Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
12 articles on this page
A GOOD FRIDAY STROLL

A GOOD FRIDAY STROLL. THEFT OF SHRUBS AT PORTHCAWL. Cærgod at Bridgetx! Police Court on Mon- day, Thomas and Cassie Russell Omsband and u ilti), of Philaddphia Read, Porthcawl, plearloo guilty to stealing a quantity of shrubs from a plantation known as The- Wilderness," and belonging to Mr G. E. Blundell, Xcttage Court, Porthcaw]. In consideration of the fact that he had served his ftve ye-ar- with the Royal Artillery, and r.-as about to re-jcin his Majesty's forces, the mate defendant was discharged, but the wife waa fined 5s. for the offence. The prosecutor said he had been, very much annoyed by trespassers for seme time past, and he mode up his mix/i to take proceedings against some responsible^ person in order to put a stop t-o M. Mrs Ruseell iia-d lived in the neighbour- liood for some years, and knew all the circum- stances. Mr Powell David, on behalf of the female defendant, a cbnitted that she ought to have known, better, and tendered sirceilf, apologies to Mr Blundcll an her behalf. She and her husband had merely gone for a walk on Goad Friday morning, and- thought no harm m going through "The Wilderness and taking the shrubs. A fine was impose d as stated.

PORTHCAWL PUBLIC UNS DEATH 0

PORTHCAWL PUBLIC UN'S DEATH -0 THE LATE MR. J. DAVIES. Mr John Davies, of the Knight's Arms, Porthcawl, died somewhat suddenly on Fri- day at the house of his brother-in-law, Mr John Evans, of Rose Villa, North-road. Car- diff. Mr Davies, who was 60 years of age, had been ailing for about six weeks, and went to Cardiff for a change on Wednesday last. He was well known and popular in the city. When a young man he was a master painter. was a member of the Artillery Volunteers at Cardiff, and was a cornet player of much skill. He had been a licensed victualler for about 30 years, and before taking the Knight's Arms at Porthcawl was the licensee of the White -Swan Cardiff. Mr Davies leaves a widow -and two children.

I EASTER YESTRIES I

I EASTER YESTRIES I- IN THE DISTRICT. .t; -=- # r ystradowen. At the annual vestry, Mr W. Thomas was re-appointed vicar's warden, aind Mr T. Griffiths was re-elected parish warden. Mr J. tbopkinf, was added to the list of sidesmen. The statement of accounts showed a balance on the right side. A resolution was passed protesting against the 'injustice done to the Welsh Church. ST. JAMES' PYLE. "v The annual vestry meeting held in Church Hall on Thursday last, the Vicar, Rev. D. J, accounts, explained by Mr. Knott, showed a nominated as Vicar's warden and Mr Rees Rees as people's warden. The church accounts, explained by Mr Nnott, showed D., -substantial balance in hand. A strong body of skfejmen was formed, and thanks were passed to all church workers, especially to Mrs Knott, for looking after the altar decorations. Resolutions of protest against the Church Act were unanimously passed, and also a vote of thanks to the Vicar for presiding. ST. MARY MAGDALIXE, KENFIG: At the vestry meeting on Friday last, the Rer. D. J. Arthur in the chair, Mr D. M. Powell was nominated as church warden, and Messrs W. B. Loveluck, W. J. Rees, Richard John and Hopkin Morgan as sidesmen. Church accounts showed a balance of £ (i 28.

NEWCASTLE HIGHER PARISH COUNCILI

NEWCASTLE HIGHER PARISH COUNCIL A meeting of the Newcastle Higher Parish Council was held on Thursday last week. Present: Messrs. T. Moles (chairman), D. Daniel, D. C. Whittingham, W. M. Rees, C. P. Puffitt, D. Moloney, Mrs. Heaven (deputy clerk), and Mr. Cox. A letter was read from Mr. Franklen, clerk ,t-o the Glamorgan County Council, re appor- tionment of cost of fire brigade appliances be- tween this parish anw "Ynysawdre, in which 'he stated that the only equitable basis was pro rata.—It was decided to accept this in- terpretation. Mr. C. P. Puffitt presented his report as manager of Penyfai School; also Mr. D. M. Moloney his report for St. Roberts' School.— It was resolved to re-appoint them for the en- duing year. Mr. David Thomas, who has been a member of the Council since its inception, tendered is resignation as a Parish Councillor in con- -sequence of failing health. Several mem- bers spoke, regretting the circumstances under which Mr. Thomas resigned, and it was resolved to accept the resignation, and to place on record the indebtedness of the Coun- cil for his past services.

RHEUMATISMKIDNEY TROUBLE

RHEUMATISM—KIDNEY TROUBLE. FREE TREATMENT. I Rheumatism is due to uric acid orystak in the joints and muscles, the result of excessive arks acfd in the system that the kidneys failed to remove as nature intended, and this acid is atso the cause of backache, lumbago, sciatica, gout, urinary trouble, stone, gravel, dropsy. To prove Estora Tablets are the successful treatment for such complaints one fnli box of forty tablets will be sent to readers of the Glamorgan Gazette" on receipt of this notice and 3d. in stamps to cover postage, packing etc. Sold by chemists, Is. 3d. per box of 40 tablets, or 6 boxes for 6s. 9d. For full box sample, address Estora Co., 132, Cbaring Cross Road, London, W.C. ) #

I PORTHCAWL MD ASSESS I MENT COMITTEEj

I PORTHCAWL MD ASSESS-  I MENT COMITTEE. A REPRESENTATIVE AT LAST. I I APPLICATIONS FOR POSITION OF LAY CLERK AND SURVEYOR. I I IMPROVEMENT OF WATER SUPPLY. I THE NEW RATE. After many years of nlin striving, Porth- cawl, or rather the Parish of Newton Nottage, has secured a representative on the Assess- ment Committee of the Bridgend and Cow- bridge Union. The fact was made known at tki* meeting of th:v Porthcawl Council on Monday. Mr. T. James presided, and there were also present the Rev. D. J. Arthur, Me-srs. R. E. Jones. T. E. Deere. D. J; Rees. and D. Davies, with the legal clerk (Mr. Evan Davies), the lay clerk (Mr. A. Brown), and the surveyor (Mr. A. J. Oborn). I MR. GRACE ILL. I Heiore the ordinary business commenced, the Chairman &aid the Council would regret to leant that Mr. Grace, who had sat as a. member of that Council for many years, had been taken ill, and had been sent away for a complete rest. He thought it was fitting that they should convey to him their sym- pathy and wishes for a speedy recovery. All the members concurred. I ASSESSMENTS. I Mr. D. J. Rees said he was pleased to in- form the Council that he had been appointed a member of the Assessment Committee, and this would be the first time Porthcawl had been represented. The Union was divided into four districts, vi., Maesteg, Ogmore and Garw with GUfach, Bridgend, and Cowbridge. It was practically impossible to remove one member from the representatives for the Brid- gend area in order to get a representative for Porthcawl, and especially as the three mem- bers had put in many years' service. Col. Nicholl had been a member for 14 years; Mr. Michael Davies, 22 years, and Mr. Griffith Edwards, 39 years. He (Mr. Rees) saw no hope in that direction, but on looking up the year book he saw grounds for putting forward a strong case for an additional representa- tive. He found that the assessable value of the Cowbridge district was £ 67,818. Cow- bridge had three representatives on the As- • ve'sftient Committee. and the same number was allowed to th.e Bridgend area with an assessable value of £ 143.448, or nearly double the value of Cowbridge. Mr. Rees said he saw the clerk before the annual meeting of the Guardians, and inquired whether he would be in order in moving an amendment to the ordinary resolution that the old mem- bers be re-elected. He was informed that he would, so when the Chairman moved that the usual method of appointing members be adopted, he (Mr. Rees) moved an amendment that an additional member be appointed for the Bridgend area, and in view of the fact that out of the C143,000 odd assessable value for that area, Newton Nottage contributed £ 43.000 and had only one representative, and Cowbridge, with, an assessable value of £ 67.000, had three representatives, he moved that the fourth member for Bridgend should be a person representing the parish of New- ton Nottage, which embraced Kenfig Hill. The amendment was carried by a large major- ity, and he (Mr. Rees) was appointed as the fourth representative for the Bridgend area. The Chairman said the Council was very pleased to hear of Mr. Rees efforts, and the result of them.. Mr. D. J. Rees: I hope now that I am a member I will do justice to every ratepayer in this district. NEWTON AFFAIRS. Mr. D. J. Rees asked whether anything was being done with regard to the erection of a public convenience at Newton, and the Sur- veyor said a permanent structure could not be erected at present owing to the shortage of labour, but he cowid arrange for the erection of a temporary two-stall building, to be con- structed during the week. GAS CHARGES. The St. John Ambulance Association wrote asking the Council whether steps could be taken to reduce the charge for gas at the I Rest, Porthcawl, which was being used as a hospital for wounded soldiers. The gas bill was a serious iteea i. the accounts. The matter was referred to the Gas Com- mittee. WEIGH BRIDGE. It was decided post notices informing the public that the weigh bridge near the gas- works was now in use for weighing goods. If NO JOBS FOR CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS. A letter was read asking the Council whether there vrere any vacancies in the sanitary department or other branch of the Counciladminietrutire department for con- scientious objectors who had been set aside for work of national importance. Mr. R. E. Jones: I move that we reply that we can't find joba for conscientious objectors. The Chairman If they can't fight Germans, they can't fight germs. (Laughter.) He quoted xx. 12, which he said applied to these men. He looked upon them as shirkers, and not&ieg less. The resolution was carried. MR. BLBHDHLL'S GOOD OFFICES. The CounctTa Uuwks were tendered to Mr. Blundell for altering the Council to get stone from hiii property to complete the Esplanade. THANKS TO THE "GAZETTE." I The Chairman painted out that that was probably the last meeting-that Mr. Miller, the Editor Ðf the "Gazette," who had in- terested himself in Porthcawl for many years and had regularly attended their meetings, would attend beifore he joined the Army. He could not allow that occasion to pass with- out expressing Lis appreciation, and he thought, the Oouucii's, of his work during the time he had beee witti the "Gazette." He had set a splendid example for others to follow. v Mr. T. E. Deere seconded, and Mr. D. J. Rees paid further tribute. Mr. R. E. Jones associated himself with with the resolution as an old Pressman, and thought Mr. Miller was deserving of the thanks of the Council for the services lie had rendered Porthcawl as Editor of the Gazette." They regarded him as one of their kith and kin. The Rev. D. J. Arthur said the conduct of the "Gazette" since Mr. Miller had been with them had been fearless, but fair; the criti- cism had been healthy and useful, and while regretting Mr. Miller's departure, he wished I him good luck and God-speed. t The resolution was carried. I SURVEYOPSHIP. Fifteen applications for the post of deputy- clerk and accountant were received. The ap- pointment will be made to-day (Friday). About 50 applications for the post of sur- veyor and inspector of nuisances were re- ceived. A short list will be prepared. I WATER SUPPLY. The consulting engineer stated that the contract entered into between the Council and Mr. J. E. Pullen for laying six miles of water pipes as between Craig-yr-Aber on the Mar- gam Hills and Smoky Cot, Cornelly, had been carried out to his entire satisfaction. The new main is eight inches in diameter, and conveys the supply to a million gallon storage reservoir about a mile from Porthcawl on the crest of Tycoch Hill. The main was laid at a cost of close upon £ 7,000, which was bor- rowed for a period of 30 years. I RATE. A rate of 2s. 2d. in the £ for the ensuing six months has been levied by the Porthcawl overseers. This is 2d. in the £ less than the corresponding six months of last year.

Advertising

-=. -r_ ",ç.oo,)If, Puritan Pi. ctures No. 2. 7  T  -=r  J ? /???

l YOLUNTEER TRAINING CORPS

l YOLUNTEER TRAINING CORPS. I AND GLAMORGAN TERRITORIAL ASSOCIATION. The Eaxl of Plymouth presided at the quar- terly meeting of the Glamoa-gan Texrltorial Association at Cardiff, and read a letter re- ceived from the War Office in regard to Vol- unteer Training Corps in the county, and ask- ing whether the Territorial Force Association would be willing to take over, in addition to their present work, the administration of these Volunteer Training Corps. Lord Ply- mouth said it appeared that the Volunteer Training Corps were in a rather different con- dition to what they had been in before. It seemed to him, and he hoped that the asso- 1 ciation would agree, that the Territorial Force Association should exercise these duties which the War Office invited them to undertake. l Much had already been done by those who had thus far voluntarily taken in hand the raising of these Volunteer battal ions, but the work in some cases had been doubtless ham- pered by the fact that it was not known what kind! of recognition would be given to them by the War Office. Now their status was definitely fixed, and as Lord Lieutenant of the county he hoped and believed that now the question of recognition had been settled they would be able to raise a, very strong Volun- teer Force in Glamorgan. He believed that their association was the proper body, repre- sentative as they were of the military side of the county, to undertake the organisation. In doing this they would be able to utilise much of the organisation that already existed. Mr. Godfrey Clark asked if it would mean that the Territorial Force Association would be called upon to clothe, equip, and arm these men. It was explained that these corps at present had nothing except what had been privately supplied to them. Mr. Godfrey Clark: Then unless we equip them we have no means of getting a really efficient force. Lord Plymouth said that up to the present it had depended entirely on voluntary con- tributions. He had always been ready to make an appeal to the county on behalf of the corps, but tie want of recognition by the War Office had thus far .made it inadvisable to ask the county for pecuniary support. He be- lieved that in some localities local efforts had been made. Lord Aberdare expressed his view that the association should take over the adminis- tration of the corps as they were invited to do by the War Office. Sir John Courtis, speaking for the Motor Corps, said that with private funds they had supplied motors, and their men with clothing, but it was extremely necessary that the War Office should give them more material help than mere recognition. Mr Herbert Lewis asked if it would be com- petent to provide money out of Territorial Association funds. It was explained that this could not be done. After further discussion it was resolved, on the motion of Mr Godfrey Clark, "that the Glamorgan Territorial Association are pre- pared to undertake the organisation, of volunteer battalions in the county. It was also resolved "that the Lord Lieutenant be requested to inform the Army Council that no satisfactory result is likely to follow until proper provision has been made for clothing and equipment." Lord Plymouth said he was glad they had agreed to adopt the principle of taking over the Volunteer Corps in the County, and he promised to emphasise the point get forth im the second resolutiibn.

SPIRITUALISMI

SPIRITUALISM. I To the Editor. i Sir,—I should like to reply to the Rer. W. T. Griffiths. His clever posing as a school- master on the composition of the undersigifed might certainly create a smile, especially hie desire to laud his own intellectual standard. He is a pastmaster at noticing the defects of his opponents, but if he was charitable, he would realise that this discussion demands his help. He ha^s notified us that lie has liad years of study in theology and medicine. Theology has been helpful, but let us have a liberal theology, not a stagnant theology. The young men of to-day are determined to show their utter dissatisfaction with ecclesias- ticism; he has arrived at a stronger faith in the spiritual reality that infinitely transcends all formulations, and is a deeper experience of the power of the reality in his own life. The presuppositions of liberal theology, as we understand it, are that more truth is acces- sible to the human mind than any yet em- bodied in creed or symbol, and that for grow- ing souls in a growing universe a stagnant theology is impossible. Theology must grow. Therefore, if modern theology is go- ing to break up present-day "priestcraft," we shall indeed have deliverance. The desire to be "comfortable," we agree, is quite consis- tent with his theology. Many of our minis- ters would like to launch out into the deep and preach according to conviction, but they console themselves with the idea that the people are not prepared; they would be tak- ing them out of their depth—an excuse merely to hold up the present de- nominational ystem. The material con- ditions are the first essentials. I make no objection to salary, but ^et us have value. Whoare the true iileii ? Those who do the truth, and never hold a principle on which they are not prepared in any hour to act, and in any hour to risk the consequences of holding it. In reference to his remarks re mixed meta- phors on any secular subject, I should like him to refer back to the motive which promoted this discussion. Anything pertain- ing to an after-life is not secular. Spiritual- ism is an assertion. He preaches the immor- tality of the soul, relying chiefly on faith and hope, and this places him in the position of secular inactivity. As a parting word, his medical experience is not above criticism, notwithstanding it is Homoeopathy. Per- haps that would be a more .suitable subject to discuss, if we take his failure to condemn Spiritualism as a criterion. I am sure we have no cause for alarm. It is better to be a Tom Thumb, with a little practical effort, than an intellectual giant with a congested dying force.—Yours etc., I F. W. HUMPHRIES.

I To tlio Editor I

I (To tlio Editor). I Sir,—After reading Mr Griffiths letters which appear week after week, I am sorrv to learn that the rev. gentleman is not the popular authority on Greek which he claims to be, with such egotism. I really expected that he would be able to teach something different to what he does when he dares to critisise the likes of the Hpy. H. J. Campbell, Sir Oliver Lodge and others. But his letters bring to my memory a poem by one of the greatest and most inspired poets that was ever known in history. When in one of his verses he puts it, "Too long the night of ignorance has brooded o'er the mind," also No:w let the blessed truth be flashed to earth's remotest span." But I fincl Mr Griffiths is too selfish to follow in that path, but wants all his congregation to hare nothing to do with it. Now Mr Griffiths own life is only a short one in this body, and for the time let us be honest with one another. Can Mr Griffiths tell me the reason why during the last huitdired years Paganism has increased by about 70 per cent, where missionaries have gone to preach ? Instead of developing Christianity they preach Churchianity, and I heard only on Easter Monday last that one 1-ev. gentleman from a Welsh pulpit said that it would be a blessing if half the pulpits were washed and cleaned of the rubbish they contain, and preached the gospel the Nazarine preach and lived, and then we could talk about the brotherhood of ma.n. But Mr Griffiths has made one great error in his epistles to the Spiritualists in confess- ing the possibility of spirit communion. Paul says in one of his epistles "Render your bodies a living sacrifice," etc. I am sure Mr Griffiths wil be Irble to come in contact with someone higher in the spirit i-ealnis than the poor earth bound ones he lias attached himself to. — Yours etc., D.W.G., COLLIER. I

If I CHRISTIAN SCIENCE AND ITS CRITICSI

f CHRISTIAN SCIENCE AND ITS CRITICS. I To the Editor. Sir,When I said Mr Griffiths did' not understand Christian Science I said so in all sincerity, and even in all charity, because I knew he would not deliberately slander what he understood, and understanding, must know to be the truth. If Mr Griffiths understood Christian Science he would inevitably know that understanding is demonstrable and tramslatable into "signs following." He does not know that, hence my justification for say- ing he does not understand the subject. It would have been unpardonably uncharitable for me to assume Mr Griffitlis had the know- ledge, amd yet because the Christian Scientists were not of his fold, made this attack on their religion and denounced it as i false. Mr Griffiths is as honest a man as I am, andl is actuated by as honest motives. I therefore repeat he was speaking out of ¡3 lack of knowledge. But I asked Mr Griffiths a question, surely not difficult for a man of his attainments to answer. He does not answer me. He refers me to another gentleman, a per- fect stranger to this controversy, in order that I may go to this gentleman for information (which I never asked for, and lie tells me that the referee has written a pamphlet against Christian Science. Well, I am not impressed. Such of the anti-Christian Science pamph- leteers as I have had any acquaintance with have had just as much knowledge of the'sub- ject as enable them to lay hold on certain ,v liol? d? on cei,tain passages in Mrs Eddy's immortal work, pluck them up bleeding by the roots, drag them from their context, and then write a penny dreadful with this parody as its text. And it is to a writer of this kind, for all I know, that the Rev. W. T. Griffiths would refer me when I asked the Rev. Mr Griffiths for a straight answer to a straight question to him, and not to an unknown phampletecr. I say again, and again in all sincerity, that Mr i""Jl"—IM'»'ll^Wg|»|IWll"^—WMMWIHIWI—I Griffiths is as honest a man as I am. His motives are as pure as mine. Owing to lack of knowledge, he charges Christian Science' with, being a false religion, and' adds to that charge that it is anti-Christian. I don't want to set my word against Mr Griffiths', and so I will just quote a few lines written by Mrs Eddy at the very outset of Science and Health. Speaking of prayer, this is part of what she says "God is not moved by the breath of praise. The mere habit. of pleading with the Divine mind as OIK: pleads with a human being perpetuates the belief in God as humanly eircumset, Ibe(I-.ai-i error which impedes spiritual growth. The habitual struggle to be always good is un- ceasing prayer Sin is forgiven only as it is destroyed by Christ. If prayer nourishes the belief that pin is can- ceiled and that man is made better merely by praying, prayer is an evil. He grows worse who continues in sin, because ho fancies himself forgiven." Thus Mrs Eddy on prayer. Does not Jesus .I^imself say something very like it? In ii,,v "last lettei- I cited something else that Jesus said and which Mrs" Eddy makes a fundamental part of her teaching. I said then if Mr Griffiths docs net belief Jesus- ¡;;a¿,d it he should cut it out of his text book and not teach it. I say here that if what r have quoted from Mrs Eddy about prayer,, is also found to be in accordance with: what Jesus has said about prayer,. Mr Griffitlis must accept it if he believes Jesus. taught so and, if he thinks Jesus said noth- ing of the sort about prayer, then he must cut out of his text bcok, the New Testament.. He cannot have it both ways. What then is. there a.nti-Christian in what I have just cited from the very heart of Mrs Eddy's teachings? I leave it to Mr Griffiths to answer.— Yours, etc., Manchester. WILLIAM COTTON. A SOLDIER S COMPLAINT. To the Editor. Si?,—Knowing that you take an interest in our soldiers, wou!d you kindly publish this short letter in your next issue. I was dis- charged from the army on March 22nd, 1916, after serving I year and 202 days, joining on September 3rd, 1914. I have spent the best part of that time out in the trenches in Fra n-ce, and I am disabled, and so far am not able to follow any employment. I am expecting a pension, which I am sorry to say, hac not arrived yet, and so each week I have had to get a medical certificate from my doctor for the state insurance, but not with- standing that, they refused to pay me sick benefit until my pension identity papers arrive, and I have now to ,appeal to a society that gives aid to soldiers' familieri. You will see that it is now going on fcr six weeks since I was discharged, and to maintain a wife and seven little children, all under the age of sixteen. I have received the large sum of R4 (four pounds) from the above society. As everybody must admit with the price of the things necessary to keep body and soul together at the present tinie, it is I think disgraceful. I may state tilailthis is not the first time I have served my country, having served through the South African War, and possess the two medals for same. Trusting that this may do good, if not to myself, to others who may bodischarged dis- abled after doing their bit.—I am, etc., A PATRIOT.

DROWNED AT SOUTHERNDOWN

DROWNED AT SOUTHERNDOWN. OLD LADY'S SAD END. I. A verdict of "Accidentally drowned" was returned at an inquest held on Friday at the Greyhound Hotel, St. Brides Major, on the body of Eva Ace 60), who was found lying dead on the beach at Southerndown on the 27th April. Rees Ace, a roadman, who identified the body as that of his wife, described how he last saw deceased going along the road to- wards Southerndown. She said she was go- ing to Slade to see the maids there, as she was sometimes in the habit of doing. When he got home about o o'clock tea was set for both of them, as if she had intended coming back. When she did not, he and some neigh- bours went out to search for her, but it was 1 o'clock in the morning before he heard that v she had been found dead on Southerndown- beach. Deceased had not been particularly de- pressed lately, though sometimes she was, and; for no apparent reason. He had never heard her threaten to do away with herself, and? there was no domestic cause for unhappiness. She used to paddle in the sea whenever she went down to it, especially as summer was coming on. Evidence having been given by Caroline Trotman as to deceased having been seen going along the road from St. Brides Major towards the beach, the Coroner next called Thomas Hadden, a forester in the employ of Lord Dunraveu, who said that at 5.30 in the afternoon of the day in question he was going down towards Dunraven Bay, when he saw a body lying among the rocks. He went to it, and found it was a woman lying on her- back, with her head and shoulders hanging- over a rock. She had no boots nor stockings nor hat on—otherwise she was fully dressed. Part of the woman's clothing was over her- head, as if it had been washed there by the sea. It was then ebb tide, about half-way between high and low water. The body was cold, and lay just opposite where the brook- runs through the pebbles into the sea. There' was no one on the beac h. It had been a beautiful day, just the sort of day to go pad- dling. He saw no sign of the shoes and' stockings. Dr. W. E. Thomas stated that death was due to drowning. There were a number of bruises on the uncovered parts of the body, face, lower part of the legs, etc.—but these might well be due to the rolling of the body on the rocks by the sea. A woman of de- ceased's age might easily have slipped while- paddling, stunned herself, and in that condi- tion might have drowned in a few minutes. The jury returned a verdict as stated of Accidentally drowned."