Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 3 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
12 articles on this page
Advertising

RARE OPPORTUNITY! FURNITURE AT PRE-WAR PRICES WHAT IS THE EXPIUANATION The reason is that, immediately War was declared, we entered into by far the largest Contracts we have ever concluded during our unbroken Business career of 66 years! The Goods were packed from floors to ceilings in the various Reserve Warehouses we hold in connection with our seven South Wales Branches, and the result to-day is that, whilst some Furnishers have been compelled to close their Establishments, through inability to obtain supplies, we still hold a very considerable quantity of the Contract Goods in question, and which we have now fully decided to ies, we CLEAR AT PRE-WAR PRICES T T T BEVAN & COMPANY, Ltd., near Empire and St. Mary Street, Cardiff; Pontypridd, Swansea, &c.

OGMORE AND GARW MILITARY TRIBUNAL

OGMORE AND GARW MILITARY TRIBUNAL. VALUE OF TIME. At a meeting of the, Ogmore and Garw Military Tribunal held on Friday afternoon, at Brynmelin there were present Mr. T. C. Jones (chairman), Messrs. S. H. Stockwood, W. Williams, D. Davies, LI. Jones, R. Thomas, D. J. Thomas, Alderman W. Llew- ellyn (military representative and Mr. T. Jones (clerk). Mr. Ll. Jones, the new Grand Master of the United Order of Oddfellows, made application for Edward Ernest Jones, by trade a baker, and now an experienced clerk, especially pro- ficient in details of procedure under the National Health Insurance Act. Mr LI. Jones said Jones was a clerk under his supervision, and had to see to the welfare of 4,000 people, divided into 40 districts. The duties necessi- tated careful training, and a through know- ledge of the provisions of the Act. The Chairman: Couldn't you get a lady to perform the duties ? Mr. Jones: I don't think I should have time to train a woman—for her or for me. I am 'now in a position which will take up the greater part of my time, and I shall be away from home a good deal. Mr. Jones added that the man had been placed in class 3 for clerical or sedentary work, and was in a deli- cate state of health. Unconditional exemption was granted, so long as the applicant rema ns in his present occupation. THE FATHER OF TEN. The next case considered was that of a scavenger and haulier, by name Kimberley, in the employ of the Ogmore and Garw dis- trict Council. The Chairman explained that this was a :pers-onal application, and not an application by the Council. Had the Council appealed he did not think it was a case they should -consider, as they could not be both judges and appellants. Applicant was called in and urged "domes- tic reasons." .Eliciting that applicant was the father of ten children, the eldest 13 and a boy, and the youngest ten months, the Chairman told him that he had served his country and the state well. The Tribunal, with alacrity, endorse that view, and granted exemption, "whilst the ,circumstances remained as they are." Applicant (timidly): Have you finished with me. The Chairman: Yes, and you can go back at once and convey the glad news to your wife. You would have got the iron cross in Germany. (Laughter). One of the claims advanced by an under- taker was the number of people he had buried within recent years. Another individual, who had been married 11 years and had only one child, was told .:tha t he had not served the state so well as the aplicant with the big family in the pre- vious case. Most of the applicants told the same sad story of depletion. They said with a sigh and a worried look that now "only old men and boys are left." A smiling milkman from Gilfach-whose very appearance suggested the golden mea- dows, the buttercups and the daisies—said with a broad grin that he had a lot of money owing to him. The Chairman: I thought they were all honest in Gilfach Goch. (Laughter). Applicant: No: they are not all honest, and uyou'ld have to go a long way to look for honest folk. (Laughter). The Chairman: Milk vendors are no ex- ception to the rule. (Laughter). Applicant: Yes, rather! I'm as honest as the day is long. (Laughter). Conditional exemption was granted. In a case "in the drapery line, where tem- porary exemption was granted for three months, the applicant not to again appeal, without the consent of the Tribunal, the Chairman expressed the view that it was a pity single men were allowed to remain be- hind. whilst the married men were called upon to go-a view in which all his colleagues con- curred. One applicant showed so little interest in his fate, that apparently it was too much trouble for him to attend and support his application. Under these circumstances the Tribunal decided that if a man did not think it worth his while to come there, he could not complain if his application was uncon- ditionally refused. DENTISTS. A NECESSITY. To whatever extent our daily rations may be cut down we must eat, and we cannot eat without teeth. We must have fit teeth to masticate, and we cannot have fit teeth without someone to patch up, and when necessary extract the molars as they deteri- iorate. Hence the dentist, and his essential, and more or less skillful, aid, even in war time. One gentleman in this fraternity, claimed absolute exemption upon the ground that he is thus doing his little bit towards the com- mon end, and he submitted, that in the .national interests, he should stay where lie was. Applicant was given conditional exemption, so long as he sticks to dentistry. A collect-ar for a certain insurance society, who was allowed exemption for three months, said the society to which he was attached' had not guaranteed to keep his place -open, and if he went and joined the colours he would do so at his own risk. The Political Club and 11 stitute at Ogmore Vale supported the application of the man- aging steward, whose functions are to super- intend the activities of an institution "with a membership of 250, composed of men in a certified occupation, viz., mining. Thus, if the managing steward were taken for military service, if would mean the appointment of someone in a "starred" occupation. Appli- cant has two brothers on active service. The Club is registered under the Friendly Society Act, and, having regard to the recent re- strictions, the management urged that appli- cant, with his knowledge of the requirements, should be allowed to remain. In reply to the chairman, the representative of the Club, who attended to substantiate the claim, said they could not very well get someone who was not of military age to undertake the duties. A man over military age, however reliable, would not have the necessary experince and understanding of the business. The Chairman :It is a responsible position, and of course the brewery companies have numbers of people "jumping" for a license. Applicant: We only serve the numbers. The Chairman: An assured lot of customers. Applicant: It is important, especially to- day, that the man in charge should know the people. The Tribunal refused the application, but allowed until July 31st to appoint a man ineligible for military service, and to makef arrangements with the recruiting officer. ft

NANTYMOEL COLLIERY LABOURER I

NANTYMOEL COLLIERY LABOURER I COLLAPSES AT BREAKFAST TABLE. I TRAGIC INQUEST STORY. I The Coroner (Mr. S. H. Stockwood) on Thursday afternoon last week held an inquest at the Police Stationn, Nantymoel, on the body of Robert Morgan (61), colliery labourer, 34 Cadwgan Sfreet, who on Thursday morning died whilst at breakfast, under painful and tragic circumstances. The first witness was Samuel Gillard, who said deceased was his step-father, and had lived with him and his mother. On the pre- vious morning they were at breakfast, and de- ceased, who was eating bread and butter, sud- denly lifted his head, made a slight noise, opened his eyes, and leant backward in the chair. Witness caught hold of him, bent his head forward, and gave him several blows in the back, and thrust his fingers into his throat. He coughed slightly, but witness could get no answer from him. He next fell on his knees, became unconscious, and in five minutes passed away without having said any- thing. Deceased worked the previous night, and returned home about half-past 5. He had not complained of his heart, though he had spoken of pains in the lower part of the left side. He was an exceptionally healthy man. Six weeks previously he injured his leg whilst at work, and a doctor attended him, and he had only returned to work about a week. He had also suffered from a cough. Dr. D. J. Thomas, physician and surgeon, Nantymoel, said he examined deceased, and found at the back of his throat a small piece of soft bread, which was not sufficient to choke him. His face was pale, and there was no sign of any struggle. He had varicose veins, and the accident might have had something to do with his death. The post mortem examin- ation that was made revealed no sign of chok- ing or suffocation. The heart was in a de- generate condition, and the large bowel very much distended, and swollen to three or four times the normal size. The cause of death was heart failure, the result of the distension act- ing upon a weak and degenerate heart. Pro- bably the cough, induced by the small piece of bread, accentuated the pressure. A man with that heart might have lived for some time, but would have been liable to die at any time from excitement. In this case, however, the wind pressure was the cause of the heart failure. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Advertising

Ladies-Blanchard's Pills Are unrivalled for all Irregularities, etc.; they speedily afford relief, and never fail to alleviate all suffering, etc. They supersede Pennyroyal, Pil Cochia, Bitter Apple. Blanchard's are the Best of all Pills for Women. Sold in boxes Is.* lid., by BOOTS' Branches and all Chemists, or post free, same price, from LESLIE MARTYN, Ltd., Chemists, 34 Dalston Lane, London. Sample and valuable Booklet post free Id.

CONCERT AT OGMORE YALE

CONCERT AT OGMORE YALE. -0. IN AID OF LADIES' SEWING GUILD. Among the most deserving and strenuous war charity organisations in the Ogmore Valley is Ogmore Vale Ladies Sewing Guild. A list of the splendid work done by this organi- sation makes stimulating reading. For the session 1915-16 the receipts have been £67 i'10s. 8d., and the expenditure £61 10s. 5d., leaving £ 6 Os. 2d. Three Flag Days have been promoted, with excellent results, namely Russian Flag Day, t42, National Fund for Welsh Troops (No. 1), £ 21; ditto (No. 2), £ 17. During the winer of 1914-15 no less a sum than £101 was collected and dis- bursed, while 339 garments were sent to the St. John Ambulance Depot, and 381 to local men. For the present session (not yet com- pleted) 45 garments have been sent to Welsh Hospitals, 380 distributed in other ways, and a large number of socks and stockings sent to the lads at the front and distributed among their children at home. A grand concert, under the auspices of the Ogmore Vale Ladies' Choir was held on Sat- urday last at the Workmen's Hall, Ogmore Vale, for the benefit of this most deserving organisation. Presided over by Rev. E. W. Hough, Ogmore Vale, the function was a de- lightful one in every way, and the spacious hall was crowded. All the artistes were first rate, and the Ogmore Vale Welsh Ladies' Choir, under the conductorship of Mr. W. H. Capel, were in excellent form, their tone and harmony being perfect. The following ar- tistes took part:—Sopranos, Miss L. Kinsey, Miss A. Thomas, and Mrs. F. J. King, Ogmore Vale; contraltos, Miss Gwen Price, Miss Katie David, and Miss K. Thomas, Ogmore Vale; elocutionists, Madame E. Gostick and Miss Katie Sadd, Ogmore Vale; altos, Miss Mansel and Miss James, Ogmore Vale; pianist, Miss Gertie Jones; secretary, Mrs. J. J. Williams, Ogmore Vale. Mr. W. Bart- lett, Ogmore Vale, in a speech, paid a glowing tribute to the work done by the Guild. !■ I.. I- —

PRESENTATION AT OGMORE YALEI

PRESENTATION AT OGMORE YALE I LATE VICAR AND FAMILY/HONOURED. I A very interesting presentation took place on Wednesday last at the Church House, Wyndham. Ogmore Vale, the recipients being the late Vicar of Llangeinor, Rev. A. J. Edwards, M.A., and Mrs. Edwards, and Miss Margaret Edwards, late of the Vicarage, Ogmore Vale, who have now taken up their residence at Cardiff, the rev. gentleman hav- ing received the important appointment of Vi-car of St. Andrews Church, Cardiff. Dr. D. J. Thomas, Nantymoel, presided, and the house was crowded. The gifts, which were from the parishioners of Llangeinor and friends, consisted of a handsomestudde d chair and purse of gold to the Rev. A. J. Edwards; a gold wristlet and watch to Mrs. Edwards; and a gold cross and chain to Miss Margaret Edwards. They were presented by Mrs. Howe, Mr. Rees Thomas, and Mrs. Samuel, Broadway, Ogmore Vale, respectively, who all made speeches befitting the occasion..Rev. A. J. Edwards suitably responded on behalf of himself and family. Speeches were also made by the chairman, Dr. D. J. Thomas; the Rev. J. R. Pugh, B.A., Vicar of Nanty- moel; Mr. Joseph Abel, Ogmore Vale; Mr. R. King, Nantymoel; the Rev. D. Mathias, B.A.; Mr. R. Burgess, Ogmore Vale; and Mr. Richard Thomas, parish warden. The musical programme that followed consisted of items contributed by the following artistes:—Miss Dora Davies, Nantymoel (elocutionist); Mas- ter Lewis and Miss Lewis, St. John Street, Ogmore Vale; Miss F. Darney and Mr. lrlett, Wyndham, Ogmore Vale. The Secretary was Mr. Windmill Howe. The following is a grief summary of what has been accomplished during Mr. Edwards' tenure of office in the parish. During the last eight years, two churches, St. Paul's and St. John's, have been built at a cost of £ 1,950, and L3,100 respectively, while St. David's has been restored at a cost of t206. During this time L7,760 has been raised and spent on church work (exclusive of grants from societies), and the only debt is one of about zC250 on St. John's, Ogmore Vale. A vote of thanks to the Chairman, Dr. D. J. Thomas, and the singing of "God save the King" terminated a most successful meeting.

BLAENGARW t

BLAENGARW. t ST. JAMES' CHURCH. The special preacher at the above church on Sunday mor- ning was Mr. D. T. Jones, lay reader, of Og- more Vale, who delivered an excellent ser- mon on the text Mark vii., 34.-The Rev. John Davies, Pontlottyn, will commence duties as priest in charge on Sunday next.

Advertising

Advertise in the "Glamorgan Gazette." If you want to sell, buy or exchange; you oamnot do better. i

Garw Gleanings

Garw Gleanings: J (By LLOFFWR ABALL) The Rev. W. Saunders, C.C., baptised eight candidates for church membership at Noddfa Chapel on Sunday. Ill The new organ was also played for the first time at this chapel on Sunday, the organist being Mr. O. S. Morgan. Ill We are pleased to learn that up to the time of writing, Pte. Trefvlian Owen, R.A.M.C., son of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Owen, Pontycym- mer, is improving after undergoing an opera- tion at the Military Hospital, Oswestry. I 1 1 We learn that a new club has been formed at Pontycymmer, which has been named The Raspberry and Spice." 1 1 It is rumoured the chairman is likely to be a bit of a "Spicer"! Ill Fancy a local knut occupying three hours in manicuring his nails previous to taking his sweetheart for a walk. 1 1 H It is a good thing he cleaned his teeth the day before-or he might have been late for his appointment; 111 We were pleased to see Private Willie Davies, son of the late Rev. and Mrs. Thomas (Noddfa), Pontycymmer, home on a short visit. Ill He emigrated to Australia; and joined the Australian Forces after war broke out. Ill He is one of an Australian contingent of 45,000, who have come from Egypt to Eng- land for a short period before proceeding to France. nil We are also pleased to see young Samuel of the "Iron Duke" home for a short stav. Ill He was on the deck of Admiral Sir John Jellicoe's flagship when she rode majestically to meet the German Fleet. I I I As a Gunner his experiences would be in- teresting to relate if he were free to unfold the whole storv. Ill He pays a glowing tribute to the great ad- miral, upon the cool and collected manner in which he commands the Grand Fleet. Ill They talk of a shortage of food in Germany —England has nothing to fear in the way of vegetables, while the Ffaldau allotments are flourishing. Ill One of these allotment holders remarked he had such fine cabbage that one morning he discovered a cow sheltering under one of them. Ill f Did he mean a "lady" cow? Ill Who was the Garw lady who, being asked what the price of potatoes was, ansyered, "Oh -H per week." Ill The distribution of funds from the Naval and Military Pension Committe of the Ogmore and Garw commences the first week of July. 1 1 1 Workers will think twice before losing a day in future, as there is a committee to be set up to investigate every case of absence. a a Officials and workmen are to be represented on the committee-so beware. Ill As regards Pantygog market, we regret a serious omission in not mentioning the pro- minent part the donkey plays on Sunday 1 T 1 One or two of the visitors will be well known as "The Sunday clippers"! Ill We have learnt officially that there are movements QtI. foot to re-open some of the old collieries in the Garw. Ill As we are sure of the statement, it augurs well for the future prosperity of the Garw Valley. Ill It will ensure plenty of work "When the boys come home." Ill What was the explanation a local knut gave for his late arrival for the Sunday service? Ill Does he have to put his collar and tie on three times before he can persuade them to sit properly? Ill We sincerely regret to learn that Pte. Edwin Rees, of the Welsh Guards, died from wounds on the 20th June. Ill He was a constable in the Garw when he volunteered for the Welsh Guards, and will be remembered by Garwites as being always most refined and courteous to everybody. Pansy Day" in Blaengarw realised over JS19. The secretarial duties were ably car- ried out by Miss Bessie Morgan (Praswylfa). Ill We sympathise with the two ladies who found themselves in Nantyffyllon instead of the Garw. Ill We also sympathise with their husbands, who walked the mountain, instead of going around Tondu, to meet them. Ill But we are glad to state that the four have now mutually agreed to walk a certain road if it occurs again! Ill There is no truth in the rumour that parcels cannot be. sent to the front.

Advertising

I PIANOS! PIANOS! PIANOS! All British Made. Best Value in the World An immense Variety to Select from. ¡ CASH or EASY TERMS, A WRITTEN WARRANTY WITH EVEBY INSTRUMILITT. We challenge any Firm to Offer Better Value, Terms oi — — —Prices.— — — WRITE FOR CATALOGUE asd COMPARE OUR STOCK. Tnompson & onacKell, (Ltd.), Invite [nspection of the Latest Designs by the Leading British Manufacturers. Brinsmead, Broadwood Player Pianos, Hopkinson, Challen & Son, Collard & Collard,. Moore & Moore, Crowley, Ajello, Cramer, &c., &c. Lar^eat Discounts for Caah. Old Instruments taken in exchange.—Sole Agents for the Celebrated Estey Organs. Quotations Given for Pianos and Organs by any Maker in the Kingdom. Tunings and Repairs a Speciality. Repairs of every description* Estimates Free. Music and Small Goods in Great Variety. THOMPSON and SHACKELL, Ltd. Mm PIANOFORTE MANUFACTURERS & ORGAN BUILDERS' X, Wyndham Street, SAL BRIDO END. Tl/1lr f WITH BRANCHES THROUGHOUT SOUTH WALES AND ]J MONMOUTHSHIRE. f

OGMORE VAiE

OGMORE VAi-E. WESLEY CHAPEL.—Last Sunday the pulpit of the Ogmore Vale Wesleyan Chapel was occupied at short notice by Mr. J. Davies Brown, M.A., Principal of the Ogmore Vale Higher Elmentary Schools. YEARLY -NIEETINTGS-The yearly meet- ings in connection with Philadelphia Baptist Chapel, Ogmore Vale, took place on Sunday and Monday last. The preacher was Rev. J. M. Hughes, Penydarren, who preached elo- quently to large congregations, both on Sun- day and Monday. The singing was excel- lent. SPECIAL SERVICES.— Special services were held on Sunday at the Presbyterian Church, Ogmore Vale. The preacher was Mr Harold Davies, (Cardiff University), who is taking over the pastorate of the church for the next three months. The services were well attended, and Mr. Davies made an ex- cellent impression on the congregation. ACCIDENT.—A serious accident occurred at the Wyndham Colliery, Ogmore Vale, on Tuesday, June 20th, to Mr. W. H. Squires, 4, River Street, Ogmore Vale. His injuries were of such a nature that it was deemed necessary to convey him to Cardiff Infirmary with all possible speed, where he now lies in a critical condition. He was very popular in the district, and' his many friends sincerely hope he will recover. FUNERAL.—The funeral of tfhe late Mrs. E. J. Edwards, wife of Mr. Thomas Edwards, of Walters Road, Ogmore Vale, took place last week at Pwll-y-pant Cemetery, Ogmore Vale. Deceased was 49 years of age, and was respected by aU. She leaves a widower aod several children to monrn her loss: The several children to mourn her loss The funeral was well attended and many wreaths were sent, and deep sympathy is felt for the family in their bereavement. WEDDING.—A smart and .pretty wedding took place on Saturday last, at Hermon Methodist Chapel, Ogmore Vale, Rev. Charles Williams, pastor, officiating. The contracting parties were Mr. Oswald Rees, son of Mr. John Rees, builder, Prospect Place, Ogmore Vale. and Miss Ethel Gertrude Wilkinson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Williams, of High Street, Ogmore Vale. The bride was superbly dressed in Saxe blue satin with pic- ture hat to match, she carried a bouquet of purple and white iris's. Mr John Rees, father of the bridegroom acted as best man, a,nd Mr. Arthur Wilkinson (father) gave the bride away. The bridesmaid were Miss Blanche. Louise Madley (Cardiff),, and Miss Muriel Wilkinson (sister of the bride). After the happy event a reception took place at the home of the bride's parents, 125 High Street, Ogmore Vale, the following guests being pre- I sent: Mr. and Mrs. Jones (sister and brother- in-law); Mr. and Mrs. Bowen (sister and brother-in-law); Mr. and Mrs. Percy Rees I (brother and -sister-in-law of the bridegroom) Mrs. Madley, Mrs. Herbert Madley, Mr. Marsh, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wilkinson, Mr. Harry Marsh and Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Marsh (all relatives of the bride); Miss Gertie Evans; Miss Edie Evans Mr. Albert Ash- ton; and the Rev. Charles Williams, who toasted the happy couple. The presents were numerous

I NANTYMOEL

I NANTYMOEL. SAROX BAPTIST CHURCH.-The health of the Rev. John Hughes, pastor of this church for over 35 years, is not up to the usual mark, and the members unanimously passed a vote that he should be released to take a long rest to recuperate. He has gone for a' while to Porthcawl, and already finds- the benefit of the change. BENEFIT CONCERT. On Wednesday evening a successful benefit competitive con- cert was held at the Workmen's Hall, Nanty- moel. The proceeds were devoted to Mr. James Thomas, Oakfield Terrace, a highly re- spected citizen of Nantymoel, who has been in- capacitated from work for a long period. The concert was organised by a committee, con- sisting of representatives from the various churches. The secretarial work was satisfac- torily carried out by Mr. John Evans, Ogwy Street. The president for the evening was the Rev. W. M. Mollin. The details of the programme were as follows:—Pianoforte selections, Madame Davies-Stephens; solo, Miss Annie Williams; duet, Misses Williams; pennillion singing, Mr. John Hughes (accom- panist, Miss Annie Edwards); solo, Mr. Ivor Kemp; solo, Mr. David Davies; solo, Mr. D. J. Harries. Great interest was taken in the choral competition, and in addition to the usual prize, the committee of the Co-operative Stores offered a valuable chair to the leader of the successful choir. Six choirs entered the competition. The prize was won by Pricetown Music Lovers, led by Mr. Iorwerth Mills. The adjudicator for the occasion was Mr. John Edwards, G. and L., Pontycym- mer. DEATH AND FU,N,ERAL.-On Thursday last week, the late Mr. Robert Ingram, Cadwgan Street, passed away suddenly. He was in work at the Ocean Colliery the previ- ous night, and had only been at home about an hour. The funeral took place on Monday. A large number of people came together to pay their last tribute to the deceased, who was highly respected in the neighbourhood. He was a faithful member and deacon at Hope English Congregational Church. The Rev. T. Hirwain Jenkins (pastor) officiated at the house and graveside, assisted by the Revs. M. J. Mills (C.M.), W. M. Mollin (B.), and W. J. Bryant (C.). The chief mourners were: Mrs. Ingram (widow), Mr. Samuel Gillard (step-son) Mr. John Ingram (brother); Mrs. Thomas Ingram (sister-in- law) Mr. Robert Ingram (nephew); Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Cole (sonin-law and daughter); Miss Florrie Cole (grand-daughter); Mr. and Mrs. Fred Boobyer and Mr. and Mrs. Worthy Boobyer (brothers and sisters-in-law); Mr. and Mrs. Bussell and Mr. and Mrs. Jenkins (brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law); Mr. and Mrs. Gillard; Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Boobver; Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Boobver, Miss Boobyer; Mr. John Hockings, and Mr. Wm. Edwards. Beautiful wreaths were sent by Hope Church and Hope Sunday School, and Ogmore Valley Silver Temperance Band. <