Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
15 articles on this page
ICRICKETI

I CRICKET. 'I I ANGELTON v. YEOMANRY. Played at Angelton Saturday. Scores:— ANGELTON. J. H. Hill, retired 24 Haynes, c Thomas, b Harvey 62 Dr. Brown, b Harvey 0 W. Hill, not out 26 F. Sparrow, b Corpl. Oring 23 C. Hill, c Lt. Lloyd, b Harvey 9 F. Hands, b Corpl. Harvey 1 Extras 9 Total (for six wickets) .163 E. Thomas, H. Fleetwood, W. Carr, and T- Trisize did not bat. YEOMANRY. Lieut. Lloyd, b Sparrow 0 Corpl. Oring, b Sparrow 0 H. Davies, c and b Sparrow 11 H. Markham, b W. Hill 0 CorpL Harvey, retired hurt 5 T. Morgan, c Dr. Brown, b H. Hill 1 T. Thomas, b Sparrow 0 1. Bevan, b Sparrow 2 R. Jenkins, b Sparrow 14 L. Evans, b W. Hill 5 F. Dale, not out 4 Extra 1 43

No title

The drought is now affecting the milk supply in Cheshire, and the present outlook is j serious. A great shortage is expected soon if the drought continues. The pastures are bare, and in many places the farmers have no water for the cattle. Enormous losses are being caused by the dryness. Root crops are spoiling, and fruit losses will be very heavy, a large area being affected. The fruit is now dropping from the trees, and many of them which promised so well are now bare. Cereals are now suffering, and the hay crop is the lightest known for several years. To arrive at the loss due to the war in terms of men killed," says a writer in the "Econo- mist," "it could perhaps be stated as being made up of annual amounts due to:—(1) Taxes paid by each man killed; (2) Cost of supporting those originally supported by him; (3) His buying power; (4) Profit due on work done by him; (5) His savings. If it is possible to obtain a fairly accurate figure for each of these factors, it is only necessary to multiply the total by the average number of years which the man would have lived, to gain a reasonable estimated value for purposes of calculating the enormous wast- age of life which is going on at the present mo- ment."

SOUTH GLAMORGAN LIBERALS

SOUTH GLAMORGAN LIBERALS ———  ———  MR. W. BRACE'S APPOINTMENT. 1 The quarterly meeting of the Executive Com- mittee of the South Glamorgan Liberal Associa- tion was held on Saturday in Cardiff, Mr. Sam Thomas presiding. There was a large and re- presentative attendance, amongst those present being Mr. W. Jones Thomas (treasurer), Coun- cillor Phillips, the Rev. D. Howell, liljr. W. Powell, Mr. D. Morgan Rees, Mr. W. Evans, and Mr. W. Taylor. Mr. Llewelyn Davies, secretary, read a letter from Captain the Hon. Roland Philipps ack- nowledging a vote of sympathy with him in the death of his brother, the Hon. Colwyn Philipps, who was killed at the. front. Mr. W. Brace, M.P., wrote acknowledging congratulations on his appointment as Under- Secretary at the Hoswe Office. Mr. Thomas, in reporting this action, called particular attention to the fact that in his judgment Mr. Brace had not been choesn be- cause of any ex-officio position which he held, but more particularly for his personal qualifica- tions for the post. In discussing political occurrences, special re- ference was made to the formation of the new Ministry, and a resolution was passed express- ing complete confidence in the judgment of f- h »» Prime ^mister and satisfaction with his promise (contained in a letter from the Chief Whip'? office to the president) that the pursuit of the special aims of the Liberal party in the sphere of domestic politics was not abandoned, but only suspended, and that when the national cause had been vindicated against the enemy the Liberal leaders would take up again the un- finished task to which the party had set its hand. Mr. S. Thomas addressed the meeting both on this point and also on the question of ex- tending the life of the present Parliament, and his remarks were endorsed by several other speakers, with the result that the resolution was passed unanimously. Mr. Jones Thomas submitted the financial ac- count, which proved very satisfactory, there being a balance in hand of nearly .£50. The question of registration was then dealt with, based upon a report from the secretary, and special instructions were given in view of the difficult circumstances of the present time.

GLAMORGAN VOLUNTEER REGIMENT

GLAMORGAN VOLUNTEER REGIMENT. DETAILS DECIDED UPON. A conference was held at the Cardiff City Hall on Thursday to consider the question of forming a City Battalion of the Glamorgan Vol- unteer Regiment, recently established in affilia- tion to the Central Association of Volunteer Training Corps, which is officially recognised by the War Office. The Lord Mayor (Alderman J. T. 'Richards) presided, and amongst others pre- sent were the members of the Corporation who had been nominated as an advisory committee by the Lord Mayor; Commander Bethune, R.N., regimental commander; Mr. J. A. Jones, Cardiff Battalion commander; representatives of the Cardiff. Volunteer Training Corps and of the Cardiff Civil Service Volunteer Corps, and Major Lucas, chief recruiting officer for Glamor- gan. Several details were decided upon for the suc- cessful promotion of the scheme, and a commit- tee was appointed to do the necessary executive work, after a public appeal had been issued by the Lord Mayor for funds to clothe and equip the battalion. The Lord Mayor has placed the Old Vestry Hall, St. Mary Street, at the disposal of the committee as the headquarters of the battalion, which will merge into itself all the existing vol- untary organisations within the area. and so I avoid overlapping.

IBRAVE MONMOUTHS

I BRAVE MONMOUTHS. I HEROIC OFFICERS. Further stories are to hand of the great fight- ing and the gallant deeds of the 1st Battalion Monmouthshire Regiment, especially in the en- gagement of May 8th, when the battalion was under the fire of German artillery and machine guns, and lost heavily in officers and men. Sergeant Samuel Phillips, of the Newport Police, and others, have now returned to Mon- mouthshire, after being treated for their wounds, and are able to supply further details of what took place. The bravery of the officers is spoken of as quite marvellous. Captain Mostyn H. Llew- ellin, who is a wounded prisoner in the hands of the enemy, is referred to as brave and cool in the extreme. He was seen descending a trench with a revolver in each hand. One of the returned men says that he won the Victoria Cross a hundred times if their observations of him may be taken as a true criterion of his splendid heroism. Lieut. E. S. Phillips, the ex-Cambridge and Monmouthshire cricketer, died a glorious death. He was fearless beyond measure. At night he was seen walking out of the trench taking ob- j servations in the most casual manner. His dar- 3 ing and his leading were always an inspiring | example to the whole of the battalion. Captain and Adjutant Dimsdale was last seen leading a party of 50 volunteers against a house where it was believed the German-s had installed a machine gun. He is stated to have been shot through the chest, and inquiries by his relatives in England have so far failed to find him. Lieutenant James, the only son of Mr. and Mrs. A. M. James, of Newport, was shot through the shoulder and lung, but he would not allow himself to be removed from the trench until the parapet which had been smashed by artillery fire had been made good. Sergt. Samuel Phillips does not quite remem- ber how his inj ury was caused. He was in the trenches with a number of comrades when a shell exploded. When he recovered conscious- ness he was by the side of a hillock caused by the explosion. He had evidently been blown into the air. He was buried twice, and some of the lower ribs on one side of his body were fractured. He is now progressing favourably.

Advertising

Up-te-date appliances for turning out every class of work at competitive prices, at the "Glamorgan Gazette" Printing Works.

HISTORY OF THE VALE I

HISTORY OF THE VALE I a I LLANTRITHYD VILLAGE AND PARISH. I (ARTICLE VI.) THE COTTAGE- A PICTURESQUE OLD I COUNTRY HOME. (By Mr. T. M. PRICE, Late of Boverton). I Llantrithyd Village and Parish contain several picturesque. old-fashioned thatched houses and quaint-looking rustic cottages, with low, thatched roofs, charming old-world gardens and a fine display of old-fashioned flowers, in- cluding fragant pinks, carnations, walftfowers, and various kinds of sweet roses, luscious fruit, and choice garden produce in the summer sea- son. Among the quaint, old-fashioned houses pro-, bably one of the most interesting and pic-, turesque is the residence and hon-te of Mr James Price, which is appropriately called "The Cottage." The house, which is rather a lofty building with a thatched roof, is situated in the lower western portion of the village called Tre Aubrey (or "The Dopry" by some of the vill- agers). It occupies a very pleasant, elevated site on the right-hand side of the highway lead- ing from Llantrithyd to Llanmaes village and ancient Llantwit Major, with charming views of the pretty Vale countryside. DESCRIPTION OF THE HOUSE. Standing a short distance from the highway the house has a lofty appearance, as the ground floor apartments stand about 7ft. above the level of the roadway. Facing due south the front of The Cottage has a pleasing appearance with its dainty display of old-fashioned plants and flowers; and on the eastern side of the house is a spacious, well stocked kitchen garden, flanked by a good fruit orchard, with protecting boundary walls on the north and southern sides of the garden and orchard. The Cottage is an ancient, two-Storied building, containing four large living rooms and other domestic apart- ments on the ground floor, and six spacious bed- rooms on the second or top floor. AN ANCIENT SUNDIAL. On the south corner of The Cottage is an ancient sundial, which bears the following in- scription: W.G.M. 1701." The date of the sundial does not, however, indicate the age of the house, which, in all probability, is much more ancient, and I have not been able to as- certain definitely when the house was erected. A BRIEF HISTORICAL SKETCH. A brief history of The Cottage will probably be of interest. The Cottage, Llantrithyd, is on the Aubrey Estate. About a century ago, or less, a lease was granted by the Aubrey family to the late Mr. William Eagleton, of Bonvil- ston Village, which comprises part of the Aubrey Estate. The leasehold property com- prised The Cottage and land adjoining at Llan- trithyd; also a house and land at Bonvilston, which is at present occupied by the Rev. Gilbert Thomas, Vicar of Bonvilston; and the Old Post Inn, with lamd adjoining, at Bonvilston Village. The late Mr. Willam Eagleton died in the year 1836, and was laid to rest in the peaceful old parish churchyard of Llantrithyd, together with several other members of the Eagleton family, who were well known and widely respected in the Vale of Glamorgan. He bequeathed this leasehold property jointly between his two sons-the late Mr. William Eagleton and Mr. Thomas Eagleton-and his two daughters, Elizabeth and Mary Eagleton, also had equal shares. Alter the death of the late Mr. William Eagleton, senr., in 1836, his son William got married and took up his resi- dence at The Cottage, Llantrithyd, where he resided until 1890. Thomas Eagleton, his brother, who remained a bachelor, lived in his father's house at Bonvilston with his two sis- ters, who were unmarried. The late Mr. Thomas Eagleton was a well- known figure in the Vale, as he held the im- portant official appointment as Relieving Officer in the Cardiff Union, and also registrar of births, deaths, and marriages for Bonvilston, St. Nicholas, and other parishes in the Vale, com- prising a very large area. He died at Bonvil- ston in the year 1890, after having held the office for over 40 years. His two sisters passed away some years before him. After the death of Mr. Thomas Eagleton, Bonvilston, in 1890, his brother William removed to Bonvilston, where he passed away in 1892 in the 80th year of his age, the leases on the property at Llantrithyd and Bonvilston village expiring at his death. I THE PRICE FAMILY IN POSSESSION. Mr. James Price, the present occupant of The Cottage, rented the house from the late Mr. William Eagleton in 1890, but it is interesting to note that his father, the late Mr. Christopher Price, who died in 1900, at the age of 76, also lived at The Cottage in his boyhood days with his parents, the late Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Price, who resided for several years in the same house; thus four generations of the Price family have resided alternately at The Cottage, Llan- trithyd, at various periods. Mr. James Price was bred and born in the parish of Llantrithyd, and has lived there pro- tically the whole of his life, -excepting the period of six years he served his apprenticeship to the carpentering trade with his uncle, the late Mr. Thomas Price, Heol-y-Ma»eh, in the parish of Welsh St. Donats, which is chiefly on the Aubrey Estate. Mr. James Price is a very in- tellectual, energetic, industriou-s gentleman, and has rendered most useful service to the parish- ioners in various capacities. He has held office as school manager for the past 20 years, and for nineteen years has acted as chairman at Parish Meetings" uninterruptedly without a change. Mr. Price is also permanent secretary for the local "Star of Glamorgan" Oddfellows Lodge, and corresponding secretary to the National In- surance Commissioners in connection with the same lodge, and he has also been for many years corresponding secretary for the late Llancarvan District Lodge, which is now amalagamated with the Cardiff City District. Several members of Mr. James Price's family are laid to rest beneath the sylvan shades of the pretty old Parish Churchyard at Llantrithyd, including his father and mother, the late Mr. Christopher Price and Mrs. Margaret Price. The former died 15 years ago, aged 76, and the latter passed away in the year 1905, in the 74th year of her age. THE RECTORY. I Near the Parish Church of St. Illtyd, Llan- trithy^, is the Rectory, the residence of Rev. Thomas Cynon Davies, B.A., Rector of the parish. The Rectory House is a substantial, square structure, erected about 70 years ago by the late Rev. Roper Trevor Tyler, M.A. The house was constructed with stones and other I building material taken from Llantrithyd Place, the old 'Aubrey Mansion. The house contains five spacious rooms and some smaller domestic apartments on the ground floor, and five large bedrooms on the second floor, with the usual outbuildings attached, and a large kitchen garden with various fruit trees, etc. The old Rectory, which formerly stood on the ,ainr site, was a small thatched house, but it was burnt down over seventy years ago. CAE MAEN FARM. Cae Maen Farm is an ancient farmstead on the Aubrey Estate, just outside the boundary of Llantrithyd Parish. The farm comprises an area of about 120 acres, chiefly pasture land, which is in the adjoining historical parish of Llancarvan, but probably attached to the old sinecure parish of Llanveithyn, which is now included in Llancarvan parish. The farm house, which is an ancient substantial building, occupies a very pleasant, elevated site near the highway leading from the pretty village of Bon- vilston to the hamlet of Llancadle and the pic- turesque villages of St. Athan and Gileston and The Leys, by the shore of the Severn Sea. The present tenants of this farm are Mrs. Eleanor Griffiths and her son, Mr. Mansel Griffiths. The same family have held the tenancy of the farm for over 50 years-a proof, if such were needed, of the good feeling existing between landlords and tenants on the Aubrey Estate. THE OLD VILLAGE INN. Formerly in by-gone days there was a quaint old-fashioned wayside inn, called The Prince Rupert Inn, at Llantrithyd village. This in- teresting old landmark was unfortunately des- troyed by a disastrous fire nearly forty years ago. The village inn was an old-fashioned building with rather a low, thatched roof. The full name of the inn was printed in large black letters in front of the house, which occupied a pleasant site about 30 yards from the cross roads and stood on rising ground above the level of the public roadway, with three or four stone steps leading up to the tap room. The inn generally went by the shorter name of "The Prince." The old house appears to have been newly thatched, and a large quantity of old and new straw which had been left on the ground at the back of the premises, was set on fire by a little boy about 9 a.m. on a Sunday morning. The little boy was a son of the tenant at that time, namely, Mr. John Howells, who was a nephew of the former tenant before him, the late Mr. Edward Howells, Builder and Contrac- tor, Llantrithyd. Although every effort was made to save the building, the flames quickly spread, and caught the roof of the newly thatched room, which completely ruined and demolished the quaint old village inn, which had been for many ages the favourite meeting- place of the neighbouring farmers and farm lab- ourers, etc., where they had often discussed the affairs of their world-the parish—over a mug of sparkling home-brewed ale. The village inn was a free house on the Aubrey Estate, the owner at that period being Mr. Charles Aubrey Aubrey. The license of the village inn was left to lapse, and was never renewed after the inn was demolished. Thus the villagers of Llan- thrithyd parish have ever since had to walk to Bonvilston village, about a mile and a half dis- tant-which is the nearest place where they may get well supplied with the "cup that-cheers," as Bonvilston village contains three licensed houses, namely, the Aubrey Arms Inn, the Old Post Inn, and the Red Lion Inn in the centre of the village. THE FFYNON ECHO WELL, &c. I There are several notable wells or water springs in the parish of Llantrithyd. One of the wells, called The Ffynon Echo," which is situated at the bottom of the Horseland Wood, is built in the shape of a beehive above the level 8f the ground, and the base dimensions under the ground are practically the same, cor- responding in shape. This well has a large opening at the top, which very probably had a door upon it in former times. The well was never known to be dry, and in the old days, when the Aubrey family resided at Llantrithyd Place, it was a valuable asset, as it supplied the household, etc., with pure spring water. Some heavy lead pipes were laid from this well to the Aubrey mansion for conveying the water to the Old Place. Some years after the Aubrey family had de- serted their old mansion, the lead pipes were taken up and sold to the Cardiff Coroporation. loan Trithyd (the bard) remembers when he was a young boy three wagons and three teams of horses coming from Cardiff to fetch these lead pipes. Each of the wagons carried about three tons weight of lead pipes to Cardiff. There are also two wells near the Ffynon Echo Well, built in similar shape, but there is no water in either of them now. These two wells are about 4ft. below the surface of the ground and about the same height above ground. A NOTABLE MINERAL SPRING. In the bottom of the village there is a noted mineral spring, which is reputed to have won- derful healing power for the eyes. Some of the villagers call this "The Brewer Well." The well is never made use of until the other wells in the village are dry, which occurs rather fre- quently in dry seasons. Nobody remembers the Brewer Well ever running dry, and the spring water is much colder in the warm summer weather than in the chilly days of winter. SUPERSTITION IN THE VALE OF GLAMORGAN. Most of the inhabitants in the Vale of Gla- morgan villages were very superstitious in the olden days of our fathers and grandfathers. Time was when, in the belief of almost every- body, the gret-n woods were haunted by fairies, nymphs might be seen dancing on the green banks of fresh running streams by moonlight, and in the courtyards of old castles, in the cham- bers of old towers, and in certain memorable parts of old places there were strange spirits of the past ages to be met with at the midnight hour. The village maiden, as she came back from her evening walk, in the old village churchyard at sunset fancied she saw some Robin GoodfelloW sitting under the hedge or coming forth to salute her. The baron's daugh- ter, in her chamber, watching the embers on a quiet winter's evening, with her foot on the rude irons, and, just as the clock struck 12, liftings up her bright eyes to the grim portrait of the man in armour over the old fireplace, was sure to think that she saw, as plainly as could be, the stalwart figure step out of the canvas, and striding stealthity towards the door, open it with a mysterious key, and then, with his iron boot, go thump, thump, along the echoing corridor. The very warder, as he kept silent watch at the still midnight hour, if he saw nought else, would see something not of mortal mould a crusader, not of flesh and blood; or a lady fair, all clothed in white, no more to be touched than the moon- beam shining through the turret loophole. Those old days are gone by, and we are not sorry. People nowadays are neither pleased nor troubled with apparitions of that kind. Yet we should not all like to have this old world of ours reduced to such a prosaic, matter-of-fact condition as to never see anything but what, according to the law of optics, was painted on the retina of the eye. To say nothing now of great spiritual realities which encircle our globe and inter-penetrate the scenes of our whole life, we must confess that we should be very sorry indeed not to have communion sometimes with the shades of the departed mighty dead as well as to shake hands and talk with the humble living. There are shades of a certain kind we are glad to see. When some of them haunt us it is very pleasant; when others of them appear it is very grand, and they are all more accom- modating than were those apparitions of the olden times. AMUSING GHOST STORY OF LLAN- I TRITHYD. In the old days the people of Llantrithyd were very superstitious, and there is an old story that a white lady (Lady Wen) used to masquerade the grounds of Llantrithyd Old Place on fine, breezy nights. Mr. John Morgan (loan Trithyd) told me a most amsing story of Llan- trithyd. In his father's days the white lady (called in Welsh, Lady Wen) was often seen masquerading about the grounds of the old manor house (Llantrithyd Place), and the ner- vous, superstitious villagers were afraid to pass that way after darkness had set in. The so- called white lady appeared in a parson's sur- plice, but the story goes that one dark night a man named William Morgan (or Will Hy Hwper), who was a bit of a nut, was coming across the path in the Cae Porth (or Porth Field) adjacent to the Old Place. He per- ceived the white lady (Lady Wen) coming to meet him on the pathway. "Come you, .my lady," said he to himself; "you shall knock me over before I will flinch or get off the pathway for you." Ultimately they met face to face, but the White Lady suddenly turned aside and passed by Will Hy Hwper. Will turned quickly after her. Lady Wen began to run, but Will also ran and caught her, overpowered her, and threw her down, and gave her such a drubbing that she never forgot it, and, curiously enough, the so-called white lady (or Lady Wen) turned out to be the parson's son (George Williams), a son of the Rev. George Williams, Rector, who died in 1815. When Will Hy Hwper arrived home in his cottage later that night, he lit a large candle, which is supposed to have driven all the superstition away from Llantrithyd, and no Lady Wen or White Lady has since been seen there to this day. According to an old story, the Rev. George Williams (Rector) was buried by night in the chancel of Llantrithyd Parish Church. Just after the funeral ceremony was over a large stone fell into the vault, and the workmen who were engaged at the grave were so alarmed and frightened that they ran out of the church thinking some evil spirit had descended upon them, and they left the grave open until day- light appeared next morning. Several old cottages in the parish of Llan- trithyd have fallen into decay during the past century, and some new houses have been erected on the Aubrey Estate. In the old days there were some old cottages adjacent to Llantrithyd Old Place. Mr. John Morgan (loan Trithyd) remembers an aged woman, called Kate, living in a quaint old cottage adjacent to the old manor house of the Aubrevs about 80 venrs ago. The old dame acted as a caretaker of the old mansion which had then been deserted by the Aubrey family. The old lady was very fond of young children, and loan Trithyd was among one of her favourite little boys, who perid her occasional visits. Old Kate often permitted some of her favourite boys to romp and play in the stately rooms of the old mansion until they became too noisy and unruly. The old dame was, unfortunately, almost blind, and her appealing entreaties to play quietly were of little avail, and the youngsters easily eluded the old dame when she chased after them, as they dodged her in secret corners of the apartments. The old lady is buried in Llantrithyd Parish Churchyard close by the old mansion. The population of Llantrithyd parish in the year 1801 was 180, in 1811 it was 199, in 1821 it had risen to 220, and in the year 1830 there were 221 inhabitants in 45 houses. In the year 1841 there were 228 in 45 houses. In 1851 there were only 201 in 43 houses; and in 1861 in 40 houses, of which 37 were inhabited, there were 204 per- sons. At the last census in 1911 the population was 138, and in 1915, it is approximately the samo stationary is life in the quiet, his- torical, old-world village of Llantrithyd. (Adverting to the preceding article, published on the 18th June, it should be stated that Mr. Edward Watts resides and holds the tenancy of Ty Uchaf Farm, Llantrithyd.) SPECIAL.—Articles on Llantrithyd Place, the old Aubrey Mansion, and Llantrithyd House, the.residence of Major-General Trevor Bruce Tyler, J.P., will be written shortly.

No title

Three Chester magistrates are working during their spare 'hours on the production of war munitions. An axe fell from the nail on which it was hung in a house at Llanwrst on the thumb of a carpenter, named Samuel Parry, severing the limb.

Advertising

LADIES BLANCHARD'S PILLS Are unrivalled for all Irregularities, etc., they speedily afford relief and never fail to alleviate all suffering, etc. They supersede Pennyroyal, Pil Cochia, Bitter Apple. Blanchard's are the best of all Pills for Women. Sold in boxes Is. lid., by BOOTS' Branches and all Chemists, or post free, same price, from LESLIE MARTYN, Ltd., Chemists, 34, Dalston Lane, London. Sample and valuable booklet post free Id.

Gathered Comments ON THE WAR

Gathered Comments » ON THE WAR. No Foundation in Fact. Speaking at the annual meeting of the Sol- diers' and Sailors' Families' Association at Cax- ton Hall, Westminster, on Friday, Mr. Hayes Fisher, M.P., declared that the unmarried mother and the war baby appeared to some jx-ople through magnifying glasses or shouting through megaphones. They were not really large problems at all. Not 1 per cent. of all the great armies, yiow numbering millions, had produced an unmarried mother. (Applause.) Do not let us he.r any more of the immorality of our armies or our women," he added. Em- phasis was placed on the indispensable value of the association, which has maintained over a million humble, but honest, homes. Collapse From Within. Colonel F. N. Maude, lecturing at the Shaftes- bury Theatre, London, on the war, said that the Germans, Moltke included, had, with Chinese- like fidelity, moulded their system on Napoleon's without entirely comprehending it. The Ger- mans were already in their last four million men, but a gentleman or two whose claims to be regarded as military authorities were ob- scure—the mention of their names aroused the laughter of the audience—placed their highest number at more than eight millions and a half. The Austrians did not count; they were a hind- rance rather than a help. The collapse would come from within; there were already signs of disintegration, and the process would set in in earnest when once the German Army was forced, as by substantial retreat, to draw in its horns in a way that could not be concealed from the people. IIf Conscription. I Addressing a recruiting meeting at ureenwav Manor, Radnorshire, Mrs. Lloyd George said that in the fairs and markets of Wales there were often seen large numbers of young men of military age who had not enlisted. They said they would go when they were sent for. She was proud of the fact that in proportion to population Wales had done better than any other part of the country, but if it became necessary to go in for conscription she would not like to be one of those young men she had referred to. Referring to the use by the Ger- mans of poisonous gas, she expressed the opinion we should turn upon the Germans with the same weapons, they used against our sol- diers. She appealed to young women to take up work in the country as their sisters were doing in the towns, so as to release men for military service, and also urged teachers and scholars in Secondary and High schools to come forward during the holidays for national ser- vice. I The Mother and the Winds. I These verses are written in the "Times," by the "Mother of a Midshipman." She of her want did cast in all that she had. Oh winds who seek, and seek the whole world over, Changing from South to North from heat to cold, Many and strange the things that you dis- cover, Changing from West to East, from new t< old. Seek out and say, my sailor is he living?" Oh foolish mother, dreaming winds would tell The winds are deaf with thunder, dumb with grieving. Who heeds a boy when all the world is Hell ? You seek a boy! For all the millions dying Who drown at sea, or landward fighting fall, The winds have heard the voice of women cry- ing, Where is my love who. dying, takes my I all?, I War Babies. I Over the signature of the Archbishop of York, there is published the report of a committee which has discussed the report of a smaller committee, convened by Mrs. Creighton to in- vestigate the "war baby" question. The full committee accepted the smaller committee's con- clusion that the rumours circulated have been proved beyond doubt to have no foundation in f act. Special inquiries were made in towns and J districts and in no case had any confirmation of the rumours been obtained. The fact that the excitement caused by the presence of large num- bers of soldiers has often led to undesirable con- duct is not overlooked. The extent and gravity of the moral problem involved in the annual statistics of illegitimate births is not forgotten, but no evidence available justifies the belief that the conditions of war have resulted in any ex- ceptional increase. As the problem has not been proved to be of any serious dimensions, it is unnecessary to discuss exceptional measures. The smaller committee stated that expressions of opinion as to the future were none of them alarmist, and pointed out that in many cases the relations between the father and mother oc- curred previous to the men's enlistment. What a German Victory Would Mean-By a German. Here is an extract picture from a German point of view of what German's victory would mean! "In this world war," says the "Inter- national," of New York, "Germany supplies the great dynamic forces of evolution. Her victories and achievements will widen the range of op- portunity for her people. Upon her success de- pends the freedom of Islam and the regenera- tion of Turkey under the enlightened govern- ment of the Young Turks. Everywhere her victory will mean what it means in her own land, industrial and civic progress, religious liberty, education and culture, and whether vic- torious or defeated, her dazzling manifestation of efficiency in every department of national life cannot fail to stimulate other nations to similar high achievements in their social and political adjustments. German s violent hatred of Eng- land expresses her sense of rebellion against hy- pocrisy, her deep-rooted disgust and haughty contempt for national selfishness, for narrow in- sularism, and all that is reactionary in social organisation. Here is the love of enterprise, the habit of energy and boldness, the reaction against a hitherto static and decadent Europe. Germany knocks at the door of the twentieth century. England, allied with barbarous Rus- sia, bars the way and would drive her back into the eighteenth." No Quarrel. The peculiar terror and horror of the pre- sent war in Kurope, apart from the atrocious in- ternational means of destruction used by land. air, and sea against life and property, lie in the fact that whole nations of individuals who had no quarrel of any kind, and hundreds of thou- sands of whom have relatives and friends in the opposite camp, have been launched against one another by the operation of diplomacy," says the Economist." The peculiar atrocity of this conflict is that by means of organisation,, wealth, and credit superior to anything known in the past, the great Continental States have been able to force into the field and lead or drive into the shell and poisonous gas zone all or nearly all the men of military age. This is the greatest marvel and horror of all the other marvels and horrors; for it comprehends and jn- cludes them all." German Submarines. Mr. Gerard Fiennes discusses in the "Ob- server" how many submarines Germany has. He suggests that we have destroyed some which have not been mentioned. "The Admi- ralty are most wise to keep all these matters dark, and, even, not to announce the destruc- tion of 'U' craft at all, unless the circum- stances are such that it is impossible to con- ceal the matter altogether. That is, pre- sumably, the case when the crew is captured. But it does not at all necessarily follow that no more German submarines are destroyed than the Admiralty own to. Indeed, it is pretty generally known that the fact is quite otherwise. Since the beginning of the war only eight have been quite positively declared to have come to a bad end. Germany may possibly be in the possession of 46 of these craft, if no more have been destroyed than have been officially announced. But, from all the indications, I should say that this number is far in excessof the fact." Ecclesiastical Christianity. For Dean Henson "ecclesiastical Christian- ity," as he calls it, is the enemy. Forecasting, in a sermon at the Temple Church, the future of the new Europe that will emerge from the war, he gave it as his belief that the final result of the immense conflict will not be favourable to ecclesiastical Christianity as we have known it hitherto. One reason for his belief is that "ecclesiastical Christianity is coming so badly out of the European crisis that its services to the highest interests of mankind may well be challenged." A second is that religion has been proved by the test of war to be independent of denominational limits. In support of the for- mer reason he instances the failure of the Pa- pacy to rise to the height of the authority which it claims to possess, for it has fallen "conspicu- ously behind the rest of the civilised world in perceiving and repudiating the moral turpi- tude of German diplomacy and the horrors of German warfare." The Supernatural. Dr. R. F. Horton, preaching at Manchester, made reference to reports of supernatural oc- currences on the battlefield. Dr Horton believes that, at all events, some of these reports are completely authenticated. He was preaching from the 91st Psalm, where the safety of "those who dwell in the secret place of the most High" is described. "Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night, nor for the arrow that flieth by day There shall no evil befall thee. He shall give His angels charge over thee to keep thee in all thy ways"—these are some passages in the Pslam which Dr. Horton said might have been written for this time and these months. "There are," he said, "wonder ful stories 'coming to us in this time of war- some of them verified and some of them floating about and difficult to verify and to fix-but they are stories which show quite distinctly how men to-day are kept in the secret places of the most High under the shadow of the Almighty, in the midst of unexampled peril." Respecting a. story told in the Press, Dr. Horton said1 he did not know how far they must take it literally. "Now and again a wounded man on. the field is conscious of a comrade in white com- ing with help and even delivering him. Is it, not an extraordinary fact," Dr. Horton added,, "that, although the carnage is so fearful, there- are evidences accumulating every day of men- men who come back to tell us of a living God' who is able to help, and of a Saviour who shows Himself in the hour of peril and when all earthly succour seems to fail, Lloyd George, .1 Addressing & crowded meeting of men on "The1  Nation and the War," at the Theatre, YojJ^the Archbishop of York said we were &gh?? a spirit which wantonly threw aside all those re- I straints which had hitherto marked the differ- ence between civilisation and savagery. How were we to get to grips with this nation? The Ii answer was in two words—"Munitions and or- 'II ganisation." They little knew how strange he- found it, as one whose calling was to be an am- bassador of the Prince of Peace, to be advis- ing fellow-citizens to use all their energising power to send out awful engines of destruction. His Grace referred to the cry for munitions i coming from the front, and proceeded: There, was once a person who made a speech at Lime- > house and introduced terrifying Budgets. He < understood the name was Lloyd George. Now everyone, even Dukes, would be ready to say that Mr. Lloyd George seemed to be the one above all others who really told people the truthj of the situation and about themselves who had the courage to face the facts, and who, with vivid and moving eloquence, was able to reach the mainspring of the life and imagination of I the people. He believed the nation was ready and willing to meet the strain, and if they had a "r willing spirit they need not think about com- pulsion. The critical word now was not com- pulsion, but direction. The Government should make, "ithont delay, a register of all the avail- able strength of manhood and womanhood, but the people who were to make the sacrifices must know they were to be made for the nation and not for individual benefit.

No title

The expert, who Mr. Lloyd George stated in the House of Commons on Thursday night he was sending over to the States to discuss the whole matter of American and Canadian muni- tions contracts on the spot, is Mr. D. A. Thomas. A Press representative saw Mr. D. A. Thomas at Newport on his return from London, and when questioned on the subject the head of the Cambrian Combine replied that he could not say anything about the matter, there being- obvious reasons why no one should know when. he was going.

Advertising

-BEVAN COMPA NY, Ltd., Special Purchase of a Manufactures Stock of 60 Superior Dining Room Suites A,i Drawing. Thoroughly Strong, well finished, and well upholstered in excellent leather cloth, worth 6 guineas each. Offered at only i4 19s. 6d. per suite. Hundreds of Dining, Drawing & Bedroom Suites from 3 guineas upwards! Near ;¡,. mpire & 79, st. Mary Street, V T; U WALES' LARGEST FURNISHERS Be van & Company FOR Iiptpepse Selectiop I I Rod* Botton; Prices! Newest Desitvs I Trai., fares Paid I Everytbi., for Furvisbiip4 Free Delivery! i Cardiff, Newport, Swansea, etc.

Peeps at Porthcawl

Peeps at Porthcawl; J By MARINER. *»» There are many rumours circulating about the town concerning the Bantams. It is said they are going to leave us. and will take up their abode in other parts. One does not know how much credence is to be placed in these statements, for one continually heais them, and long after the time events are sup- posed to happen the men are still in our midst, happy and contented. The military situation is continually changing, and while it is quite possible that we may wake up one morning and find that all the men have left us, we hope they will remain some time longer. It is indeed a pleasing fact that since Porthcawl became the centre for the re- cruits of the Welsh Army Corps there has been not the slightest cause for complaint as to their conduct. They have shown their patriotism by joining the Army, and they have shown their good sense and regard for the King's uniform by maintaining the ex- cellent reputation gained by the first draft of roen to the town. We should be sorry to 4 part with them now, but they joined for a., purpose, and are anxious to soon be doing: something to accomplish that object. They want to have a go at the Kaiser's Army, as one sunburnt lad told me this week, and I know the powers that be will give the Ban- tams the chance at the earliest opportunity. Every day the men improve in their work- and it is work, I can assure my readers—and in appearance. I like to see their sunburrnt faces, and as for their physique—well, it has improved wonderfully, and they are now fine specimens of manhood, ready and anxious to put their whole physical force and every bit of scientific knowledge they have gained in the methods of warfare into the scales and to the test to hurl back the German line over the Rhine, and compel it to defend the lamd whence comes—or once came—the German sausage. w If the Bantams are going to leave us, as they must do one day, may I make a sugges- tion in the hope that it will meet with the approval of Colonel Homfray? The matter was raised by a friend of mine this week, and as it is one of tremendous importance to the town. I venture to ventilate it in my column. As many other towns are suffering, so Porth- cawl is—from an inadequate supply of water. This has been the cry for some years past. This year, owing to tlie foresight of Mr. T. E. Deere, J.P., the assistance of the Penybont Council was secured to help our town over the summer, and by allowing us the surplus from their supply. It was hoped that this would tide Porthcawl over the strain of the summer months caused by the necessity of supplying water to Newton Camps. Unfor- tunately the Penybont supply has failed us. They cannot allow us any more water—at pre- sent at any rate. Now, we have plenty of water ourselves to meet our present require- ments, if we could only get it through the pipes in sufficient quantities. That is the difficulty, and to remove that trouble it was decided some time ago to put in 8-in. pipes. Consent fo the Local Government Board was obtained as a result of the good offices of Mr. Deere and the legal clerk to the Council. But the difficulty now is to get labour to lay the 8-inch pipes. How to get over the difficulty was a puzzle for the Council and the contrac- tor but my friend's suggestion-it is not mine, and I do not claim it as my own-is that Colonel Homfray should be approached and asked if he would allow a number of his men to help the Council out of the hole. And the trench digging would be of valuable ser- vice.. < w < The proposition should be put to him fairly. The main purpose would be to save Porthcawl from embarrassment during the summer. In the second place, it would not be expected that the men should give their labour and so relieve the contractor from payments he would otherwise have to make. On the last occasion the Bantams did do the town a ser- vice, I understand they did not get the best of treatment at the hands of the Council. Let thera be paid the standard rate of wages. The contractor, I am sure. would not grum- ble, and no doubt it would pay the Council to get the work done as quickly as possible. It would be of more value to Porthcawl than the wages paid to the men. We do not want the thing done for nothing, and I hope the Council will not ask for it. I am sure if this fair offer was made, Colonel Homfray, with a desire to help the town in its trouble, would willingly assent to the proposal. The work on the sewers in John Street is mow completed, and there is a through road (from the station to the Esplanade. Motor- ists and cyclists will be pleased to know this, because I must admit they have put up with a good deal of inconvenience in the best of good humour. Work is now proceeding in Wells Street, and then the men are off to Nottage. I • • • A good joke is now going the rounds con- cerning work in John Street. The last bit of filling in had been completed when one of the warkmen, throwing up his shovel shouted, "Brave, we are through the Dardanelles." Of course he referred to the long job in John Street. But some passers-by heard the words, and, like lightning, it was spread through the town that the Allies had suc- ceeded in getting through the Dardanelles. Great excitement prevailed in the town—until the official reports were published. a A more stirring scene than that which took place at Newton Camp on Monday night has seldom been witnessed, certainly not in Poi-theawl. As is well known, Mr. D. J. Rees, the energetic Y.M.C.A. secretary, has arranged concerts at the Y.M.C.A. tent. On Monday night a splendid programme was ar- ranged, and one of the artistes—I only men- tion the name because of what happened and not because I think less of the others, who were all good-was Miss Parsons, of Cardiff. She sang "Abide with me." with such pathos and dramatic force that when the chorus was taken up with stirring emphasis by the sol- diers, even the artiste was affected, and she continued with tear-stained cheeks, while tears coursed down the faces of many a man in khaki uniform. I understand Mr. J. P. Leat, who since he has come amongst us has performed many fine actions, has undertaken to provide another concert for the Bantams at his own expense, and it is his intention to supply every man with a packet of cigarettes. Colonel Phillips, R.A., commander of the Severn Defence, was the chairman at Mon- day's concert, and thoroughly enjoyed, the musical treat. • t • A question: Why the hilarity amongst the Bantams subalterns one evening recently ?

SHOPS ACT NOTICEI

SHOPS ACT NOTICE. v PORTHCAWL ICE-CREAM VENDOR FINED At Bridgend Police Court on Saturday, Frank Berni, ice cream vendor, John Street, Porthcawl, was summoned for having failed to fix a notice in his shop prescribing the day of the week on which the shop assistants took their half-holiday. Rhys Williams, inspector under the Shops Act, gave evidence, and defendant was fined 10s.

GERMAN DREADNOUGHTSI

GERMAN DREADNOUGHTS. I ARMED WITH 15-IN. GUNS. I According to a letter received from a German naval officer interned in Holland, Germany since the war began has not only added to her sub- marines (says the New York correspondent of the "Daily Mail"), but she has also completed and commissioned a Dreadnought of 25,600 tons and a battle cruiser of 26,200 tons and 28 knots of the Derfflinger class. In both ships 15in. guns have been substituted for the 12in. guns which they were originally designed to carry. These alterations were prompted by reports of the destruction wrought by the 15in. guns of the Queen Elizabeth. Two very fast cruisers have also been completed, according to the writer, and by the end of the year Germany -will have at her disposal four more Dread- noughts and a number of battle cruisers. These latter ships, the writer remarks, are rapidly nearing completion and will, it is said, be armed with guns even heavier than the 15in. At the Cockerill works, near Liege, he says, twelve small submarines have been built, dis- placing from 200 to 250 tons apiece. They are in sections, and can be taken to pieces and moved by rail. Their submerged speed is 12 knots and their surface speed 16. They cam fire two torpedoes simultaneously. Six of the boats were ready on June 1st. The Germania, Krupps, Vulcan, Howaldt, Blohm and Voss, and Schichau yards, the officer states, have since the beginning of the war turned out 24 submarines, each of 1,200 tons, with a submerged speed of 16 and a surface speed of 20 knots. These boats carry four tor- pedo tubes and two heavy quicknring guns. They have a steaming radius of 3,000 miles, and are fast enough to overhaul all but the fastest liners. The same yards are stated by the officer to have turned out twelve submarines of 800 tons each, with a submerged speed of 15 and a surface speed of 20 knots, carrying four torpedo tubes and two quick-firers each. Finally, they have completed besides the above twelve smaller sub- marines of 300 tons each with (two?) torpedo tubes and one quickfirer, a surface speed of 18 knots and a submerged speed of 14. Half these 1 submarines are already in commission.