school, and would like to spend the vacation together. A co-terminus scheme would facili- tate their arrangements as well as facilitate the arrangements of the Governors and the Education Committee. It was eventually agreed to report that the Governors were in favour of adopting a uni- versal scheme for holidays throughout the county. SCHOLARSHIPS. The Clerk read a communication from Dr. James, the Chief Education Official, inquiring as to the number of scholarships the Gover- nors suggested giving this year. The Headmaster, in reply to a question by the Chairman, said they had seven scholar- ships last year. It was decided that the same number be applied for this year. KXAMINATION. in a not nor l.:ter, Dr. James advised the Governors that the annual examination of the school would take place on the 10th, 11th, and 12th inst., conducted by the Board of Education Inspectors of Schools, and he asked the Governors to arrange for a confer- ence with the inspectors at the close of their Examination on Wednesday, the 12th. This was agreed to. The Clerk reported that the Oxford Local Examination Committee had a surplus of P,5 9s. 4d. in hand from last year's working, and the Governors had at a recent meeting deci- ded to apply this amount to the school prizes for this year in addition to the estimate given for the year's requisition. ow Dr. James wrote that it was the decision of the Commit- tee to crop the estimate by this amount on the grounds that the committee had agreed to be responsible for any deficit in connection with the Local Oxford Examination. After some discussion, and on the sugges- tion of the Chairman, this course was agreed to. FREE TUITION. ine Headmaster reported that he had three pupils in receipt of free tuition in con- sequence of the circumstances of their par- ents, and as these free tuitions had to be re- newed at short periods the Headmaster asked for the instruct.ona of the Governors in each case. In reply to a question by the Chairman, members report 1 that no change of circum- stances had ta.,en place, and the renewals were granted.

LONG SERVICE MEDALSI

LONG SERVICE MEDALS I FOR MAESTEG FIREMEN. I At the dance at the Town Hall on Wednes- day evening Mr. Gomer Davies, on behalf of the Maesteg Urban District Council, presen- ted long service medals to a number of fire- men of the Maesteg Fire Brigade. Mr. Davies, in making the presentation said he was pleased to find that the members of the Fire Brigade had worked so well together for so many years. It proved that they were interested in a noble cause, and from his own personal knowledge and from information that he had received from those who had seen them at work he was glad to say that they were an efficient body of men. He was also pleased that the Council had decided to re- cognise their services and thereby encourage the men in the proper discharge of their duties. Any wcrk that was worth doing at all was worth cU ing we'J, and it was a source I of pleasure to him that evening to be in their midst, ard to present those members that were eligible with medals. The recipients were: 1, Lieutenant II. Elliot, 20 years' ser- vice; 2, GriLths Roes, 13 years' service; 3, John Saunders, 10 years' service; 4, Chas. Purnell, 10 years' service; 5, Edgar Elliot, 10 years' service; 6, W. E. Bumdge, 10 years' service. Each of the recipients thanked Mr. Davies. As they received their medals, on t'he motion of Captain J. Hocking, seconded by Lieutenant H. Elliot, a hearty vote of I thanks was accorded to the members of the Council, and to Mr. Davies for his presence that evening, and for his kind remarks in reference to the work done by the Fire Brigade.

No title

It was stated at the meeting of the Cardiff Secondary Schools Committee on Wednesday by Mr. Dyche, the headmaster of the Howard Gardens Municipal Secondary Boys' School, that one of their former pupils, named Follett had won the D.C.M. He was in charge of a telephone under fire, and by sticking to his post he was able to bring about the destruc- tion of a German battery. "It has been my lot to war with other races in what was called savage warfare, but among the Zulus, the Kaffirs, and the Dervishes no acts so cruel and wicked have ever been per- formed—acts that can only be described as coming from the children of the devil." So said Field-Marshal Lord Grenfell at a meeting of the Mission to Deep Sea Fishermen at the .Mansion House on Wednesday.

PARISH COUNCILS1

PARISH COUNCILS. 1 PENCOED. I At a meeting of the Pencoed Parish Coun- cil held at the Public Hall, Mr. Lemuel Lewis was elected chairman for the ensuing I twelve months. Mr. Thomas Thomas was elected rioe-chairman. It was decided to issue a precept on the overseers for L45, this amount to cover the expenditure of the Par- ish Council for a period of three years.

SOUTH WALES WESLEYANSI

SOUTH WALES WESLEYANS. I MAY MEETINGS. 1 The May meetings of the South Wales Dis- trict Wesleyan Synod are being held at Aber- dare. The representative session was largely attended, the Rev. Marshall Limon presiding. The Rev. J. Redfearn proposed a resolution expressing indignation and horror at the atro- cious methods of Germany in the conduct of the war, and profound sympathy with the thousands in this and other lands who have been plunged into sorrow and suffering by their crimes, special reference being made to the sinking of the Lusitania. ''The large and noble response of the young men of our church," said the resolution, "to their coun- try's call is highly gratifying." The reso- lution was carried. The Rev. George Byron reported with re- gard to home mission that the fullest advan- tage had been taken of the facilities for work amongst the soldiers. From the local churches 2,354 men had enlisted, but later figures not yet available were considerably larger. Mr. T. Hutchinson, treasurer, reported on foreign missions, and a discussion was led by Messrs. Simpson, Seager, Hutchings, and others. Property returns showed, the Wes- leyan Chapels in South Wales to be valued at L445,529, an increase of £ 5,197. A resolu- tion, moved and seconded by Messrs. Oram and C. F. Sanders, pledged the Synod to sup- port the Government in any stringent temper- ance measures which may be considered neces- sary.

MAESTEG FREE CHURCHESI

MAESTEG FREE CHURCHES. I SUNDAY SCHOOL DEMONSTRATION TO I BE REVIVED. A special meeting of the Maesteg Free Church Council was held on Friday evening at Tabor Chapel. Mr. T. S. Morris, Presi- dent, was in the chair. There were also rep- resentatives of the Sunday schools of Carmel, Bethania, Tabernacle, Canaan, ZoaT., Zion, Wesleyan, English Congregational and Bethlehem. The question of reorganising the Sunday Schol demonstration was consideroo.. and it was generally felt that it should be revived and carried out as it had been for forty years. The Rev. W. H. Thomas, Tabor, was ap- pointed Secretary pro-tem. The date of the demonstration was fixed for Whit-Tuesday. Mr. T. S. Morris, in virtue of his office as Chairman of the Free Church Council, was appointed Grand Marshal for the day, and Mr. Isaac Jenkins, as conductor of the oldest Sunday School in the central division, was selected to conduct the United Sunday School chorus in front of the Town Hall.

MAESTEG GROCER PATRIOTI

MAESTEG GROCER PATRIOT. I THREE SONS WITH THE COLOURS. I Few tradesmen in Maesteg can boast of having contributed so handsomely to Lord Kitchener's Army as Mr. and Mrs. 1. W. Leake, of Commercial Street. They have three sons connected with His Majesty's for- ces. Mr. David 0 Leake is with the Royal Army Medical Corps, now in training at Northamp- ton. Mr. Ivor Leake is with the Cardiff Pals Battalion, in the Machine section, and now at Seaford. Mr, Sydney Leake is with the Public Schools and University Corps, now at Epsom. The three young men are quite de- lighted with their Army training and enjoy excellent health. Like the father, they en- joy active life. Mr. I. W. Leake has been churchwarden in the parish of Llangynwyd for sixteen years, is an ex-President of the Maesteg Chamber of Trade and at present is Worshipful Master of the Llynvi Lodge of Freemasons

ATTEMPTED THEFT BY A TRICKI

ATTEMPTED THEFT BY A TRICK I YOUNG PORT TALBOT MAN CHARGED. ) At the Aberavon County Police Court on I Tuesday, George Rees (20), of Cwmavon Road, Aberavon, was charged on remand with having attempted to obtain by a trick < £ 1 8s. lid. from the Port Talbot Steelworks Co., on May 7th. Mr. L. M. Thomas, who prosecuted, said on Friday, prisoner went to the Steel Works, and at the pay office called out "Number 1165." That number belonged to an employee named Joseph Fowler. Prisoner had previously worked at the steelworks, so he knew the sys- tem of payment. Mr. Price, who received the number called out, was rather dubious, so de- fendant handed in a note purporting to belong to his brother, and asking him to get his money. Another employee named Evans made investi- gations, and found that the brother had also left the employ of the Steelworks Co., and the number 1165 belonged to Fowler, who shortly afterwards called for his money. The Com- pany employed so many men that it was diffi- cult to recognise each one individually, and they had to be particularly careful because they had lost a considerable amount of money lately through tricks of this kind, and he asked the Bench to so deal with the prisoner that it would be a deterrent to him not to do such a thing again, and it would also be an example to others. Sergt. Jones, of the Steelworks, gave evidence of arresting prisoner, and Frederick Price, of George Street, Port Talbot, an assistant timekeeper at the Steelworks, gave evidence of prisoner coming to the pay box and calling out the number mentioned. He also handed in a note purporting to have been writ- ten by his brother, asking him to call in and get the £ 1 8s. lid., which was due to him. Wit- ness became suspicious, and called the attention of the chief timekeeper to the matter Thomas Evans, of Rice Street, Port Talbot, chief timekeeper at the Steelworks, said he be- came suspicious because he knew the name of the person whose number was 1165. Joseph Henry Fowler, of Ebbw Vale Row, Cwmavon, said his number was 1165, and he denied that he authorised anyone to get his money. He had not seen prisoner before. Tom Abbott, of Eagle Street, Port Talbot, a foreman fitter at the Steelworks, said prisoner's brother left in April, and there was nothing owing to him. Prisoner pleaded guilty, and said the note was given to him by his sister, who found it at the back of the door. The Bench imposed a fine of 40s., and warned prisoner as to his future conduct.

Advertising

m Up-to-date appliances for turning out every I class of work at competitive prices, at the I "Glamorgan Gazette" Printing Works. >

GAS IN THE STOMACH IS I DANGEROUS I I

GAS IN THE STOMACH IS I DANGEROUS. I I P?YSsC?NG RECOMMEND THE US £ Li- MAGNES!A. Sufierers from indigestion or dyspepsia should remember tliat the presence of gas or wind in tne stomach invariably indicates that the stom- ach is troubled by excessive acidity. This acid causes the food to ferment, and the fermenting food in turn gives rise to noxious fermentin, distend the stomach, hamper the normal functions of vital internal organs, cause acute headaches, interfere with the action of the heart, and charge the blood stream with deadly poisons, which in time must ruin the health. Physicians say that to quickly dispel a dangerous accumulation of wind in the stomach and to stop the food-fermentation which creates the gas, the acid in the stomach must be neutra- lised, and that for this purpose there is nothing quite so good as half a teaspoonful of pure bisurated magnesia taken in a little water im- mediately after meals. This instantly neutral- ises the acid, thus stopping fermentation and the formation of gas, and enabling the inflamed, distended stomach to proceed with its work under natural conditions. Bisurated magnesia is obtainable in powder or tablet form from J. Jones, of 31 Caroline Street, and other high- class chemists and stores everywhere, but as there are many different forms of magnesia it is important that the bisurated which the physi- cians prescribe should be distinctly asked for. 5204

No title

The engagement of Mr. Sinclair Neill and his London Company in a series of sketches, at the Cinema Theatre, Bridgend, should provp most attractive during the coming week. Mr. Neill was at one time a leading member of Sir J. Forbes Robertson's, Mr. Lewis Waller's, and Mr. F. R. Benson's com- panies, and his performance of "Garrick" is well known, having been played at all the leading Moss and Stoll and Syndicate Halls of the United Kingdom. He is supported by his wife, Miss Alice Miller as "Ada Ingot." Mr. M. E. Walker, who enacts the part of the Alderman" is a well-known Shakespear- ian actor, having toured with Messrs. F. R. Benson's, Allan Wilkie's and A. Marsh's Companies, whilst the comedy portion of the play is strongly portrayed by Madame Isabel Beresford as "Mrs. Brown, a part she has played with great success in many tours with Mr. Edward Compton. Mr. Bernard Marsh and Mr. Wm. Garrett complete a well-known strong caste. The Bank Thief" is a dra- matic play in tabloid forms, quite a contrast to the lighter touches of comedy and pathos as seen in the performance of "Garrick."

DEFENCE OF THE REALMS ACT I

DEFENCE OF THE REALMS ACT I ABERAVON CABBY FINED. I MIGHT HAVE BEEN SHOT. I At the Aberavon Borough Police Court on Thursday, Joseph Adams, a hansom cab dri- ver, of 4, Albert Terrace, Aberavon, was charged under the Defence of the Realms Act with refusing to stop when challenged by a sentry at Port Talbot Dock on the 6th inst. Private Alfred Smith, of the 4th Welsh, said at 10-30 p.m. on May 6th he was on duty at the Docks when a hansom cab came over the bridge towards him. He called on the driver to stop but he did not do so. He only shouted out: "Alright, I am going to the Dock Hotel." When he returned witness stopped him and asked him why he had not stopped and defendant became abusive. Private Rogers, of the 4th Welsh, gave corroborative evidence, and said he told pris- oner he was d- lucky he did not have a bunet through him. When the sentry called on defendant to stop he whipped up his horse all the faster. Colonel Vaughan, commanding the Swan- sea district, was present in Court, and said he regarded the offence as a very grave one, and he asked the Bench to impose the extreme penalty. The sentries on duty would have been thoroughly justified in firing on defend- ant for refusing to stop, but they exercised the privilege they had and refrained from doing so. There had been previous com- plaints, and it was necessary that the military should take all precautions possible to prevent a repetition of this. The Mayor (Mr. W. J. Williams) said de- fendant's offence might have resulted in his death. The Bench must support the military authorities, for we were living in such trying times. He would be fined P-10. Mr. Dan Perkins, who defended, expressed his regret at what had happened and said defendant should have stopped when he was requested to do so.

KILLED ON HILL 60 r

—————?———————— KILLED ON HILL 60. r MAESTEGIAN WHO VOLUNTEERED. t Mr. J. Jeanes, a painter, of 25, Brynmawr Place, who enlisted after the outbreak of war, has been killed in action while serving in his regiment on Hill 60. Mr. Jeanes was the adopted son of Mr. and Mrs. Humphreys.

No title

Major-General Lee presided at a meeting of the Board of Management of the King Ed- ward VII. Hospital, Cardiff, on Wednesday. Mr. Leonard D. Rea (secretary) announced that a large number of special donations to the hospital had been received, including 100 guineas from Mr. T. W. Davies, Park-place, and j650 from Mr. Ewart Bell. The Great Western locomotive employees had decided to increase their annual donation of 25 guineas to at least 50 guineas, and they hoped to do more. (Hear, hear.) The Chairman said it was gratifying to know that the war was not stopping the flow of charity. What was hap- pening in connection with this hospital was happening all over the country. The war was productive of a great deal of evil, but, on the other hand, it was bringing out the very best traits in the people of this country. (Hear, hear.)

No title

At the meeting of tho Margam Council on Monday, on the proposition of the Chairman, a vote of condolence was passed with Captain Preston on the loss he recently sustained in the death of his daughter.

HUGE PORT TALBOT PROJECT j

HUGE PORT TALBOT PROJECT j PROPOSED FUSION OF PORT TALBOT I CO AND BALDWINS, LTD. An extraordinary general meeting of Bald- win's, Ltd., was held at the Grand Hotel, Birmingham, on Wednesday. Colonel J. R. Wright, who presided, said the matters for consideration were (1) the increase of the Company's capital, (2) the arrangements which practically amounted to an absorption of the Port Talbot Steel Com- pany, (3) alterations in the Company's ar- ticles of association. The company of Bald- win's, Ltd., was formed thirteen years ago, and has been a progressive company, having accumulated over that period nearly LIOO,000, sinking funds for the redemption of Debentures and leaseholds and a reserve fund of £ 275,000. But to-day no manufac- turing business could stand still, and there mus be developments if they were to keep in the front rank of their business. Develop- ments of this character bad long been in contemplation. They were now the subject of advanced negotiation, and consisted of the construction of blast furnaces at Port Talbot, which would give unique facilities for the pro- duction of pig iron at tho lowest possible cost, for consumption by Baldwin's, Ltd., in preference to having to buy in open markets under fluctuating conditions, and difficulty of getting regular deliveries. The ore would be brought from the ship to the ore bunkers' without the intervention of railway carriage, and the coal, which the directors hoped would all come from the company's own collieries, would be transported from the collieries to the coke ovens at the lowest carriage in this or any other district. The waste gases from the blast furnaces and coke ovens would be used for the generation of electrical power for the works. It was estimated that the expenditure required for this extension would be about P-450,000 to £ 500,(XX). But close to the site of the proposed blast furnaoea were the works of the Port Talbot Steel Company, Ltd., a company which required a large amount of iron for its manufactures. NOMINAL CAPITAL OF HALE A I MILLION. The Port Talbot Company was in possession of works equipped with the most modern fur- naces and machinery for the manufacture of steel and of the many requirements of sec- tions and plates in shipbuilding and oonstruo- tional work. It had a nominal capital of half a million pounds, of which E350,000 had been issued and fully paid up. In 1914 a five per oent. Debenture issue of L300,000 was effec- ted. The company was originally formed as a joint venture by Baldwins, Ltd., in connec- tion with the Gloucester Wagon Company. and each of these companies at present held 125,000 fully-paid shares. Subsequently some of the customers and friends of the company became shareholders, and were now kolders of 100,000 shares. The company was already a large customer of Baldwins for coal, and if the developments to which he had re- ferred were carried out they would probably be large customers at Baldwins for other raw material. In fact, the ramifications were such that the directors looked on the blend- ing of the two companies as a necessity. The Port Talbot Company had been controlled by a Board consisting of shareholders nominated —half by the Gloucester Wagon Company and half by Baldwins, Ltd., and the active management had been in the hands of Col. Charles Wright and Mr. Davies. [ A DESIRABLE STEP. ) The Board were of opinion that the fusion of the Port Talbot Company with Baldwins was a very desirable step, and that a fair basis was the exhange of a fully paid 21 share in Baldwins for an equivalent share in the Port Talbot Company, the Port Talbot share- holders ranking for dividend as against Bald- wins only after the expiration of Baldwins' financial year, namely 30th June next. Hav- ing ascertained that all the shareholders of the Port Talbot Company approved of the proposal, the Board were advised that the arrangement could be effected by a transfer to Baldwins of the shares in the Port Talbot Steel Company not already held by them- the Port Talbot Company remaining a separ- ate Company. In this way no breach oc- curred in the continuity ef the Port Talbot business, and no disturbance was made in that Company's financial arrangements, and there was no need to deal with their debentures. The Board therefore recommended that the capitlal of Baldwins, Ltd., should be increased as stated, and that the proposals for the ac- quisition of the outstanding Port Talbot Steel Company's shares on the basis of an equival- ent exchange at face value should be appro- ved and carried out. The present intention was that three of the Port Talbot directors should join the Board, the three directors proposed being Mr. R. V. Vassar-Smith (chairman of Lloyd's Bank and of the Glou- cester Wagon Company), Mr. E. L. Evan- Thomas (director of the Gloucester Wagon Company), and Lord Quenington, M.P. (di- rector of Lloyds Bank and of the Gloucester Wagon Company). The Chairman then moved the following resolution:— That the present capital of the Company amounting to £ 850,000, divided into 250,000 Preference shares of ki each, and 600,000 Ordinary shares of ki each, be in- creased to P,1,500,000 by the creation of 650,000 additional Ordinary shares of £1 each. The resolution was seconded by Mr. Stanley .Baldwin, Vice-Chairman, and carried. The Chairman also proposed the second resolution:— That the proposals submitted to and ex- plained at this meeting for the acquisition by exchange for fully-paid shares in this company of the outstanding shares not held by this company in the Port Talbot Steel Company, Ltd., be and the same are hereby approved. This was seconded by Mr. Roger Beck and carried. The third resolution embodying a number of alterations in the Articles of Association was formally approved. The fourth resolution, proposed by the Chairman, was that Baldwins, Ltd., through the Board might exercise their voting power as shareholders of the Port Talbot Steel Com- pany, Ltd., to alter the Articles of Associa- tion of the latter company. This resolution was seconded by Mr. Davis and carried. It is understood that a confirming meeting will be held at the Company's Office, at Swansea, on the 27th inst.

No title

Rumours that Messrs. Baldwins were to build blast furnaces at Taibaoh have been in the air for considerably over a year, so that the new arrangements will not come entirely as a bombshell to the district. It was known that Messrs. Baldwins held a good percentage of the shares of the Port Talbot Steel Com- pany, and the Steelworks have recently been enlarged to cope with the Government and railway work. The blast furnaces will be erected on the site of the old Margam Copper Works of Messrs. Vivian and Sons, at the extreme cor- ner of the Margam float and just above the patent fuel works. When the acquirement was first mooted, it was announced, and was not contradicted, that coke ovens and bye product works were also to be erected in the district. Since then, the ground on which the blast furnaces are to be erected has been cleared, but we are officially informd that the actual buildings will not be oommenoed until there is a prospect of the war being termina- ted. The prosperity which the Steelworks have helped so materially to bring to the district, and the announcement that Messrs. Baldwins propose to erect new works might make people too optimistic and it might be mis- understood, but the announcement that building operations are not to be commenced yet should dispel extravagant anticipations. Seen by a representative of the "Gazette" th Secretary of the Steelworks Company de- clined to commit himself to anything defi- nitely, but said that the announcement made at Birmingham was more in the nature of a preliminary announcement. It was more or less an arrangement of convenience between I Messrs. Baldwins and the Port Talbot Steel- works. It did not mean a transfer of busi- ness, but fuller details would undoubtedly be given later. The Steelworks at the present time employ considerably over 1,200 hands. New spacious clerical offices iiqre ope-r-ed this year, and the works themselves were enlarged by the addi- tion of three new furnaces, a new steel sheet, and plate mills and section mills.

FUNERAL OF MR T AI BURGESS

FUNERAL OF MR. T. A. I BURGESS. FREEMASONS' TRIBUTE. I The funeral of the late Mr. Thomas Alexan- der Burgess, of Port Talbot, on Saturday was, in accordance with the deceased's wish, of a very quiet nature. The service was conducted by the Rev. D. J. Jones, the Vicar of St. Theodores, and the interment took place at the Chapel of EaeQ There was a large number of friends who at- tended to pay a mark of respect, including a large number of members of the Afon Lodge of Freemasons, of which deceased was a Past W.M. A short service was first held in the church. There were eight bearers,, old Taibach friends of the deceased, included in the num- ber. There were many handsome floral tributes, including one from the Afon Lodge of Eree- masons. The deceased, who was the eldest son of the late Mr. T. H. Burgess, will be missed by a large circle of friends. He was one of the most popular men in Aberavon) where he spent so many pleasant years and in which he took such an interest. As we mentioned last week for six years he was a members of the Aberavon Corporation, during which time he was elected Mayor. It was during his Mayor- ality that the road to the Docks—one of his pet schemes--was opened. In addition to being an ardent Freemason, he was for many years a Land Tax Commissioner for the dis- trict. He w is a'so a musician of no mean order. He was an accomplished pianist and organist, and his services were frequently re- quistioned in the district. He only retired from business as a chemist this year, and he then took up his residence in Port Talbot. While being of a philanthropic disposition, he shirked the limelight in distributing his bounty, but any of the poorer classes could tell of his kindly nature and generosity. He leaves a widow and married daughter to mourn their loss. The mourners were: Mr. H. A. Burgess (Aberavon) Mr. A. C. Burgess (Cardiff), Mr. L. E. Burgess (Cardiff), and Mr. G. Mills (Port Talbot.) Among the Freemasons at the graveside were Messrs. D. J. Jones, T. Gibb, L. M. Thomas, T. David, F. Page, and H. Jones.

I AFON YALLEY MINERS I

I AFON YALLEY MINERS. I INADEQUATE TRAIN SERVICE. DEFICIENT AMBULANCE FACILITIES. j The monthly meeting of the Afon Valley district of the South Wales Miners' Ferer- ation was held at the Dockers Hall, Port Tal- bot, on Saturday, Mr. W Davies (Cwmavon) presiding over a large attendance of dele- gates. The Agent; Mr. William Jenkins, J.P., said that the delegates represented a member- ship of 1,500 on the new basis. This practi- cally meant that every member in the lodges in the district had now paid their 2s. membership into the district. The Chaitman complimented the district on its loyalty in carrying out the decision of the South Wales coalfield with regard to in- creased membership. The Agent, Mr. Jenkins, presented a lengthy report upon the conference which had been held in London in connection with the war bonus, and at the conclusion of the report he advised the men to wait patiently for the results of the conference. The meeting passed a resolution compli- menting Mr. Jenkins upon the line of action I he had taken. Mr. Jenkins also reported that he had successfully negotiated the settlement of a number of compensation cases during the past month. Complaints were made by several lodges in the Afon Valley about the inadequate num- ber of ambulance men kept in various dis- tricts underground. It was reported that during the month one man who had been injured underground had had to wait a considerable time before he could receive proper treatment on acoount of lack of ambulance men and material. It was decided to bring the matter before the proper authorities and report at the next meeting. Complaints were also made of the inade- quate train service in the Afon Valley, and it was stated that where men had been injured in the pits they had had to wait a consider- able time before they could be conveyed to their homes or to hospital, through the in- adequate train service. It was decided that the matter should be brought to the notice of the railway authori- ties.

No title

Manning Rees, of Ynysygwas, Cwmavon, and a naval signaller, stationed at Barry Island, performed a gallant deed while he W36 bathing with another sailor. The other man got into difficulties and Rees in his efforts to render help was nearly drowned himself, but succeeded in getting to the land in an ex- hausted condition. Rees, who is a mason by trade, joined the Naval Reserve shortly after war was declared. He also played forward for Cwmavon for some seasons and is a. well- known figure in the district.

No title

Reports of Meetings and Notices of Forth- coming Events can be sent direct to the Gazette" Office, Quezon Street, Bridgend.

Advertising

Up-to-date Appliances for turning out I every class of work at competitive prices, at the Glamorgan Gazette Printisw Works. I

M ARGAM URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL

M ARGAM URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL. EMPLOYEES ENLIST. J THE CONDITION OF STATION ROAD. L.G.B. AND LOAN FOR WATER SCHEME. The monthly meeting of the Margam Dis- trict Council waa held on Monday, Mr. R. Evans, J.P., presiding. There were also present Messrs. G. Lipscomb, W. B. Hal- lowes, G. Ltewellyn, L. Nicholas, R. Llew- ellyn, Major Gray, W. Lewis, H. Davies, E. Evans and J. Walters. COMPLAINT FROM POXTHRYDYFEN. I -Ur. J. WalteTs asked what steps the Sur- veyor had taken with regard to the scaven- ging of Ponthrydyfen. 4 The Surveyor said he had great difficulty with the contractor, and he had had to deal very strongly with him. A few days before he had sent the Council's cart to do the sca- venging but it was found that the contractor was doing the work. Wliat he proposed to do was that when the contractor failed to carry out his contract he should send a Coun- cil cart to do the work and deduct the amount from the contractors charge. HEALTH. The Medical Officer of Health reported that during March the number of births registered was 47, namely 25 boys and 22 girls, giving a birth-rate of 36.38 per 1,000 per annum. The number of deaths during the same period was 17, giving a death-rate of 16.35 per 1,000 I per annum. COMPULSORY NOTIFICATION OF I MEASLES. ihe Sanitary Committee reported that a letter had been received from the L.G.B. in- timating that they had under consideration the question of the measures which might be taken for controlling the spread of measles, German measles and whooping cough, and for reducing the mortality from these dis- eases and requesting that the Sanitary Authority would take the matter into con- sideration and inform the Board if they were desirous of obtaining the powers they sugges- ted in regard to these diseases. The Clerk said he had requested the Medi- cal Officer of Health to give his views on the matter. CONDITION OF STATION ROAD. I Mr. I-t. JLdeweilyn, as a matter of "public necessity," called attention to tho condition of Station Road, and thought it was time they made some representation to the County Council to open negotiations as to the possibility of the Council again taking over the control of the road. When that Council had the road under their control the road waa satisfactctory and they did not have the disgraceful scenes which had been wit- nessed during the last six or seven weeks. A few weeks ago he saw the tradesmen standing at their doors vigorously protesting against the dust which waa accumulating round their shop premises. It was a serious thing, be- ¡ cause all the commodities in the shops must have depreciated in value, for they were covered with dust. It was a disgusting scene. No attempt had been made to sweep the roads and the refuse was allowed to accumulate inches thick. The shopkeepers were satisfied with the work done by the Council, and he moved that negotiations be opened with the County Council for the Margam Council to look after the Station Road in future. Mr. G. Lipscomb seconded and Mr. W. B. Hallowes supported. The recommendation was agreed to. ENLISTMENT OF EMPLOYEES. I The Surveyor reported that Tom Hughes, Captain of the Fire Brigade, William George, haulier, and Edwin James, steam lorry driver had enlisted, and it was agreed to reinstate them in their old positions on their return. THE SEWERAGE OUTFALL WORKS. I A letter was received from the engineers with reference to the Margam and Glyn- corrwg Sewerage outfall sewer, stating that the cost of the work approximately still to be completed was £ 1,435. Of this sum the cost of dredging at the end of the outfall, which must be carried out, was R200, and there waa £ 800 compensation required by the oontrao- tors. There was a balance of E435, of which Glyncorrwg would pay £294 ¥d Margam JE141. The total saving to the two Councils was £ 435, but against this they had to accept liability from the Board of Trade and other interested parties which might materially re- duce the saving above mentioned. Letters were also received from the Glyn- corrwg Council and from Mr. G. Lipscomb, Agent to Miss Talbot, on the subject, and it was agreed, on the recommendation of the General Purposes Committee, to have the outfall sewer continued to its original length. T. PRICE OF COAL. A I it was agreed that the price of coal be lett in abeyance for the present as the new con- tracts for coal did not come into operation until the 1st June. SLOT METER INSTALLATIONS. J It was agreed that £ 5,000 be borrowed under the provisions of the Margam Urban District Council Act for the purpose of fixing and providing complete slot installations, and to meet present contingencies. It was further agreed that slot meter in- stallations be provided in houses assessed up to a rateable value of JE12. THE WATER SUPPLY. I In reply to the Council's request for sanc- tion to borrow JE500 for the provision of pumping plant, etc., at a well at the celluloid works in the Duffryn Valley, the L.G.B. re- plied that they were not prepared to sanction loans at the present time, except in cases of urgent necessity. In any case they would not be able to sanction a loan in the present in- stance unless the right to take water from the well was secured for a definite period. The Waterworks Committee recommended that application be made to Miss Talbot for the necessary loan, and at the same time to point out the deficiency «Jf the water sup- plies, and to enquire if the Margam Estate would be willing to put down the necessary plant if the Council would agree to purchase the water taken from the well on terms to be agreed upon. SHORT WATER SUPPLIES. The Surveyor drew attention to the neces- t sity of warning the public against the waste of water, and he was directed to distribute leaflets warning consumers against the waste of water and the penalties they incurred by so doing. THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. I The Library Committee reommended that a sub-committee consisting of the Chairman (Mr. W. Lewis) and Messrs. H. Davies and Ll. H. Nicholas be appointed to consider the estimates obtained by the Surveyor for fur- nishing the library and the appointment of librarian and report. The Committee also referred the question of the selection of books for the library to the sub-committee. Mr. Nicholas moved that plenary powers be granted to the sub-committee to open the tenders, etc., and he stated that the special sub-committee had co-opted the Rev. D. J. Jones, Rev. J. E. Rees, Mr. Walon, B.Sc., and Mr. D. W. Lewis to consider the supply of books. If Mr. Llewellyn did not think the sub-com- mittee had any authority to add to their numbers. He thought it was the duty of the Library Committee to consider the question. He was surprised no one elso had been in- vited. He did not think it was necessary to add to the sub-committee. There was a large number of public libraries, and it would be easy to select books for the library. He was afraid it would lead to a quarrel between Church and Chapel. The Chairman said catalogues had been ob- tained from various institutions. Mr. Llewellyn thought that the sub-oom- mittee's proposal was a rather dangerous proceeding, Mr. Nicholas said the idea of having the four gentlemen was to have them co-opted to the Council and not only to tho Library Com- mittee in dealing with the. matter. Mr. Davies said the sub-eerp.Timtee had had instructions to co-^pt CULT men, and in choosing the gentlemen thoy had, the sub- committee thought, it would be an advantage. They did not want any sectarian quarrels. It was eventually agreed to invite tenders, etc., and a special meeting of tho Council was fixed to consider the matter.

FATAL ACCIDENT AT PORT TALBOT DOCKS

FATAL ACCIDENT AT PORT TALBOT DOCKS. ABERAVON MAN'S SAD DEATH. I Mr. Howell Cuthbertson conducted an in- quiry at Aberavon on Monday morning into the circumstances surrounding the death of Thomas McCarthy, who died from injuries he received at Port Talbot Dock last week. Mary Ann McCarthy, of 9 Sandfields Road, Aberavon, said her brother was 21 years of age, and he was a dock labourer. He had the accident on Wednesday, and died at the Margam Hospital. William Thomas, of 37 Castle Street, Aber- avon, foreman at Port Talbot Wharf, said de- ceased was employed with two other men loading ferro-mangonese from the stores to the w harf. He saw McCarthy on tho ground immediately after the accident, and although he spoke he appeared to be wandering in his mind, and what he said was unintelligible. Deceased only commenced this particular work at 2 o'clock in the afternoon, and the accident happened at 3-45- Although three men were engaged on the same job, no one saw what actually happened, as the other two men had gone to get a barrow. In answer to Mr. J. Hilditch, inspector of factories, witness said deceased was accus- tomed to work the capstan, as he had worked it occasionally for the last two years. De- ceased had fixed a chain to the end oj the rope he was using, which was quite un- necessary. In his opinion, deceased did not get enveloped in the rope as the rope was round the capstan, and he thought that the accident was caused by the chain atriking deceased's head. The Foreman of the Jury: You say there was a knot in the rope; why was that knot there? Was it connecting the pieces of rope? Witness: Very often a knot gets in the rope owing to the way it gets pulled about and wound Then the rope was not in proper condition ? -No; but there was sufficient good rope for the purpose for which he wanted it. But there must have been a strain on the rope at that particular spot?—Yes. You mentioned that there was a chain at- tached to the rope which was not absolutely neoessary?—That is so. Is it contrary to orders to put a chain at the end of a rope?— Yes. Are there orders that a man is not to at- tach a chain to the end of the rope?—If they do so, they do it on their own responsibility. In answer to another Juryman, witness said a knot in the rope would foul the cap- stan.. A Juryman: It is said that the men cannot have a new rope, so they have to have some- thing elee?—There was a rope at each cap- stan, and if the men had wanted another rope they could have had it. NOT THE FIRST ACCIDENT. I A Juryman: Inis is not tne nrst acoiueut which has happened at this capstan?—Wit- ness: No. What is the reason?—You had better ask the engineers' department. John Foster, of 7 Somerset Street, Taibach, employed on the Margam Sewerage Extension pipes, said deceased was pulling the rope alone. The chain flew round and knocked deceased down. In falling down he fell on the "bob" of the capstan, and tho chain flew round again and hit deceased on tho head. In his opinion the knot had jarred on the cap- stan and before McCarthy could get clear the chain had knocked him down.- Immediately witness got the man off the "bob" the cap- stan stopped revolving. Sidney Morgan, employed at the Harbour House Docks as mechanical foreman, said the capstan was examined and oiled every morning, but on Wednesday morning it was not overhauled, as there was nothing being done at the wharf. Mr. D. Bonham, of the Dock Workers' Union, asked if it was a fact that the men had complained about the capstan as- being dangerous. Witness replied that they had. Mr. Bonham: And in your estimation there was no reason for the complaints? Witness: Yes. Continuing witness said the danger lay in the fact that dust accumu- lated on the plate when the men tipped bal- last. This might happen forty or fifty times a day. THE INJURIES. 1 _1 I — i 1 7 1 1 I Dr. redericks sai?- Yes; if I see a rope in a'bad condition I put it right. The Foreman: Do we understand you are responsible for these ropes not being in order ?-I do not think I am, but I am will- ing to take a certain amount of reeponsibil- ity. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and also recommended that the Dock Company should be asked to see that more attention was given to the ropes. Mr. W. Griffiths, on behalf of the Dock Company, expressed his regret at the acci- dent, and sympathised with the relatives; and the Foreman, on behalf of the jury, also expressed sympathy with the family.

Advertising

Our representative for the Garw Valley is Mr. D. J. Rees, Post Office, Pontycymmer, to whom all reports and notices of events should be sent. LLOYDS BANK LI M ITED   Head Office: 71, LOMBARD STREET, E.C. Capita! Subscribed £ 31,20^,200 Capital Paid up 5,008,672 Rgsgh/g Fund 3.60COOO Deposits, &G. 118,173,359 Advances, &o. 59,4-39,647 _=:a. OVER 880 OFFICES IN ERGUKD AMD WALES. French Auxiliary: LLOYDS BAKii (FnArtCE) LIMITED. Offices in PARIS, BORDEAUX, BIARRITZ & HAVRE.

NANTYMOEL

NANTYMOEL. ST. JOHN AMBULANCE.—The results of the recent St. John Ambulance Association examination, held at Nantymoel Council School by Dr. W. E. Thomas, Bridgend, are to hand :—First aid certificates: Oswald T. Griffiths, Dinam Street; Evan Walters, Vale- View; John Thomas, Brooklands; David T. Jones, Frampton Cottage; William Evans, Howells Street; Rees Jones, Ogwy Street; George H. Williams, Brynogwy; David Davies, Station Road; Ernest C. Jones, Brooklands; Lewis Davies, Vale View; Robt. J. Williams, Graigfryn; Thomas D. Thomas, Vale View; Christopher Thomas, Station Road; Timothy James, Nantymoel Row; Thomas J. Evans, Vale View;, and Shem J- Davies, Waunwen. Voucher: Rhys Williams, Brooklands. Label: Owen Lewis, Llan- harran Terrace. The lecturer was Dr. D. J. Thomas, Brynbedw. Eighteen candidates- entered, and all passed.

KBNFIG HILL

KBNFIG HILL. SERIOUS ACCIDENT.—An unfortunate accident occurred to David Davies, of Bedford Road, Cefn Cribbwr, on Saturday. While proceeding homewards from the colliery over the incline, the steel rope struck him with such force that his leg was broken and he re- ceived severe injuries to the head. Dr. Twist was promptly summoned and arranged for the unfortunate man's conveyance to the Cottage Hospital, where every possible arrangement was made by the matron and staff. Although the accident occurred about 3.30, Dr. Twist had amputated the mutilated limb and had the other injuries attended to within about two hours. This is the second occasion on which the great advantage and value of the hospital has proved itself in cases of accidents" in the neighbourhood.

PENCOED

PENCOED. ANNIVERSARY SERVICES.—The anni- versary services of the Penuel Welsh Baptist Church were held on Tuesday evening and' throughout Wednesday of last week. The officiating ministers were the Revs. D. S. Jones, Bridgend, and Nicholas, Tony- pandy. DISTRICT MEETING.—A meeting of re- presentatives of the Calvinistic Methodist Churches of the Bridgend district was held at Salem Vestry on Monday. The meeting was presided over by the Rev. James Llewelyn, Bridgend. The secretarial duties were car- ried out by the Rev. T. R. Williams, Pyle. Following the business session, a church meeting was held, at which a paper was read by Mr. Thomas John, Bridgend, on The Sunday School as a Means of Grace." The subsequent discussion was participated in by the Revs. E. W. Pearoe, Porthcawl; T. R. Williams, Pyle; and Messrs. Alexander Smith, St. Brides; James Loveluck and D. R. Jones, Laleston.

LALESTON

LALESTON. DISTRICT NURSING.—On Tuesday even- ing the annual meeting of the Laleston and District Nursing Association was held at the Laleston National School. At the request of Mrs. Nicholl (Merthyrmawr), the Vicar of Newcastle, the Rev. D. Phillips, presided. The annual report showed that the nurse had made over a thousand visits, and from a finan- cial point of view the Society had held its own. After returning a vote of thanks to the various officers for their services during the past year, the following were re-elected:— President, Mrs. Nicholl, Mertyrmawr; hon. treasurer, Mrs. Knight, Tythegston Court; hon. secretary, Mrs. L. D. Nicholl, Laleston House.

NANTYFFYLLON

NANTYFFYLLON. EISTEDDFOD SUCCESS. Miss Jennie Griffiths, Nantyffyllon, was again successful in winning first prize for contralto solo on Sat- urday last at Bryn, against soine matured com- petitors. This young lady is a pupil of Madame Sambrook-Jones. 5221

No title

Mr. W. C. Bridgeman has given notice of a question he will address to Mr. Tennant in the House of Commons regarding the alleged billeting of some of the Welsh Bantams in the house of a woman who is said to be a German and has a brother in the German Army. He will inquire whether such a prac- tice is in accordance with War Office, regula- tions. There is as yet no settlement of the dis- pute originating in the tinhouse department of the Morriston Tinplate Works, Morriston,. which has brought about the stoppage of the- whole tinhouse and also the whole of the eight mills. The Executive of the Dockers" Union ordered their members, who stopped without notice, to resume work. So far,, however, the men remain idle. Mrs. Pritchard, of Quay Hill, Tenby, has been notified that her husband, Sergeant E. Pritchard, of the 1st Welsh, has been killed in the fighting at Hill 60. Mrs. Pritchard is a daughter of Mr. John Brooking, of Tenby, who has four daughters married to soldiers. Within six months the husbands of three of them have been killed in action in Belgium, and the fourth is in Germany, a prisoner of j war. Prin £ e