Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
13 articles on this page
Advertising

Z.- BEVAN & COMPANY, Ltd., Furnishers and Piano Merchants, CARDIFF, SWANSEA, &c. Do you realize the great importance of placing your orders in the hands of a lirst-class firm vshsn purchasing vs- FURNITURE -a The name of this well-known Firm is a household word throughout, Stiutli Wales and MSnmouthshire, and is of itself a guarantee for the quality of the goods supplied. f An immense Selectioa! Fo^k-bottom prices ^verv aiticJe warrai^td Catalogues G all's —All goods delivered fiee up to 200 miles from "any Branch. ———— ,The longer you put off purchasing 1he more you will certainly have to pay for 9 THAT PIANOFORTE Bevan & Company are not solely dependant upon the sale of InstrumEnts, and cam therefore supply one at many pounds under the usual Music Warehouse Prices. Every Piano warranted Ten Years. Organs from 7/6 and Pianofortes from 10/6 per month.

Peeps at Porthcawl

Peeps at Porthcawl; J By MARINER. « | .r- 9 I am very glad to hear that the large num- ber of wounded soldiers who, having faith- fully done their "bit," have come to (KlT town for rest and recuperation, are to be given a jolly good time during their stay amongst us; they deserve everything 114 the best, -and we shall try to give it to them. I understand that Mr. D- J. Rees, whose acti-ri- ties in connection with the Y.M.C-A. are well- known, is the prime mover in a scheme having this object in view, and by the time these lines appear, the machinery he has con- structed will be in full working order. An influential and representative town's -meet- ing was held at the Y.M.C.A. on Monday afternoon, with Mr. T. Elwood Deere, J.P-, in the chair, to consider the question of pro- viding comforts for the wounded soldiers at the Rest and at Detnygraig. Mr. D. J. Rees (secretary) read a letter from the Command- ant of the Rest (Mrs. Ioewis), stati-ng that several gentlemen had kindly offered to give concerts for the entertainment of the soldiers, and she would be glad if he would undertake the entire work of the organisation of these events in order to obviate overlapping and other difficulties. It was agreed by the cam- mittee that Mr. Rees should undertake this work. The first concert was held on Thurs- day last week, and others have been arranged. It was thought that Christmas pudding and other little luxuries might be sent to the sol- diers, and another suggestion was thrown out that the provision of the whole of the Christ- mas dinner for the inmates of the Rest and Danygraig should be undertaken. This sug- gestion was received with enthusiasm, and it was decided to canvass the town for subscrip- tions for this purpose. Districts were mapped out, and canvassers appointed to Sf)- licit donations in cash or kind. Each can- vasser will be provided with a collecting book and a printed appeal, signed by the chairman and secretary (Mr. T. E. Deere, J.P., and Mr. D. J. Rees). A committee was appointed to undertake the arrangements, comprising Mrs. Leonard Byass, Mrs. W. J. Phillips, Mrs. Pyman, Mrs. T. D. Bevan, Mrs. Bradshaw, Mrs. Wyndham Jenkins, Mrs Alexander, Mrs Charles Morris, Mrs. Hugh Price, Mrs. John Owen (Nevern), Mrs. D. J. Rees, Mrs. Allen, Mrs. T. E. Deere, Mrs. E. W. Pearce, Mrs. Howells (Rhyl School), Mrs. How-all Williams (Newton), Mrs. Harrison, Mrs. Grover, Mrs. Price; Mrs. Francis, Miss Roberts, Miss Williams (Trelawney), Miss Langdon, Miss Katie James, Miss Dobson, Miss Letty David, Miss Cole, Rev. W..1. Phillips, C.C., Mr. Sam Eeast, Mr. T. Ernest Davies (National Provincial Bank), Rev. T. S. Samuel, Mr. D. Davies, Mr. T-. E. Deere, J.P., and Mr. D. J. Rees. This is in every way a strong committee, and they can be re- lied upon to bring the scheme upon which they have embarked to a conclusion satisfac- tory to all concerned. 1*1 Porthcawl can claim to have at least one of its sons with the Canadian Forces in the per- son of Mr. W. S. Vivian, youngest son of the late Mr. F. E. Vivian, of Porthcawl, and brother of the late Mr. H. C. Vivian. Mr. Vivian, who is with the 47th Battalion (Over- seas) of Canadians, has recently arrived in England. He has been stationed with the 104th Regiment on Vancouver Island for the past 13 months, doing home guard, and im- mediately transferred to the 47th Regiment on their leaving New Westminster, B.C., for England. We wish him the best of every- thing. Hit A special train arrived., at Porthcawl on Monday afternoon, conveying a number of wounded soldiers belonging to I Co., 3rd Welsh Regiment, under the command of Cap- tain Grismond Phillips. who are to be sta- tioned at the Rest and Danyg/aig, to tfe number of about 180. These n.en have all seen active service, and some who re not able t-o walk to their new home, were con- veyed by a fleet of motor cars which had been arranged for. The others marched down through the town, led by the hand of the -23rd (Pioneer) Battalion, who also played to the station a number of the 3rd Welsh Regi- ment, who have been at Danygraig for some time past, and have now proceeded else- where. Ill The last belated visitors have departed, and the town is now left to its winter somnolence. True, we have the military with us, and their numbers are daily increasing, but witlxtbat exception—to use a well-worn phrase-it is as dead as a door nail, though, like Dickens, I should imagine that a coffin nail is the deadest piece of upholstery in the trade. There are possibilities, very rerapte, I am afraid, of com- mercial activity in the erection of a new hydropathic hotel, but to rely upon this pro- ject materialising in any way at the present time would be very unwise, for there is a great difficulty in the way. If the erection of the building is to be proceeded with in the near future the Council will be required to pledge themselves to provide adequate and necessary sanitary arrangements, which cannot be done except at the expense of a considerable sum of money. This places the Council in a quan- dary. Naturally, the Council wish to do everything in their power to assist in the development of the town, but there is the em- bargo of the Local Government Board upon unnecessary expenditure on the part oMocal authorities during the period of the walr to be borne in mind, and this I am afraid the Board would' characterise as unnecessary, though it would undoubtedly do the town a great deal of good. It was a timely sugges- tion of Mr. Grace that the architect for the proposed work should be invited to meet the Council in order to discuss the pros and conS" of the situation, because in any case no harm will be done, and the Council do not pledge or bind themselves in any way. What the result of such a conference will be it is, of course, idle to speculate, but if, as seems more than probable, it is found impossible to proceed with the project at the preent juncture, it may still remain a scheme, merely postponed nntil < more fitting moment. Such an insti- (Continued on Bottom of Next Column)

Peeps at Porthcawl

(Continued from Previous Column). tution woul d do much for the town, and might lead to its becoming one of the recognised all- the-year-round resorts, instead of merely a; place to be patronised only in "the aeaflQfl," ►

ThE TALE OF A HORSE i

ThE TALE OF A HORSE. i PORTHCAWL MAIL. CAQT Mitt-ViaI SUED. BREACH OF WARRANTY. t At Bridgend County-cewrt on Friday, ore His Honour Judge n Bøbets, David Jones, hay merchant, ci -Caanm, sued Isaac Jow«, of Rprthcawl, far a toesfch eff "warranty of a horse. Mr. Lovafit Frasor, barrister, was for the plaintiff and 1&. W. H. iThccnas for the defendant. .-1k..ùwat Fraser said his client feought a I horse from a Mr. Wlatkms, i&gfcRtifor an un- disclosed principal, Isaac Jones, who was now fbemg 'suod. Plaintiff said 'he \5sitgft St. Mary Hill,tair last August, aaiil ^s&w^Watkins with a horse for sale. He asked him how much he wanted for it, acd WarSktns: repslied £26 10s. In answer to witness- he feaid he would war- Tartt the horse te be¡a; williker. Witness found the horse could not see; in both eyes, and offered t25 for it. Eventually, he agreed to buyiilie animal for £ 25 70s. Witness impressed on defendant the fact that he wanted the borse for a hilly district, and he said he would guarantee the animal as a thoroughly reliable one. He added, "If T had"aT>ad horse I would -never sell it to a local man." Witness gave him a crossed cheque and took the animal Imme. Next morning 'he. tried it in a light "trolley, but could not get it to move even with coaxing. He subsequently saw Watkiris. at "Tygthegsto and be aai3 "he was prepared to try the horse anywhere. When witness called upon him on a. subsequent occasion he refused to see ¥im -or to discuss the matter at all. Cross-examined by Mr. Thomas: Witness did not tell Watklns the horse was just the sort of animal he had been wanting. Defen- dant did not tell witness the animal was "a bit collar proud. Edward Daivis, John-street, Nantyfyllon, said he saw defendant in Bridgend at the end of September. Defendant told witness he had sold a horse to plaintiff at St. Mary Hill Fair. Later witness told defendant he could fetch the horse back again, and he said plaintiff could do nothing with, him, as he gave no guarantee. Witness was of opinion the horse was no good at all, as it was a jibber. Know- ing the horse, he would not give E5 for it. Roland Thomas, cashier in the employ of the London and Provincial Ba4, Bridgend, II said he passed plaintiff's cheque for payment. He subsequently went with the plaintiff to Tythegston, where they saw Watkins. Wit- ness told him the cheque he had cashed the day before had been stopped, and the bank wanted the money back. Watkins replied 'that the cheque was all right, and the money had been paid t& defendant. Plaintiff sand. the horse was a jibber, aijd1 Watkins said, "It is all right, as I told you yesterday. I only had my day's wage for selling the horse, and if Mr. Isaac Jones will return the money I will return the day's wage." Evan Rolands, milk-vendor, said the horse Was a proper jibber. Defendant, in the box, said he was the driver of the mail cart from Porthcawl to Bridgend. He was allowed an hour for the journey, which included stops at Tythegston and LaJeston. He used the horse in question in the mail cart, and found that it was rather a bad starter, and a bit "collar proud," but a good worker. The first time he used the horse in the mail cart he was five minutes late at Bridgend, as the horse was a little slow in starting. Watkins asked him if he had a horse he could lend, and witness lent him this horse. Witness asked him to take the horse to St. Mary Hill Fair, and told him to try and sell it, but not for less than L22. He told him not to give a warranty with it..If the horse had been quite all right it would have been worth at least £ 50. Griffith Watkins, horse dealer, of Tytheg- ston, gave evidence of the sale of the horse. He gave no warranty with it. His Honour gave judgment for the plaintiff,- with damages for £1"5.

DEFENCE OF THE REALM ACT

DEFENCE OF THE REALM ACT PORTHCAWL MAN CHARGED. ADJOURNMENT GRANTED. Frederick Charles Bowen, labourer, Porth- cawl, was charged at Briigen4 Police-court on Monday with having committed an offence under the Defence of the Realm Act by hav- ing made statements likely to prejudice recruiting, at the New Inn Beerhouse, Porth- cawl. Captain* Shannon, of the 3rd Welsh (Pio- neer) Battalion, appeared to prosecute on behalf of the military authorities. Mr. W. M. Thomas, for defendant, said he understood an application was to be made for an adjournment. He had all his witnesses present, but he would not oppose it. He did, however, ask that bail shotfld 'be allowed. Captain Shannon: I have no objection, but sureties ought to be substantial, as it is a serious case. Mr. Thomas: That is a matter for the Bench to decide; we say it is trivial. Defendant was reraanded, bail being allowed, £20 in himself and one surety of £20.

No title

Mr. Osmond Smith, the small holdings officer of the Glamorgan County Council, in conversation with a newspaper represents tive, said there was much confusion in the minds of farmers and ag ricultural labourers regarding recuiting. Whilst some farmers and men had been starred others had not, and it should be made clear that if men desired to be marked as indispensable they should enlist before December 4th in their group, and then come before the tribunal. They would then be in a better position for exemption, he thought, than those who did nothing. This advioe applied only to farmers and skilled lab- ourers of military age who had received Lord Derby's letter.

PORTiiCAVffL URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL

PORTiiCAVffL URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL. GAS MATTERS. I THE MEMBERS SEEK FURTHER I INFORMATION. Mr. T, E. Deere, J.P. (Chairman) presided 1 at a meeting of the Porthcawl Urban District I Council on Monday evening. A CURT RETORT. I A circular letter was' received from the Local Government- fi(44-t with reference to I the constitution of the recruiting tribunal, stating that it might be considered advisable to alter the constitution of the local tribunal so that, instead of consisting of the whole of the members of the Council, a tribunal of five might be elected, who need' not necessarily be members of the Cuncil. Mr. T. G. Jones moved that the tribunal consist of the three oldest members of the Council—Messrs. John Grace, T. James, and R. E. Jones, with Mr. Leonard Byass and Mr. G. E. Blundell (Nottage Court). This was agreed to. On the same subject a communication was received from the Recruiting Arbitration Tri- bunal at Cardiff, suggesting that this tri- bunal might undertake the work instead of the local tribunal, in order to save expense and inconvenience to the Recruiting Officer in attending before a number of different bodies. This tribunal would undertake the work in East Glamorgan, and the Pressklent of the Local Government BoArd had given his consent to the arrangement, on it being pointed out to him that it Wtmld be more helpful to deal with unstarred men in starred occupations than his own scheme. Mr. T. James: This letter appears to be from busybodies who would like to have the ruling of heaven and earth in their own hands. If I were not suggested as a member of this tribunal I would not sit still and allow the functions of the Council to be t«Jk«n from them in this manner. They have to write to us to get our consent to this arrangement, whereas, according to the terms oi Mr. Wal- ter Long's letter, it is compulsory upon us to do our own work ourselves. I move that a reply be sent saying the Porthcawl Council is capable of managing its own affairs. (Laughter.) Mr. J. Grace: I have much pleasure in seconding that. The proposal was adopted. MAIN DRAINAGE CONTRACT. Messrs. John Taylor and Soate reported upon the progress made with the main drain- age contract during the past fortnight. In that time 130 pipes had been laid, making a total of 2,410 up to the present time. Owing to the fine weather the progress made had been. satisfactory. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE GOVERNORS. "Mr. T. G. Jones was appointed one of the representatives of the Council on the Board of Governors of the University College of South Wal es and Monmouthshire, Cardiff, in the place of Mr. David Jones. Mr. J. Grace is the other representative. THE PRICE OF COAL. Messrs. Harris and Co. wrote, in reply to a letter recently sent to local coal merchants regarding the price of coal. They stated they were quite prepared to fall into line with other local merchants, and would be pleased to supply the poorer townspeople at I! the same price charged to larger purchasers, I plus the trifling cost of distribution. I PROPOSED HYDRO. I Mr. R. S. Williams, of Cardiff, wrote en- closing a block plan showing the proposed site of a hydro to be erected an the sea front. I This would mgan an outlay of R30,000 or P,40,000 in building, and he would be glad to hear that the Council would be prepared to carry a public sewer to the site of the building, bearing in mind the rates which would be payable for such a building. Mr. R. E. Jones said they were being asked to carry out a big scheme, but they fhust bear in mind the fact that the Local 1 Government Board had told them they must I not spend any money at the present juncture, if such expenditure could possibly be avoided. He did not think that at the present time they could pledge themselves to go in for a scheme which might mean the expenditure of £2,000 or £ 3,000. Of course, they wanted to welcome any scheme for the development of I the town, because the more development that took place the less the rates would be propor- tionately. At the same time, he did not think they could offer to spend this money at present, and he moved that a reply be sent to this effect. Mr. D. Davies seconded. f The Chairman acquiesed, remarking that they could not put the town to such an ex- pense at the present time. tt Mr. T. James thought plans were put in for another building some years ago, and the Council expressed themselves ready to meet the parties concerned. The Chairman: They are asking you a plain question: "Will you go to this expanse or not?" and we say No." Mr. John Grace thought it would be unfair to the town to give an answer to such an im- portant matter on the spur of the moment, and he thought- they might very well invite the architect to meet. the Council to discuss the matter. Perhaps then they might-be able to find a way to allow this development; he beheved a way could be found. Rev. D. J. Arthur seconded this amend- ment that a conference be arranged. Mr. R. E. Jones withdrew his resolution, remarking that if the difficulty could be over- come by meeting the architect, he would be very glad. The Chairman thought it would be quite safe to adopt this suggestion; they did not bind themselves to anything. Mr. Grace's suggestion was adopted. I "WEST ROAD. I Mr. R. E. Jones said that during the course of a walk round the town the previous day he had noticed that most of the roads were in good condition. There were a num- ber of holes in West Road, however, which I wanted filling up at onoe.

GAS INQUIRY NEEDED I

GAS INQUIRY NEEDED. I Mr. R. E. Jones urged the necessity for holding. more frequent meetings of the Gas Committee He had some important figures' in his possession by which they could com- pare the working of the Gasworks under the jurisdiction of the Council and of the pre- vious private company. He would like, in fairness to the gas manager, for him to be present, in order that they could go thoroughly intb the.matter, and see the great difference between the wages paid each week from the commencement of the working by the Council and the corresponding week when the Gasworks were under the control of the company. He thought a meeting of the Gas "Committee might be held every other Mon- day evening. Mr. T. G. Jones said there were heaps of things they as members of the Council should know about the Gasworks,yet often when they weTe asked questions in the street they could -not say Yes or No to them. According to his diary, the last proper meeting of the Gas Committee was about a couple of months ago. The Chairman: I think you are wrong there, Mr. Jones. Mr. T. G. Jones added that this was an undertaking belonging to the ratepayers, and it was only fair that the members of the Council should have all possible information in regard to it. The Chairman said it was decided at the last annual meeting of the Council to hold a meeting of the Gas Committee every alter- nate Monday evening. There was only a little business to transact, and it was there- fore' agreed that instead of calling the mem- bers together specially, the meetings of the committee should be held every Friday even- ing, after the meetings of the Works Cgm- mittee. There had not been very much to do up to the present time, bjit if it was im- perative for special meetings to be held, it was only necessary to move a resolution to revert to the old arrangement to meet every Monday evening. Mr. J. Grace did not think any figures with respect to the working of the Gasworks should be divulged until they had had a meet- ing with the Gas Manager. For the pur- pose of comparison he would rather take what it cost the old company to run the Gas- works the week before the Council took it over. The circumstances were now entirely different, and no doubt would be easy of ex- planation. It was agree d that the committee meet every alternate Monday evening. I INDISPENSABLE. I Rev. D. J. Arthur drew attention to the I fact that 4nany other Councils bad adopted a I resolution to the effect that certain of their officers were indispensable, and suggested that Council should take similar steps. Mr: T. James seronded and a resolution was passed expressing the opinion of the Council that the deputy clerk, the surveyor, and the overseer are indispensable. I DANGEROUS. The Chairman introduced a matter which ) he thought required immediate attention. A gentleman had complained to him that he had fallen very heavily in Victoria Avenue, owing to the state of the pavement, and he said he was told the pavement was private property, and the Council had no jurisdiction lover it. If the owners were responsible they ought to put it in repair; if the Council were responsible, they must put it in order. On the suggestion of the Chairman, the matter was referred to the clerk (Mr. Evan Davies) to ascertain the responsibility.

ALLEGED POACHERSI

ALLEGED POACHERS. I KENFIG HILL MEN DISCHARGED. I At Bridgend Police Court on Monday, William Lougher, Station Road, Kenfig Hill, and James Evans, Pwllygarth Street, Kenfig Hill, were summoned for having been on Stormy Down in search of conies. Mr. W. M. Thomas defended. P.C. Stockford said at 10.30 a.m. on Wed- nesday he was in a trap in plain clothes, com- ing from the direction of Porthcawl, when he saw three men on Stormy Downs, with a black retriever dog. He watched them for some time, beating the ground, and then went closer to them. He saw them pick up a rab- bit. Witness stopped, and when they saw him, Evans came towards him. As witness had an injured leg, he thought it not advis- aN" to go on to them. Witness went to hè keeper's, who accompanied him back. Gn tHo way they caw the three men coming from the direction of the quarry. They still had the dog with them, working the ground. When they noticed witness and the keeper, they ran off the ground, and walked some distance up the Main road. They stopped, as if in conversation, and then parted. Lougher came towards them, and witness stopped him. He told him what he had seen, and he re- plied, You have made a mistake." Wit- ness went after Evans, who said, "You did not see me." Witness had failed to trace thi other man. Mr*. W. M. Thomas: I suggest that these men were not together?—They were. Mr. Thomas said the man Lougher had in- to rdec to go to Laleston. The dog was at his heels when the constable passed in a trap. He continued to walk on, and was met tater bv th constable and the gamekeeper. The gaj ekeeper told defendant that he had m- tit)nt-. d him before, and Lougher replied, 'Yea, you told me that if I brought this dog along the road again you would summon me, but I have got a perfect right to bring the dog along the road." Evans had been to Tytheg- ston, and was returning home, when he was stopped by the constable. He denied having been in search of conies. The case was dismissed. I TWO LADS FINED. Bertie Almond and Wm. Wilkins, Pwlly- garth Street, Kenfig Hill, were summoned for having trespassed on land in the occupation of ,Miss Talbot, at Tythegston Higher, in search of conies. Albert Nugent, gamekeeper, said he saw the defendant's ferreting on Stormy Down. When they saw him they raIP away, but he caught them. The lads said they had gone to dig out a ferret. When they got it, they went away. Fined < £ 1 each.

KENFIG HILL 0 GROCER 1

KENFIG HILL 0 GROCER 1 COMMITTED FOR TfUAl. t ALLEGED OFFENCE AGAINST A GIRL. I Evan James, grocer, Kenfig Hill, was com- mitted for trial at Bridgend Police Court on Monday on a charge of having attempted to commit a rape on Florence George, single, aged 17, of Pisgalj Street, Kenfig Hill, on the 23rd November. Mr. W. M. Thomas acted f^r defendant. Prosecutrix said she resided with her par- ents.. She was 17 years of age..She had known defendant for about twelve months. Defendant kept a grocer's shop, and witness had been a customer there. On the day in question she went to the shop for candles and bread for her mother. The time was about 9 o'clock at night. Witness went to the back door of the shop, as the shop was shut. She knocked at the door and defendant opened it. Witness asked him for candles and bread, and he asked her in. She went in, and he asked her to go through to the shop. Witness went through the kitchen, w here there was a little boy. Defendant asked her to hold the lantern, and defendant then got the goods from the shop, and put them on the counter. He went towards the doorway, and then caught hold of witness round the waist, and dragged her into the middle room. He threw her on some sacks. Witness struggled, and then fainted. When she recovered, defendant was still in the room. Witness got up, pushed defendant away, and ran out. The little boy was in the back kitchen when she went through. When she got to her home she fainted again. Her mother came out, and took her in. Her mother asked her what was the matter, but she was too poorly to tell her distinctly. Later witness told her that Evan James had "been pulling her abqut." Dr. Twist was called in. Mr. W. M. Thomas: On the day in question i jti went to the shop during the day ?—Yes. Did you tell him you would come back in the night for the candles ?-No. You have been going to the shop about twice a: week for groceries for several months past?—About twice a week. Why did you leave it so late before you went to the shop this night ?-I had no time before. Was it jin consequence of an arrangement with defendant?—:No, sir. This is not the first time you have called at the shop after hours ?-No, I have been there tkcee times before. You have usually gone through to the shop?—No, he has brought the things to me. If two persons say they have seen you come r'óut of the shop after closing hours, that is untrue?—Yes. Did defendant kiss you several times {-Yes, but I was struggling with him. Has he kissed you before ?-No. Why didn't you shout when he started to kiss you?—I cannot say. Has defendant been forcing your mother for payment of an account before this took place?—No. On Sunday night, Nov. 14th, were you in the shop with defendant, spooning ?-No, I was not out. Were you in the shop with him last Tues- day week ?—No. I put it to you that on the numerous occa- sions you have been to the shop the conversa- tion has been very suggesti-veP-Ko.. Jane George, mother of prosecutrix, said on November 23 she sent her daughter to defen- dant's for candles and a small loaf of bread. The time was about nine o'clock. Witness was waiting for her to come back, when she heard a sound at the back door. 'Witness went out and found her daughter leaning up against the window exhausted. Witness asked' her what was the matter, and she muttered some- thing about Evan James, and witness guessed the rest because of the girl's condition. After taking her indoors witness went up to defen- I dant's. Defendant refused to open the door to her, and witness told him that if he did not open the door she would go to the police ser- geant. Witness remained by the door for about a quarter of an hour, and then witness went for Police-sergeant Morgan. The ser- geant was not in, but she afterwards found a constable. He came down the road with her until they met the sergeant. Witness told the sergeant, and P.S. Morgan came to her house and saw the girl. Witness afterwards sent for the doctor. Before the doctor came her. daughter told her that "Evan James had been pulling her .about." ijtr. W. M. Thomas: Have you ever had any trouble with your daughter before P—No. She has had an illegitimate child; was not that trouble?-Yes, and the magistrates know that. Did she usfe to receive letters from the boys at a grocer's shop?—She was receiving letters. Did you ask defendant nt to allow letters to be sent to his shop?- Yes, I did not know how she was getting letters. Have you not tried to keep her from run- ning aster boysPI-She does not run after boys; she was only after one man and one only. Did you send your daughter to James' on this afternoon?—Yes, about three o'clock. Did you ten her about the candles then ?— No, I did not know I wanted candles till nine o'clock, when the lad with us told me he had not got any for his lamp. Do you know that James came to the door almost immediately after you left P-Nio. Do you know that your son came directly after you left and had a struggle with defen- dant ?—No. Defendant is a respectable man as far as you know?—He has not proved it. Prior to this P-r have known nothing about him. Dr. Twist, Kenfig Hill, said he examined proxecutrix.* She was very excited and upset. From the girl's clothing it appeared that the girl had been molested. P.S. Morgan said on receiving a complaint from Mrs. George he went to her house and saw the girl. Afterwards he went to defen- dant's shop and kno-eked at the back dcor. (Continued on bottom of next column).

KENFIG HILL 0 GROCER 1

I (Continued from Previous Column.) j After some time it was answered by Evan Jameg. Witness told him he was going to take him into custody. Defendant replied, "Don't do that; let me go and see the old woman and see what I can do with her." Witness con- veyed him to Kenfig Hill Polioe-station, cau- tioned and charged him, and in reply, he said, "I never touched her. I only caught hold of her and she fell in a fit." While witness was putting defendant in the cell defendant told him he would reward him well if he would do his best for him. Mr. W. M. Thomas: Defendant protested that it was absurd to arrest him for anything that he had done ?—That is so. Did he say that it was probably the mother's fault that he was in that position —No. Mr. Thomas submitted that he had no case to answer, and dealt in detail with the evi- dence, contending that no British jury would convict. Defendant, who pleaded not guilty, was committed for trial at the next assizes, bail being allowed, himself in R25 and one surety of £25. Mr. Stanton and His Victofy. Mr. Stanton, M.P., accepted his victory in Merthyr Boroughs with calm dignity. Asked whether he had anything to say upon the result of the election, Mr. Stanton said, "Well, it is at least a message of good cheer to the boys in the trenches, and certainly a set-back to the pro-German section." In a short speech Mr. Stanton said he was proud of being a native of the boroughs who had not been disqualified from being a prophet in his own country. (Cheers.) As a Britisher it had been impossible for him to hang on to his job, and his opponents had now discovered that they had thrown him into another job. (Laughter and applause.) He would endea- vour to the utmost of his power to justify the confidence reposed in him when he took his place on the floor of the House of Commons instead of on the Plough Tip. (Laughter and cheers.) He trusted to g-ve an account of himself to their credit as electors and to his opponents' shame. Soldiers' Pay. Writing in "The Times" on the subject of soldiers' pay, the Rev. F. B. Meyer refers to the case of a young Canadian who .arrived in London after four months at the front. He knew no one here, and had no loose cash. The only money in his possession was 1 cheque for his pay of £ 20. But it was practicaJly use- less. All the banks were closed, no post office would look at it, and he spent hours in wan- dering from one place to the other to obtain the cash to pay for a meal. Mercifully he finally got to the Y.M.C.A. hut. But we know of quite a dozen shnilar cases (says the r writer), only the pity is that in some of these certain women or men have undertaken to ex- change the cheque and to give the cash by in- stalments. You can imagine the rest. In Car- diff yesterday I came across a similar case, and I would like to suggest that the pay- masters be instructed to pay the men in his Majesty's Service in some form that would be honoured at the post offices. It would be easy to arrange this, and the discomfort and danger alluded to would disappear. Bishop v. Bishop. Speaking at the Birmingham Diocesan COIk- ference, the Bishop of Birmingham said a peeIt. of the Realm had listened to some purveyo* of garbage in regard to the Headquarters- Staff, and had made statements known to be.' false. When he (the bishop) saw that sta.fl. there was no time from sunrise that they were- not on the alert, and they lived simple liveeu He never saw any ladies, and he deprecate# t-e tendency to listen to such wild talk borou bC ignorance and prejudice. Butgar Treachery. -1 Some outspoken criticisms of the tangled' skein of diplomacy which has led to the present Balkan situation were made in the coui-se of 111. lecture given by Mr. Crawford Priçe, the watf correspondent with the Serbian Army, at His- Majesty's Theatre on Sunday afternoon. The All fsSh, he said, had themselves to blameh for what Recurred. Warnings without JKUQ? ber had been given to prove the method o? deception employed by the Bulgarians to- aggrandise themselves at the expense of Serbia, a,nd it passed all conception that ais. the very moment the Allies were urging; Serbia to make sacrifices in order to satisfy what was thought to, be Bulgarian aspirationfl: the Bulgarians were actually engineering ø. compact with Germany. Even the commencement of hostilities- between the Bulgars and the Serbians was marked by characteristic treachery, for the- former actually invited the oiffcers of their.- enemies to wine and dine and play cards wittir them, and then, in the dead of night, pro- ceeded to murder them in their sleep. With Germany checked on the eastern ahicr western frontiers adequate help to Serbia. would have effectively bottled up the Central Powers, and Austria would have been rom- pelled to sue for peace. As the position was now, Germany would, by her invasion of Serbia, obtain all the- copper, cotton, and foodstuffs she required* Her power of resistance would be considerably increased, and the Allies' task rendered infi*- nitely harder.

About the War WHAT PEOPLE SAY

About the War. » WHAT PEOPLE SAY. » Hopeful M.P. Speaking jftt a. dinner of the Nottingham Liberal Club, Mr. T. P. O'Connor said that he had never doubted, for one moment since the opening of the war that England and her Allies would win, and his hopes were higher this week than ever. Mr. Redmond had spoken confidently of what he saw on the Western front in a public speech, but if-any- thing his Language was even more emphatic in private. He found that in the morale of our men, in their buoyant hopefulness, in their superiority in munitions, there was cer- tainty of victory. The Russian forces had already brought to futility all the expectations of Germany of crushing the Russian Army and forcing Russia to plead for peace. Even in Serbia, where for some time there seemed to be the most vulnerable point of the Allies, there was now good reason for hoping that in- stead of finding victory there Germany would add another to her futile and self-destructive enterprises. The "Accomplished Task. Discussing the "Accomplished task" of the Austro-Gei mans in the Balkans, as communi- cated in the Berlin oflicial report of Sunday night, the "Westminster Gazette" in a strik- ing leading article pfves the debit side of the account. There is tie plain fact, it says, that these advantages, such as they are, have been bought by abandoning the offensive and oven weakening the defensive against Russia. No one in Germany or Austria now talks of going to Petrograd, and even the more modest ambi- tion of wintering in Riga and Dvinsk has had to be abandoned. The great army on the East front is hung up far from its bases and exposed to all the rigours of the Russian winter, while its reserves ase being eaten up in chasing Serbians through the mountains. Russia, in the meantime, appears to be get- ting munitions and equipment quicker than either her friends or her enemies expected, and, if she should be able to spare troops for an incursion into Bulgaria, or if Rumania should come in on the side of the Allies, then the Near East adventure might easily be turned to catastrophe. At the same time Italy is undertaking a vigorous offensive on the Gorizia a.nd Isonzo front, and the deman d for reinforcements to save Trieste becomes daily' more urgent. It is scarcely fanciful, in the circumstances, to read bejtweon the lines of the German wirelesrf, which is dictated by Main Headquarters, a certain scepticism as to the value of the Balkan operations on purely military grounds, and a desire to place a limit to the military commitment. What It Means. One of the most interesting events of the Parliamentary week was the introduction of Mr. Stanton, the new member for Merthyr at Tuesday's sitting of the House of Commons. He is (says the Parliamentary correspondent of the "Times") a big, burly, picturesque figure of a man, young as Labour members go —he is only 42-a miner of miners. At the time of the national coal strike the rallying- point of the extreme Socialists, heavily defeated at the last election as an orthodox Labour candidate in East Glamorgan, he has found himself in the achievement of what, according to all the laws of electioneering, was a virtually impossible task He has shown that mere party, with its money, its machine, and its orators, has lost its power in our politics for the duration of the war. He has, incidentally, performed a useful service to the Labour party by exposing the absurdity of their preliminary local ballots for the selection of candidates. The miners' lodges in the constituency gave Mr. Winstone a majority of 7,832 votes; at the election he only polled 6,080—fewer than the ballot gave Mr. Stan- ton. The Labour Party were palpably misled by the voice of a larJLØ number of miners who had no Parliamentary votes. This by-election will haa-e a. bracing effect on the House of Commons. It has revealed in a flash the spirit of the nation, and will strengthen the hands of those who are all out for the prosecution of the war by all the means in our power. The result throws a flood of light on the feeling of the mass of the people towards compulsion. Mr. Winstone stood for no conscription at any price. Mr. Stanton was denounced high and low as a conscriptionist. Mr. Jowett, the Socialist M.P., speaking for Mr. Winstone last week, went so far as to say that conscrip- tion or no conscription was the one vital issue -in the conflict. According to this interpreta- tion, conscription has won a victory of nearly two to one in the most unlikely constituency in Great Britain. Compulsion, if and when it is demanded by the Government, clearly has no terrors for the South Wales miners, and stock argument in an old controversy is seen to be merely bluff. The meaning of it all is not likely to be lost on Parliament.

Advertising

W. T. JONES MANCHESTER HOUSE, NOLTON ST., BRIDGEND NOTED FOR Reliable Welsh Flannels. HOME-MADE SHIRTS t3?B?!!? A Large Stock of Hosiery m F?R?OnM M 5<6 j Cashmere to Thickest WooHM, tStS??TthN?H at Reasonable Prices. Any Size Garment made to Sg^Eic3iiMi8 order on the Premises. ???? Ctlil(lr<1°S   and i-Bos? lb a Speciality. Boys' Shirts always in Stock ALL-WOOL BLANKETS in Ten Sizes. FROM 17/11 PER' PAIR. Telephone, WINTER, 1915. Established 593 Central 1875. To COLLIERY OWNERS CCNTRACTORS, SINKERS AND LOCAL BODIES, DANN CO., South Wales Clothiers and Boot Merchants, Wind Street, swanseaet Beg to notify the above that they are now ready to execute any 0: defs in- Oilskins, Waterproofs and Boots. 9 000000000000000000000000 Goods despatched same day as Order. oooccococccooooooooooooo PRICE LIST ON APPLICATION. NOTE THE ADDRESS. 6163" n J W   '?"??SS'SM????'M? '?' ?'?-?f—?ssssB's-S ^j|j THS CELEBRATED   ? ? ?nMf"'? ?*?'- ?" ?))'![rT?'    and are j ?' -?7/% [!  '? ? Can and luvect the instruments. Ha ??// ? 5 ? Ca?oguesPostr?c. ?? WADDINGTON & SONS, Ltd. (EST ABLISBED 1838J STATION ROAD (Opposite the County Schools) PORT TALBOT, ?? '—