Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
16 articles on this page
Advertising

L 'ii ■! —————————■——— OOllitflM/ Of Every Description at Lowest Prices. Compare. A "GAZETTE" OFFICES, BRIDGEND.

PORTHCAWL URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL

PORTHCAWL URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL TO RECEIVE HOTEL PROPRIETORS' DEPUTATION IN REGARD TO RESTRICTIONS ORDER. 'I ht* usual fortnightly meeting of the Porth- cawl Urban District Council wa, held (a week Inte oa account of the holdavs), on Monday. Air. H. E. Jones, in the absence of Mr. James, was elected to the chair, and there were ailso §>reseat Messrs. Dan Davies, D. J. Rees, and Rev. D. J. Arthur, with Mr. Chork-y, assls- taut clerk, and Mr. Hatcher, surveyor. A-letter was read from Mrs. Violet Gaskell, acknowledging one from the Council con- doling with her in the loss of her husband. The letter concluded "Xo doubt his end was glorious, but at present I can only feel grief for the sadden manner of his death." A letter was read from the Cwmavon Slag Company saving that, owing to the difficulty of obtaining materials and also to threatened labour troubles, it would be impossible for them to d-eliver the J inch macadam, as arranged. (This was in reply to the Council's ktter saying that the contract must be con- sidered 'off' unless the macadam could be de- livered within seven days). Mr. D. Davies asked if the matter was really urgent. The? Surveyor said it was highly desirable to get the slag as soon as possible, but he could not say there was any immediate need of it. Mr. D. Davies thereupon proposed that some other firm be applied to for quotations, etc. The niatter was ultimately left in the SUT- veyor's hands to take such steps as he thoughtv proper. Ae .tetter was read from Madame Desmond, informing the Council that she was erecting « smali palmistry tent on private ground, and iwpi-Lg that it would have the Council's sanction and approval. Mr. Dan Davies: Is the land assessed. Tha Assistant Clerk: No. Mr. Dan Davies: Then I think it ought to be. SMOKE NUISANCE. A tetter was read from Messrs W. E. Bourne nnd Co. f Limited, in reply to a protest from the Council as to the smoke from the company's chimney. The firm wtobe that they were experimenting with a different kind of coal, and if that failed, the onJy thing would be to close down the works, "Which, we presume, you don't wish to force uatodo." Mr. D. Davies said that the nuisance was a very real one, and the only remedy was to erect a proper chimney stack. A communication was read from a com- mittee representing the hotel proprietors in the seaside resorts of Wales announcing that a series of meetings were being organised all over the principality "To protest agftinst the cruel and unjust Liquor Control Order," and to call for its drastic alteration. The letter was to ask whether. the Council would Ailow their chairman to take the chair officially at such a meeting in Porthcawl. Afco, would the Council receive a deputation -on the subject P J Vhawman: Would you like to hear their -v.»ewsr gentlemen ? Mr. D. Davies: Yes, I think we might do that. It was finally decided to meet the deputa- tion on Friday at 6 o'clock. TAR-SPRAYING "TRAGEDY." A. letter was read from a lady visitor com- plaining of damage done to wearihg apparel received from the tar-spraying apparatus that is no & in full swing in certain parts of the town. "Walking through Park Place with a friend," wrote the lady, "the men engaged in tar-spraying called to us to hurry past. We did so, and felt a smarting sensation in our eyes." When the ladies had safely run the gaantlett, scurrying through an atmosphere charged, so they deposed, with specks of fine dust, they found that their attire had suffared considerably in the process. And imi fact the writer of ..he letter ended by planking diown (so to speak) under the Coun- cil's nose a formal bill for "two pique skirts, two b iouses," and two of several other articles of feminine attire which *ur reporter had not the- technical knowledge to transcribe. The Council received the demand with the gravity that the occasion demanded. It was felt that it was a serious matter, and that ttio I-aclv viaitors had a genuine grievance, Vat—the Council could do nothing. It was a «natter for the contractors, to whom, accord- ingly, the correspondent was referred. A letter was read from the Noi-tfi British and Mercantle Insurance Company in regard to tha insurance of the furniture of married men. called to the Colours. But it appeared that the Council had had no application for the storage of furniture, hence they had ,none to insure. It was however decided to ask the Insurance Company for terms, so as to be prepared. THE COAL QUE-C-TION I An important letter was read from the Cen- tral Committee af Cardiff in regard to the coal supply for household purposes, -and sug- gesting that a committee should be appointed mi every town to gather information from ooal merchants and dealers as to the amount of ooal they have been in the habit of selling. If this information could be obtained, it will be possible to collate it for the purpose of finding out. what amount of cnal will be wanted for the winter. It is only by co-oper- ation between colliery and distributor, the letter concluded, that the supply of coal for (Continued on Bottom of htext Column.)

PORTHCAWL URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL

(Contittutd frem Provim Cakam). household purposes for the coming winter could be property -guw-atkteed. -U Would a3so be advisable to buy in now, before the winter, where the committee had room for storage The question was felt to be one of grave importance, and it was at once resolved to set up a committee as suggested. Mr. D. Davies proposed the whole Council. Rev. D. J. Arthur: I propose it goes to the Gas Committee. The Clerk: That is the whole Council. The Chairman: It is a very important mat- ter to give to any committee. It was ultimately decided that the com- mittee should consist of three members only, and that these should be the three chairmen. THE TOWN. WATER. I A report on the town water was read from the medical officer of health. This was highly satisfactory, and it was the feeling of the Council that the facts should be given as wide publicity as possible. The anlysis was as follows:—Chemical analysis-a soft, pure, neutral water; bacte- riological analysis—the same, very satisfac- tory.

PORTHCAWL

PORTHCAWL. ) SCHOLASTIC SUCCESSES.—At the recent examination for entrance scholarships at the Bridgend County School, the following pupils of the Porthcawl Council School were success- ful :—Ira Bartieti Lawrence, Thomas Samuel Lord, Vera Grace Gillard, John Tudor Foster, and Frederick William Jones. The results are very satisfactory, and reflect much credit upon the efficiency of the instruction received at this school, under the headship of Mr. Job Baker. Thirty-two pupils frjm this school (not includ- ing the above) liav- won scholarships at the Bridgend County School during the past seven years. FUNERAL.—The funeral of the late Miss Phoebe Dorothy Dredge, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dredge, Newport, Mon., took place on Friday last at Newport Cemetery. Prior to the interment, a snort service was held' at St. Luke's Church, conducted by the Rev. J.' R. Phillips, senior curate of St. Woolos. The deceased, who was of a bright and happy dis- position, passed peacefully away at Porthcawl, after a long and trying iLlness in her 20th year. She had been an active participant in the various concerts, etc., organised at New- port, and was hetd in esteem by a large num- ber of acquaintances. The mourners were:- Mother and Father Phyl and Phyllis (brother and sister): Auntie FLo; Auntie Bibbie; Uncle Arthur and May; Auntie Bessie; Uncle Ted; Auntie Chloe; Mr. Featherstone; Cousin George and Minnie; Uncles Frank, Fred and Jim; Cousin Amelia and Mr. Emlyn Phillips, Abertillery. Amongst the large number of floral tributes sent were those from Mother and Father; Phil and Phyllis; Auntie Bibbie; Auntie Flo and Uncle Will, Maesteg; Aunties' Kate and Marjorie, Maesteg; Uncle May and Arthur; Auntie and Will; Auntie Chloe, and Ted, Cardiff; Cousin George, and Minnie; Cousin Elsie, and Reg.; Mrs. R. Parfitt and family, Porthcawl; Uncle Jim and family, Pontypool; Cousin Sarah, and Frank; Uncle Fred and Llydia; Mrs. Bradley and family; Mr. and Mrs. W. A. White; ifiss Deakin and family; Her Fetlow Staff; Her Sunday School Teacher Miss Weaver, Porth- cawl; Mrs. Phillips and family, Lamb Hotel; Misses Jessie and Gladys Davies; Mr. and Mrs. Percy Phillips; Matron, and Miss Rut- ledge, Highfield, Bassialeg; Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Wilkinson; Mr. and Mrs. Feather- stone; Miss Elsie Cope; Mr. and Miss Well- steed; Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Bird; Mr. and Hurley Mrs. Woodliffe and family, Malpas; Mrs. Morrish and family; Miss Maggie Gibbs; Mr. and Mrs. Victory; Mrs. Tucker; Mr. E. Morrish.

ITONDU WESLEYANSI

I TONDU WESLEYANS. I SUCCESSFUL ANNIVERSARY SERVICES LAST SUNDAY. The anniversary services in. connection with the Sunday School took place on Sun- day, June 18th. At the morning service at 11, conducted by the Rev. Mr. Dawkins (mini- ster in charge), special hymns were sung by the choir; also recitations were given by Lizzie Ballinger and Violet Presoott. Special reference was made to those scholars who had been brought up in this school and were now serving their country in H.M. Forces, the preacher implar-iug the Divine blessing and guidance upon them. -An amreu wm. givftl to the children on "Discretion," after which a timely and thoughtful sermon was delivered to the congregation. At the afternoon service at 2.30, the follow- ing contributed to the programme:—Solos, Clarice Pegler, Hilda Edwards, Phyllis Jacka; recitations, Muriel Major, Hilda Edwards, Ritta Pittard, Hilda Jacka, Geo. Baker, Irene Reed, Irene Lloyd, Violet Pres- cott, Fred Whitlock, Bertie Evans, Tom Bal- linger, Mary Anson, Doris Pope, Howard Saunders, Willie Ayres. Leonard Evans, Harold Edwards, Clarence Powell, and Ray- mond Prescott recited Psalm 145 between them. At the evening service the.following items were given :-Recitation, The Soldier's Prayer," Violet Pittard; solo (No. 100 S.S. Hymn Book), Phyllis Jacka. The choir ren- dered the anthem, "Peace, be still." The services throughout the day were well ] attended. The singing was a special feature of the services, being bright and quite in keeping with the occasion, the children doing their respective parts exceedingly well. The musical arrangements were in the hands of Mr. S. Paget, A.C., who is to be congratu- lated on the satisfactory results of his labours. j Mr. F. Slack presided at the organ.

TAKING THE TURKISH TRENCHESI

TAKING THE TURKISH TRENCHES I GRAPHIC LETTER FROM PENCOED MAN. I The following letter from Private Albert Mallett, of the 4th South Wales Borderers, has been received by a local gentleman. Our readers will agree with us in thinking the letter well worth publicity. We may say that three young soldiers from the village were in the same Company as Private Mallett out in Gallipoli. Two are known to be dead, and the third, Pte. Watkins, has been missing ever since, and there is little hope that he still lives. Private Mallett writes from Glymenopoulo Convalescent Camp, Alexandria, Egypt, and dates his letter May 18th. After stating that he was wounded on the 5th of April at Mesopo- tamia, Private Mallett goes on:—" We left Port Said for Mesopotamia on February 14th, arriving in the Persian Gulf on February 25th, then proceeded up the river Tigris on lighters, and got to a place called Shikes Saad on March 16th. It was there I got my next few letter- only a week before going into action. I was very anxious about my people during, the five, intervening months, but I was fortunate enoughs to meet my brother Charley in Alexandria luoM January, and was pleased to hear that they were all in good health at home. I am sorry to say I have lo,t all my chums. I don't sup- pose we shall see poor Will Watkins and Arthur Greville again. Well, they died fighting like heroes for. their King and country, and it was some fighting, I can tell you, in Gallipoli at that time, and I thank God for being spaced through it all. I have been in some terrible battles" there, but I won't say anything more about the Dardanelles, as I should like to for- get it To resume:—We moved up from Shikes Saad to the firing line, and got into the trenches on the 2nd of April. We had every support from our artillery (over 200 guns) behind us. This was the first position of the Turks we had to break in order to get to Kut to relieve Towns- hend. We moved to our position on the night of the 4th, and were to charge their first line some time early in the morning. It was very little rest we got that night, I can assure you, as we were jammed in as tight as we could pos- sibly be, and a man can't very well sleep stand- ing up. I was luckier than some of them. I managed to get a blanket in the trench, and got into the traverse and lay down. I slept like a rock until someone pulled me up in the morn- ing, and no sooner was I on my feet than we had the order to get over the parapet. We went over in fine style, I can tell you. We had to take the first two lines, and top until the artillery bombarded the third and fourth lines. Well, that was the worst part of it. Fancy lying down flat while over 200 guns were sending shells over at the rate of six shells a minute. For about half an hour it was a ter- rible row. After that was over, we took the third and fourth lines easily. It appears that the Turks 'smelled a rat' the night before, and cleared out, leaving a couple of hundred men behind. If they hadn't we should have cap- tured about 30,000 Turks, or killed"them, as no- thing would have stopped us that morning. However, the Turks had very little start, and we soon caught up with them. We got out in extended order, and went for them, but they had good cover, and we had to dash across ground simply swept with machine gun and rifle fire. Nothing daunted, we went for them in good style. Our boys were dropping thick and fast all around. We were getting down to have a breather before-making the last rush, j when I got it through the right instep. The worst of it was, the bullets were simply pouring down amongst the wounded, and many a poor fellow was put right out where he was lying. Well, I could see a likely place for cover about 300 yards back, so I started to crawl there. On the way I met a sergeant and another of our fellows. They were both wounded in the legs, so we laid down as flat as we could and dressed each others wounds, as the blood was pouring from us. One of them was dressing my foot ,when he got another bullet lo the back, so we went for cover as quickly as we could. When we grot there we found it was not deep enough, so we dug ourselves in with our entrenching tools--oxily ju

COWBRlDGB POLICE COURT I

COWBRlDGB POLICE COURT. I Tuesday. Before: The Mayor (Councillor D. Thomas) and Mr. Illtyd Williams. DRUNK. I William Stevens, hay baler, for being drunk and disorderly, was fined 10s. Michael Cronnin, who had been locked up for a similar offence, was fined 6s. A COAL MERCHANT FINED. ] ( James Escott, coal merchant, was charged 1 with not having scales and weights on his I cart when selling coal in less than 2 cwt. lots, and also with not having some of his coal bags properly labelled. Fined 5s. in each case.

Advertising

Kernick's Vegetable Pills Are the perfected outcome of research, experiment and PRACTICAL EXPE- RIENCE extending over more than 50 years. Hence their great and undeni- able superiority. The makers are able to GUARANTEE the highest possible quality in all drugs employed, the most scrupulous care in carrying through all the processes of manufacture, giving a finished medicine of the utmost value in the treatment and relief of Indiges- tion, Biliousness, Sick Headache, and other Stomachic and Intestinal dis- abilities. From all Chemists at 9d.^and 1/- per box.

ft Garw Gleaninlxs I

ft* Garw Gleaninlxs,, I (By LLOFFWR ARALL) J -t y Ir r One o the greatest receptions ever seen in the Gar was given to Councillor LI. Jones, J.P., P ntycymmer, upon his return hom? after Iii,;ial)l)o,iiitnient as Grand Master cf the Gra: I lnited Order of Oddfellows at the A.M.C. at Lancaster. 11 1 1 He is to day without a doubt one of the most popular men in South Wales. 1 1 1 On Sunday last at St. Theodores Church, Pontycymmer, an except-oually large and' representative gathering atteIHled: the memor- ial service of the late Lord Kitchener and all fallen heroes of the Garw Valley. Ill We regret to learn that after advertising that three rows of seats would be reserved for relatives of soldiers and sailors who had fallen, many of these failed to gain ad- mittance. 1 T Immediately the crowd was allowed to enter, these seats were soon filled by boys and girls who were not relatives. 1 i- i Uufortunately many of the bereaved rela- tives had to return home disappointed, as there was no room in the Church. 1 4fl 11 We certainly condemn the actions of the juvenile elements who were seen giggling about upon such air impressive and sorrowful occasion. 1 1 1 We are pleased to -note that Councillor T. C. Jones, Pontyrhyl, has been appointed1 chairman of the Naval and Military Pensions Committee for the Oginore and Garw. f 1 1 It must have been "tight" upon a local person rushing for a drink at 3 minutes t-o 9 ,p.m., minus his stockings, his wais-tcoait,. and — Ill Anyhow he had the triumphant satisfaction of "getting there" in time for his drink! 1 1 1 Mr. Robert Sparkes, Ivor Street, Ponty- cymmer, has been officially notified that his brother, Quarter-Master-Sergeant Matthew Sparkes, 5th Border Regiment, has been awarded the D.C.M. for conspicious bravery in holding his trench after all his officers had been killed. Ill Mr. Frank Ricketts, overman at the Inter- national Colliery has been informed that his nephew, A.B. Horace Llewellyn, Bean ward- t sell, was one of the 12 survivors from the H.M.S. "Hampshire." Ill Who was the chap that wanted to take his horse to bed? i 4ft i We sympathise with him upon his reception when he led the animal rp to the back door. Til Private Luther Stephens (Lloffwr), we are pleased to state, is quite safe, and we heartily invite another letter from him regarding his experiences. 1111 A local minister approached a local "knut" and said he was sorry to see him coming out of such a place. 111 "I wouldn't come out," answered the "knut," "only its these bally restrictions." *11 We congratulate Sapper Cyril Griffiths, wireless operator in the Royal Engineers, and son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Griffiths, Post Office Buildings, Pontycymmer, upon passing all his examinations, and being appointed to a very responsible position. Ill Who was the person that couldn't find his braces the next morning? 111 Has he told anyone yet where he really found them? 111 The New Market is one of the most popular places in Blaengarw at present. Why ? Enough said! Ill Pantygog on Sunday mornings also reminds ? one of markets. Between the pigs, fowls, horses, and the would-be experts judging them—some lively discussions and arguments take place! v it Talk about allotmentsThere are, some fine growers in Pontycymmer. 1. 111 One person was prepared to bet that his beans were 6 inches high at Whit sun, and in full bloom/as well. Ill We won't dispute his words: but we do think they must be "some" beans! Ill We are again requested to draw attention to those of our local grocers at Pontycymmer who still refuse to sell sugar to any person unless some additional purchase is made. r 1 1 1 If this practice is continued, there will be no alternative but to report the matter in the proper quarter.

PONTYCYMMER I

PONTYCYMMER. I OMISSION.—In the wedding account of last week we omitted to insert the names of the bridesmaids. These were Miss Maggie Ricketts (sister of the bride), and Miss Jane Jones (friend).

Advertising

-O'I:¡-" 1711"Y.R *0 ??   if THE CELEBRATED j g § M *? ? PtS  ?)

iVIEWS OF OUR READERS I

VIEWS OF OUR READERS. WELSH CONGREGATIONAL SINGING FESTIVAL. To the Editor. Sir,— Kindly allow me to correct the state- ment made with reference to Mr. Rhys Wil- liams, A.C., Bridgend, who so ably conducted the 41st singing festival of the Bridgend and District Welsh Congregational Union, and to whom much praise is due for the high standard attained in the rendering of the hymn tunes and Mr. S. Davies' anthem "Daeth yr awr. Mr. Williams richly deserved1 ijte honour, but he is not the first conductor in the district to receive it. The 24th annual festival, which was held in the year 1899, during the tim? of the "Big Strike," was conducted by Mr. William Dodd, who at PIZ sent resides at St. Michael's Road, Maesteg, but previous to; his removal to Maesteg, was a resident at Kenfig Hill and! Pyle, having been brought up there since he was a boy.— Yours etc. I REUBEN G. JENKINS.

I PARISH RELIEFI

PARISH RELIEF. I To the Editor. Sir,-Has it ever struck you how the relief of our local affairs is managed? Here is one instance of the way it is done in the Garw, and one or two cases very similar. The hus- band of No. 1, who is a soldier, is described as "jdeser*er," leaving a wife and child at the mercy of the world. Nothing comes in, her war pay having been stopped. She has nothing against her whatever. She applies for parish relief. She is informed that she can get noth- ing—she must go and earn for herself and child. No. 2, whose case is precisely the same, applies, and, with the aid of two minis- ters, she gets an ollowance of twelve shillings and sixpence relief, and her ability to earn is equal to that of No. 1 I maintain each should get 6s. 3d. Can anyone explain why one. pays the piper but is not permitted to select the tune P—Yonrs, etc. | FAIRPLAY. I

I RELIEF OF SOLDIERS FAMILIES I

RELIEF OF SOLDIERS' FAMILIES. To the Editor. j Sir,— Some of ps out here in France have read your most welcomed paper for the last few weeks, and it seems to us as if all trades are out for an increase of wages in answer to the increased cost of living brought on by the war. We don't want anyone to think that they don't deserve it, but our complaint is that nothing is done for our wiveg and the little children we have left behind. At the commencement of the war we were allowed the Government allowance. In my case, for instance-having three children, my wife re- ceives 23s. per week. She receives nothing from my late employers, not even coal. And here I may state that before a brother of mine took over the house, my wife received four shillings weekly from the ReJief Com- mittee to help her on the way. But as soon as my brothers action came to the knowledge of the Relief Committee they stopped the four shillings allowance. I would like to ask: "Did that Committee think she was getting too much?" If so, let some of the members try it for a week or so. If things have gone up for everyone else haven't they one up for soldiers wives? We think it Tiigh time that some of our 'leaders should advocate something for the benefit of those we have left behind. We are. willing to put up with the hardships of this war, and even lav down our lives for our Country, but when we see that our little children cannot get sufficient to keep them it hurts us a great deal more than facing the Germans. So, sir, I hope some kind friend win try and start something for the benefit of those we have left behind, and11 am sure he would have many grateful thanks from the boys who are out here trying to do their bit.-Yours, etc., J ONE OF THE BOYS FROM CAERAU. I .————

ASYLUM STOKERS WAGES II

ASYLUM STOKERS' WAGES. I To the Editor. I Sir,—I have a suspicion that Transcript confuses the issue. His letter is chiefly concerned with the things I did not say. For instance, I have not said that Asylum workers should not organise. Every worker should organise, and I have not defended the Asylum workers for failing to organise, but I do refus e to subscribe to Transcript's policy of starving them because of their failure to do so. I am bound to remember that they do not get a living wage because of the in- differenoe shown by organised workers to local government. Transcript's views are summed up in the question he puts to me as to whether I would: support a proposal to disband our Trade unions if the miners were employed by the Glamorgan County Council. He thinks that the primary function of all trade unions should be that of fighting employers for in- creased wages, and whilst it is and always must be true of trade unions for workers who. have to get a living from the capitalist class, it should not be true of unions for workers who is employed by the public direct. Alld in spite of Transcript's surprise I repeat that it would not be nececssary if trade unionists acted up to the best principles of their unionism. If the capitalist system were abolished it would still be necessary to organise. But instead of the workers being forced to con- centrate their energies on fighting the capit- alist for a living wage they would be able to devote their time and intelligence to social and intellectual! advancement. The organi- zations would still be necessary to give ex- pression to and carry into effect any reforms they desired in this direction. I am under no delusion about the fine quali- ties of the Glamorgan Trade Unionist, and agree that he is as good as they maka- them. But that is not the point. Progressives they may be industrially. Generous they certainly are. To remedy an injustice to one of them- selves they will fight like furies. Touch their sympathy with a tale of anyone or anything in need, and they will give with both hands. But when you come to politics you. have to steady up. The only test one can appdy is resullts, and although I consider that the leaders of political labour in South Wales are among the finest and, most earnest and energetic workers I have ever met, or hope to meet, I must admit that the results are not yet nearly as gooa as erne has the right to expect. My contention, that the trade unionists of Glamorgan, in common with other trade unionists, are not true to the best principles of their unionism is ably proved by Transcript himself, who he describes the struggles of other workers employed by public bodies. One cannot forget the fact that the trade unionists in the county have the power to seize and1 retain control of the public institu- tions. If they used that power one is en- titled to assume that the workers would be given decent working conditions. Transcript would not, I am sure, suggest that when the workers do wake up to a realisation of their powers, and use them, that will force their employees to organise to fight for a living wage. His question as to why I continue to work for colliery managers if they are displeasing to me in their actions has puzzled me greatly, because in the first place I have not said they have displeased me, neither do I work for them. Transcript suggests that I should be better employed in. doing nothing and allow these men to fight their own battle. If this is the correct method to adopt, why did he try to help them to fight, as he did when the Tondu T. and L. Council (more power to its elbow) tried to organise them. In any case I feel sure they won't fight any the worse for the little "leg-up" I iunro been able to give them, even if they are as bad as Transcript depicts them.—Yours, etc. MERVYN W. PAYNE. Hoola-ethog, 17-6-1916. f

Advertising

Advertise in the "Glamorgan Gazette." If you want to sell, buy or exchange; you cannot do belttpr. -J ,° J??tM??Oa?ORMP?a*? v ?ctMSf'S 67Lleurns The PerfecHon of Pipe TeBMCO.  AND J'ACII. COOL, SWRFT AND FPACFTAKT.