Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 3 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
18 articles on this page
Advertising

S Cash or E B? ? EasyTer s  I* -=- "<==-=='¡u.l"r. -&8> THE SOUTH WALES FURNISHERS i Have upwards of 25 years' Reputation for Excellence in Quality and Strictly I Moderate Prices. REMEMBER THE COMFORT IN YOUR HOME DEPENDS ON WHERE YOU FURNISH. If you cannot call, send for our Illustrated Catalogue, post free. ???*??'*?*?*?????????*'???.??*?''?*??*??'??'????*??? 25, Wyndham Street, Bridgend. V i? Lar?e & Well-stocked Showrooms. ;¡.' -,1>< .t.)

I FAR AND NEAR I

I FAR AND NEAR. I WAR TOPICS OF INTEREST. I .aL W T'r i • r-r-r i » « • The British. If I were to sum up the essential features of the British people," faid M. Paul Hymans, the Belgian Minister. I should -say kindness of heart and loyalty." JE500 Reward. Hon. Olonel Joseph Cowcn, of Stella Hall, Blavdon-on-Tyne, has offered a £ 500 to the crew of the first aircraft to bring down a Zeppelm in the British Islands or the surrounding terri- torial waters. I Saved by a Testament. I Private Fred Davies, of Lampeter, of the Royal Fusiliers, has returned home, having been badly wounded by a piece of shrapnel. His life was saved by the Testament he had in his pocket at the time. Famous Cambridge Men. I Such famous Cambridge men as K. G. Mac- leod, J. G. Will, R. B. Lagden, and Hope Crisp are amongst the large number who have been wounded, many of whom, like Crisp, will never again be able to take part in sport. I Civil to Military Prison. Sprinfield Gaol, Chelmsford, which has accom- modation for three hundred prisoners, is to be changed from a civil to a military prison. The civil prisoners will have been transferred to Pentonville, Ipswich, and Cambridge. The governor, Mr. Scott Blake, becomes the military -commandant, while the staff will go to Penton- ville, Canterbury and Parkhurst for the dura- tion of the war. .Near the Firing Line. While Mr. N. V. Bowater was motoring Somewhere in France" with a friend, they found by the roadside an exceptionally fine specimen of the rare lizard orchid, seen some- 'times at intervals of many years on this side of the Channel. This war specimen of a botanical fugitive is on show at the establish- ment of an Ashford, Kent, tradesman, Mr. .Bowater having a residence in the locality. Boy Bugler. I The school attendance officer reported to the Carmarthen Borough Education Committee that a boy had been accepted as a bugler by the com- manding officer of one of the Welsh regiments although he would not be fourteen until Sep- tember next. In reply to a question, the clerk (Mr. Thomas Walters) said the committee could do nothing. The military had a right to ac- cept the boy for service according to the regu- lations. Kitchener's Sister Nurses Baby. i When Mrs. Parker, sister of Lord Kitchener, -visited Ilford she noticed on arrival a soldier's wife-with t-,N,iiis. The mother was delighted te show her boys, but her pleasure was hardly less than that of Mrs. Parker when the latter found that one of the boys was named Kitchener Armstrong. "I must nurse it now," she re- marked, picking up the baby, and to the I :amusement of the mother and the company she nursed the youngster for some time. Song-Then As Usual. I A Worcestershire Territorial in a letter to a friend says:—" Yesterday evening at dusk there was a lull, and the Germans began to sing —not ragtime, but classical music—at an im- promptu concert. Not a shot was fired while the singing lasted, and at the end the 7th Wor- cesters, sportsmen as ever, gave them a rousing cheer, which was acknowledged by the German tenor with a solo. An hour afterwards both sides were pumping lead at each other as JUsual." My Wife-God Bless Her! A British soldier just released from Ger- many on arriving at Tilbury said to the "Telegraph" :It has cost my wife ten shillings a week out of her allowance to keep me in Germany, and if it hadn't been for the food she sent me I couldn't have stood it. Twice a week she sent me a parcel and a kind letter with it without fail—God bless her. See, I've got it down in my diary, Letter and parcel from Nellie.' Letter and parcel from Nellie.' Modest Soldier. A man of the Army Service Corps, who re- fused to gi\e his name, performed a great act of bravery at Reading. The soldier heard -cries for help from the direction of the River Kennet. He ran to the river and saw a boy -struggling in the water. He went to the boy's assistance without waiting to take off his tunic, and after considerable difficulty succeeded in bringing him to the bank. The boy was in a semi-conscious condition, but he quickly recov- ered. The soldier was enthusiastically cheered by the onlookers. .A War Note. In the early hours of a recent morning- one of the workmen employed at the House of Commons entered one of the division lobbies, now so seldom used, and upon a writing table saw some loose papers. Clearing them up to throw away, he noticed an envelope open and something protruding. He examined the con- tents of the envelope to see if he would be war- ranted in treating them as being of no use, -when he found the package contained over ■ £ 20 :in tl notes. The name and address on the (envelope were those of a Welsh M.P., who is .also a member of the Government. This ttfiorded a clue, and the package was returned ■to the owner, as the addressee proved to be. ,A Mecican General. A picturesque figure among the men of the -Princess Patricia's Own," visited in billets during their relief from the trenches, was the machine-gun officer who, when war was de- clared, was a general with Villa's army in Mexico. A soldier of fortune and fond of ad- venture, he went over to Mexico and joined the Tanks of the Constitutional Army, in which he tfoon rose to a position of authority, and partici- pated in all the fighting in the Republic for eome two years (says Reuter). On the declara- tion of war with Germany and the announce- ment of the formation of the "Princess Pat's," however, he obtained his release from General Villa, after some difficulty, and hurried to Ot- tawa, where he enrolled in the battalion. In the recent nghting he has done splendid work with his guns. That German Sausage. A telegram from Munich states that eighty Germans are seriously ill in a suburb of that city. They were poisoned by eating liver sausages containng Para typhoid bacilli. Huns in Africa. We are getting new lessons in geography every day, but the fact is not yet sufficiently known that there is -in German South-West Africa a place with the appropriate name of Huns. It lies north-west of Warmbad, about 50 miles from the border of Cape Colony. German Attacks. The German estimate of Sir Edward Grey finds its counterpart in some of the attacks which were issued from the Turkish Press at the time of the Bulgarian atrocities upon Mr. Gladstone. According to one Turkish news- paper, Gladstone was a Bulgarian, whose real name was Grozadin. He changed it to Glad- stone on arriving in London. Scots and War Munitions. I The Glasgow District Committee of the Amal- gamated Society of Engineers on Thursday issued a manifesto to all engineers in the Scot- tish area calling upon them to enrol for the in- dustrial army on War Munitions before Sunday, and to give reasons for any doubt as to being on urgent Government work, in order that the authorities, and not employers, might decide the question. The committee state they are in full sympathy with the War Munitions Bill. Army Boots. I The demand for Army boots has affected the ordinary boot trade in this country. There is prospect of a shortage in civilian footwear. Already boots cost an average of 3s. more a pair. A Northampton manufacturer confessed the other day that he was experiencing no difficulty in securing advanced prices. The only trouble was in filling orders, Very few new samples are being shown, and these are mostly boots which can be handled concur- rently .with Army orders. Special work, though very highly priced, is discouraged. Great Rifle Shot. I Territorials all over the country will be de- lighted to read the announcement that Sergeant A. G. Fulton, of the 16th London Regiment (Queen's Westminsters) has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal "for great devo- tion to duty and consistnt good work during the whole period his battalion has been engaged." Sergeant Fulton is one of the greatest rifle shots in the British Empire, and, with the exception of Corporal (now captain) Ommunden of the H.A.C., has the most remarkable record of any Bisley marksman of the past decade. Boys' "Battle." I The story of a stone fight between two bands of boys, whose ages varied from 11 to 16, was told at Newport, when 23 boys were summoned for throwing stones in Allteryn- road and Fields-road. The evidence was that Power-street was ranged against North-street as "British and German forces," and the former won the fight. Streets lamps were broken, and a boy. who not of the party, was struck on the head and rendered partly un- conscious. The boys pleaded guilty, and were each ordered to pay 2s. 6d. towards the costs. Prudential's Investment. I Mr. J. Burn, chief actuary of the Prudential I Assurance Company, referring to the company's I investment in the new War Loan, said to a i e- present.ative on Friday:—" This morning I heard there was very considerable excitement in financial circles in the city regarding the huge investment in the War Loan by our company. This excitement was still further increased by the announcement that < £ 5,000,000, or, as some said, < £ 10,000,000, had been invested. The fact is, we have applied already for over 23,000,000 in the loan. I am confident that our total hold- ing will eventually amount to over < £ 5,000,000, including conversions. Carrots al) 1d. I In an interesting letter to his parents, a young Cardiff docksman, writing on June 30th from France, says that he has come across one of the Brigade Supply issuers, whose name is King, and whose home is Roseberry Place, Penarth. Food for which the Government has not fixed a maximum price, is, he says, very dear, young carrots and turnips being a penny each, and bread as high as a franc for a 3 lb. loaf. There are some weird pets with the soldiers, including a young goat and a tame hare. "An old chateau is near," he says, "and the lovely grounds are a perfect network of trenches." I Money Lenders Cute Dodge. During the last ten days the talk of borrowing in order to subscribe to the War Loan and con- vert older Government securities, has brought out a regular flood of circulars from money- lenders offering their services for the purpose. A correspondent of The Times" who has been particularly pestered makes the apt suggestion that these gentry might save themselves a great deal of trouble, and others as much annoyance, if they were to utilise their funds by subscrib- ing direct. The State will be only too glad to get their "d £ 50 to tl,0000 at a commercial" (not an uncommercial) "rate of interest," as the cir- culars put it. There would be less worry and fewer bad debts. Letters Censored by Enemies. The Foreign Office issues a notice stating:— Letters bearing the German censorship label which have been received in England have es- tablished beyond doubt the fact that when the Swedish mail steamers Boorn and Thorston were captured by Germans the closed mail bags from Russia and Sweden which were on board were opened and the contents subjected to cen- sorship by the German authorities. This act was in direct contravention of Article 1 of the Hague Convention of October, 1897, of which Germany was one of the signatories and in which it is laid down that the postal correspon- dence of neutrals of belligerents, whatever its official or private character, found at sea on board a neutral or enemy ship is inviolable. Statements have emanated from German sources to the effect that the letters were returned to the Swedish postal authorities unopened.

I RECEIVING THE WOUNDED

I RECEIVING THE WOUNDED. I STIRRING SCENES IN THE GARW. Stirring receptions were given to wounded soldiers returning to Blaengarw, on Thursday and Saturday, and to Pontycymmer on Mon- day. On Thursday Private 36032 W. Mor- gan, of the 1st Welsh Regiment, returned. Long before Private Morgan's train steamed steadily into the station, crowds of people, full of enthusiasm, thronged around the sta- tion platform. It seemed as though the whole district desired to show its admiration for the gallant fellow by being present to welcome him home. However, amid the joy- ous exaltation, there could be seen here and there, huddled away at the back of the crowd, those who bore expressions of sorrow and anxiety for those who, by some unhappy fate, may never return again. Neverthless, they were there to do homage to a hero who had returned. As the Welshman stepped from the train, the Blaengarw Band greeted him by the playing of stirring and patriotic airs. He was then officially received by Dr. Wilson, Mr. C. Morruzzi, Rev. David Davies, Messrs. James Davies, W. Thomas, and C. R. Heycock. A procession afterwards formed up, and headed by the band, marched through Gwendoline Street, back through Railway Terrace to the home of Private Morgan. Speeches of appreciation of the gallant ser- vices rendered to the country by Private Mor- gan were delivered by the Revs. David Davies, W. Thomas, J. Davies, and Dr. Wilson. Mr. Heycock, on behalf of Private Morgan, re- turned thanks for the reception he had re- ceived. It is interesting to note that Private Mor- gan volunteered for service on the 18th Nov., and left for France on May 6th. Once in France, it appears he had to reach the trenches under heavy shell fire, and machine gunfire. A few days later he took par tin an important charge, and happily came out of it unscathed. He was wounded, however, on Whit-Monday near Ypres, bullets piercing his left and right thighs. He was in France a little over four weeks. At the hospital, he says, lie had all that could be desired. A WOUNDED CANADIAN. On Saturday, Private William Maurice Davies, son of Mrs W. Davies, of Egerton Street, East London,. Canada, who enlisted with the first contingent in his native city, was enthusiastically received by the residents of Blaengarw, and was wildly cheered as he alighted from the train. He was met by Dr. Wilson, the Rev. J. Davies, Messrs. C. Mor- ruzzi, and C. R. Heycock. The St. John Ambulance Band, Blaengarw (under the con- ductorship of Mr. W. J. Lewis), headed the procession. Private Davies was conveyed in a trap to the home of his uncle, Mr. Arthur Morris, 2 Brynberris Terrace, Blaengarw, where a large crowd had gathered to welcome him. Rev. J. Davies stated that they all should be thankful to the wounded hero, who had travelled from Canada to assist in this gigan- tic struggle. Our colonies were as one in their genuine and loyal support to the Mother j Country. The war had been the means of consolidating the Empire, and every part had rallied excellently and magnificently to the call for men. (Cheers.) Private Davies, in a. few words, said that the excellent reception given him was quite unexpected, and he thanked them one and all for their appreciation of the help given by the Canadian forces. (Cheers.) A DESPATCH RIDER. In an interview Private Davies stated that he was a despatch rider, and joined his corps two days after war was declared. He gave up a good situation. Five days later he was at Velearchi Camp, Quebec, and left for France in September. He was on the water 23 days, and started fighting after three days' rest in France. Private Davies described several small encounters in which he took part previous to the all-important battle of the Canadians. "We were 37,000 strong," he said, "and-while We were 37,000 strong, and he said while defending the line the Canadian Scottish were ordered to retire, but blankly refused, and held the ground under heavy shell fire aid attacks with asphyxiating gases until reinforcements arrived. We were driven back with the loss of four guns, but the Cana- dian Scottish again returned to the offensive and re-captured the guns and returned to safety. Our officers were soon picked out and put out of action. In this engagement one of our privates was honoured with the Vic- toria Cross. When the roll-call was made, out of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th brigades, we could not muster sufficient men to form one battalion. One of the atrocious acts commit- ted by the Germans was the crucifixion of a Canadian Sergeant and some privates on barn doors. He claimed that the Canadians were equal to Germans in siege gun firing, and ex- celled them in rifle firing. The Canadians now called the well known "Jack Johnsons, "Jess Wollards," since Johnson's defeat. He was very optimistic as to the ultimate result, and stated that the French were fighting well. One of his pals made up the following: "Here we are again, boys; Here we are again We beat you on the Ypres, We beat you on the Aisne; We gave you h- at Neuve Chapelle; And here we are again!" Private Davies was glad of the opportunity to state on behalf of himself and Canadian friends at the hospitals that the treatment meted out to them was par excellence. From the Canadian Hospital, France, he was re- moved to York, and from there to Lord Air- dale's Voluntary Hospital for Wounded Sol- diers. In a letter from his mother, who felt proud of her son, it states that Canada has ready 25 miles of men at four deep, to send across to help to bring this crisis to an end. Also that Canada will leave no stone unturned to adequately provide the Allies with muni- tions. I WOUNDED HERO AT PONTYCYMMER. At Pontycymmer on Monday evening Cor- poral Goss, of Cuckoo Street, Pantygog, Pontycymmer, who was wounded in action ar- rived home. A tremendous crowd had gathered to give him a hearty welcome. The BIaengarw St. John Ambulance Band (under (Continued on Bottom of Next Column.)

I RECEIVING THE WOUNDED

(Continued from previous column.) the conductorship of Mr. H. J. Lewis) and the Boy Scouts' Brigade (under Scoutmaster F. W. White) were at the station, and upon the arrival of Corporal Goss the band played patriotic selections. After the Rev. David Hughes, Sergeant Evans, Messrs. Morgan Weeks and Job Fox had received Corporal Goss on behalf of the Committee, loud cheers were given him. The procession then wended its way through the main street to his home. Sergeants Evans, Watts and P. C. McLoughlin headed the pro- cession, and next came the band. Corporal Goss followed in a conveyance. The Boy Scouts brought up the rear. Cheers greeted the soldier en route. Rev. Hughes in his speech pointed out that it was a honour to the valley to welcome the homecoming of our wounded heroes. Corporal Goss had fought in the field of battle, and he was pleased to see they gave him a reception as all Britishers should get. Corporal Goss is now convalescent and is quite willing to go back to fight for his country. (Cheers). Corporal Goss thanked them for the kind reception, and corroborated Rev. Hughes statement that he was ready to go back and da his bit for his country. (Cheers).

I STORM AND FLOOD

I STORM AND FLOOD I IN THE GARW. Soon after 5 o'clock on Sunday morning a storm of unusual violence, accompanied by very heavy floods, broke over the Garw Val- ley. Distant rumblings were heard for half an hour before, but at 5.30 a.m. it had reached the valley. The lightning was most vivid, and the roars of thunder were like a heavy cannonade. Unfortunately, the drains were quite unable to take away the water, which found its way into the sewers, bursting out through the manholes. The heavy iron covers were removed like tin toys. Through Alexandra Road, Albany Road, Richard Street, to the main street in Pontyeymmer, and in several other parts of the valley tor- rents of water flowed from the mountain, bringing with it many tons of debris, which was deposited at various points. One famous and well known landmark, viz., "Carters Cot- tage," was washed away. Many business premises suffered damage. The Council stables were flooded to a height of 4ft. to 5ft., and it was with great difficulty that the valu- able horses were got out. Several private houses had water entering through the back door and passing to the front. The Council workmen were early on the scene, and laboured strenuously all day to re- move obstacles from Iiie main streets, and they deserve the best thanks of the commun- ity for their arduous labour on Sunday. I AT NANTYMOEL. Early on Sunday a thunderstorm broke over this neighbourhood and in a very short while the flood of water and mud had covered certain portions. Many of the houses are built on the hillside, and in many cases the water forced its way through the houses. Workmen of the Council were at work all day dealing with the situation. The Blaenogwy Farm and the drapery shop of Mr. T. Richards, No. 1, Ogwy Street, suffered much inconvenience and dam- age from the iundation. None of the inhabi- tants remember the flood of water so violent as it was on Sunday last.

IPONTYCYMMER SOLDIER MISSING I

I PONTYCYMMER SOLDIER MISSING I ANOTHER WOUNDED. I On Thursday morning of last week, Mrs. Alice Healey, of 38 Bridgend Road, Ponty- cymmer, received notification from the officer in charge of records, Shrewsbury, stating that 16887 Private Francis John Healey, the Welsh Regiment, was posted as missing on the 25th May, 1915. Private Healey volunteered on October 12th, 1914, and left for France at the end of April. He worked at Ffaldau Colliery for 11 years. Mr. S. Phillips, tailor, Pontycymmer, re- ceived a letter from the War Office on Tues- day informing him that his son, Private Jas. Phillips, was in Hospital at Alexandria, Egypt, having been wounded at the Darda- nelles. He had given up a post as district surveyor in East Suffolk to do his "bit."

IDEPARTURE OF MR T WILLIAMSI

DEPARTURE OF MR. T. WILLIAMS I I FROM THE GARW. I Mr. and Mrs. T. Williams, who have been at the Llanharran Hotel, Pontycymmer, for the past twenty-three years, have gone into retirement, and have left Pontycymmer. As a native of the lower end of the Garw, Mr. Williams knew it when it was a rural retreat of much beauty. He has witnessed its development into a busy industrial centre. Mr. Williams has been an active public man. For ten years he was a valued member of the Ogmore and Garw Urban District Council. For many years he was one of the managers of the Ogmore and Garw Group of Schools, and during his year of office as chairman, the Tymeinor School was opened. For a good many years he was treasurer of the Miners' Federation Lodges at Pontycymmer. He was always ready to assist any good causes. His new home is at Rock Fawr, Tondu.'

OGMORE YALE COLLIERI

OGMORE YALE COLLIER I DOES NOT INTEND TO PAY. At Bridgend Police Court on Saturday Mary Margaret Owen, North Road, Ogmore Vale, summoned William Jones, John Street, Og- more Vale, for £4 lis., bastardy arrears. Defendant, who had served one term of im- prisonment, for having failed to pay off arrears said he did not intend to pay as the dhild was not his. He was sentenced to 28 days.

No title

The universal recognition of that Right to Live, asserted for small and great nations alike, against any or all Imperialisms, will open a new chapter in the history of man- kind," says the "Nation."

I I Garw Gleanings

I I Garw Gleanings (By LLOFFWR ARALL) Miss Doris Morgan, daughter of Mr. T. O. Morgan, Pontycymmer. has won the first prize in the county examination conducted by the Calvinistic Methodists, and also secured the medal for the best Welsh paper. w Mr. Thomas John Morgan, Blaengarw, gained the second prize. < w A terrible thunderstorm visited the Garw Valley early on Sunday morning. « Many shops and private houses were flooded, and at 5.30 a.m. hundreds of the inhabitants were busily occupied sweeping the water out of their houses. w The storm was ssudden and so furious that in many cases men were knee-deep in water. a 6 0 On Sunday, Lloffwr Arall" often heard the question asked, "Where does the Council Surveyor lives?" WWW We were pleased to see the assistant sur- veyor and our local Councillors doing their best. • • Excellent welcomes were given to two wounded soldiers who arrived at Blaengarw and to the one who arrived at Pontycymmer. • m • Half a dozen young men in Blaengarw have been making inquiries as to whether the par. in last weeks "Gleanings" referred to them! e This confirms the suspicion that the "toilet touches" generally ascribed to the fair sex are also very prevalent among the male sex. w One member of the fair sex asked if an error had been made in naming Blaengarw-as she knew a few at Pontyeymmer who were partial to a little powder. w w As she declared she knew this from her own experience—we presume there is some truth in it. w We would like to remind our readers that next Saturday is Pansy Day" throughout the Garw Valley. < This is a special day set apart for the benefit of the sailors. < < We hear very little news of our gallant Navy—yet their silence spells safety for the English shores. All the nurses will appeal with smiling faces for the necessary contributions! o o o They are threatening that anyone refusing to buy a "pansy" for the benefit of those so nobly protecting us from invasion by our enemies are bun-human"! (now in hospital). < w We hope the miners and owners will come to a'l amicable settlement. & o 6 The young lady who paid for the conveyance of her travelling trunk to the station, and up- °t! arriving at the station found that she had no money to get a ticket, is to be sympathised with. A local fisherman shocked the inhabitants of Pantygog last Sunday by indulging in his favourite pastime. < The ambulance men and nurses ought to turn out with the Blaengarw Band and local police at the forthcoming carnival in aid of local relief. « We would like to :-noiv why measles, whoop- ing cough, scarlet fever, etc., are catching in day schools but not in Sunday schools. The present prices of a haircut and shave throughout the Garw are 4d. and 2d. respec- tively. m m m We may now expect to see a good many of the thrifty kind carrying sideboards about with them! • mm The reception committee members are desi- rous of giving a patriotic welcome to all woun- ded soldiers returning home. Therefore, all persons who have information as to the arrival of wounded soldiers should, try to give the members as much time as pos- sible to arrange the reception.

t BOXING

t BOXING. I GILFACH MAN WINS. Tom Coates (Gilfach) and Steve Kavanagh (Bargoed) met at the Pavilion, Bargoed, on Saturday evening in a six round contest. Both men were aggressive, and in the fifth round Coates went down suddenly as if in pain. The referek (Mr. Jack Powell, Bargoed), declared that Kavanagh hit low, and gave Coates the verdict on' a foul.

1 PONTYCYMMER

1 PONTYCYMMER. STUDY CIRCLE.—At the Ffaldau Work- men's Institute on Thursday, of last week, the usual fortnightly meeting was held, Miss Thomas H.E. School (leader) presiding. An excellent paper was read by Mr. J. J. Morgan, B.A., H.E. School, subject entitled "Nation- ality." At the close of the meeting Messrs. Leo Williams moved and J. Williams seconded a vote of thanks to the Chairman and speaker. PRESENTATION MEETING.—On Friday, at the Fox and Hounds Hotel, Brynmenin, a presentation meeting was held to present Mr. J. E. Crusoe, Pontycymmer, with a roll-top desk and revolving chair, on the occasion of his marriage. Mr. William Thomas, Ponty- eymmer, presided. After the chairman's ad- dress, a pianoforte solo was play by Mrs. Williams, of Brynmenin, the accompanist for the evening. Solos were rendered by Messrs. George Teakle and W. J. Teakle, Brynmenin. On behalf of the employees, Mr. Francis J. Thomas, Maesteg, made the presentation. Mr ) Crusoe responded. Speeches were afterwards given by Dr. Mellin and Messrs. G. Dawkins, Daniel Lewis, C. Stock, and David Harris.

NANTYMOEL

) NANTYMOEL. SUCCESS.—Miss Rosie Gillard, Vale View, and Miss Nellie Price, Osborne Terrace, have passed the examination for pupil teachership. Both were pupils at the Higher Elementary School at Ogmore Vale. DINAM CHAPEL.—On Wedesday last the usual annual treat was given to the scholars of the Sunday School of Dinam Church. A splendid tea was provided, and after every- body had done full justice to this, open-air recreation was provided, and the scholars found various ways of amusing themselves. OPEN-AIR CAMPAIGN. The usual weekly open-air service was held near the Liberal Institute. The minister in charge was Rev. M. J. Mills. The following laymen delivered telling add resse- -Messrs. Sydney Watson, Folland, Davey, Edwards, and others. The people on their door-steps lis- tened attentively. The previous prayer meet- ing was held at Horeb Chapel. The number of Christian workers was not up to the usual mark. I- FUNERALS—On Wednesday last week the funeral took place of Elinor Margaret, the in- fant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Gar- net. 20 Vale View. The body was interred at the Blaenogwy Cemetery. The Rev. R. T. Gregory conducted the burial service.— Also on Saturday the body of the late Mrs. Ann Davies was brought here from Caerau to be buried at Blaenogwy. Deceased resided at Nantymoel soine years ago, and was a sister to Mr. John Keefe, Rowland Terrace. The burial service was conducted by Rev. —. Davies, Caerau. GILEAD ANNIVERSARY.—The Sunday School anniversary in connection with Gilead C.M. Chapel was held on Sunday, and proved, in the opinion of the crowded congregations that attended the services, an unqualified success. In the morning service, the pulpit was occupied by Miss Smith, B.A., who is well known in the locality as an enthusiastic reli- gious worker, and her remarks on this occa- sion, both to children and adults, were highly appreciated. In the afternoon and evening a miscellaneous programme was contributed mainly by the Sunday School scholars. A special feature of these services was the high standard of singing attained by the children's choir, under the leadership of Mrs. T. Thomas and the adult choir, conducted by Mr. John Evans, and special praise is due to these leaders for the untiring perseverance in the face of serious obstacles. Highly efficient work was done at the organ by Mr. W. H. John (for the adults) and Mr. W. J. Davies (for the children). The following were the items in the excellent programme provided:— Afternoon service (president, Mr. Tani-es Llewellyn)—Solos, Misses Sallie Evans, Kitty Mor ris, Lilla Hughes, Nellie Harries, Gwen I Davies, and Messrs. Ted Jones and Willie Hughes; recitations, Misses Doris Jenkins, Nellie Allen, Nellie Jenkins, Phyllis Hughes, Olive Jenkins, Mary J. John, and Messrs. Donnie Roach and AYillie Narbeth. At the evening service the president was Mr. James Evans. The following contributed to the programme :-Solos. Misses Maggie Evans, Beatie Harries, Pattie Howells, and Messrs. Willie Hughes, Arthur Evans, and Ted Jones; recitations, Misses Linda Howells, Janet Nottingham, Catherine Davies, Clarice Harries. Lizzie J. John, and Messrs. Ieuan Mills and Willie Morris. The usual treat took place on Monday. The tea was thoroughly enjdyed by alL and hours after- wards were spent in lovely weather on the mountain. Fruit and sweets were distri- buted generously to the children, and all in- dulged in innocent healthy games.

I OGMORE VALE

I OGMORE VALE. PRESENTATION.—An interesting function took place at Bethlehem Vestry on Friday after- noon, when the staff of the Ogmore Section of the Prudential Assurance Company attended to present Mr. and Mrs. J. Williams, on Mr. Wil- liams' departure to undertake the supervision of the newly-formed section at Tondu, with a token of esteem. Among'those present were:—Messrs. J. Davies, Pontycymmer; J. W. Simmonds, Kenng Hill, and D. L. Jones, Ogmore Vale, with Mr. D. J. Davies, superintendent of the Bridg- end district, and Mrs. Davies, and Mr. D. Daniel, agent, Aberkenfig. Previous to the pre- sentation a delicious repast was partaken of, when the following ladies waited at the nicely- decorated table :—Mrs. W. Jones and Miss Maud Jones, Highland; Mrs. E. Hopkins, Misses Ger- trude and Lily Jones, Bridgend Shop, and Gwen Price, Oxford House. Mr. Davies, the superintendent presided. Mr. A. Griffiths, the senior agent of the section, asked Mr. Williams to accept the gift of a handsome hall-stand. Afterwards the following testified their admira- tion of Mr. Williams:—Messrs. J. Davies, Pon- tyeymmer, a former assistant superintendent of the Ogmore section; J. W. Simmonds, Kenfig Hill; D. Rogers and D. L. Jones, Ogmore Vale. Messrs. D. Daniel, Tondu, D. Williams and W. Jones, Ogmore Vale, also spoke. The following enlivened the meeting with songs:—Mrs. B. A. Davies, Miss Gwen Price, Mrs. J. Williams, Messrs. D. Rogers and W. Jones, accompanied by Miss Gertrude Jones. Mr. Williams gained high repute as a conductor of Bethlehem Juven- ile Choir.

No title

The Southwark Coroner, at an inquest, said that he had received many letters declaring that the increase in the number of street accidents in London was due not only to bad lighting, but to the fact that either very young or very old men were now driving vehicles. A taxi- cab driver who was giving evidence stated that some taxi-drivers were as old as 70. The Coro- ner: Are they competent? Witness: Oh, yes; as competent as I am.

Advertising

LADIES BLANCHARD'S PILLS Are unrivalled for all Irregularities, etc., they speedily afford relief and never fail to alleviate all suffering, etc. They supersede Pennyroyal, Pil Cochia, Bitter Apple. Blanchard's are the best of all Pills for Women. Sold in boxes Is. Hd., by BOOTS' Branches and all Chemists, or post free, same price, from LESLIE MARTYN, Ltd., Chemists, 34, Dalston Lane, London. Sample aad valuable booklet post free lei  .??_  ? ?M?M?s?BBN S a PIANOS! PIANOS! PIANOS! All British Made Best Value in the World An immense Variety to Select from. CASH or EASY TERHS. A WRITTEN W.A^AXTV WITH KVKUY i N STRl»i;\T. We challenge any Firm to Offer Better Value, Terms or —Prices. — — '— a ?—. ■ WRITE FOR CATALOGUE and COMPARE OUlt STOCK. Thompson & Shackell, (Ltd.), Inspection of the Latest Designs by the LEADING BRITISH MANUFACTURERS Brinsmead, Broadwood Player Pianos, Hopkinson, Challen & Son, Collard & Collard, Moore & Moore, Crow ley, Ajello, Cramer, &c., &c. Largest Discounts for Cash. Old Instruments taken in exchange.—Sole Agents for the Celebrated Estey Organs. Quotations Given for Pianos and Organs by any Maker in the Kingdom. Tunings and Repairs a Speciality. Repairs of every description. Estimates Free. Music and Small Goods in Great Variety. THOMPSON and SHACKELL, Ltd. PIANOFORTE MANUFACTURERS & ORGAN BUILDERS' 1, Wyndham Street, BRIDGEND. WITH BRANCHES THROUGHOUT SOUTH WALES AND MONMOUTHSHIRE.  f?'????r??H?   j Telephon.e 119. Glamorgan Gazette Offices, BRIDGEND. We Direct You to the above Address for PRINTING OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS fPoster Work a Speciality I ■ i Call or Write: lamorgan Gazette Office, ? Queen Street. POSTERS Any Size, Shape or Colour.

I ACCIDENT AT NANTYMOEL

I ACCIDENT AT NANTYMOEL. I DOCTOR SHAKEN UP. An accident happened to the trap in which Dr. Smythe was driven to see his patients last week. The pony, hich is naturally spirited, took fright ank? b(Ited off, and the trap toppled over the bank above North Vale View. The consequences might have been very serious. The doctor had a severe sprain of the ankle and a violent shaking. He has been laid up since then, but is gradually re- covering..

Advertising

Up-to-Date Appliances for turning out ) every class of work at competitive prices, at the "Glamorgan Gazette" Printing Works. MORFA OIL The Collier's Great Remedy. CURES l Rheumatism, Sciatica, Lumbago, Sprains, Strains, Bruises, Stiff Necks, Stiff Joints, Strained Sin- ews, and all Pains, in Joints and Limbs. THOUSANDS of GENUINE TESTIMONIALS Sold in Bottles at Is. lid., 2s. 3d., and 4s. 6d. From all Chemists or the Proprietors. Evans & May, Chemists, T39 Water St., Aberavon,