Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
15 articles on this page
Advertising

-=: BEVAN & COMPANY, Ltd., F;.irnl*shers ancl Piano Merchants, CARDIFF, SWANSEA, &c. Do you realize the gr at imp*rtance of placing your orders in the hands of a first-class firm when pur basing pr FURNlTURE The name of this well-known Firm is a household word throughout South Wales and j Monmouthshire, and is of itself a guarantee for the quality of the good > supplied. An immense Selection Pock-bottom pr ces Every article warranted Cd édo 6 ue." G atis ———— All goods delivered nee up to 200 miles from any Branch. ———- S- ''i' u I mmmom  00'1\ v jiooi The longer you put off purchasing the more you will certainly have to pay for Iti!r THAT PIANOFORTE Bsvan & Company are not solely dependant upon the sale of Instruments, and can therefore supply one at many pounds under the usual Music Warehouse Prices. Every Piano warranted Ten Years. Organs from 7/6 and Piauofortes from 10/6 per month.

Peeps at Portheawl

Peeps at Portheawl J By MARINER. « 1 As I briefly announced in last week's no ten, the wounded soldiers in our midst are assured of a bounteous Christmas dinner, thanks to the generosity of one or two public-spirited. re sidients, and the arrangements are now prac- tically complete. It is highly satisfactory that such prompt and appropriate apprecia- tion of the services of those who have done so much for us should be forthcoming, and by all accounts the soldiers are in for a jolly time— no one will deny that they deserve it, These gifts wili do away with the necessity for the public canvass of the town which had been decided upon, but there are sure to be other calls in the near future, and those who had determined to give something to this deserv- ing fund will be able to allow their donation to stand over until it is called for, by which time it is to be hoped it will have gathered in- terest. Mr. and Mrs. John P. Cadogan, of Cardiif and Porthcawl, have, as already an- nounced, undertaken to provide everything necessary for the Christmas dinner for the 90 wounded soldiers at the Rest, and from all accounts the "spread" will be a fine one. A committee to make the necessary arrange- ments has been called together, consisting of Mrs. Leonard Byaas, Mr*. Wyndham Jenkins, Mrs. W. A. E. Pyman, Mrs. Charles Morris, Mrs. Dr. Alexander, Mrs. T. Elwood Deere, Mrs. Grover, Mrs. D. J. Rees, and Mrs Wynne Jones. The men at Danygraig, numbering about 150, are also to be entertained in a similar manner, Mr. Wyndham Jenkins and Mr. Walter A. E. Pyman having interested themselves in the movement by obtaining subscriptions from their friends at Cardiff Docks. The dinner to the Danygraig men is to be given at the Porthoawl Hotel. ? If 1 In other ways, too, the soldiers are being well looked after. The children attending Porthcawl Council Schools, for instance, have collected nearly 1,000 cigarettes for the woun- ded at Danygraig, and pupils at a private school have collected a large quantity of sweets and fruit for the men at the Rest. 1 S 1 I had a short—but none the lees interesting chat with one of the men from the Rest dur- ing the week. He is a Scotsman, and in the Hussars. He has seen a good deal of active service, having been to France twice, and the Dardanelles onoe, and luckily has escaped seri- ous hurt. He says that given the choice he would sooner go to France than anywhere else, for though there is danger everywhere, there is in France the chance of a few days' rest behind the firing line, whereas at the Dar- danelles the men are constantly under fire. The Turks, however, are much cleaner fighters than the Huns, but they do not like facing our men in a charge, and several prisoners have been found with wounds in the back, where they have been shot by their German officers in the attempt to get them to advance. He characterises our landing at the Dardanelles as a marvel, and thinks that had British guns and British gunners been in the place of the Turks no foe would have set foot on the Penin- sula. He has many acts of bravery on the part of his oomraodes to rowunt-acte which passed unnoticed by the offioers in the fighting and which will therefore go unrewarded. H ? 1 I understand that a gratifying measure of success attended the work of attesting under the group system in our town. I believe I shall not be wrong in stating that about 150 came forward, though this, of course, by no means represents the true number of Porth- cawlians who have offered themselves, as many of them, doubtless, went to Bridgend and other places. At one time the rush was so great that there was not sufficient accom- modation at the Council Chamber, and a L. -.re number were attested and sworn in at ne offioe of Messrs. T. E. Deere and Co., whore Mr. G. F. Sibbering had a very busy time. t t What is this I hear about a plea for u*n I't.v the conduct of the business of the Council P It is an excellent suggestion, and if wisely made and carried out will do a great deal of good to the town. If we have the knowledge that thei plea is put forward with the beet of intentions, and that those who have been offenders in the past will see the error of their ways, then a brighter day will dawn for ou. town. Nous verrons. Ill I am glad to hear attention has been drawn to the fact that so far the two soldiers who last summer bravely saved persons from drowning at Porthcawl have gone an re- warded. Of couree, they will say they only did their duty, without thought of fee or re- ward, but at the same time there is no doubt that great pluck was exhibited, and we should all like to think that these two brave fellows had something to remind th-em of their stay amongst us, and of our gratitude to them. There seems to have been some misunderstand- ing about bringing the deeds to the notice of the Royal Humane Society, but that mistake is to be rectified by the Council, and it is to be hoped that something tangible will ac- crue. I am informed the Society has a cer- tain time limit within which deeds of this na- ture must be brought to their notice in order to secure their certificate. I am unable to say at the moment of writing what that time limit is, but let us hope it has not yet ex- pired.

No title

Mr. Thomas Lewis has returned to his home in Cwmdonkin-drive, Swansea, after being a year in a German internment camp. He went to Germany in June, 1914, to take up the position of supervisor of rolling in tinplate works in Westphalia. His intention in going there was to see the country, and gain ex- perience of its industrial conditions and then return at the end of the year. After war broke out he continued his work at the mill for four months, and then under a general order he was interned. Mr. Lewie, referring to the harsh treatment of the British interned in Germany, says if it had not been for the food sent to the camp from friends in Eng- land many would have starved. As to shel- ar, they were treated in a humane manner.

PORTHCAWL URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL

PORTHCAWL URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL. THE GAS UNDERTAKING. SMALL COMMITTEE APPOINTED TO MAKE AN INVESTIGATION. A meeting of the Porthcawl Urban District Council was held on Monday evening, Mr. T. Elwood Deere, J.P. (chairman) presiding. I PROPOSED HYDROPATHIC HOTEL. I It was reported that a special meeting of the Council the previous Friday Mr. R. S. Williaos, of Cardiff, discus&ed with the mem- bers the question of the proposed new Hydro- pathic Hotel at Porthcawl. He stated it was not likely the erection of the building would be undertaken before the termination of the war, and they would not wish to be connected with the public sewer until about 18 months after the building was commenced. They would like the building to be drained into an extension of the Council's sewer if possible, as it would be detrimental for such a building to be drained by means of cesspools. It was agreed that arrangements be made with Mr. Midgley Taylor to meet Mr. Wil- liams on the occasion of bis nest visit to Porthcawl. r AIAIIN DitAl-N-VU" UU.ViKAUT. I Messrs. John Taylor and Sons reported upon the work accomplished in connection with the main drainage contract during the past fort- night. In that time 101 pipes, had been laid, bringing the total to date to 2,511. The number of men employed had averaged 12. The progress of the work had been delayed lowing to bad weather preventing work being done on several days. Mr. T. James: How long will they be com- pleting it ? The Chairman: You know what was said- about two months. STARVING RATEPAYERS. Mr. Davies, of the Knight's Arms, drew attention to the lack of lighting facilities in The Square, Williams Place, and Lifeboat Terrace. It was monstrous that such a state of affairs should exist, and the residents there were losing business because people were unable to find their way to come or go. He hoped the Council would do something for them, or they would soon be starving. Mr. T. James moved that a reply be sent to the effect that the Council regretted they were unable to do anything in the matter on account of the Defence of the Realm Act. It was agreed that this reply be sent as regards The Square, and with regard to Wil- liams Place and Lifeboat Terrace it was agreed instructions be given for such lamps to be lit as would not be visible from the sea. PLUCKY SOLDIERS. Colonel Homfray wrote stating it would pro- bably be within the recollection of the Council that on July 11th, the day previous to his battalion leaving Porthoawl, Private Jeffrey, of the 17th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, res- cued two men from drowning. One man was still alive, and at the inquest on the other man the jury recommended that some reward should be given Jeffery for his bravery. Naturally, if any reward was to be given the man would be very pleased to receive it, and he (Colonel Homfray) would be glad if the Council would see if anything could be done in the matter, as it appeared to have been lost sight of. Mr. T. James said he had understood from the offioer representing Colonel Homfray at the inquest that he would see to the matter, and therefore it was left in his hands. As nothing appeared to have been done, he would move that the Clerk place the facts before the Royal Humane Society. Mr. T. G. Jones concurred, and said he would like the Clerk at the same time to draw attention to the case of a soldier who had been staying at Danygraig, Lance-Corporal illiams, of the 3rd Welsh Regiment, who rescued a young lady from drowning, in August. This was unanimously agreed. THE GAS UNDERTAKING. At a mooting of the Gas Committee Mr. R. E. Jones drew attention to the increase in the cost of wages in connection with the gas undertaking since its acquisition by the Coun- cil, as compared with the working under she old company. A oommittee, consisting of Messrs D. Danes, J. Grace, and T. G. Jones, was appointed to investigate the whole ques- tic I. THE CONDITION OF THE STREETS. ..■Jr. D. Davies said the channelling in p ac- tical'y every street in the town wanted atten- tion tvf&jv the streets were made up. J le Chairman: I agree, but you must not forget we have no workmen at the present ti;c- and if the steam roller is to be held up wnen it comes it will be this time next year toe,fore t'-v work is done. Mr. D Davies: It is a serious matter, and X>x)i>le are walking in mud and water. The Ci*a riuan: The levels are all wrong to- day. Mr. n Davies seconded Mr. D. Davies' position. Mr. T James moved as an amendmeit ti-at th.3 Surveyor report on the matter at ie :xt W or v•; C. it-n.ittee meeting. It would bo a serious thing to commence all this work just as the rolh'r was coming. Lev. I' J. Arthur seconded the ameadent, which was carried.

I A FREE PICTURE

I A FREE PICTURE. We have received from Messrs. Christr. Thomas and Bros., Ltd., the makers of Puri- tan Soap--the one and only olive oil soap—a charming engraving of "The Old Folks at Home," being one of the pictures used in the 4ories of advertisements running in our columns. The picture is on sunk plate paper, and measures 8i by llin., and is well worth framing. Messrs- Christr. Thomas and Bros., Ltd., will be glad to send one of those pic- tures quite free to any of our readers mention- ing the "Glamorgan Gazette" in their appli- cation.

No title

Tip-to-date Appliances for tnrning out every elays of work at compotittva prices, at th. I Glamorgan Gazette hintwc W arta.

KENFia HILL CHARGE j

KENFia HILL CHARGE. j I STORY OF THE ALLEGED ASSAULT. I I PRISONERS COMMITTED FOR TRIAL. I At Bridgend Police Court last Friday Messrs. D. H. Lloyd and T. E. Hopkins con- tinued their hearing of the Kenfig Hill bur- glary charge. The accused were Daniel Wil- kins and Stanley Wilkins, oolliers living in Pwllygarth-street, Kenfig Hill, who were charged with having burglariously broken and entered the dwelling-house of Magdalen James, The People's Stores, Kerdig Hill, about 11 p.m. on December 1st, and stolen L4 16s. in money. Mrs. James' story, it will be remembered, was that the prisoners broke into the house, and stated they were detectives. They ran- sacked the drawers, and demanded that she should tell them where the week's takings were kept. They broke open the cash-box, which contained three £1 notes, two 10s. notes and 5s. in silver. The police were informed, and subsequently she identified the two men from amongst others at the Police Station. The first witness called on Friday was PJ3. Morgan, stationed at Kenfig Hill, who said that from information received and inquiries made he asked twelve men to appear at Kenfig T" CIt. TT tlill .roiiee station on uecemoor zno. tie also saw the two prisoners, and asked them to put on the clothes they were wearing the pre- vious evening, and come to the Police Station at 4 o'clock. They said they would do so. Prisoners came, accompanied by Daniel's father and father-in-law. Prisoners were placed among the other men, and Daniel's father and father-in-law asked to leave the room. Mrs. James was then brought in, and witness asked her to see if she could identify the two men who were in her bedroom the previous night. She first of all reoognisod the prisoner Stanley, whereupon witness re- quested him to sit down, and consider himself under arrest. Mrs. James then walked down the line again, and picked out the other pri- soner. Witness thanked the other men for their attendance, and they left the room. Daniel, who had not sat down, said "I am going to give you a rough house to- night." Stanley then got on his feet, and witness advised them to sit down, and not be silly, but they paid no heed. Daniel sprang on his back, and Stanley tried to trip him, and aimed several blows at his body. P.C Lewis then arrived on the soene, and took charge of Stanley, whilst witness took charge rvf cl.ni^lr Trim fiAlTAral V-L -&J-. _&.a.l.& and al so kicked him, but eventually witness got the better of him, and placed him in the cells. Witness sent for assistance, in order that prisoners might be searched. They were cautioned and charged, and Stanley replied "I know nothing about it." Daniel said, "I will tell you nothing. Not guilty." Pri- soners were placed in separate cells, and wit- ness heard Daniel shout to Stanley "Don't give in, Stan; say nothing." Witness also heard Daniel say "Stay nothing, Stan; we will get out of this job all right. We will engage a solicitor. Answering Mr. W. M. Thomas on the ques- j tion of the identification of the prisoners by Mrs. James, witness denied that she looked up and down the line twice, and then said "No, I cannot see anyone here." She did not look up and down the line again, and then shake her head. It was not true to say that witness looked straight at the prisoner Stan- ley, and asked her to look again, when she said "I fancy this looks like one of them." Witness did not then move across the room and look at Daniel, telling her to find the other one. Mrs. James did not say This looks like the other one." She did not have the slightest difficulty in identifying the pri- soners. Stanley stood quite still whilst the identification was proceeding, but Daniel was contorting his face in an endeavour to escape recognition. Witness denied that after the i identification he sprung at the prisoner Daniel Williams, and caught him by the throat. It was quite untrue that he drew his truncheon, and struck Daniel several heavy blows with t it, rendering him unconscious. He did not use his truncheon at all. This ooncludoo the oase for the prosecution. Mr. W. M. Thomas said he recognised that the Magistrates would have to send the pri- soners for trial, but in view of the opinion ex- pressed by Lord Justioe Alverstone that in such cases the defendants should give their evidence at the earliest possible moment, he would put both prisoners in the box. They would give a complete denial to the charge, and give the police every opportunity to cross- examine them, and endeavour to shake their testimony. The prisoner Daniel Wilkins was the first witness. He stated that on the evening of the burglary he was in the "Butchers' Arms," Kenfig Hill, and remained there until "stop tap" at 10 o'clock. After leaving the hotel he walked straight home, arriving there about 10.15. He subsequently went with his sister and his wife to the Ambulance Hall, where a danoe was in progress, and saw his iiister-in- law there. He did not go inside the hall, but looked in through the window. Afterwards his sister and brother came back with him to the house. They left about 11 o'clock, and witness went to bed about five minutes later, and did not leave the room till the following morning. The sergeant saw him in the morning, and asked him to change into the gq rr>A h.ct. woo ii\ vwwi-w 

IPRISONERS LUXURIES

I PRISONER'S LUXURIES." I ILL-USAGE OF BRITISHERS. j It would appear from the statements of ex- changes peiaoiis tnat Jbritish prisoners are still subjected to tne same ili-uiiage as in tile early stages ot the war. There arrived at Uarditt last week two seamen who had been interned—one for uxteon months and. tne other for three months. At Kuhleben, where one of them was "domi- ciled," there are in all, it was stated, some- tiling like 4,500 prisoners, including an ex- mayor of Manchester in the person of Mr. .Butter worth. The prisoners at this camp are badly fed, badly housed, and ill-treated, and were it not for the fact that 5s. a week is- allowed them from the British Relief Fund the probability is that they would die of hunger. The only food they are given is soup and bread. With their 56., however, they can buy such "luxuries" as butter (for which 2s. 8d. a lb. is charged, but which is now unob- tainable), sugar, etc. To answer a guard is deemed a crime, for which the punishment is 72 hours in a cell with bread and water. The site on which the camp, which consists of wooden huts, is erected was formerly a raocoourse, so that the interned men haTe plenty of room to move about, and they are allowed to indulge in such games as football, cricket, etc. Before the prisoners were allowed to com- mence their journey home they were denuded of their best articles of clothing, particularly woollen goods. Those who had money above the value of 200 marks when they were in- terned given that amount, while those who were penniless were presented with 19 marks. L The only newspaper they are allowed is one printed specially for the oamp, and in thi, publication alleged German victories—such as the annihilation of English divisions and Ger- man investment of London—are to be found. Life on a wooden hulk in. Hamburg, guarded by German soldiers, is anything but a bed of rose&- according to a man whose experience of such a hardship extends over a period of three months. At this institution, which accom- modates 500 men, food is both soanoe and an- wholesome. but the inhabitants are able to purchase sufficient food with the money al- lowed them from the British Relief Fund to subsist. I They are not allowed to wear boots, and not only have they to parade the deck bare- footed, but have to do a certain amount of hard work. Ill-treating the British seems to be a pleas- urable occupation for the German guards. On visiting days the whole of the prisoners are put in the hatch and locked in. All conversation has to be in German, as speak- ing in English is a punishable offence.

Advertising

LAOTES BLANCHARD'S PILLS Are unrivalled for all Irregularities, etc., they speedily afford relief and never fail to alleviate all suffering, etc. They supersede Pennyroyal, Pil Cochia, Bitter Apple. Blanchard's are the beet of all Pills for Women. Sold in boxes Is. I ld., by BOOTS' Branches and all Chemists, or post free, game price, from LESLIE MARTYN, Ltd., Chemists, 54, Dalston Lane, London. 3ample and valuable booklet post free Id.

No title

I Up-to-date appliances for turning out every I class of work at competitive prices, at the 'Glamorgan Gazette" Printing WOVIO,

NEED FOR BREAD I

NEED FOR BREAD. I HOW TO HELP PRISONERS IN I GERMANY. Miss Meredith Richards, a member of a well-known Cardiff family, and sister of Dr. Richards, vice-chairman of the Welsh Insur- ance Commission, who went out to Switzer- land three months before the commencement of the war for reasons of health, hae just re- turned to this country. During the whole of the time she spent in Switzerland she was in close touch with all phases of thought and opinion of the State, concerning which she was able to communicate some interesting parti- culars to a reporter on Saturday. I returned to England mainly on personal busuiness," said Miss Richards, 41 but whilst I am here I am specially anxious to do what I can to make further known the excellent work that is being done in Switzerland for sup- plying food to British prisoners of war in Ger- many and Austria. The organisation which is carrying on this work is the British section of the Bureau for Assisting Prisoners of War. Ita headquarters are at the British Legation, Berne, and Mrs. E. Grant Duff, wife of the British Minister in Switzerland, is president. The bureau supplies paroels of food and bread -chiefly broad-and I want to Bay that it is thoroughly organised on a business basis. Money sent to the bureau for the supply of food is well administered, and people may be quite sure that food will reach the intern- ment camps in perfect condition, much better than when it is sent from England. To assure myself of this I worked with the bureau for five or six weeks, and have looked through hundreds of post-cards included in the parcels sent out and returned by the interned pri- soners. They furnish indisputable proof that the bread is rooeived tn good condition. Only 2 per oent. of the parcels fail to reach their destination or arrive too stale or mouldy to be of use." You refer especially to the supply of bread for the soldiers, Miss Richards P" U Yea, because our soldiers ask for bread, bread, bread. Fortunately, before parcels were sent out at the commencement of the war men were asked what they were most in need of. Here are a few of the repliesi- You ask me what I wejit moetP It is bread 8' Here eatables are very acceptable.' 'My requirements are eatables and bread. All those who have relatives and friends who are prisoners," continued Miss Richards, can supply their wajits in this way by send- ing cheques or postal orders addressed: Brit- ish Section, Bureau de Secours aux Prison- niers de Guerre,. British Legation, Berne.' Money orders should not be sent. They oc- casion endless delay. I should also like to make an appeal for the fr endless prisoners, who are greatly in need of help, and for Rus- sian prisoners in particular. Russia being so remote from the prisoners' camps, and her organising capabilities 80 indifferent oompared with those working at Berne, it is well-nigh impossible for the Ozar's soldiers to get any- thing from the homeland, and their plight is indeed, pitiable. Money intended for the supply of bread to Russian prisoners should be addressed to the Russian section of the Bureau at Berne. Both in the case of Brit- ish friendless prisoners and those in the Rue- sian catnips the bureau knows where help is most needed. Parcels can be sent by vans to Frank- furt in 24 hours with no trans-shipment. These splendid facilities flfre not granted for ordinary single parcels. Four pounds of bread can be sent for Is. weekly, and the letters received in acknowledgement oontain certain terms of speech that are distinctly BritL,ih, and make it quite clear that they are not written by the Germans. Earlier in the war proof was quite posi- tive that specially hard treatment was met- ed out to our men. I have indisputable proof that this was so, and it jø, of course, general- ly known here. But cert&in information in- dicates that matters have undoubtedly vastly improved. Concerning the cruelty experienced earlier in the war there is an interesting ex- planation. A man named Dr. Carl Peters was governor of one of the German oolonies in Africa some time ago, and, it will be re- membered, was dismissed by the Kaiser for ill-treatment of the natives. He took refuge in London, lived there some years, and was evidently made at home in England. Then, when the war began, probably for the purpose of endeavouring to curry favour in Germany, he published there a brochure purporting to describe the cruel treatment meted out to German civilian in Britain. He proceeded to urge in return harsh treatment for the Brit- ishprisaners in Germany. Petard said, 1,1 An Englishman has no respect for any man until that man has knocked him down.' Kindness and generosity, he suggested, were absolutely thrown away on Englishmen. I think this pronouncement had ita effect upon the ignor- ant element in the German population, and also upon the commanders of the prisoners' oampe. It was published in one of the most widely-read newspapers, and was obtainable also in Switzerland. I gather from my recent observations that sentiment in Germany is now changing. The leading papers publish articles showing the futility and foolishness of this attitude of hatred towards Britain. It may, of course, arise partly from economic causes, but I think the change is ethical also. The whole of Germamy is not entirely bed. For exampl e the Yarwaerte,' the Socialist daily journal, referring to the sinking of the Lusitania, said Murder on the high seas is no work for heroes.' Miss Richards has not quite decided whether she will return to Switzerland, but says that she will go if she can be of greater use in war relief work there than in Eng- land.

No title

Mr. Rees Hughes, of Gul-nos-road, Ystfely- fera, who died on the fth November last, left esrtate of the grose value of L898, of which j6886 is net personalty. Probate of his will has been granted to Mr. Simon Thomas and fib. William Thomas.

About the War

About the War. » WHAT PEOPLE SAY. I # # 7 1 w I r l -Ir 'I r T -T -I The Next Budget. Now that the Finance Bill is out of the way the Treasury officials are beginning to oonsider the next Budget, due in April. The opinion i& generally expressed (writes the London cor- respondent of the "Yorkshire Post") that the present 3s. 6d. in the £ on unearned inoomes will be rawed to 5s., and the lower rates of income-tax in proportion. Treasury officials are oonvinoed that it is only by progressively heavy taxation that consumption can be re- duced, but, like some other people, they for- get that the greatest consumption is on the part of those people noT, reached by direct tax- ation, or those who ate able to demand and get a war bonus to meet it—so that the taxa- tion does not accomplish ita first object. Asked to Resign. I At a meeting of the executive committee of the Elland Liberal Association held on Satur- day at Halifax a resolution was passed calling upon Mr. C. P. Trevelyan, M.P. for the Elland Division, to place his resignation in the hands of the executive forthwith. The Elland Liberal Executive have already adopted their candidate to sucoeed Mr. Trevelyan in the person of Councillor H. Dawson, of Hudders- field. Mr. Trevelyan beoame Parliamen- tary Secretary to the Board of Education in 1908, and resigned his position at the out- break of hostilities as a protest against the war. He has since identified himself with the Union of Democratic Control, and his ob- ject is to "get peace as soon as possible on tolerable terms." No Conscription Conference. I A no conscription conference took place at Birmingham on Saturday, and was well at- tended. Councillor Kneesham, the Labour candidate for West Birmingham, presided, and read the following letter from Mr. J. H. Thomas, M.P.:—" You will be aware that I am genuinely anxious to win the war. I realise all the issues involved, and the abso- lute necessity of seeing the Allies' cause tri- umph, but I am equally satisfied that to secure this the unity of the country is essential. That unity would certainly be broken if the Government were to introduce conscription. I know nothing that would be so much resented, that is v iewed with worse suspicion, or would lead to difficulties the harm of which would be incalculable at this time. I therefore hope the Government will realise the strength of the opposition to the question of conscrip- tion." Peers and M.P.'s. I A long and proud roll of honour appears in the new volume of Dod's Peerage. It con- sists of those whose names appeared in the last issue of Dod's who have lost their lives in the war. There are 485 names in the list— Peers and sons of peers; baronets, knights, and their sons; members of Parliament and their sons. In the roll appear the names of one Prinoe--Prinoe Maurice of Battenberg; one Sultan-the Sultan of Lahej and five members of Parliament—Mr W. C. Gladstone, Mr. C. T. Mills, Mr. Agar-Roberts, Lord Ninian Crichton-Steuart, and Captain O'Neill. Five bishops have lost a son in the war—the Archbishop of Dublin, and the Bishops of Winchester, Hereford, St. Asaph's, and Shef- field. The names of two grandsons of the late Lord Salisbury appear in the roll. Lord Dee- borough has lost two sons, Lord Durham a son and a grandson. Other peers, members of Parliament, administrators, and men of dis- tinction who have give of their dearest and beet to the national cause include Lord Lana- downe, Lord Hardinge of Penshurst, Lady Strathcona, the Duke of Wellington, Lord Lincolnshire, Lord Ribblesdale, Sir Oliver Lodge, Lord Cowdray, Lord Valentia, Sir Frederick Banbury, Lord Balfour of Burleigh, Kaid Maclean, Sir Frederick Cawley, Lord St. Davids, Sir Michael Culme-Seymour, Sir Wm. Tyrrell, Sir Courtnay Warner, Sir Robert Chalmers. A son of the late Mr. George Wyndham fell. Sir Schomberg MacDonnell was another victim. The list, a long and sad one, showa how all classes are paying their toll to the war. I 17 Year Old Lieutenants. A "Public School Master," writing to the "Tlmes," iiayEi.-Lord Kitchener has, I be- lieve, laid down that commissions are not to be given to boys under the age of 18. To my own certain knowledge this order-ff it is an order-Ï8 not being obeyed. Commissions are being given to boys of 17 and 17; rtraight from the public schools, and sometimes with most unfortunate consequences. In the neoes- eary papers which we have to fill up, wa schoolmasters are not asked if the boy is in any way suitable for the position for which he is applying, and we know that oommisions are being given to young and undeveloped boys, who are most unsuitable for them, who cannot rise to their opportunity, and to whom their freedom is a misfortune. These young boy, are being withdrawn from the discipline of school life at an important and critical age, when control is most necessary. Under nor- mal conditions they would either be kept at school for at least another year, or be learning a business or profession, probably living at home. They would not go to Oxford or Cam- bridge at so young an age; but now they are being pitchforked into positions for which they are not suitable and for which they have no natural inclination, and are being, to a large extent, withdrawn from all moral oon- trol. They find themselves with more money than they have been accustomed to or than is necessary to them, certainly with more than they are worth or would earn in any other way, they have a great deal of freedom during the week, and most week-ends off duty. The consequences are often disastroua to them- selves and a waste to the country. Of course there are a few exeoeptions; but for the most part we can ask—(1) Is it right to take boys of 17 or 171 at all? They can get to-day a good military training at any of the public schools, and at the same time enjoy all the benefits of school life. (2) If they are token, ought they not still to be subject to such dis- cipline and moral control as they have at the Uuiverr.ity ? A Compliment and a Confession. Mr. T. P. O'Connor, M.P., concluding an article on the war in "Reynolds' Newspaper," aay" :-There is something oomio-if anything can be comic in such a world-tragedy as Ger- many has brought about-in the plaintive complaints of the frank Germans and Aus- trians that though GermanJ-68 they think- has nndoubtedly won, the Allies are stupid and inhuman enough not to realise that she has won. The complaint is a oompliment and a oon fees ion, and it is true. We do not rea- lise that Germany has won; we do not be- lieve that 'Germany has won or can win. Above all, we are determined that Germany thtdl not win. She is at her aenith; we are slowly but surely rising from the nadir at which we started this war to our aenith, which is as certain of coming as the rieing of to-mor- row's sun. Germany is ending; we aTe only beginning. These are the faote which every subject of the Allied Powers must keep oon- stantly in mind. Keeping such facts in mind, we can look at the incidents of day to day with calmness. They may irritate; they may even give us moments of discouragement; we should be more than human if we were not im- patient for the hour when the tide is going to turn, and possibly we get more impatient the nearer that hour is coming. But the fact remains, Germany is getting exhausted with every hour; every hour is a loss to her and a gain to us, and bidfrig our time in self- conifdence, in inflexible resolution, we shall go on till we have made it impossible for 'Ger- many ever again to be a peril to everything in civilisation, in liberty, in the free develop- ment of every nation which she has been for nearly half a century.

Advertising

Ttesttts fos Sotd:ttrs VSaUow. Scarves, Socks, Shirts, Mittens, Vests, Pants, Handkerchiefs, &c. Note the Address- W. T. JONES MANCHESTER HOUSE, NOLTON ST., BRIDGEND Telephone WINTER, 1915. Established 593 Central —————— I ————— 1875. To COLLIERY OWNERS, CONTRACTORS, SINKERS AND LOCAL BODIES. DANN & CO.. South Wales Clothiers and Boot Merchants, Wind Street, Swansea. Beg to notify the above that they are now ready to execute any Oiders in— Oilskins, Waterproofs and Boots, 000000000000000000000000 Goods despatched same day as Order. 000000000000000000000000c PRICE LIST ON APPLICATION. NOTE THE ADDRESS, 6163  I -¡; ??! THE on"BPAlrM j ? pQ tiu04 -?    Er.42 wEESs&i-i ø Q 1/ I Z r" II'. -= 11'     ???n.r. ?''?.nd  ?' ? 5 rovemeo s .I Cwt&io all m(AternJ.Provements and 0M4 C  BEST VAL UIE ,IN TTIE WORLD. 0,4-rA ill— the t??Stf? U??? ? S '? ?? ? ? 5 ? = c?iaWtcsPo?'?' j ?   W -== C1J :& ïJ rIJ 0 r Iz  & ?ON?. Ltd. S 5 -==: (ESTABLISHED 1888.) g 1361 ????' ? STATION ROAD (Opposite the CoantJ Schools) PORT TALBOT. (? IP 1 —r 1|||

No title

The end newe has reached the town of Hay, Breoonshire, that Private George Williams, K.S.L.I., son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Williams, 28 Caetle-etreet, waa killed by a German sniper on the 5th instant whilst rescuing a wounded oomra.de in France. Private Williams, who was only 21 years of age, has four brothers on active service. Starred Agriculturists. Addressing a meeting of farmers at Win- chester, Iiord Selborne said that "starred" agricultural hands would not be given an armlet. As they were indispensable there was no reason to put them in the Army Reserve, and they must be content to know they were doing their best for their country. To meet the labour difficulties farmers ought to ask landowners, through the local committees, for gardeners, keepers, and woodmen, and the landowner's duty was to offer all unessential labour to help the farmers. Village women should be canvassed as Lord Derby canvassed the men, and patriotically urged to do their war work in the fields. Financiers. The Chancellor of the Exchequer presided on Saturday at. the conference at the Home Office with representatives of the principal insurance and financial companies of the king- dom. Among those with Mr. McKenna were Mr. Edwin Moatagu (Financial Secretary to the Treasury), Sir John Bradbury (also of the Treasury), and Lord Reading, with whom the Chancellor conferred several times on points which were raised by the delegates. Acoord- ing to the "Sunday Chronicle," general appro- val wtis expressed by the speakers of the Gov. ernment proposals as embodied in the Bill which will h. before the House of Commons. There is no doubt that the companies are unanimously agreeable to sell out-right to the Government the bulk of their American securities on the Government's own terms, namely, in exchange for 5 per cent, par bonds at five years. But in cases where it would be inexpedient to sell the securities outright (as, for instance, where the companies will require them for their own operations in the United States), the companies are accepting the offi- cial proposal to hand them over to the Govern- ment for a period of two years, the Gvern- ment paying the companies meanwhile 11 per cent. more than the natural interest. It transpired at the conference on Saturday that the same terms will be offered to private hol- ders of American securities, and that am ap- peal will be made to their patriotism.