Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 7 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
17 articles on this page
MAESTEG COLLIERS FINED 1 I

MAESTEG COLLIERS FINED — ALLEGED FALSE MARKING OF A TRAM. A CHANGE FROM DAY WAGE TO TONNAGE. At Bridgend Police Court on Saturday, Wm. Jones, collier, Ivor Street, Maesteg, and John Phillips, collier, Gelliheblig Cottages, Llangyn- wyd, were summoned for having falsely marked a tram at St. John's Colliery. Mr. Kenshole (Aberdare) was for the Com- pany, and Alderman E. E. Davies (instructed by the Miners' Federation) defended. Mr. Kenshole, prosecuting for the Colliery Company, said Jones was doing ordinary col- lier's work at the colliery, and Phillips was one of a gang that was driving a hard heading in the 7ft. seam. For a considerable time the men had been paid on the day wage rate pend- ing the settlement of a price list. Eventually, however, a price list was settled, and com- menced on 17th May last. Each collier had a working number, and when he was working by the ton he marked his trams consecutively to the end of the week or fortnight. The day wage rate ceased on Saturday, 15th May, so that all the coal worked on that day was com- pany coal. The tonnage rate commenced on Monday, 17th May. In order to get a proper commencement of the new arrangement, the officials were told to go in and get all the coal from the faces that had been worked up to the end of Saturday. When the fireman went into Jones' place he found that in addition to his working number of 332, Jones had also got 1 in the ring; and Phillips had also got his number 326 with (1) in the ring. The result would have been that these men would have been paid their day wage rate and would have been paid under the tonnage rate as well. They were interviewed and asked if they had left the trams of coal at the face. They said they had, and when asked why they had put (1) in the ring they replied, To get paid." William John Packer, Duke Street, Maesteg, night fireman at St. John's Colliery, said in con- sequence of the change in the mode of payment he was instructed to do certain work, and went to William Jones' working place. He found a tram there with Jones' working number, and a (1) in a ring. Phillips' was the same. They would have been paid the day wage rate for the coal, and at the tonnage rate, thus getting two payments. Alderman E. E. Davies: The price list came into operation on the 17th May?—Yes. And this tram was filled on the 15th?-Yes. When were Phillips and his party informed that they were to come on the price list? I don't know. Alfred W. Preston, under-manager, said up to the 15th May the 7ft. seam was worked at the day wage rate. After he received the report regarding the tram he saw defendants, who told him they had marked the trams in the way they had in order to get paid for them. Alderman E. E. Davies: Did Jones tell you he was entitled to be paid for the tram?—I don't think he did; I don't remember it. If they had been working on the price list up to the 15th, and on Monday were to be paid on the day wage rate, would the last tram for the 15th May be marked (1) for the 17th May? Yes, in the ordinary way. Why should it be included in the following week in one case and not in the other?—I could not say. Is it because it is to the Company's advan- tage in one case and to their disadvantage in the other?—I don't know. George Isaac said he was present at an inter- view between the under-manager and Phillips. The under-manager asked him if he had marked the tram in the ring. Phillips asked why, and the under-manager told him he was doing wrong. Phillips replied that he was sorry, and did not know he was doing anything out of the way. EXPECTED TO BE PAID. For the defence, Alderman E. E. Davies said the evidence given by the prosecution was far from proving criminal intent on the part of defendants. This all happened at a peculiar time-during a change from one system to an- other. The Company had set up a very careful system to see that the change was carried out properly. They suggested that the defendants marked the two trams with the intention of get- ting paid for them, knowing at the time they did it that they had no right to paid for them. Jones, in fact, did so deliberately with the ex- pectation that he would be paid for it, and that he was entitled to be paid for it. It that was so, then he submitted the charge must fail. Whether the man was right in his belief was not for the Bench to consider. That would be a matter for serious consideration by the Com- pany later on and for negotiation. With regard to Phillips, he was working under the yard sys- tem. Although his party knew that the price list was commencing on the 17th May, they did not know it was to apply to them, and they were expecting the previous arrangement to be terminated by notice. It was the rule to mark the last tram on Saturday to ensure that the proper number of trams would be provided the following week. When he was told that he had done wrong, Phillips immediately informed the checkweigher, and asked him to take the tram off the list. It had been admitted in evidence that if the Company had been going from the tonnage rate to the day wage rate, they would have had the benefit of these trams, so taking the advantage of the change. William Jones said he had been employed by North's since last October. Up to the 15th May he was on the day wage rate. He knew that the price list was coming into operation on the 17th May. He still considered he was entitled to receive the money for the tram, al- though he had not been paid for it yet. When the under-manager asked him why he marked his tram with (1) in the ring. witness told him that he marked it to be paid for it, and that he was entitled to be paid for it. The under-man- ager said it was a serious matter. Mr. Kenshole: Have you ever changed over from day wage rate to tonnage before i Yes. Where?—At Nantymoel. Have you ever marked a figure in the ring before?-No; it was not required. If that tram had gone up to the machine you would have been paid for it?—Yes. The trams that are worked in the afternoon shift go out at night?—I don't know. John Phillips, Llangynwyd, said his party was the only party in the seam working on the yardage system before the 15th May. He knew that the price list was coming into operation on the following Monday. He first knew that he as a party was to come under the price list on the 2 o'clock shift on Monday. When he heard that h. went to the checkweigher and told him to keep the tram back, as he was go- ing on tonnage. Mr. Kenshole: Do you know by putting the mark on the tram that you would have been paid at the tonnage rate?-No; I was working by the yard. I was expecting a fortnight's notice before I went off the "yard." William Hitchings, checkweigher, said Phil- lips asked him to take the tram off his list. The Chairman: We are satisfied that the charge is proved, for which defendants will be fined R2 each. John Jones, collier, Garn Terrace, Maesteg, was similarly summoned, and fined X2.

Advertising

"ssssr vs- BUSINESS AS USUAL I the Flag Flying. BUSINESS AS USUAL for Style & Value. A CALL ?0 ?UTY. j??????M THE RIGHT HON. JOHN BURNS, M.P., writing on Sept. nth, 1914, says:—"I hope  ?"?????? that the great army of Housekeepers will not only have their renovating done now, but ??????  ???/?'????\ ? will also RESUME THE BUYING OF FURNITURE. By so doing you will help to r g relieve the distress and prevent unemployment, on which the GERMANS ARE COUNT- \?E-3L  tING TO WEAKEN GRA EAT BRITAIN. Be Patriotic and carry out Mr. John Eum's §jj advice! Every purchase needlessly with-held is equal to a vote for German //??' ? aggression! Our FURNITURE, like our Navy, is Absolutely Reliable. » ^T jj /'S?-t\\ ags?ssEon! OMrFURMtTURE, like our Navy, is Ab?o?u?etyRBB!ab!e. r ?\y  mmont;;ftA few of our J63/J8/6 f°r the | £ ^| Ijjflt Parlour Suite from £ 3/18/6 Minimum of Cost -—- £ 6(10(° Minimum of Costa=W.omBedroom 26/10/0 Solid Walnut Suite, .28 15a. Bedsteads 20/18/0 A. E. LOCKYER, conplite House Furnlstur, 138 & 139, Gemmercial St., Maesteg

MAESTEG NEWSAGENTS I

MAESTEG NEWSAGENTS I AND THEIR NEWSBOYS. I I At Bridgend Police Court on Saturday, T. J. Davies and Paul H. Watkins, newsagents, Commercial Street, Maesteg, were summoned for having employed boys after the hours stip- ulated in the Shops Act.—Mr. J. R. Snape defended. G. Ferrier Williams, Shop Inspector under the Maesteg Urban District Council, stated that he saw boys employed by defendants sell- ing papers at ten o'clock. He saw Davies, who told him that the train did not come in till 9-5. Witness added that he allowed the newsagents half an hours grace in which to get the boys in, but considered ten o'clock was beyond the limit. Mr. Snape: It was not necessary for you to have reported the matter to the Council be- fore taking proceedings?—No. Did you report the cases to the Council?- Yes. Why?—Mr. Davies thought I was dealing too harshly with them, and I thought if there was any benefit to be given the Council should deal with it. The reason you reported it was that in your opinion it was a very thin case?—No. You were very doubtful whether you ought to go on or not?—No doubt at all. Have you found out that the train arrived at 9-5 ? Y es; a special train. Will you tell the Justices the time the boys are allowed to sell papers?—They are allowed out till 9-30. By the Act?—Nine o'clock by the Act. So if the train does not come up till after nine the newsagents must not put boys on the streets to sell papers?-No boys under 14. For the defence Mr. Snape submitted that it was ridiculous to take out summonses in this case. The public were anxious to get the last editions of the papers in these times. The papers did not arrive till 9-5, and that left practically no time for the papers to be sold. Because they were selling at ten o'clock the Inspector rushed those people into Court. Defendants were fined 10s. each.

IASSAULT AT NANTYFFYLLON

I ASSAULT AT NANTYFFYLLON. I THREATENED TO THROW HER DOWN- STAIRS. At Bridgend Police Court on Saturday, Annie Haines, Hearts of Oak Cottages, Nantyffyllon, summoned William Clarey, col- lier, Hearts of Oak Cottages, for assault. Complainant said she was talking to a neighbour when defendant came up and used abusive language. When she was putting her child to bed she heard a kick at the door. She heard defendant say that if he could not get in the front door he would go round the back! He went round there and forced an entrance. He then told witness to come downstairs or he would go up and throw her down. Witness then came down and defendant used offensive language towards her. Mrs. Roberts also gave evidence. Defendant was fined 15s.

ALLEGED BAD LANGUAGE AT CAERAU

ALLEGED BAD LANGUAGE AT CAERAU. NEIGHBOURS FALL OUT. I At Bridgend Police Court on Saturday, Mrs. Wilcox, Mrs. Emily Morony, and Mrs. James, of Glanavon Terrace, Caerau, were summoned for having, it was alleged, used indecent lan- guage towards Annie Vysey. Complainant said on the 29th June defendants started on her about 11 in the morning. She had gone out to the back to throw some ashes into the garden, when Mrs. Wilcox used an of- fensive term to her. The other defendants later called her other names. They said she had not been in the tuberculosis hospital at all, and she produced in Court a certificate from Dr. Bell Thomas that she had been in the tuber- culosis Hospital for treatment. Frederick Lambert said he heard the three defendants using bad language towards com- plainant. Mrs. Lewis, daughter of Mrs. Wilcox, said they had been washing, and had got a line full of clothes out, when complainant came out and threw some ashes down. A second shovel- ful was thrown, and as it was going over the clothes, her mother called complainant a "dirty slut." Complainant then tried to throw a shovelful over witness' mother. Defendant denied having used indecent lan- guage. The case was dismissed.

j CAERAU I

CAERAU. I PRESENTATION. On Wednesday after- noon the staff and scholars of Caerau infant school presented Miss James (the popular senior assistant) with a handsome leather writ- ing case, suitably inscribed, on her departure for Neath. Miss Williams made the presen- tation, and Miss James appropriately respon- ded. Miss James has been engaged at the above school for seven and a half ye.ars, hav- ing served for seven years under the late Miss Wi lkins. By her kind and gentle manner Miss James has made a host of friends at Caerau. She has been appointed headmistress of Melyn Infant School, Neath, and while her departure will be a great loss to the district and will be keenly felt, she carries with her the good wishes of her many friends to her new sphere.

Advertising

Up-to-date appliances for turning out every class of work at competitive prices, at the "Glamorgan Gazette" Printing Works.

ECONOMISING IN LABOUR

ECONOMISING IN LABOUR. MAESTEG COUNCIL AND ITS WORKMEN MR. J. P. GIBBON AND THE FUTURE OF THE DISTRICT. Mr. H. Laviers, J.P., presided over a meeting of the Maesteg U.D. Council held at the Council Offices on Tuesday evening. There were also present: Messrs. T. Lewis, Philip Jones, J. Hughes, A. Nicholas, T. E. Hopkins, J.P., Rees Griffiths, Gomer Davies, J. P. Gibbon, J.P., D. Davies, H. M. Jones; with the clerk (Alderman E. E. Davies), the surveyor (Mr. S. J. Harpur) and the sanitary inspector (Mr. G. E. Howells). THE ASSISTANT INSPECTOR'S SALARY. An application by the Assistant Inspector of Nuisances, for an increase in his salary, was brought before the meeting. Mr. D. Davies said the matter had been considered enough, and he therefore moved that the Council confirm the resolution passed at a previous meeting, granting the inspec- tor an increase of JE10. This was seconded. Mr. Gomer Davies moved an amendment that the increase be not granted. He did not think it would be wise that the applica- tion should be granted. Mr. Griffiths seconded. The amendment was put to the meeting and lost, the original resolution being accepted. A PROBATIONER'S HOLIDAYS. A letter was read from Miss Bronwen Howell, probationer nurse at the Maesteg Hospital, in which she asked for leave for her annual holidays. Mr. T. E. Hopkins moved that the applica- tion be granted. Mr. Gomer Davies said he was not against granting the holiday, but was it convenient for her to have her holiday when there were 33 patients at the Hospital ? The Chairman thought there was a very un- usual number at the Hospital. Mr. Gomer Davies moved that the appli- cation be granted subject to the matron's con- sent.—Agreed. WHAT A PATIENT COSTS PER DAY. The Clerk read the monthly statement from the Hospital with regard to the cost per pa- tient per day for the month of June. It was recorded that each patient cost at the rate of Is. lid. per day. Mr. T. E. Hopkins wished to say on behalf of the Finance Committee that although that amount appeared rather high, the Council ought to know that there were two items of expenditure included in that amount which woul

IMAESTEG CONDUCTOR 0

MAESTEG CONDUCTOR 0- I OF GWENT GLEE SINGERS. In fulfilment of long-standing contracts, the Gwent Glee Singers, who lost three of their members in the Lusitania disaster, left Cardiff on Friday night for a return visit to the United States, the tour being expected to last nine months. On this occasion Mr. David John (Dewi Llyfnwy), Maesteg, acts as con-t ductor, and the place of Taranlais Hopkins, who went down with the Lusitania, is taken by his brother, Mr. George Hopkins, of Tylors- town, formerly of the Turner Opera Company. Another change is the inclusion of a coming young Gilgerran vocalist, B. T. Jones.

I CAERAU COLLIERY SUMMONSES

I CAERAU COLLIERY SUMMONSES. At Bridgend Police Court on Saturday, Richard Lewis, ripper, Church Street, Caerau, was fined 10s. for having carried up timber in a cage at Caerau Colliery. William* Williams, collier boy. Lloyds Street, Caerau, was summoned for having stolen a quantity of timber, value 6d., the goods of Norths Navigation Colliery Company. The summons was dismissed.

I DEATH OF A MAESTEG TRADESMAN

DEATH OF A MAESTEG TRADESMAN THE LATE MR. WM. JENKINS. It is with regret that we have to record the death of one of the most highly respected residents of Maesteg, in the person of Mr. William Jenkins, ironmonger, Commercial Street. Mr. Jenkins had been an inhabitant of the town for more than 40 years, and dur- ing that time he had established a thriving business in the district. Mr. Jenkins could not be idle; he was essentially a man of action and not of words. If it was necessary for him to say "Go and do," he almost invariably went and did the thing himself. His life accumulated no rust, but it was spent unre- mittingly in service and duty and devotion to things noble and good, to within a few weeks of his death. One sad feature of his death is the suddenness with which his breakdown came about. For almost a twelvemonth or more Mr. Jenkins' health had been somewhat indifferent, but, in spite of a gradually failing health, he still applied himself to his business and to other calls and services in life. At last, however, the human machine had to give way, and for about three weeks Mr. Jenkins was confined to his home, and latterly to his bed, where he became the most patient of pa- tients. He died peacefully, in the presence of his family, in the early morning of Satur- day. He leaves a widow, four sons, and a daughter to mourn their loss. Mr. Jenkins' activities were not only cen- tred in business. He was an active member, trustee, deacon and treasurer of Bethel Bap- tist Church for many years. In his "going home," Bethel Baptist Church has sustained a great loss, for whatever was to be done there, Mr. Jenkins would be foremost in the work. His religion was not of the meditative type, but of the practical; his Christianity was not in the air. To him it was not a theory to be propounded or a problem to dis- cuss, but a life to live. The Church was a sphere for him to labour in, and he did labour in his own practical way, with untiring devo- tion and incessant industry. Bethel Church, which he served so faithfully and well, loses, by his death, a most unselfish supporter. He leaves behind him a widow who is no less active in the Church and in all philanthropic movements than he himself was. Her child- ren, three sons and a daughter, who are in Maesteg, are also faithful members at Bethel. A fourth son, the youngest—Mr. Stanley Jen- kins-is in the trenches in the North of France, fighting the battles of his King and country, but official information is to hand stating that leave cannot be granted him to pay the last tribute of respect to the mortal remains of his father, whom he had not seen for many months. This circumstance adds greater sadness to the sorrow of the bereaved family, to whom the greatest sympathy is ex- tended by the Church and friends. The Church at Bethel mourns the loss 01 one who was faithful to the cause, zealous for its progress and prosperity, who was upright in the extreme in all that he did, and who was the trusted friend of every minister of the Gospel. The funeral, which was for men only, took place on Wednesday.

MAESTEG I

MAESTEG. I PREACHING SERVICES.—The annual preaching services of Calfaria Welsh Baptist Chapel, Cwmfelin, was held on Sunday and Monday, when the Rev. Charles Davies, Car- diff, and the Rev W. Saunders, Pontycymmer, preached eloquent sermons to large and ap- preciative audiences.

NANTYFFYLLONI

NANTYFFYLLON. I SAR,O.N.-An interesting quarterly meeting was held in connection with the Saron Sunday School, Nantyffyllon. The children's meeting was held in the morning, when a large num- ber of children attended. Miss Blodwen Grif- fiths, the Superintendent of -L-he Children's Sunday School presided. The following chil- dren took part :Glyn Richards, D. Ernest Morris, Morfyd Powell, Ivy Davies, Vera Thomas, Edith Mills, Florence Hopkins, W. D. Williams, Lily May Davies, Elizabeth A. Davies, Sarah Ann Rees, Gwladys Thomas, Dilys Davies, Ernest James, Gladys Davies, Dories Davies, Gwyneth Hughes, W. T. Jones, Cosslett Griffiths, Gwyneth Davies, Brinley Hughes, Olwen Price, Lizzie Thomas, Marcu Van Loon, Elizabeth Mary Thomas, Arfor Williams, Annie Miles, Arfor and Maggie Wil- liams. The children's choir gave a capital rendering of H Milwys Bach y Groes." An- other successful meeting was held in the even- ing, when the adults took part. Mr. Hopkin Hopkins, Supetintendent of the Sunday School, presided over a large congregation. Mr. David Hopkins and Mr. J. B. Thomas both gave excellent recitations, and Misses Sarah Jane Rees and Gwladys Thomas fol- lowed with another dialogue. Miss Blodwen Griffiths' Girls' Choir was heard to advantage, and Misses Anfor and Maggie Williams gave a pretty duet. Solos were rendered by Misses Muriel and Margretta James, H. Davies and Mr. D. J. Davies, A.C. A trio by Messrs. Tom Lloyd, Watkin Watkins and Miss Davies, and a quartette by Messrs. H. Hopkins, J. B. Thomas, Misses Nest Davies and Margretta James. Other items were: Male quartette by the brothers. Messrs. D. J. Davies, A.C., Geo. M. Davies, Idris Davies and Ancurin Davies and a solo by Mr. Hopkin Hopkins. Addres- ses were delivered by Messrs. Lewis John, Joseph Thomas. Benianain Tho-iiis and Mor- gan Thomas. Miss Blodwen Griffiths and Mr. I W. J. Richards presided at the piano.

Advertising

Up-to-Date Appliances tor turning out every class of work at competitive prices, at the "Glamorgan Gazette" Printing Works. THE SALE OF ALL SALE IS w w w. HENRY LAVIERS WHICH IS NOW ONe As usual there are wonderful Bargains in every Department. Send For Circular- fie IiaVieps, Commercial St., MA ES TEG. OOOOOOOöooaa    ?    ?? Complete Mauna 1. n. JenK? tns? ? ??? Successor to TNT. Jenkins & Sons, 14 and 15, Commercial Street, MAESTEG. We are now showing many new designs in. BEDROOM SUITES Solid Oak, Walnut & Mahogany. pMoM: Sir1" "'ir It has always been our Prices: ISp] It has always been our object to sell the 6 ti Gru..iinnpeaas «s |Vwa|4 iiPe fHj [l i$p ,i i newest & best designs 8 Guineas ? Llji lDftpjJ- U 1 at prices well within 10 Guineas the reach of everyone. It will be a positive pleasure to us, to show you round our show- rooms whether buying or not- Accept this as an invitation when next in the vicinity.

IMAESTEG GROUP OF SCHOOL I MANAGERS

I MAESTEG GROUP OF SCHOOL I MANAGERS. I THE N.U.T PROTEST. I The ordinary meeting of the Maesteg Group of School Managers was held at the Plas- newydd Board Room on Monday afternoon, when there were present Mr. Alfred Griffiths (in the chair), Mrs. David, Mr. Gomer Davies, Mr. W. G. Roberts, Mr. J. Roderick, Mr. J. P. Gibbon, J.P. C.C., Mr. T. E. Hopkins, J.P., Mr. John Hughes and Alderman K E. Davies, with the deputy clerk, Mr. G. Ferrier Williams. I RESIGNATIONS. Miss Alma Lewis, uncertificated teacher at the Cwmfelin Infant School and Mr. J. V. Morris, teacher at the Nantyffyllon Boys' School, and Mr. D. H. Watkins, uncertificated teacher at Caerau mixed school, wrow resign- ing their positions.—Accepted. A letter was read from Mr. Giraldus Rees, of Church Street, Maesteg, now pupil teacher at the Plasnewydd Boys' School, to be ap- pointed uncertificated teacher at that school from August 1st to 15th September next, when he intended entering college. It was resolved that the application be not entertained. TEACHERS' PROTEST. A letter was read from Mr. J. J. Griffiths, hon. secretary of the Maesteg District branch (N.U.T.) with copy of a resolution passed at a meeting of the branch held on the 25th ult., objecting to the action of the managers in re- fusing to appoint local men, who had comple- ted their professional training, to schools in the district where there were vacancies, on the ground that they were of military age and that women should be appointed to fill the vacancies. It was resolved that the Clerk forward a copy of the resolution to Mi-. Griffiths. INSPECTOR'S REPORT. The report of H.M. Inspector, Mr. \V. Ed- wards, on the Nantyffyllon Council School, after visits of 10th March, 28th and 29th of April were read and considered, and the Clerk directed to write to Dr. James that the managers considered that the recommen- dations therein contained be carried out. SCHOOL CLEANEKS. Applications for the post of cleaner for the I Garth School were read, when it was resolved that Mrs. Mary Ann Phillips, of Pit StreeT, I flnrth. he aDDointed. APPOINTMENT. I It was resolved to recommend that -Miss Ethel Hanson, of Llangynwyd, be appointed I uncertificated teacher to the Cwmfelin mixed school, and that Miss Kathleen Ferrier, un- certificated teacher of Cwmfelin, be trans- ferred to the Llwynderw Boys' School.

IFURIOUS RIDING AT CAERAU I

FURIOUS RIDING AT CAERAU. l LITTLE GIRL INJURED. I At Bridgend Police Court on Saturday, Christopher Jenkins, collier, Caerau, was sum- moned for having ridden a bicycle furiously at Caerau. .A police constable said he saw defendant rid- ring at a furious rate. He knocked over a little girl, and injured her. When he spoke to defendant about it, he said she was on the wrong side of the road. Defendant was fined 15s. I Morgan Morgan, collier, Caerau, was simi- larly summoned, and had to pay 15s.

Advertising

WAR WAR I Has given a ehanee to show what CO-OPERATIVE FACTORIES (controlled by Workers, not eapitalists) *an do, many of our goods are the same price as before the War Biscuits, Lards, Jams, Soaps, etc., not advanced. We are affiliated to the Co-operative Union and the C.W.S (wbo have an annual turnover of about ,c -o,oooooo.) We pay 5 on Share Capital and 4% on Loan Capital Deposits (this can be withdrawn anytime. New Members joining are at once in benefit, under our Insurance Policy, and in the eveht of Husband's death 4/- out of every £ paid as a trading member, is immediately paid the Widow, or 2/- in the £ to the husband if his wife dies, (this has nothing todo with the usual Dividends,) YES, it pays to be a Co-operative Member, think it over, you caa join anytime, and costs 1 only. Caerau & Maesteg Co-operative Society Limited. DOROTHY CAFE, (NEXT DOOR TO MAYPOLE) Ccitjnjercial Street. Maesteg. The next time you are visiting Maesteg, call at the Dorothy fur a really good CUP OF TEA. Home-made Bread and Fresh Welsh Butter. Plain Tea, 6d. Hot Dinners from 12 to 2.30p.m. Chops and Steaks to order. Cooked Meats are our speciality. Always fresh and of Best Quality. Pressed Beef, Roast Pork, Engish and Welsh Ham, Ox Tongue, Galantine Veal and Ham, Pork Pies, Veal & Ham Pies, Steak & Kidney Pies, Sausage Rolls. Large sizes made to order at shortest notice. FREE ESTIMATES FOR WEDDINO RECEPTIONS Luncheons, Dinners and all Branches of Catering R. WILLIAMS & SONS. Be Patriotic I Keep your Money on the move by spending wisely with our Advertisers. 1