Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 8 of 8
Full Screen
15 articles on this page
SERIOUS ALLEGATIONS MADE DURING I POLICE COURT HEARING

SERIOUS ALLEGATIONS MADE DURING I POLICE COURT HEARING. SAYS DEFENDANT VISITED HIM WHILE MOTHER WAS AWAY. I ALLEGED THEFT OF £ 110. I DEFENDANT COMMITTED FOR TRIAL. j Remarkable allegations were made against j a' married woman I during the hearing of a I charge of theft at Bridgend Police Court yes- terday (Thursday). The case occupied the Bench several hours, and it was one in which Elizabeth Pitchford, Victoria Street, Caerau, wife of Thomas Pitchford, was charged with havintr stolen the sum of tllo in gold and a wooden box, the property of Elizabeth Roberts, widow, Caerau Road, Caerau. Mr. Trevor Hunter (instructed by Mr: J. R. Snape) was for the prosecutrix, and Mr. Lin-, coin Reed (instructed by Alderman E. E. Davies) appeared for defendant. irabeth Roberts, Caerau Road. Caerau. a Vw, said her husband died about two years j a, and left some property. The estate was pr(ed at £1,.3.59 17s. 7d. Witness had kept money in the house in a wooden box, which was placed in a tin box. The box was kept in her bedroom. Witness did not make it a practice to keep the wooden box fastened, but the tin box was closed with a padlock. Witness continued that she left Caerau on Whit-Monday to go to Newcastle Emlyn. In the money box when she left was Clio, wrapped in two pieces of paper. All the money was in gold. Witness saw the money was secure before she left, and after locking the padlock, fastening the tin box, she took the key with her. She left her unmarried son William in charge of her house. He had been living with her for the last two months, and at one time lodged with defendant. She left the key of the house with her son. Wit- ness afterwards received a letter from an- other son of her's, and in consequence she re- turned to Caerau on the following Thursday. She examined the tin box in her bedroom. She found the fastening of the box had been forced off. The wooden box was on the wash- ing stand, but there was no money either in the wooden box or the tin box. When she left the house on the previous Saturday she placed a cloth over it. Mr. Lincoln Reed: How long have you known Mrs. Pitchford?—I do not know her. You knew your son was lodging with her?- I knew that. Did you know that Mrs. Pitchford was a married woman, and her husband and three sons lived with her ?—Yes. When did you, count this money last of all before you went away?—A week before I went. Was the Clio money that you had saved since your husband's death?—Yes. He died on 6th July, 1913?-Yes. HUSBAND'S WILL. I By his will you have got for your life the rent of the houses that he left?—Yes. How many houses did he leave?—Seven. How much does the rent of these houses amount to a month?— £ 1 8s. for seven, and J61 4s. for one. Have you got any other income except those houses on which to live ?—I have the earn- ings of my sons. How much money had you of your own at the time your husband died?—More than two hundred pounds. pafter your husband's death, how many Jteople had you to support?—Myself and son. Your other two sons, David John Roberts and Evan Rees Roberts, are trustees of your husband's will, aren't they?-Yes. And was the only interest given to your son William a life interest in one of the houses? —Yes. With the exception of that do the other two sons take the whole of the interest on the estate?—Yes. Was a good deal of ill-feeling created as a result of the will ?—Yes. William did not like it?-No. Did he think your husband had treated him unfairly ?—Yes. Do you know why it was that your husband left such a small interest to your son William. The Chairman said he did not think the Bench could allow the question at that stage. Mr. Lincoln Reed (to witness): Has your "on William been a sober man and of temper- ate habits ?—He drinks a glass of beer, but I have had no trouble with him. When you went away on the Saturday did you arrange for anyone to come in to look after him during your absence ?-No. Was the tin box broken in 'any way when you went away?—No. Did William know that you kept money in that box ?—Yes, but he did not know how much. The letter that you received bringing you home was from one of your other sons, not William?- Yes. William did not write to you?—No. We have been told that William, on the Sunday evening, discovered that your box 1ad been forced did he know where you had 40ne to?—Yes. But he did not write to you ?—He can't vrite. WILLIAM'S STORY. William Roberts, son of the last witness, aid he was a driver underground. For the last ew months he had been lodging with his nother. He had previously been lodging /ith Mrs. Pitchford. Her husband lived with ier, and she had three sons living at home /ith her. On Whit-Saturday, 22nd May, he aw his mother off at the station. His two rothers and their wives went away as well. 'hat afternoon witness went to defendant's ouse and saw her. Her husband was not in t the time. She told witness that he had one to Maesteg. Defendant's little girl laud was at home. Witness arranged for efendant to come to his house, and they went igether with the little girl. When they got ) his house they went to the kitchen, and om there to the garden. Witness saw Mrs ims, the next-door neighbour with a Mrs. aylor, in her garden, and they said to Mrs. itchford, Mrs. Roberts would not be will- ig for you to cut her trees." They had it some lilac off the tree. On returning > the house, they looked over the house. He towed her his mother's room upstairs, and fendant asked him what was in the old tin )X, and he told her that that was where s mother kept her money. A VISIT TO THE BEDROOM. Witness afterwards went downstairs, and Id defendant before he went that he was go- g out to .fetch a tin of tongue for supper, id said he would not be long. Witness left -fendant up in his bedroom when he went iwnstairs. The time was then about ten clock. Witness was out about a quarter of i hour. When he got back both Mrs. Pitch- id and her little girl were in the kitchen. ley all had supper together. Defendant t the house about 11.40, her little girl ac- mpanying her. Witness saw thent to the or, and then went to bed. On the fol- vingday. Sunday, he went into his mother's d.room about .2 o'clock to water the flowers. ) as his mother had told him. He noticed two pay dockets on the floor. He then lifted the cloth up on the box, and found the catch had been broken. He looked into the box and fo'ind £ 36 10s. in gold. Witness knew that his mother kept money in this box, but he did, not knew at that time how much money was there. 'Witness placed the wooden box back inside the tin box and replaced the cloth. On the Monday he left the house and went to Swansea. The howse was fastened up before he left. On the Tuesday he went out again, leaving all the doers and windows locked and fastened. About 1 o'clock be went to Mrs. Pitchford's house, and left again about 2,30.; He had sent out for a collar and front, and as I he was going down the street he asked Mrs.1 Pitchford to coring it down to the house When! she came. I A KNOCK AT THE DOOR. I Witness trld her he had a case of .flagons < in the house. She said she was goiiKg ,away (itl tha Wednesday, as.d witness taM her he would not mind going with her. Mrs. Pitch- ford brought the front and collar to the house. They went upstairs to his room. the little girl remaining downstairs on the couch. Witness came downstairs first, and defendant, who witness added haiJ- -sent the little girl for fish and chips before she went upstairs, called out that the child was late coming back. Hf went out to lock for her. Witness found her crying, and she said she had lost the 2s. roo. her mother had given her. He went back to the house, and defen- dant let him in, and they went out to fetch the JittJe girl. While Mrs. Pitchford was in the house witness heard someone knocking. Witness did not answer, as defendant told him not to open the door. Defendant left the house about 11J30 with the little girl. The next day witness went to his mother's bed- room before he had breakfast. He noticed the lid of the box was wide open, and on look- ing inside he missed the wooden box. He saw that on the washing stand. There was no money either in the wooden box or the tin box. Later his brother came, and said the money had gone, and he accused the defen- dant $or the loss of it. Her husband came to the house and kicked up a row, and defen- dant asked him if he had gold in the house. He looked puzzled a bit and looked pale, and then said "Yes." The defendant did not say anything about being accused of the theft. His brother said to the defendant that he saw the little girl come out of his mother's house the night before. Mrs. Pitchford said she had not been to the house, only the little girl. Mr. Lincoln Reed: You have given us a very interesting narrative. With regard to the Wednesday night when you went to the house with your brother, what condition were you in?—I had a few drinks. Were you drunk ?-No. I put it to you, your brother had to sup- port you?—No, he did not. BOTH ACCUSED. I put it to you no suggestion was made that Mrs. Pitchford had taken the money, but simply the little girl?—No, he accused them both. Do you know the following morning they both went to the Police Station with refer- ence to this charge?—Yes, sir. I put it to you, almost the whole of the story you told with regard to what happened on the Tuesday is a fabrication?—It is the truth. The only occasion you saw Mrs. Pitchford in her house on the Tuesday was in the morning, and you asked her if she had a oollar and front, and a little boy went to fetch it ?-Yes. Was the daughter Alice Maud there at that time?—Yes. Did she hunt in the drawers for one ?—Yes. Do you recollect what coin you gave the boy?-A bob, I think. I put it to you that you gave him a half- crown and you took that from the midst of a lot of gold which you took from your trouser pocket?—No, there was no gold there. MEANT TO ENJOY HIMSELF. I Did Mrs. Pitchford say to you that you seemed pretty well off ?-She did not. Did you say that your family had all gone away leaving you behind, and you meant to enjoy yourself as they did?—Yes, I did. What remark did you make to Mrs. Pitch- ford to make her ask you such a question?— I just told her voluntarily. Did you tell Mrs. Pitchford that you had been to Swansea the day before?—Yes. Did you tell her you had had a good time, and you came over Cymmer Mountain with a bottle of port in your pocket ?-I did not say I any such thing. Why did you leave hojpe ?—Because we had a little row, and I went away. Was it about your father's will?-No, it wasn't. Have you only got the life interest in one house after your mother's death?—Yes. Your brothers have the rest?—Yes. Did you quarrel over that?—Not much. Was that because you were "a worthless son" (-No. Are you an irregular workman?—No, sir. Have you lost seven weeks during the last twelve months ?—Yes. Is it true that your indebtedness has been paid off by instalments?—Yes. You have not been on friendly terms with your brothers?—Yes, I am. I put it to you, the story about Mrs. Pitch- ford being in the house in the evening is un- true?-It is true. Did you see her in the Ca.erau-road ?-No, she was in my house. When you saw Mrs. Pitchford and the little girl in the street at 10 o'clock you gave her a penny for having taken the collar there?— No. I did not give her a penny. When the boy brought the collar you did not keep it?-No, I wanted a front. Why didn't you buy your own collar?—Be- cause the little boy was there. Were you too drunk to go?—No, I was not. I put it to you that you made no sugges- tion that she should buy you the collar, but that the little girl could bring it ?—I did. Do you suggest that Mrs. Pitchford is of drunken habits?- W e afle always drinking to- gether. You suggest she is a drunken woman ?- No, but I have been to her house drinking. Was her husband there?—No. Were the children there?- Yes. Did he know you were there?—He knew there were lfagons there. You said you happened to go out the back and saw Mrs. Pitchford pushing the little girl over the wall. Is that untrue ?-No, it is quite true. If she went to the back door, there was al- ways the chance of seeing the neighbours ? —Yes. AN ALLEGATION. Why did this woman go to your bedroom Witness Replied making an allegation. Then you suggest that she is also an im- moral woman ?-Yes. How long were you upstairs ?-Ten minutes. You came down separately?—-Yes, I came down first. And the little girl was on the couch all the time?—Yes, downstairs. But you said in your evidence in chief that you went out to find the little girl. Is that so ?-Yes. What were you doing the other part of the time you were there?—We were talkivg;ai&,d drinking. And the little girl was theoe?—Yes, You didn't go into your mother's bedroom on the Tuesday night with Mrs. P&chford ?— o. The twexi morning you got up m 8.30, and before you had breakfast you want into your mother's room to water the flowers, and found the tin box was open and the £ 36 10s. miss-: irng. Before this morning, whefn had you been in the kadroom previously?—On Sunday. Tken the suggestion ymake is that whilst you were away for fifminutes looking for. the little girl, Mrs. Prtchford had taken the: money ?—Yes. When did you take the wooden box back to the bedroom?—I never took it from there. How do you acceunt that the accused has, stolen the box when the box was there all the' i time?—She is not charged with stealing the; box. But she is. Now, didn't you take the box back to the bedroom yourself ?—-N o, I did not. What were ,you doing with yourself on Whit- LNIonday?-Enjoyin,, myself. If you had not told Airs. Pitchford that you walked over the mountain, she would not have known ?—No. TO THE RACES. I Where did you go to at Swansea?-To the I races. ODid you win much money?—-No. Did you lose much?-No. What were you doing on Sunday?—I didn't go out. Was that because the pubs. were closed?— No. What did you do, get over your condition ? —No. What were you doing, then?—Cooking my grub. Did you meet Mrs. Pitchford on the Caerau Road on the Saturday at 9 o'clock ?-I did not. Having met them, did you say you would go to the house and get some lilac ?--That was in the house. Whose house?—Mrs. Pitchford's. Did you pick the lilac?—No, I didn't; the little girl did. I put it to you neither Mrs. Pitchford nor the child were ever near your house ?—She was there. Immediately after they got the lilac they went out through the garden gate ?—They did not. What did you take Mrs. Pitchford to your mother's room for?-To show her round. Was the tin box covered up?—Yes. Where in the bedrom did the box stand?— By the fireplace behind the bed. What was there about this box, covered up as it was, that should cause Mrs. Pitchford to ask what was in it?—I don't know. What did you tell her?-That my mother was keeping her money in it. Had you any idea how much there was there?-No. Have you ever discussed it with your bro- thers ?-No. You then went into the other bedroom?— Yes. STATEMENT REPEATED. I You make this scandalous statement about this apparently respectable married woman. Don't you know that this part of your story is absolutely untrue?—It is quite true. Did you tell the solicitor that is instructing my learned friend that it was on Wednesday morning that you saw the papers?—I said on Saturday. Is it true that on Sunday evening you no- ticed that the padlock had been forced?—On Sunday. You have not been living in your own home for many years until November last?—No, I got home at September. Did you come home in debt?—Yes. Whatever damage was done to the box was done on Saturday night ?-I could not say whether it was broken before or after mother went away. If what your mother says is true, it follows that the box must have been broken on the Saturday night?—I don't know. Mr. Lincoln Reed produced the box and pointed out the damage. Is it your suggestion that this woman forced this box open during your few minutes' absence ? Do you know how she did it ?—No. Can you suggest anything?—No. BROTHER IN THE WITNESS-BOX. I I David John Roberts, brother of the last wit- ness, said he went away with his mother on the Saturday and returned on Whit-Monday. He went to work on Monday evening and also on Tuesday evening. He passed his mother's house as he went to the colliery. When near the house he saw a little girl come out of his mother's house through the front door. Wit- ness knocked at the front door of the house, but got no answer. He tried the side en- trance door, but that was locked. He then went on to work. On the following day his brother came to see him, and they went to see Mrs. Pitchford about 9 o'clock. Witness said there was money missing from Caerau- road, and if she had it, kindly to give it back. She said she had never been inside the house at all. Witness said if she had not been in- side the house, he had seen the daughter com- ing out. She said, "Yes, you may haye seen the daughter come from there." The child had taken a front up, and she (Mrs Pitchford) was waiting by the fish shop for her to come back. She said, "Are you coming up for my gold, or, rather, for my husband's gold? Say, Tom," referring to her husband; "haven't we got gold in the house P" Her husband never answered. She repeated, "Say, Tom," and Tom slowly answered, Yes." Witness then came from the house. He had exam- ined the tin box before he went to Mrs Pitch- ford's and found it broken open. He saw the small box on the washstand, but there was no money there. WHAT THE NEXT-DOOR NEIGHBOUR I SAYS SHE SAW. Florence Sims, wife of Henry Sims, of I Caerau Road, Caerau, next-door to Mrs. Roberts', said she remembered Mrs. Roberts being away. She saw people in the garden— I Mrs. Pitchford and the little girl, and Wm. I Roberts also. That was on the Saturday, about 9.30. A Mrs. Taylor was with her in the garden. Mrs. Pitchford was picking lilac off the tree. She said, for Mrs. Pitchford or William to hear, that she was sure that Mrs. Roberts did not know that woman was picking that from the tree. They went off the gar- den then. They went up the path and into a little glass porch leading to the kitchen door. Mrs. Pitchford went into the porch first. and then William and the little girl fol- lowed. There was no sound in the back- garden afterwards. Alice Taylor, married woman, of Caerau- road, said she was at the last witness' house on Whit-Saturday, and she called her out into the garden. She saw William Roberts and a little girl there. She heard a woman's voice, but could not see her. SUSPECTED. I Sergt. Davies said he went to Mrs. Pitch- ford's house on the 29th May. She and her husband were present. He addressed ac- cused on the matter of the lost money, and told her that she was suspected of having stolen the money. She said she had never been inside the house. She had a good hus- band ana two of her sons, were working. She could lay her hands. on P,160, which was in the cash box on the table at that moment. It was their own money, which they had been saving. They ihad part of it in the Post Office Savings Bank-, but withdrew it when the war broke out. William Roberts used to lodge with her, fiefid he owed her some money, and he went there the previous Saturday evening to pay a few shillings off the account. He called Sfcgain on the Tuesday and borrowed a clean cellar and front from her. On Wed- nesday morning he called again, and accused her of having stolen some money from the house. She knew nothing about the money. Har husband and two sons brought her on an average LS every week. A search warrant was obtained, and he called on the 1st June. The defendant said she would show him all the money she had. She then went into the front room and brought a cash box contain- ing JE161 in gold, and JE4 in Treasury notes; and placed it on the kitchen table. She also produced L6 in Treasury notes from her poc- ket, and said that was all the money they had, and she could prove when the time came that it Was their own. He then took charge of the money. £ 51 was returned, and he took charge of RIIO. Mr. Lincoln Reed: When you went in on the first occasion, was Mrs. Pitchford count- ing some money?—No. Were there some pay tickets there ?—Yes. Did you examine them ?-No. They are industrious men, these Pitch- ford's?—Yes. Thomas John Thomas, postmaster, Bridg- end, said the instructions of the Head Office were that before giving evidence he should have the direction of the Bench. I DEFENDANT'S BANKING ACCOUNT. The Chairman said the Bench wished to have the particulars, and witness proceeded that Mrs. Pitchford had a banking account, and that closed in November last. The ac- count opened on 12th October, 1912, by a pay- ment of El 5s., and the only withdrawals were of £3 in November, 1913* and November 5th, 1914, of £40 10s. 6d. Mr. Lincoln Reed: Since the outbreak of war have you found many people draw the money out?—I have not. That is very satisfactory. Thomas Rees, sub-postmaster, of Caerau, said he made a payment of t40 to Mrs. Pitch- ford in November, 1913. Thomas Rees, clerk, Caerau Colliery, said defendant's husband and two sons worked at the colliery. He produced particulars of the wages received by the men for the last twelve months. The husband earned E135 10s. 3d.; Thomas H. Pitchford, tl36 3s. Id. and D. J. Pitchford, t69 10s. lid., making a total of zC341 3s. 4d. Rachel Davies, of Caerau-road, Caerau, a shopkeeper, said she knew Mrs. Roberts, and remembered her being away at Whitsun last. Whilst she was away she remembered her son William coming into the shop about 10 o'clock. He bought a tin of tongue. She could see that he had had a glass or two, but nothing out of the way. Mr. Lincoln Reed submitted there was no evidence to go for trial, but the Chairman said the Bench considered a prima facie case had been made out.

I THE DEFENCE I

THE DEFENCE. I Mr. Lincoln Reed then entered a plea of not guilty, and addressing the Bench said a num- ber of respectable witnesses had been called whose characters he had not made, deliber- ately or indirectly, the slightest attack upon, nor did he make it; neither did he want to, with the exception of the one witness, Wm. Roberts. His was the only testimony that he did not accept, and he ventured to say that no jury having seen and heard him, bear- ing in mind the facts, could possibly accept the testimony which he gave. Could the Bench have any doubt in the face of that evi- dence. He was plainly the ne'er-do-well of the family. This man was left at home in entire charge of the house, and he knew where the money was. On Sunday night some of the money disappeared. He suggested that the story given by the witness William Roberts was un- true, and he thought, after the evidence had been heard, the Bench would say that was a case where the charge had not been made out. HUSBAND'S EVIDENCE. I Thomas Pitchford. husband of the defend- ant, said the jE160 taken from the house was his property by his savings. He had pur- chased a house in Carmen-street, and sold it in August, 1911, for £ 220; the mortgage was taken over, and he received the balance of JE60. He had kept the money in the house, and he had added to that. His wife had been banking money of her own, which she got by keeping lodgers. He had got the money long before last Whitsuntide. Mr. Trevor Hunter You have been working very regularly?—Yes. You are pretty saving ?—Yes. You hadn't reduced the mortgage during the time you had it. You paid nothing off it during the year you had it?—I did all I could. How much had you saved by last Septem- ber ?— £ 80. With or without the £ 40 from the bank?- Without the L40. Did that include the zC60 you had from the houses ?—Yes. r 4i YEARS' SAVINGS. I So that between 1910 and November, 1914 you managed to save £20, in 4-21 years ?—Yes. Had you saved any more money up to last November 9-No. Who kept the money, you or your wife?- My wife. > Can you tell me why that was not put in the post officel-I wanted it kept at home. You knew she had this money herself?— Yes. Did you ask your wife why she was putting her money in the post office and not putting yours ?-.No. Where did you keep your money?-In a drawer upstairs. Was the drawer locked ?-No, open. Was it loose in the drawer, or wrapped up? —Oh, 'loose. You were present when the police sergeant called ?—Yes. Why didn't you tell him you hacLR60 from selling a house ?—I didn't think anything about it. Alice Maud Pitchford, the six years old daughter of the defendant, gave evidence. William told them to go through the back gate after they had got the lilac, as the woman next-door was looking, and she would tell the missus when she came back, and he cursed her. They did not go into the house. On the Whit-Tuesday William came to the house and asked for a clean front. as his mother had gone away. She went to his house on the Tuesday evening and took him a front. Her mother was not with her that night. She took a parcel to the house one night because he was too drunk to take it. William Roberts never gave her half a crown to go and buy fish and chips with, neither had he found her in the street crying for having lost the half-crown. COMMITTED FOR TRIAL. On this evidence, the defendant was com- mitted to take her trial at the next Assizes. She was released on a bail of P-50 in herself, and a surety of £ 50.

THE CHAIRMAN ACCUSED I

THE CHAIRMAN ACCUSED I I OF HOLE-IN-THE-CORNER BUSINESS. I BUT MR. LEWIS AFTERWARDS I WITHDRAWS REMARK. I The question of. assistant surveyor's salary was again raised at Maesteg Urban District I Council on Tuesday, Mr. H, Laviers presid- ing. After the reading of the minutes, Mr. T. E. Hopkins thought the paragraph relating to the decision of the Council to increase the salary of the assistant surveyor should be de- leted. It was not, he said, his usual custom when he was defeated to raise any objection, but in this instance he considered the atten- tion of the Council should be called to the fact that the motion was entirely out of order. He noticed that the clerk had placed the matter on the agenda for confirmation. Mr. David Davies wanted to know if the Council was in order in discussing the matter at that period. On the Chairman's suggestion it was de- cided to confirm the minutes as being correct, and The Clerk then dealing with the matter said at the last meeting there was some heated discussion with regard to the question, and an objection was raised to the resolution on the ground that it was not in conformity with clause 28 in the Standing Orders. On look- ing over the Standing Orders he found that while clause 28 did not apply, clause 44 did, and, according to that, no motion to increase the salaries of any official was in order unless notice was given, and for that reason he had put the matter on the agenda. Apparently all the resolutions that had been passed with reference to increases in the salary of officials had been out of order because in no case of the kind had notice been given. Curiously enough this was the only case in which ob- jection had been raised, but aU the same the- objection was a sound one. Mr. D. Davies asked to be allowed to speak a few words. He agreed with Alderman Davies with regard to the matter. The rea- son he had taken the matter up in the way he had was because when it first come on they decided to let the application lie on the table for a while-not for the war; if it was for the war he would agree to that-but when Mr. Gomer Davies was chairman he allowed matters to be carried through umder the same circumstances. It was because he (Mr. Gomer Davies) knew he had sufficient votes behind him to carry the thing through that he had brought the matter on. Mr. Gomer Davies had broken the rules himself, and then cried out against others. Continuing, Mr. Davies said he was quite agreeable to give notice of motion. It was only right that they shouM carry things out according to rules, and be honest with one another. NO OBJECTION BEFORE. I Mr. T. Lewis said during the number of years he had been on the Council he had known of increases of salaries granted to nearly every official, but he had never heard any objection qf this kiud raised before. He moved that the motion which was carried at the last meeting be confirmed. The Chairman thought that would be in order, because each member of the Council had had notice that the matter was coming before the meeting that night. Mr. Lewis' resolution was seconded. Mr. T. E. Hopkins: Before you put that let us know what is the opinion of the clerk with reference to it. Is he of opinion that notice of motion with regard to increases of salary must be given for the next meeting, or can it be dealt with to-night? The Chairman: Personally, I should prefer the matter to be dealt with at the next meet- ing. Mr. Gomer Davies and Mr. Gibbon, who took an active part in the discussion at the last meeting, are both absent. Mr. Hopkins moved that the matter be de- ferred till the next meeting. This was seconded. I Mr. D. Davies :I agree to that. I only want the rules carried out. Mr. Hopkins: Whatever we have done in the past we ought to do things right now. Two blacks don't make a white. Mr. Rhys Griffiths: I should be very sorry to be Chairman or Clerk of the Council if the Local Government Board came down on the council and censured them. Ratepayers or the Chamber of Trade might get hold of a matter of this kind which is out of order, and send it to the Local Government Board. Mr. Lewis: With regard to carrying on business in a straightforward manner I agree with other speakers, but why bounce on this one man. We are treating him worse than wo would if he was outside civilisation. Mr. Hopkins' resolution that the matter be deferred until the next meeting was put to the vote and carried unanimously. AN ACCUSATION. I Mr. Lewis: You have not put my resolution. It is sque-ezing--a hole in the corner business. The Chairman: Do you mean that to refer to me. Mr. Lewis: Yes; I do. The Chairman: I put the motion to the meeting, and it was carried unanimously. I put it quite fairly. If you refer to me I must say that you are quite unjustified and you ought to be very careful before you make in- sinuations. I think you ought to apologise. Mr. Lewis: You have not put my motion. The Chairman: I am sorry that Mr. Lewis should make such insinuations. He has been chairman himself and ought to have some sym- pathy. I have no intention of skipping things. It was decided to refer the matter to the next meeting, the Chairman remarking that he did not see why there should be such strong feeling,shown. He had no desire to do any- thing that was not in accordance with the wishes of the members. Later Mr. Lewis rose and said owing to the very extraordinary way the Council had dealt with this young man he went a bit out of the way in making the remark he did in regard to the Chairman. Xobody ip, the room respec- ted the chair more than he did, and he felt it was his duty to apologise and withdraw what he had said in the heat of the moment. The Chairman: Thank you, Mr. Lewis, and I accept your apology.

No title

Mr. Llewellyn Yorath, of Tynycaia Farm, St. Brides Major, is a remarkable example of vitality and energy at an advanced age. Though Mr. Yorath is 84 he is taking part in the hay harvest on his farm, and is at work every morning with a hay rake before seven o'clock. It has been his custom for many years, between the hay and the corn harvest, to take a swim every day in the sea at South- erndown. Tynycaia Farm used to be in the possession of the Rev. Edward Picton, rector of St. Brides Major, and was a relative of General Sir Thomas Picton. General Picton was staying at Tynycaia when he received the order to proceed to Belgium, where he fell on the field of Waterloo.

Advertising

I T D. SCHOFIELD Bill-Poster and De- liveries for Town and Country; rents all the principal oardings in Bridgend. Work executed with despatch.-AddTeSti, Near the ftew Bridge, Bridgend.

COWBRIDGE SIFTINGS

COWBRIDGE SIFTINGS. J (By VELOX.) ->- ->- -L ->- I There are very few people in Cowbridge who are not genuinely sorry to know that next week will probably see the last of the Glamorgan Yeomanry's stay in the town. No one can deny that Cowbridge has benefited to a very large extent during their sojourn here. Those who at the start grumbled about the expense incurred in converting the Mar- ket Place into stables, would do well to find out how the matter looks now in £ s. d., and then "hereafter hold their peace." In- directly all classes have reaped some benefit, and at a time when it ought to be appreci- ated. We did have a few gloomy prophets, but it speaks well for the conduct of the men of the three squadrons that during the stay of about five months not a single serious com- plaint has been heard from the police, the billets, or from the general public. I will not go so far as to say that we have been en- tertaining "angels." It will be enough to say that we have entertained men who have heard and answered the call of King and coun- try. I have had conversations with many of the men, and they all testify to the kindness they have received here. We hope that we shall all part the better for having known each other, with only pleasant memories and no regrets. If the Editor will allow me I should like just a word with the "croakers." Only a few they are. There has not arisen any- thing which demands that anyone should take up the cudgels on tehalf of the Cow- bridge girls—only in the minds of a few who gloat in the filthy, whose minds are diseased. They have not failed to cast reflections upon the honour of every girl seen talking or walk- ing with a soldier, by a shrug of the shoulder, by a devilish innuendo, by a filthy remark at every opportunity they have endeavoured to tarnish the fair name of our girls. They attribute motives where there is not even a semblance of wrong, actuated by the diseased state of their minds, which does not permit them to even think that girls can be sociable, merry, and bright, and still remain pure. These people are not strangers, but, thank heaven, the honour of our girls is not in their keeping. I am not attempting to bolster up the character of Cowbridge girls; they do not need it; but "Honi soit qui may y pense." w Lost somewhere between Southerndown and Cowbridge a full-sized motor-car with chauf- feur attached, when last seen was being towed. Charlie-naps. Rope-snaps. Charlie—gone. Frank—forlorn. 0 a 0 The members of the Calvinistic Methodist Sunday School are rather proud of their re- cord in the Sunday School examination of the East Glamorgan Presbytery, and well they might be. It is very creditable that one little Sunday School should secure 7 prizes in an ex- amination spread over such a large area, es- pecially is Elwyn Thomas to be congratulated upon his success in winning the second prize in the whole of the Presbytery. Certificates were gained as follows:—Senior, Mr. E. W. Mills; under 21, Gwenith Thomas; Elwyn Thomas, Dilwyn Thomas, Ernie Lane, Nellie Blick and Halcot Roberts. I had the pleasure this week of listening to a man who was well over the "high-water mark," giving his version 8f the wars of bye- gone days. This is what he said, We want a leader like we had when the English were fighting the Philistines in America. He was a little chap, called David. The English Army wanted to retreat, but David had got the other chap weighed up—I forget his name; he was a big chap, though, and was all bounce. David picks up a stone and lets drive at him down he comes wollop then our chaps gets at the enemy with their machine guns, and drives every man of them over the Alps into the sea." Someone then suggested that he was a bit mixed, and that caused a row. Cowbridge and district is doing well in the national egg collection.

I CAERAU TRADESMENI

I CAERAU TRADESMEN I t AND THE SHOP ACT. I At Bridgend Police Court on Saturday, William David Thomas, draper, Caerau Road, Caerau, was summoned for having allowed his shop to remain open for the serving' of cus- tomers after 11 o'clock. G. Ferrier Williams, shop inspector, gave evidence, and defendant was fined 10s. Thomas Jones, grocer, Victoria Street, Caerau, was summoned for having failed to exhibit in the interior of his shop a notice, as required by par. 3 of the Closing Order made by the local authority. Fined 10s. Jenkin Jenkins, grocer, Victoria Street, Caerau, was summoned for a similar offence. G. Ferrier Williams gave evidence, and defendant was fined 10s. I MAESTEG SUMMONS DISMISSED. I Thomas M. Russell, outfitter, Commercial Street, Maesteg, was summoned for having, it was alleged, allowed his shop to remain open for the serving of customers after the hour of 11 o'clock. Defendant said he had been to the station to see if suits for which customers were waiting in the shop had arrived. He found they were at the station, and when he got back the cus- tomers were still waiting. All he did was to make up the parcels again. He took no money and for the purpose of business the shop was closed.. The case was dismissed.

LLANTWIT MAJOR I

LLANTWIT MAJOR I INTERESTING PRESENTATION. At the Ebenezer Congregational Church on Tues- day an interesting meeting was held, at which the members and congregations of the joint churches of Bethesda y Fro and Ebenezer, Llantwit Major, presented their secretary, Mr. John Isaiah Thomas, late of Gileston, now farm bailiff at Pare Gwyllt, with a valu- able drawing-room clock and pair of candle- sticks (supplied by Mr. E. M. Needham, of Bridgend), on the occasion of his marriage to Miss Laura Williams, Castleton. The Rev. Wm. Evans, Carmel, presided, and was sup- ported by the Rev. T. Davies, Swansea, and the deacons, Messrs. W. Dunn, J. C. Thomas, M. Price and J. Morgan. Mrs. John Price, the senior lady member of the churches, who was to have made the presentation, was not able to attend owing to failing health, so the second senior lady member, Mrs. M. J. I Morgan (Brook House, Boverton) handed over the gifts. Mr. J. C. Thomas and Mr. J. Morgan (deacons( also spoke. Mr. Thomas returned thanks. The Rev. T. Wil- liams congratulated both the church and Mr. Thomas on the happy feeling that existed be- tween secretary and churches.

PONTYCYMMERI

PONTYCYMMER. I WOUNDED. 30965 Private Herbert Brown, 1st Welsh Regiment, who was wounded in the hip at Ypres on 3rd May, has returned to his home at 9 Nantryrchain Ter- race. He joined his regiment on the 10th March, and left for France on 21st April. being an old soldier. He had 21 days' ex- perience in the trenches. PROPERTY OFFERED—Mr. T. E. Deere (on behalf of Mr. H. F. Lambert, who holds a commission in the Welsh Army Corps) offered j for sale by auction at the Dunraven Hotel, Bridgend, on Saturday the leasehold dwelling- houses, Nos. 11 and 12 Wood-street, Pontycym- mer, held for a term of 99 years from 1909 at annual ground rents of £1 5s. and £ 1 10s. re- spectively, No. 12 being let at 35s. per lunar month and No. 11 being in the occupation of the owner. The property was withdrawn. The .solicitors for the vendor were Messrs. Stockwood and Williams, Bridgend. FUNERAL.—The funeral of the late Mr. John Rees, aged 76 years, of 50 Cuckoo Street, Pantygog, Pontycymmer, who died on June 12th, took place at Maudlam Church, Pyle, on Wednesday of last week. -Deceased was a mem- ber at the Zion English Baptist Chapel, Ponty- cymmer, and an old and respected inhabitant of the Valley. The Revs. W. Reynolds, W. Saun- ders, C.C., and E. Davies, Pontycymmer, and W. P. Griffiths, Blackmill, officiated. The mourners were:—Mrs. Ellen Rees (widow); Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds, Cymmer (son-in-law and daughter); Miss Catherine Rees, Blackmill (daughter); Miss Catherine Morgan (step-daugh- ter); Mr. and Mrs. Morgan Rees, Pantscawen Farm, Llangeinor (brother and sister-in-law); Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Morgan, Pyle (brother and sister-ill-law Messrs. Edmund and Hopkin Thomas, Pyle (I others-in-law); Mr. William Rees, Nottage (bother); Misses Rees and Master Willie Rees, Nottage (grand-children); Mrs. and Miss John, Ogmore Vale (sister and grand- daughter); Mr. Frank John and Misses Mariah, and Maggie John, and Mr. Rees John, Black- mill (son-in-law and grand-children); Mrs. E. Davies (niece); Mr. T J. Jenkins, Caerau (grandson) Mr. William Rees and Miss Mattie Rees, Pantscawen Farm (nephew and niece); Mr Tom Rees, Kenfig Hill (nephew); Mrs. and Master W. Worthy, Ogmore Vale (niece and grandson); Mrs. John and Mr. Rees Morgan, Pyle (niece and nephew); Mr. Rees, Pyle (son- in-law) Mrs. Rees and Mrs. Evans, Pyle (nieces); Mr. Tom Rees, Pyle (nephew); Mrs. and Mr. W. David, Pyle (sister-in-law and nephew); Mr. and Mrs. Richards, Messrs. Tom and Willie Richards (cousins); Mr. Emlyn and Miss Katie Reynolds, Cymmer, Port Talbot (grand-children) Mr. and Mrs. T. Jones, Kenfig Hill (cousins); Mrs. Wylde, Pyle (sister-in-law). Wreaths were sent by Misses Maggie, Maud, and Master Rees John (grand-children), Blackmill; Mesdames James, Gear and Bull, Pontycymmer.

j CAERAU

j CAERAU. FUNERAL.—The funeral of the late Mr. Alexander Jenkins, aged 30 years, of Talbot Terrace, who sustained fatal injuries at the Nantybar Colliery on the previous Wednes- day, took place on Saturday amid manifes- tations of sorrow and respect. The funeral was one of the largest seen in the district for some time. Mr. W. Roberts, lay reader, of the St. David's Church, conducted a short service at the house. The interment was at the Llangynwyd Burial Grounds, the Rev. Harold Thomas, of Garth Church, officiating. The deceased leaves a widow and three little children.

I READING IN BED

I READING IN BED. I BLAENGARW WOMAN'S CLOTHING CATCHES FIRE. I TRAGIC AFFAIR. -A n inquest  We d nesday at the An inquest was held on Wednesday at the Workmen's Hall, Blaengarw, by Mr. S. H. Stockwood, coroner, on the body of Mary Evans, a widow, who received burns which caused her death on June 7th. James Evans, collier, of Blaengarw Road, said the body viewed by the jury was that of his mother, aged 61. She lived with him. He saw her last on the 6th of February about six o'clock in the evening. He went out about that time and when he returned his mother had gone to bed. He went to bed about twelve o'clock, and about half-past twelve he heard her getting out of bed, and then his sister called him. He went into his mother's room and saw the deceased standing by the bed, her nightdress burning, his sister was sitting on the bed. The corner of the bed was on fire. He put out the fire with a jug of water. After things hal been put. right lie went back to bed. He did not think his mother was much hurt. His mother told him there was a candle on the table by the bed, and she had been reading and fallen asleep. The table with the candle on was close to the bed, and the paper she was reading, he thought, must have caught fire. His mother 'I'n In +h..n.. 1- t. !-• ■ u 1 1 -I "I was m the hapit ot reading in bed and no such accident had happened before. Catherine Evans, 19 years, daughter of the deceased, said she was sleeping with her mother, and they had gone to bed about eleven o'clock the Saturday night. They had a candle for light, and it was placed on a table close to the bed. When she went to sleep her mother was poking the fire. Her mother called her later. When she awoke she saw her mother standing by the bed and the table was burning and her mother's gar- ments were burning in front. The candle was in the candlestick on the table. She jumped out of bed and called her brother. By the doctor: Her mother's nightdress was made of flannelette. Annie Richards, wife of John Richards, of 69, Blaengarw Road, next door to the de- ceased, said the last witness came for her on the Sunday morning, 17th February, about nine o'clock. She went and found the de- ceased in bed. She said she was always in the habit of reading in bed, and always kept a light burning all night. That night she must have thrown the paper back on the table. She smelt burning and got out of bed, and in try- ing to put out the fire on the top of the bed and the table the front of her nightdress 1.J ro -1 caugnt, nre. one dId not tnink she was burned as badly as she was. Dr. J. W. A. Wilson said he was called into the deceased on the 7th February. He found that the deceased was extensively and deeply burned about the abdomen and chest, and slightly burned on the neck and face and fin- gers and patches on the forearm in a manner consistent with the statement given by Mrs. Richards. He attended her and did not ex- pect her to recover. She had not been in good health immediately before, and she suf- fered greatly from shock. Later, in conse- quence of the shock she became demented and that lasted the last 3 months and there was great difficulty in feeding her, and she died on 21st June. The immediate cause of death was exhaustion, the result of her condition in con- sequence of the burns. A verdict of accidental death was returned.

Advertising

The Rev. T. Vaughan Jones, C.M. minis- ter, Maesteg, has accepted the unanimous in- vitation to become the pastor of Salem C.M. Church. Cwm, Llansanilet. Mr. Jones will commence his duties there early in September. I LLOYDS BAUK a E ?s §T'?'B? L T E D E.C. Head Office: 71, LOMBAR3 SinECT, E.C. OVER 880 OFFICES IN ENGLAND AND WALES. Exceptional facilities are at the disposal of Officers in His Majesty's Forces, both at Home and in France, where the Bank's French Auxiliary, r LLOYDS BANK (FRANCE) Lii.'ITED, has Offices in PARIS (26, Avenue de I'Cpera BORDEAUX, BIARRITZ and HAVRE.

I BLAENGARW

I BLAENGARW. ANNIVERSARY SERVICES—On Sunday and Monday at the Trinity Calvinistic Methodist Chapel, Blaengarw, the anniversary services were held, when the Rev. E. T. Hughes, of Swansea, delivered inspiring sermons to large congregations. RECEPTION COMMITTEE.-The following officers and committee members of the Blaen- garw St. John Ambulance Brigade Band have been appointed to arrange receptions for the wounded soldiers upon their arrival at Blaen- garw, viz.:—Dr. J. W. A. Wilson, M.D. (chair- man), Messrs. D. Morgan (vice-chairman), E. Richards (treasurer), W. Davies (secretary), D. Watts-Thomas, C. H. Feiven, James J. Allen, F. John, W. J. Morgan, D. H. Davies, A. L. Lewis, W. J. Lewis, T. E. Lewis, J.P., W. Dry- burgh, Watkin Williams, Wm. Owen, John James, and Evan John; co-opted members: Dr. J. B. MacCutcheon, Rev. David Davies, Messrs. C. R. Heycock and Evan David, J.P. INFANTS' WELCOME.—A meeting was held at the Workmen's Hall, Blaengarw, on Friday last (under the auspices of the Ogmore and Garw U.D. Council), to establish an infants' centre in connection with Infants' Consulta- tions and School for Mothers. The speakers were Mrs. Leverton, Dr. MacCutcheon, Revs. J. Hughes (Nebo) and David Davies (Trinity). Mr. W. J. Morgan, M.E., presided. The follow- ing ladies were appointed: Mrs. (Dr.) Mac- Cutcheon, Mrs. (Dr.) Wilson, Mesdames W. J. Morgan, D. Davies, M. Evans, J. Lewis, J. Hughes, A. Stevens, B. Gough, D. Grey, T. E. Lewis, H. Sparkes J. Lewis (Brynbedw), and Miss Burnell; president, Mr. W. J. Morgan, and secretary, Miss Bessie Morgan. At the close of the meeting the usual vote of thanks was ac- corded the chairman and speakers. PREACHING SERVICES. On Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday of last week preach- ing services were held at Trinity, Tabernacle, and Mount Zion Churches, under the auspices of the South Wales Calvinistic Methodist Asso- ciation. There was a large number of delegates present from London. Inspiring sermons were delivered before large congregations at the fol- lowing churches by Rev. W. M. Griffiths, B.A., London and Dr. Phillips, Tylorstown, on Tues- day evening at Tabernacle; by Dr. Cynddylan Jones, of Whitchurch, Cardiff, at Mount Zion. On Wednesday afternoon at Tabernacle the Rev. W. Adams, B.A., Llanelly, and Rev. T. Charles Williams, M.A., Menai Bridge, preached. On Thursday morning, at 7.30, at Trinity, Rev. E. Rowlands, Crickhowell, was the preacher, and at 10 a.m. Rev. E. P. Jones, B.A., Cardiff, and Rev. R. R. Roberts, B.A., LL.B., Chester, officiated. Rev. M. W. Griffiths, B.A., London, and Rev. J. D. Evans, M.A., Ponty- pridd, preached in the afternoon and in the eve- ning the Rev. R. R. Roberts and Dr. Cynddylan Jones. On Thursday, at Tabernacle, the preachers were Rev. J. C. Evans, Borth (Card.), at 7.30; Rev. T. C. Williams, M.A., Menai Bridge, and Dr. Cynddylan Jones at 10 a.m.; the Rev. Wii). Tolles (Moderator), Aberdulais, and Rev J. M. Jones, Cardiff, at 2 p.m.; and the Rev. Philip Jones, Llandilo, and Rev. T. C. Williams, M.A., at 6 p.m. At Bethel C.M., Pontycymmer, on Wednesday evening, Rev. ^laldwyn Hughes, Cardigan, and Rev. T. C. Williams officiated. From the standpoint of or- I ganisation everything was arranged to perfec- tion, and great credit is due to the Rev. David Davies (chairman), Mr. Thomas Thomas (general secretary), and all members of the vari- ous churches, for their kind hospitality towards the numerous delegates,present. The treasurer was Air. Daniel Davies. Refreshments were provided for each day, over 1,200 persons sitting at the tahlp".

NANTYMOEL

[ NANTYMOEL OPEN-AIR CAMPAIGN.—The weekly ser- vice was held at Pembroke Terrace on Tues- day evening. Rev. R. T. Gregory a'nd several laymen delivered short addresses. The prayer meeting preceding the public service was held at Gilead C.M. Chapel. DIN AM. CHAPEL.-On Wednesday even- ing a large congregation assembled at Dinam Chapel to hear a sermon by the Rev. Philip Jones, Llandilo, he being one of the special preachers at the Blaengarw Association meet- ings during the week. The lively and dra- matic style of the preacher secured the at- tention of the people, and his discourse on "Trust in God" created a deep impression. CHURCH PARADE.—On Sunday last a procession, consisting of the Nantydyrys and W. T. Wilkinson Lodge of the R.A.O.B., Og- more Valley Branches of the Bristol and West of England Society, Amalgamated Society of Railway Servants, Boy Scouts, Fire Brigade, etc., walked up from Ogmore Vale Station to Nantymoel. headed by the Ogmore Valley lemperance Band. A service was held at 3.30 p.m. at St. Paul's Church. The Vicar, Rev. J. Richards Pugh, B.A., delivered an appropriate and practical address. All the money collected in church and along the streets was devoted to the local fund for the relief of soldiers' and sailors' wives.

Advertising

Up-to-date appliances for turning out every class of work at competitive prices, at the "Glamorgan Gazette" Printing Works. Printed and Published by the Centra! Glamorgan Printing and Publishing Com- pany. Ltd., at the "Glamorgan Gazette, offices, Queen Street, Bridgend, Glamor- gan. FRIDAY, JUNE 25th. 1915.