Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 8 of 8
Full Screen
16 articles on this page
BRIDGEND URBAN DISTRICTI COUNCIL t

BRIDGEND URBAN DISTRICT I COUNCIL. t MEMBER'S SON WOUNDED. I An ordinary meeting of Bridgend Urban District Council was held on Tuesday after- noon, when there were present Messrs. J. T. Hitt (presiding), Edward Preece, Geo. Bevan, W. Jones, and J. G. Jenkins; with Mr. Ivor M. Howell (deputy clerk). Before the meeting had started with the items on the agenda, Mr. J. G. Jenkins rose and made a sadly disconcerting statement, and one that elicited the deepest expressions of regret. He asked for their sympathy in behalf of one of the members, Mr. George Harris, who that day received the intelli- gence that his third son, Percy, was lying in hospital at Warrington, having lost an eye and one of his arms, which was shot away by a shell. The wounded soldier is a stretcher- bearer in the R.A.M.C. Mr. Harris (it was stated) has five sons in the Army. Mr. Bevan and other members joined with Mr. Jenkins in his expressions of sympathy and regret, which will find a response every- where in the town and district. PRESERVATION OF CHILD LIFE. Mr. George Bevan submitted the report of the Works Committee, in which, under the Notification of Births (Extension) Act, the Surveyor reported that the number of births and deaths for the last three years were as followsBirths: 1913, 210; 1914, 191; 1915, 172. Deaths under one year: 24, 9, and 9 in the same periods respectively. The Com- mittee recommended that the Clerk enter into negotiations with the Bridgend Nursing Asso- ciation with a view of securing the services, if possible, of Nurse Mainwaring as health visitor for the district. Mr. J. G. Jenkins, speaking in favour of the appointment of a health visitor, said it was most important—indeed, the time had come when it was really imperative—to safe- guard the lives of young children. These lives had always been the heritage of the nation, and by everybody it was now recog- nised as one of the most precious of all the assets we possess. The war would make ter- rible gaps in the manhood of the country, and it behoved them as a Council, and all other similar bodies, to look well after child life in the early stages of its development. In reference to the proposal to secure the ser- vices of Nurse Mainwaring as health visitor, they all knew that she was a most excellent nurse, both as to ability and experience, and if they could secure her appointment to this important position he thought they would have taken a step which would produce good results in the future. (Hear, hear.) He for- mally moved that the Council support the Committee's recommendation. Mr. Preece: Do you suggest a part of the nurse's time ? Or what is the position? The Chairman: We decided to open up negotiations to see whether the Nursing Asso- ciation will allow Nurse Mainwaring to take over the extra appointment, and until the decision of the Association has been given, we cannot do anything in the matter. Mr. Bevan: We are practically bound to take action. It is forced upon us, is it not? The Chairman answered in the affirmative. Mr. Preece said he did not think Nurse Mainwaring would be able to give the neces- sary time apart from her present duties. The Chairman said Nurse Mainwaring undertook most of the maternity cases, and to her, they thought, the work would not be such a great deal more. Mr. Preece: What we have specially to con- sider is the preservation of child life-more particulaTy where there has been neglect in the home life. The report was then adopted. ALLOTMENTS FOR WEST WARD. I The Surveyor (Mr. William Bevan) re- ported that in reference to the land at Sunny- side he had received a letter from the agent of the Greenmeadow Estate enquiring whether the land was wanted on a lease or on an annual tenancy. Mr. Wm. Jones moved for a lease for five years, assuming the terms to be agreeable. Mr. Jenkins seconded, and the Council con- curred. CONGRATULATIONS TO LIEUT.- I COLONEL SMITH. Mr. J. G. Jenkins proposed a vote of con- gratulation to Lieut.-Colonel Fred Smith on his promotion to the command of the Cardiff City Battalion. The Lieut.-Colonel was for a long time Police Inspector in the town, and was a very popular and able officer, and he thought it their duty to congratulate him upon his promotion. Mr. Preece seconded with great pleasure, and the Council, with similar sentiments, agreed. IMPORTANCE OF CO-OPERATION. I The Deputy Clerk read the following letter from the District Coal and Coke Supplies Committee for South Wales and Monmouth- shire (appointed by the Board of Trade):— "Park Place, Cardiff, 16th June, 1916. Dear » Sir,—The Board of Trade have appointed a committee to deal with the supply of coal and coke to consumers in the Monmouthshire and South Wales district, and this committee has had under consideration the question of meet- ing the requirements of coal for household purposes during the coming winter. The matter is an important one, in view of the de- creasing output of collieries and the increas- ing requirements by the Admiralty and munition works. For the purpose of dealing with the matter of house coal supplies in a proper and efficient manner, it is suggested that a committee should at once be appointed for each town in Monmouthshire and South Wales, with the object of obtaining informa- tion from the coal merchants as to the monthly quantity of coal they have previously purchased, the colliery owners from whom they have bought the coal, together with any other necessary particulars, and that the com- mittee shall dear with all detailed questions that may arjse from time to time, and shall only refer to the Board of Trade Committee such of them as they cannot deal with, By obtaining this information the district com- mittees will be in possession of detailed infor- mation as to the approximate quantity of coal required by the town or district they represent, and the Board of Trade Committee will be abie to make arrangements with the collieries for the necessary supplies. I en- close a form of return which could be filled in by the coal merchants and sent to the secre- tary of your committee for their information, and after being summarised the returns could be forwarded to myself. The Board of Trade Committee will be much obliged if you will kindly bring the matter before the next meet- ing of your corporation or council, and ascer- tain whether they are willing to appoint a committee as suggested. If they concur with the proposal, perhaps they will kindiy at once I appoint a committee, so that there shall be no delay in obtaining all the particulars required. I shall be pleased to supply the secretary of any committee appointed with any further in- formation or particulars that he may require. It is important that the ccal merchants should be urged to supply all the particulars asked for, as it is only by co-operation be- tween merchants and colliery owners that means can be devised for preventing a short- age in the supplies of house coal to cus- tomers. It is also considered to be import- ant that the attention of householders should be drawn to the advisability of gradually ob- taining supplies now in case where there is sufficient room to store. This would to some extent relieve the heavy presure of orders on the coal merchants in September and October. The district committees should point out the urgent necessity for the strictest economy in the use of fuel, and should ask that every as- sistance possible shall be rendered to keep the requirements down to the lowest possible limits. Further, consumers can co-operate with the committee by endeavouring to use such coal as is offered to meet their demands without insisting on obtaining exactly the same description as they have previously re- ceived. The Clerk (in reply to Mr. Preece) said the committee was appointed by the Board of Trade, and consisted for the most part of members of the Coalowners' Association. On the motion of Mr. Preece, seconded by Mr. W. Jones, the whole of the Council was appointed a committee to consider the matter, and the clerk was instructed to convene a meeting at the earliest opportunity.

IBRIDGEND MAN DIES FROM WOUNDS

I BRIDGEND MAN DIES FROM WOUNDS. Deep sympathy is felt with Mr. and Mrs. David Watkins, Vernon Street, Bridgend, in the sad death of their son, Private D. E. Gar- field Watkins, Glouoester Regiment, who died from wounds received in action. Private Watkins, who was 24 years of age, was em- ployed at Messrs. Bennetts, boot salesmen, Bridgend, and at the outbreak of war joined the 7th Hussars, and was transferred to the Gloucesters, with whom he went through the Gallipoli campaign. He was invalided home with frost-bitten feet, and on recovering he Private D. E. Garfield Watkins. I was transferred to another battalion of the same regiment. He had been in the trenches only two or three days when he was wounded. The deceased was of a most tractable disposi- tion, and was a general favourite. A Sun- day School scholar, and a communicant at St. Mary's, Nolton, a special memorial service was held in the Church on Sunday afternoon, conducted by the Rev. T. P. Price (Rector of Coity). A keen follower of every form of sport, and an athlete of some promise, de- ceased was a prominent member of the Bridg- end Wednesdays Old Boys' Team. A younger brother, Bertram John Watkins (21), is in the Glamorgan Yeomanry, which he joined 12 months ago last May, and he is now on ser- vice in Egypt.

BRIDGEKD HEROES I

BRIDGEKD HEROES. I INTERESTING PRESENTATION BY I NEIGHBOURS. An interesting presentation was made last Saturday by the good folk iliv-ing im and around Jenkin Street, Bridgend, the recip- ients being Willie Stanton, H.M.S. "Fal- mouth," and Private Wm. Jackson, 1st Sea- forth Highlanders. Stanton, who is home on short leave, was in the Jutland battle, and on behalf of hiis ship can account for two of the enemy's vessels going down. Jackson, who has been in hospital for four months, has had the mis- fortune to lose the use of his right axm. The presentation took the form of a silver watch and chain to Stanton, and a silver tea-pot to Jackson, who is a married man. Mr. Weeks carried out the arrangements in an able manner. After the ceremony the two recipients were entertained to light refresh- ments provided by some of the neighbours, the musical part of the feast being provided by Mr. Neish, one of Private Jackson's fellow workman. A happy hour or so waa spent singing patriotic songs, etc., the children and every one joining in. The gifts were supplied by Mr. Gilbert Williams.

PENYBONT MILITARYTRIBUNAL

PENYBONT MILITARY TRIBUNAL. ♦ A REQUEST FROM BRIDGEND TRIBUNAL I REFUSED. The usual weekly sitting of the Penybont Military Tribunal was held on Tuesday, Mr. W. Butler presiding. Mr. Knight was the Military representative. Before proceeding to the hearing of appeals the Tribunal sat to consider a request from the Bridgend Tribunal for permission to in- spect the Penybont Tribunal's books, relating to the action of the Recruiting Officer in lodg- ing the appeals. After discussion the request was refused. The first appeal down for hearing was that of Tom Evans, wheeiright and blacksmith, the Factory, Blackmill. Appellant, who is a man'ied man, pleaded that he is in a. cer- tified occupation. The nearest blacksmith to himself in the neighbourhood was three miles away, and he served portions of Maesteg and Caerau.. I A Mem ber: Are you pretty full up with work?— Yes, we can't cope with the demand. Appellant was closely questioned as to his statement in iregard to the nearest black- smith being three miles away, but proved his point to the satisfaction of the Tribunal, which accordingly granted him full condit- ional exemption. In the next ca?c, that of W. T. Davies, ma?teT baker, Pencoed, the Military represen- tative announced at once that the Advisory Committee agreed to full conditional exemp- tion, and this was granted. W. Davies, the manager of the Cinema HaN, Aberkenfig, was granted total exemption on medical grounds. The case of E. R. James, provision dealer, Bridge Street, Kenfig Hill, was referred back to the County Tribunal. Appellant, who pleaded that he was the sole pmprietor and manager of his business, and would suffer serious financial loss if he had to leave it, had already appeared before the County Tri- bunal, but the verdict of that body had been cancelled by the new; regulations. The Tri- bunal, however, decided that it was not a case for them, a.nd referred it back to the County Tribunal, Ill" stated. 0. E. Chess, the proprietor of a motor and mechanical engineering business in Bridge Street, Kenfig Hill, asked for exemption on the ground of financial hardship. The Military Representative: The recruit- ing officer a-grees to the conditional exempt- ion of this man. Full conditional exemption was accordingly granted. W. E. Bevan, Star Inn. Wick, described as a shepherd, etc., was appealed for by his father, who employed him, and who pleaded, that if his son were taken has (the father's) living would be taken too, inasmuch as he could not carry on the double business of the public-house and the farm. The land composing the farm, Mr. Bevan, senior, explained, was in two parts, both a considerable distance from the house and from each other. He, Mr. Bevan, senior, could not possibly work it himself on account of physical infirmity. Questions by members of the Tribunal elicited the fact that the acreage of the., farm was 30, and that the stock consisted practi- cally entirely of sheep. Mr. D. H. Price: Could you live on the pro- ceeds of the public-house if the farm was given up? The feeling of the Tribunal was that the farm was a very small one to absorb the entire energies of an able-bodied young man of military age. A "full conditional" motion, was lost on being put to the vote. Ulti- mately it was decided to grant two months exemption without the right of further appeal. In the case of W. T. McOann, labourer, Bridgend Road, Aberkenfig, the Military re- presentative intimated that they were pre- pared to agree to the full conditional exemp- tion of this man, and this was accordingly granted by the Tribunal without calling the man in. W. J. Howell, labourer, Williams Street, Brynmenim, was appealed for by his em- ployers. The firm was represented before the Tribunal by one of their foremen, who, while sub- mitting that the work on which Howell was engaged, which was filling trams with slag to act as ballast for the permanent way, was unskilled, urged on the other banid that it was highly important and necessary work, and it was a question of getting men, skilled or unskilled. The firm had even gone to the trouble of importing men from Ireland, but they would not stay. Several Members: Did you pay them well enough ? After discussion the appeal was refused. Messrs. North's Navigation Ltd., appealed fot a number of their men, a.s follows:— W. Buckingham, Oak Terrace, Coytrahen; Robert Williams, Coronation Street, Aberkenfig; W. G. Williams, Bridgend Road, Aberkenfig; T. H. Jones,. Bryn Road, Tondu; J. S. Heal, Alma House, Bryncethm; Percy Crocombe, St. Brides' Road, Abenkenfig; Wm. O'Brien, Quarella. Road, Bridgend; W. Jones, Dunro- ven Street, Aberkenfig; George Haflsen, Park Terrace, Tondu; E. Burnett, Tynygarw, Aber- kenfig and Evan Hopkins, Maesteg Road, Tondu. Mr. Rolls, a foreman in the company's employ, appeared for Messrs. North, a.nd conducted his case with tact and ability, the result being that all the men appealed for were granted full conditional exemption, ex- cept Heal, Crocombe and But, wher each received two months "without variation or renewal. Full conditional exemption was also given to Thos. PepperaH, Afan Road, Cefn Cribbwr, and Tegai Thomas, Derllwyn Road, Tondu. The Tribunal had, a puzzling case before them in the appeal of C. A. Lowe, Park Ter- race, Tondu, harness maker, apprenticed to Mr. Lewis, Wyndham Street, Bridgend. As one member observed, they had to be very careful in this case, as it was one in which thte Bridgend Tribunal was mixed up. (Continued at bottom of next column).

PENYBONT MILITARYTRIBUNAL

(Continued from previous column). It was ultimately decided that, so far as the Penybont Tribunal was concerned, the case was ultra vires, and it was accordingly dis- missed. There were four appeals down for hearing under the Military Service Act. But it was intimated that in each case the Military agreed to conditional exemption, and this was granted without appellants being called to appear. The four names were:—D. J. Jenkins, Cherry Grove Cottage, Corntown; D. R. Rees; Kenfig Farm, Plye; W. H. Wia- liatas, Maiden Street, Cwmfelin; T. D. James, Ton Philip Farm, Kenfig Hill. >

I WAR AND AGRICULTURE j I

WAR AND AGRICULTURE. j OGMORE AND GARW CASES. No fewer than 41 cases were disposed of by the Ogmore and Garw Tribunal at a sitting held at Brynmenin on Wednesday after- noon, when some interesting points came on for consideration. The members present were: Mr. T. C. Jones (chairman), Messrs. S. H. Stockwood, W. Williams (Ogmore), D. Davies, n. J. Thomas, R. Thomas, Llewellyn Jones, with Ald. W. Llewellyn, J.P., (Mili- tary representative) and Mr. W. Williams (Ogmore) representing the Board of Agricul- ture. The last named gentleman-from Nantymoel—one of the best known farmers in the district, who made his first appearance, specially watched cases affecting the interests of agriculture, and the necessity of retaining on the land a sufficient number of hands for the maintenance of crops and herds in due efficiency. There were several cases before the Tribunal illustrating the straits to which farmers, in these times, are often put, especi- ally when the farm holdings, owing to the hilly configuration of the countryside, and the shortage of labour, are exceptionally difficult to manage. t Of the several agriculturists, the first to appear was Morgan Rees, whose age is 74, his health indifferent, and he averred that if his granclson-theonly male hand—was not ex- empt, the farm would come to a standstill.— Unhesitatingly, the exemption asked for was granted. Ww. Edwards, a solitary shepherd boy of 18, working on Tynant Farm, and represent- ing his uncle an another farm, was given simi- lar freedom, the Chairman, on behalf of the Tribunal, expressing the hope that applicant would continue in his present course, and do his best to "keep things going on." In a case of the same sort, in which the farmer appealed for his son, applicant said there were "only two" on the farm, and he positively couldn't get men.—Conditional ex- emption was granted. A man of 23 was the applicant in the next case. He said the tenant was his mother, who was a widow.—The latter was called. She declared that her son-the "only male per- son" on the farm of 195 acres-did the whole of the work, and also shepherded the lfocks.- Conditional exemption again ensued. Described as a collier-ostler and a farm bailiff, it was said of Herbert Davies (31) that all efforts to secure an older man to succeed him as a collier-ostler had absolutely failed.— Mr. W. Williams (agricultural representa- tive) There is a great difficulty in getting shepherds. It is easier to get ostlers.-Appli- cant said he had advertised, unsuccessfully. It was impossible to get a man with the dual qualifications, and there was no other man on the farm.—The Chairman (by way of jest): He must have a lot of spare time. (Laughter.) —Conditional exemption. The manager and operator at the Hippo- drome, Pontycymmer, said the concern was not a success financially.—The Chairman: Then it wouldn't be a financial loss to shut it up?—Applicant: We are'under a lease, and there is enormous expense, and two families to support.—One month's exemption, and no appeal without consent. Three students attending Bridgend County School successfully applied for exemption until July 31st, to enable them to pass their examinations. An assistant supt. "under the Prudential" said he was responsible for the 1,000 members in his division. His position was not guar- anteed, and if he ceased to fill it he would be financially embarrassed. He had one man at Pencoed, and another at Tondu, and if these went "they would expect him to do it." —The Chairman: A very generous company. (Laughter) .-Conditional exemption. A fish and fruit haulier, aged 26, told the chairman that he "struck away as soon as he left school," and it took him eight years to work up the business. The Chairman: You have not made enough money to invest and bring in an income?— Not yet. You hope to do so?—I shall try my best (Laughter).—Conditional exemption. A boot and shoe maker said his wife was absolutely incapable of carrying on the busi- ness, especially on the buying side. The Chairman: It is easy to sell?—We can sell more than we can get. The demand is greater than the supply.—Conditional exemp- tion. "Many a true word is spoken in jest." A I d y an d gents' tal l oi- '1 said- he Was the only "lady and gents' tailor, said he was the only one in Ogmore. The Chairman: The only one! a.,e they all gone and joined the army, or what! Applicant: They have gone to the collieries, I think! (Laughter). A Member: The harbour of refuge. (Re- newed laughter). A mason in the employ of Ogmore and Garw District Council1 was given tlu'ee months, pending his wife's restoration to health. The Tribunal announced that it could not give further exemption to a milk-vendor, who explained that he had failed, to dispose of his business and having spent a lot of money it would be a serious loss if he was call- ed up to relinquish it. His sister, he said,, was not able to undertake the duties.—Appli- cation refused. Applicant, however, will not be called up until July 28th. One of a batch of bakers said bread baking was too hard for women folk, and the chair- man laid it down that ."no woman can tackle 12 sacks a week."—Conditional exemption.

BRIDGEND LADYS GRUESOME DISCOVERY

BRIDGEND LADY'S GRUESOME DISCOVERY. [ WASHED UP AT OGMORE. Mr. S. H. Stockwood on Monday held an inquest at the "Three Golden Cups," South- erndown, on the body of the unknown man found on Sunday, cast up by the sea, on the beach near the Marriatt" at Ogmore. The first witness—Winifred Rowlands-said she was a milliner, carrying on business in Caroline Street, Bridgend, and was now stay- ing at the "Marriatt" Bungalow. She was on the beach near the Marriatt at 11 o'clpck on Saturday night, and saw nothing unusual then. On Sunday morning, however, about 9.30 she sAw from her window a form on the pebbles close underneath the bungalow. She took it to be a human body, and on going out. found that it was so. It was not there the night before. There had since been in a tide, and the- body appeared to have been washed up by the tide. She communicated with the police. Sergt. Evan Bowen deposed that on receiv- ing a: message from the last witness, he went to the spot, and saw the body .as described. There was no head and no arms or legs. The feet were some two yards away, close to- gether, but attached to the body by what he took to be a ligament." There was an entire absence of clothing, though there was a brown leather belt round the waist, which appeared to hold the trunk together. The body ap- peared to have been in the water a very long time (six months he should think), and was in a very bad state. It was the body of a full- grown man, muscular, but he could form no idea of the age. The police had had no in- formation recently of anybody having been lost—since the bodf of a sailor found in Janu- ary. There were no identification marks. The jury found there was no evidence to show whose body it was, or the cause of death.

No title

Pte. A. Mallett (Pencoed), S.W. Borderers, whose graphic letter from Mesopotamia ap- peared in our last week's issue.

U COMPULSORY RESIDENCE IN GLAMORGAN

U COMPULSORY RESIDENCE" IN GLAMORGAN. ————— w ] IMPORTANT TEACHERS' "PROTEST" MEETING AT BRIDGEND. Under the auspices of the N. U.T. a well- attended meeting of the teachers of the Bridg- end district was presided over by Mr. W. Rees at the Oidcastle' Council School, Bridg- end, on Tuesday last to protest against the action of the Glamorgan Education Com- mittee in dismissing from their service three head teachers who were alleged to have failed to comply with the regulations requir- ing head teachers to live within a mile of their schools. The teachers involved are the heads of Wern Boys' Council School, Ystalyfera; Wern Infants' School, Ystalyfera; and Maes- marchog Council School, near Neath. The whole history of the case was given, and the nature of the campaign to be carried out explained, in able addresses delivered by the president of the Union, Mr. Crook, B.A., B.Sc., who came direct from London on this special business, and by the following mem- bers of the Executive:—Mr. Rhys Nicholas Mr. Celfyn Williams (Swansea), ( C wmavon )P, hillips (Cardiff). Mr. Wilmott, and JMiss Phillips (Cardiff). Mr. Wilmott, of Cardiff, also spoke. The following reso- lutions were passed with complete unanimity That this meeting expresses its admira- tion of the unswerving loyalty and the prompt decision of the entire staffs of the three de- partments to face adversity in support of their persecuted colleagues, who are dismissed be- cause of the manifest desire of a small major- ity of the Glamorgan Elementary Education Committee to exercise tyranny over a head- mistress against whom no fault can be alleged other than the natural desire to live at home with her parents; and over two headmasters, whose only fault is. that they desire to be allowed to live in homes which they have established and maintained for their wives and families for many years. The small ma- jority referred to includes an Alderman from an autonomous area, and two other co-opted members, who, not having been elected by the ratepayers concerned, do not represent them." I In view of the fact that the dismissals were founded on promises alleged to have been made by the teachers, on appointment, to re- side within a mile of the school, and subse- quent futile attempts by two officers of the committee, in their affidavits in a Court. of Law, to prove that such promises had been made, and the judgment of Mr. Justice Peter- made, ? that he had not sufficient evidence before him to say that any such promises had been given by the plaintiffs,' this meeting is of opinion that an obligation of honour rests on the Committee to observe the bond as strictly as the bond has been observed by all teachers who gave such-undertaking." That this meeting deplores the persistent and unpatriotic refusals of a majority of the Education Committee to accede to the appeals made by bodies of School Managers by the Press and by a very important section of the County Council itself, that the question at issue should be postponed till after the war." That this meeting rejoices to learn that the Executive of the N.U.T. approves of the action of the staffs of the schools concerned in resigning their posts, and further pledges it, self to comply with any demand made upon members of the Union by the Executive of the N.U.T. to enable the Union to defeat a fla- grant act of tyranny, of unjust and capricious dismissal. Mr. H. C. Sloman, local secretary, effi- ciently carried out all the arrangements in connection with the meeting.

I BRIDGEND BOY IN THE JUTLAND I SEA FIGHT

I BRIDGEND BOY IN THE JUTLAND SEA FIGHT. A Bridgend boy—literally a boy, since he is only 17 years old—who did his "bit" man- fully in the Jutland battle is Trevor John, son of Mr. Wm. John, Grove Road, Bridgend. Trevor has sent his parents a vivid account of the battle. Dating from H.M.S. Revenge, lie writes:— I should like to meet the one who said the Revenge went out to pick up wounded. They would have found a difference if they had been in it. I will tell you as much as I am allowed. We left our base with the Grand Fleet as quiet as we always do, and I never felt so well as I did then. We steamed about for a bit. While we were steaming we heard that battle cruisers were in touch with the enemy, and were holding them. We still steamed on. we being the second ship of the line, the Admiral being ahead of us. The next thing we heard was that the Queen Elizabeth class had got into the fight. This put fresh heart in us, as we had been afraid the Germans would run away before we had a chance to fire at them. At last we got in sound of the guns, and were simply dancing for joy. In my turret we were singing all the time until just before we opened fire. When we got in range the flagship opened fire first, and then we did. It was terrible to see. It was a lovely but awful sight to see ships on fire and sinking. I will never forget it. We kept oil firing until they ran away. We claim to have sunk some enemy ships our- selves. Their losses must have been terrible. Anyway, we kept following them, as we should have liked to have finished them there and then, and we would have, if they had not run away. We met the Germans about half- past five. Of course, they expected an easy victory over the battle cruisers, but found they could not beat them, let alone us. In the night our destroyers made attacks on them, and sunk some more. Next morning we steamed round the battle area, and down south, and found the Germans had gone home for another holiday. This will tell what sort of fleet you have looking after you: We fought on the 31st May, and patrolled all next day came to our base, replenished, and were ready to put to sea on the night of the 2nd of June. I can't tell you any more, but will' if I ever get a chance of coming home. I was sorry about George Farmer. All they do at home for him he deserves, as it was a very rough time for our boys. I lost about two dozen chums on one ship that went down but wait till the next time we get a pop at them."

IBRIDGEND CONFERENCE

I BRIDGEND CONFERENCE. ———  ,——— MOVEMENT AGAINST SUNDAY CINEMAS. A conference of the Bridgend and District Union i)f Churches, representing 20,000 mem- bers, was held at Bridgend on Friday, the Rev. Ionverth Jones, Maesteg, presiding. A resolution was passed expressing the view that the Sunday opening of cinemas would prove detrimental to the highest interests of the community, particularly to the children and'. young people, and, farther expressing the hope that the various District Councils would; refuse to license further Sunday performances. t The conference also expressed appreciation of the action of those members of Councils who had hitherto refused to grant licenses, and pledged itself to use every endeavour to secure the return of such persons, at future elections. A resolution was passed appealing to the chief officials of the Red Cross Society to .appoint Nonconformist chaplains at all Red Cross Hospitals in the area represented by the Union. The secretary (the Rev. C. P. Thomas, Maesteg), reported that the licensing petition of the Union had been sent to the Liquor Control Board, and the Board had sirc(- granted all the reforms ask for.

MENTIONED IN DISPATCHES

MENTIONED IN DISPATCHES. Lieut. Daniel E. Rees, who was mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig's recent dispatch, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Rees, Gadlys, Llangyn- wyd. He cut the enemy's wire and, -did, excel- II lent patrol work. Lieut. Rees is an oldi Bridgend County School boy.

TONDU AND ABERKENFIG

TONDU AND ABERKENFIG. NORTHS NAVIGATION, LTD.-The j directors of North's Navigation Colliery have appointed Mr. T. H. Lakin to the important post of cashier toi the company consequent upon the death of Mr. L. G. Jones. The appointment has been received! by the staff and the neighbourhood! generally with much satisfaction. Mr. Lakin has served the com- pany for many years, having entered1 the service in 1889, sometime before the company assumed its present name, and has worked! 9 up by much perserverance and diligence, thus fitting himself for the important position which has now been conferred upon him. It is a source of much gratification to his many frieUtd, who tender him their congratulation.. In the iiiiisical world, Mr. Lakin is weU- known as a brilliant pianist and organist, always taking a leading part in the principal musical events of the district. He was for some years organist of St. John's Church, and is at present chief organiser of the choral society at Tondu.

BETTWS

BETTWS. Result of Prize Drawing for the benefit of Mr Thos. WIIRams, Shwt, Bettws. Winnimg-. Ni-inib,ei-s-2071; 1618; 2125; 1870; 2060; 2280; 2234; 1873; 1616; 1722; 1535; 1257; 2281; 15,52; 1599; 1244; 1974; 1636; 1214; 1763; 1555; 1574; 2032; 1498. Prizes must be claimed within 14 .diays.-Apply Joel Grif- fiths, Fairfield, Bettws, near Bridgend.

CAERAU

CAERAU. The winning Number in Drawing for the benefit of the widow of the late Private Dick John, Caerau, are:—1st, 2224; 1913; 1246; 2512; 2262; 1791; 1314; 946; 2623; 2376; 1896; 1176; 1136; 577; 1457; 1472; 2775; 2962; 2578; 2441; 611; 2530; 1308; 1797; 2153; 1827; 2670; 2059. A11 prizes to be. claimed within 14 days.

MAESTEG

MAESTEG. MAESTIXT BUSINESS MEN'S FEDERA- TION.—A General Meeting of the above will be held on Tuesday, July 4th, at 8 p.m. sharp.— Evan W. Lewis, Hon. Sec. 8129 PRINTED AND PUBLISHED by the CENTRAL GLAMOEQAI PRINTING AND PTTBMSHINS COMPANY, LTD., at toe" GLAMORGAN GAZETTE" OPFICBI, QUIA STREET, BRIDGEND, GLAMORGAN. FRIDAY, JUNE 30th, 1916.