Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
21 articles on this page
Advertising

Of Every Description at Lowest Prices. Compare. rr|l|Vll|lU "GAZETTE" OFFICES, BRIDGEND.i——■■m —— V

PORTHCAWL I

PORTHCAWL. I CHARGE AGAINST THE COUNCIL.—Mr. Wallace, of the Board of Agriculture, sat at PoitLcawl on Friday last to investigate a chrnge made by Mr. Thomas Bevan, Newton, that a pound for cattle had been closed up and used by the Porthcawl Council for the purpose of a store. Mr. Evan Davies, Cardiff, clerk to the Council, conducted the case for that body. The inspector will report. 'FRANCE'S DAY."—It was left to Mr. T. James, Chairman of the U.D. Council, to get a committee together to prepare for France's Day" in Porthcawl. He wisely summoned four ladies from every place of wor- ships. Others withhim are the Rev. W. J. PhiHips; C.C., and Mr. Ernest Davies. of the London and Provincial Bank. The town and district was divided into nine areas. Two ladies were placed in charge of the whole, and they are to summon other, members to act with them. Several committee meetings have .already been called, and the whole plan of campaign has been fully arranged. The cause is :t very deserving one. The want of money L V is mo;t keenly felt, and the suffering of the poor French soldiers is very great. Mr. R. E. Jones has already promised a donation of C-5, .and it is hoped a goodly sum will be netted.

KENFIG HILL

KENFIG HILL. FUNERAL.—On Wednesday last week the funeral took place of Mrs. Price, wife of Mr. J. P ice, manager of the Co-operative Stores, Kanfig Hill. The deceased lady was a native of Pontrhvdyfen, and had become well known and respected by all during her stay in Kenfig Hill. She was a faithful attendant at St. Theodore's Church, and will be greatly missed by a large circle of friends. The funeral, which took place at St. James' Church, Pyle, was one of the largest and most representative seen in the district for many years. The Cooperative Society's shops at Pontycymmer, Tondu. Heolycyw and Kenfig Hill were closed, for the employees to be present 'at the fu ne-rai. The chief bearers were Mr. J. Hit- chings, Pontycymmer Mr. Harris, Tondu Mr. Beavis, Heolycyw and Mr. Bowen (secre- tary to the Society), while the committee of management were represented by Messrs. G. Clarke (president), Mr. S. Dawe, Pontycym- mer, and Messrs. David Evans and Ivor Hard- ing, Kenfig Hill. The services at the house and at the Church were conducted by the Rev. Alcwyn S. Jones, B.A. (Kenfig Hill), assisted by the Rev. D. J. Arthur (Vicar of Pyle). At the house, "Lead, Kindly Light," was feel- ingly sung, and at the church "Jesu, Lover of my Soul," and at the graveside, "Bydd myrdd o rhyfedcloclau. Pathetic scenes were wit- nesse d at the graveside, the little orphaned children dropping bunches of white flowers into the grave. The mourners were: Mr. J. Price (widower); Misses Mildred, Enid, and Myrtle Price (daughters); Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Jones, Bryn; Mr. and Mrs. David Jones, Waunsciel, Bridgend; Mrs. Brookes, Mrs. Moss, and Miss David, Aberavon; Mr. and Mrs. T. Poulson, Miss Poulson, Miss Vaughan, Mr. and Mrs. J. Price, Mr. and Mrs. Davies, Blaina; Mr. and Mrs. Evans, Bryn, and Mrs. Roos, Bryn. Among the large number of in- timate friends present Were: Mr. and Mrs. Gore, Plough Inn, Heolycyw; Mr. and Mrs. Jenkins, Court Colmon; Mrs. George Haw- kins, Mrs. G. Clatworthy, Mrs. Bateman, Heolycyw; Mrs. Llewellyn Jones and son, Mrs Smith, Mrs. Burchell, Mrs. S. Dawe, Miss Evans, Mrs. Craven, Pontycymmer; Mr. and Airs. Gronow, Coychurch; Mrs. Butler and Mrs. Richards, Pencoed; Mr. Thomas David, R.A.M.C., Neath; and Rev. T. M. Williams, Kenfig Hill. There was a large number of beautiful wreaths, sent by the following:— Members of the Kenfig Hill Co-operative Branch; members of the General Committee; employees of the Pontycymmer Central Stores employees of the Kenfig Hill Branch Mr. J. Price and children; Mr. and Mrs. Dd. Jones, Waunsciel, Bridgend; Mrs. Brooks, Aberavon; Mrs. Moss and Miss David, Aber- avon Mr. and Mrs. Poulson, Blaina; Mr. and Mrs. T. Davies, Blaina; Mr. and Mrs. David Edwards, Tranch Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Short, Kenfig Hill. The wreaths were carried by employees of the Kenfig Hill Branch—Messrs. Thomas, Williams, Syd David, J. Lane, and David Edwards. There were also present the members of the Kenfig Hill Co-operative Stores Ladies' Guild, who were marshalled by Mrs. Edward Sutton (president) and Miss S. Edwards, secretary. The Education Commit- tee were represented by Messrs. Edward Sutton and James Jones.

BLAENGARW

BLAENGARW. C.E.M.S.—The annual business meeting in connection with the St. James' branch of the Church of England Men's Society, took place at the Church Hall. Blaengarw, on Wednes- day evening of last week. Mr. G. H. Simon (vice-president) presided, and was supported by Mr. J. J. Williams, hon. sec. After the quarterly letter from headquarters had been iraad by the secretary, also the balance sheet for the current year (which was passed), the following members were elected as officers for the ensuing yearPresident, Rev. John Davies; vice-president. Mr. G. H. Simon (re- elected) treasurer, Mr. J. W. English (re- elected) secretary, Mr. J. J. Williams (re- elected1^ assistant secretary, Mr. D. J. Vaughan (re-elected). The report was given by each member of the work done by them draftng -the. last year. Messrs. W. Phimmer (junx.) and John Lewis were appointed audi- tors for the ensuing year. Messrs. J. W. English and A. Griffiths were appointed as siick visitors, while Messrs. W. Plummer, IL B. Jones, and John Lewis were elected as a committee in addition to the officers. Messrs. H. B. Jones and J. W. English were appointed together with the Chairman and Secretary to serve on the Federation Committee.

NSPCC PROSECUTION I

N.S.P.C.C. PROSECUTION. I CHARGE. OF NEGLECT AGAINST PYLE '1 WOMAN ADJOURNED TO GIVE DEFENDANT I ANOTHER CHANCE. At Bridgend on Saturday-before Alderman W. Llewellyn (cnairman), Alderman John Thomas, Messrs. Evan David, Thomas James, and John Evans—Caroline Jenkins (respect- ably dressed) and living at Waun-y-Mere Cot- tages, Pyle. was summoned at,the instance of Richard Best (Aberavon), inspector of. the N.S.P.C.C., upon' the charge" of having neglected her four children—William (12), James John (8), Marjorie (7), and Arthur (5), in such a way as to cause them unnecessary suffering. AIr. DftjiixLJUewellyn appeared for the prosecution, and Mr. W. M. Thomas defended. Mr. David Llewellyn, in opening, said de- fendant's husband was in Egypt, serving in the 1st Glamorgan YeaLLianry. The charge against his wife, the advocate described* as a very bad case, the woman having been warned on previous occasions. The children were filthy and verminous, and defendant (as alleged) was immoral in her habits. She had two daughters—one in a situation at Porth- cawl, whilst the other kept the house, which was visited by men at all hours of the day and night; and, in his view, defendant was not a fit person to have the care and custody of the children. Whilst the latter were neglected, defendant and her daughters were well dressed. She had 27s. a week from the Army and the daughter, in a situation, was in re- ceipt of a small wage. Inspector Best gave evidence, in detail, of the neglected state of the home, and the sorry condition of the children, as witnessed by him- self and Inspector Williams, who accompanied him on the occasion of his visit. The girl at home was 18 years of age. The age of the girl in the situation at Porthcawl he did not know. The eldest boy (William) suffered from a bone disease in tone of his legs, but was now fit to attend school. By Mr. W. M. Thomas: All the children (and not only the boy with the diseased bone) were verminous. They were all fairly well nourished, except the little boy. They were not clothed and booted as they should have, been. Are you aware (asked Mr. Thomas) that she goes out charing four days a week to respect- able houses in Porthcawl?—No, I am not aware of it. I am told she comes home at 1 in the morning. I Can you prove it P—No, I can't prove it directly. Have you consulted the next-door neigh- bours, who are very vindictive?—No-; I have not; and I don't think, from my investiga- tion of the case, that there is anyone who is vindictive against the woman. On the con- trary, they feel quite sorry for her. Mr. Thomas, at this stage, read a certifi- cate from Dr. Twist, who had, on the previous night, examined the house and the children, reported the house to be in good condition, the bed clothing "absolutely clean," and the children well nourished, and "perfectly clean," and there was no trace of disease. The doctor added that he had known defend- ant for nine rears, and had always found her to be clean and of sober habits. The Inspector, asked how he reconciled his testimony with the medical certificate, an- swered that from the date of his visit, eight days had elasped, and it was possible for the place to have been transformed. There was (the witness went on) no cause or justification for poverty. He told defendant she was better off now than before the war, and that there was no need for her to go out to work. Mr. Thomas: But for these rumours, you wouldn't have brought her here to-day?—If I hadn't brought her here to-day I wouldn't be. doing my duty. Mr. D. Llewellyn: There was no suggestion of extreme poverty in the appearance of the daughters. ?—Quite the contrary. These pro- ceedings are brought in consequence of neg- lect, and not about rumours. Inspector Williams (Pyle) deposed: I have known defendant for five years. Her hus- band, when at home, was a farm labourer, earning £1 a week. His wife is now in re- ceipt of 27s. a week from the Army, and, in addition, she has 7s. a week from her daugh- ter, apart from what she makes by charing. The rent of the house is 4s. a week. I agree with the evidence of Inspector Best. In September last I went there with him. The condition was bad enough then and filthy; it is worse now. She was warned by *-he Inspector in my presence. In one bedroom the names of men and soldiers were written all over the walls. I have met >this woman during the last five years, and particularly the last nine months, on different dates, coming home from Porthcawl, with her daughter, in the company of soldiers. I have seen men come out of the house On the 19th Dec., 1915, I was on duty in plain clothes, and could hear some loud talking, and at 1.30 at night I I saw two soldiers come out of the house, and I saw her and her daughter *send them away outside the door. I was near to the spot, and have no doubt that they were soldiers from Porthcawl. The family has been wilfully neglected. She is not a fit person to look after the children. The treatment is likely to be injurious to health. The health of these children has already been injured. It has been an accumulation of filth for the last 12 months. It is the worse experience I have ever had. The children do not attend regu- larly at school. Cross-examined by Mr. Thomas: I don't agree that all the children were well nour- ished. The men I saw were strangers—sol- diers billetted at Porthcawl. I don't know that defendant has a son, a soldier, who visits the house. I have never heard of it before.. Mr. David Llewellyn: How do you explaiii Dr. Twist's letter?—I can't explain it. Mr. W. M. Thomas, for the defence, said his client worked at the Bon Marche and other places at Porthcawl, kept by very respectable people, who, if they had had the slightest sus- picion, would never have engaged her. Ad- mittedly, the 17 year old daughter, who was in charge of the house, and looked after the children, had not worked so well as her mother would have done had she been able to devote all her time to the duties. Defendant had been a good rtiother, though probably there had been some neglect on her daughter's part. As to the charge of immorality, it might easily have been left out, and he sub- mitted it was only introduced to bolster up a frivolous case. There had been no previous charge, and the only men who had ever visited the house were defendant's son, who was in the Army and with his friends, called occa- sionally. The incidents had been grossly ex- aggerated, and it was not a case for Police Court interference. Catherine Jenkins (the defendant) was called, and was most emphatic. It was ab- solutely incorrect to say that she had ever had improper relations with soldiers. No soldier had ever come out of her house early in the morning, and there was not the slightest truth in the imputations. Dr. Twist on the previ- pus day, made a thorough examination of the house, and unable to attend that day, he, in- stead, wrote the letter. This was the case. After consideration of the circumstances, the Chairman said they wanted to give defendant very chance to im- prove. The state of things to which the Inspector deposed was no doubt very bad, al- though Dr. Twist certified there had been very considerable improvement. The case would be adjourned for a month, to see how defendant conducted herself and looked after the home and the children. She was finely bound over in the sum of 40s. to appear and; answer the charge on the appointed day.

Advertising

PmMm means getting the most value for the 1 least money spent. r. <, i j?Pj??B)} tflT Some economise" on soap by bu??  *?———' soaps-good enough to look at, ¡  '?:?:? ??jn t imp<- ure soapa—good enoug** h to look at, ?!   ?:??:?::?!' none the less not pure soap, but soap j plus other cheaper and less valuable or • ??!????????! plus othef .cheaper and less valuable or  ??!???i???!?! worthless &r even harmful ingredients, { You avoid this mista ke if you buy the ???!? soap that is pure by name an d pure by nature-th e soap that saves its cost week by week in the c lothes it saves fnHfWH?H?? the soap that combines A:?e? quality  with greatest economy2—the soap that is  !??!!???!?!?? called  PURITAN I ill SOAP I  SOMP llllllflllt WITH THE OLIVE OIL j CHRIST*' Thomas • mos.. 4.TO.. Bristol. | w* • —

RheumatismKidney Trouble

Rheumatism-Kidney Trouble Rheumatism is due to uric acid crystals in the joints and muscles, the result of excessive uric acid in the system that the kidneys failed to remove as nature intended, and this acid is also the cause of backache, lumbago, sciatica, gout, urinary trouble, stone, gravel, dropsy. Estora Tablets, a specific based on modern medical science, are the successful treatment, and have cured numberless obstinate cases after the failure of all other tried remedies, which ac- counts for them superseding out-of-date medi- cines sold at a price beyond all but the wealthy. festora Tablets fully warrant their description- an honest remedy at an honest price, 1/3 per box of 4tO tablets, or 6 for 6/9. All Chemists, or postage free from Estora Co., 132 Charing Cross Road, London, W.C. Bridgend Agents, Boots, Cash Chemists.

Advertising

Advertise in the "Glamorgan Gazette." If you want to sell, buy or exchange; you cannot do better. I

I BETTWS

I BETTWS. t SACRED CONCERTO—A sacred concert was held at the Sardis Baptist Chapel, Bettws, on Sunday, and was well attended. Mr. 1. A. Williams (schoolmaster) took the chair. The solos and recitations were appropriate, and were well received, all performancéS being of an exceptionally high order. Solos were given by Misses S. A. Riggs, Gwen Evans, E. M. Matthews, B. A. Lock, Bronnie Riggs, and by Messrs. W. Lewis, D. Jones, John Evans, and W. Griffiths. Recitations were given by Miss Cassie Duckett and Miss Dilys Lewis. The accompanists.were Miss S. A. Riggs, Miss May Williams, and Mr. Gomer Jones. The committee responsible for the concert con- sisted of the chairman, Mr. Joel Griffiths (sec- retary), Mr. David Lewis, and Mr. Oliver Davies.

I HEOLYCYW

I HEOLYCYW. PARISH COUNCIL MEETING. — The members present at the last meeting of the Coychurch Higher Parish Council were Messrs R. J. Palfreman (chairman), Thos. Edwards, and Evan Griffiths .-Correspondence relating to the Commons Regulation Order was read, but it was felt that the matter contained therein would be better dealt with by the Parish Meetings.—It was reported that the stile adjoining the Common, near Brynwith Colliery, had been broken, and the clerk was instructed to have the same repaired.—As one of the members had not attended the meetings of the Council for a considerable time, it was decided to declare the seat vacant.-A notice of motion was given that the Council, at its next meeting, proceed to fill the vacancy thus caused.

I TONYJREFAILI

I TONYJREFAIL. CHAPEL OUTING.—The young people inl connection with Ainon Baptist Chapel, Tony-5 refail, held an enjoyable picnic on Thursday of last week, when a visit was paid to the grounds of Llanharran House, by kind per- mission of Mrs. J. Blandy Jenkins. The party was shown round by Mr. John Morgan, and afterwards partook of an exceUent repast in the vestry of the United Methodist Chapel, kindly lent for the occasion. The arrange- ments were in the capable hands of Mr. Gar- field Matthews, and Miss Mary Gethin Evans, secretary and treasurer irespectively.

IABERGARW BREWERY COMPANY LTD1

I ABERGARW BREWERY COMPANY, LTD, .1 The annual meeting of the shareholders of John Brothers, Abergarw Brewery Company, Ltd., was held at the company's offices at Brynmenyn. The report of the directors for the year ending April 30th was adopted, in- chiding the recommendation of a dividend on the Ordinary Shares for the past halif-year at the rate of 8 per cent. per annum, making 6 per cent. for the year, and the increasing of the reserve fundi by £1,000, leaving C471 4s. 9d. to be carried forward! subject to the directors fees. The retiring directors, Messrs. David Jenkins and Edward Williams, were re- elected.

I DEATH OF PTE JOHN WILLCOCKS PONTYCYMMER

I DEATH OF PTE. JOHN WILLCOCKS (PONTYCYMMER). On Thursday of last week, Mrs. Mary Jane Willcocks, Bridgend Road, Pontycymmer, re- ceived a notification from the Infantry Record Office, Shrewsbury, dated July 5th, that her husband, Private John Willcocks, Welsh Regi- ment, "died of disease" (place not stated), on the 22nd June, 1916. Pte. Willcocks enlisted in the Army on the 15th February, 1915, and left with the Indian Expeditionary Force four months ago. He worked as a collier at the Duchy Colliery, Pon- tyrhyl, prior to enlistment, and he leaves a widow and six children to mourn their loss.

IPTE T POWELL PONTYCYMMER SERIOUSLY WOUNDED

I PTE. T. POWELL (PONTYCYMMER) SERIOUSLY WOUNDED. Mr. Wm. Powell, Oxfprd Street, Ponty- cymmer, has received a notification to the effect that his son, Pte. T. Powell, Gloucester- shire Regiment, is lying in a dangerous condi- tion in a hospital in France suffering from shrapnell wounds in the head, thigh, and elbow. Pte. Powell was previously employed at Hopkin's, ironmonger, Pontycymmer. Mr. Powell has another son serving his King and country, viz., Corporal Garfield Powell, B.Sc., Chemical Section, France.

I DRIVER BEN LEWIS LATE OF BLAENGARW WOUNDED

I DRIVER BEN LEWIS (LATE OF BLAENGARW) WOUNDED. Driver Ben Lewis, Royal Field Artillery, son of Mr. and Mrs. Rees Lewis, Llwyn yr Eos, New Road, Porthcawl, late of Blaen- garw, has been wounded in the arm, and is now at St. Helen's Hospital, Liverpool, and progressing favourably.

I OGMORE VALE

I OGMORE VALE. SCHOOL AN-NIVERSA-RY.-Tlie anniver- sary of St. John's Sunday school took place on Sunday,* July 2nd. There was Holy Communion at 8-30 a.m., Matins and' Ser- mon at 11 a.m., and a Children's Flower Service at 2-30 p.m., when the children brought their gifts of beautiful flowers, which were afterwards sent to various hospitals to cheer our sick and wounded heroes. At the af ternoon service, Miss May Cottreli remltered the solo "He wipes the tear from every eye." The evening service was held1 at 6 p.m., when Mr. Wm Hurford gave a good render- ing of "Arm, arm, ye brave." The singing at all the services was excellent. Miss M. Walton pres,-dodl at the organ, and! the sing- ing was under the direction of Mr. R. J. Bye. The preacher for the day was the Rev. J. R. James, Vicar of C-Ifyrydd-, who de- livered powerful and inspiring sermons. He was assisted by the Rev. D. Mathias, curate in charge. The school treat took place on Wednesday last in glorious weather. The ststoAar* formed a procession, and headed by the Ogmore Valley Temperance Band, paraded the principal streets. After tea, games and sports were provided for the children.

PONTYRHYL

PONTYRHYL. RECEPTION AND PRESENTATION.-A most enthusiastic receptiOn was given to Private H. MjcKenna, Station Road, Ponty- rhyl, on Friday* evening Last, at Nazareth Chapel, which was crowded to weOicome the gallant soldier, who has seen service in France And was among the first to Jand at fSuvlia Bay in Gallipo'i. Mr. Tom Pugsley, who pre- sidled said that every soldier who had returned to Pontyrhyl from "the front," had received public recognition, and the committee, stimu- lated by the great interest taken, hoped to continue this excellent practice. After the enthusiastic singing of "Rule Britannia," Mrs. T. C. Jones presented Private McKenna with a silver medal, suitably inscribed, and said she hoped he would finally return looking as well as he did that evening. Pte. Mc- Kenna responded, and thanked the people of Pontyrhyl for their kindness; after which Commander Pugh, M.E., and Mr. John Braund made vigorous speeches, and Master Willie Howells gave an appropriate recitation. At Private McKenna.'sl request "Nearer my God to Thee," was sung, and proved' a most impressive item. The singing of the "The Marseillaise," "God save the King," and "Mae Hen Wiad Fy Nhadau," ended the meeting. Mr. Willie Thomas, A.L.C.M., did excellent service at the organ, and the dea- cons of Nazareth, are to be congratulated on granting facilities for these meetings to be held.

IBRYNMENIN ATHLETIC SPORTS

I BRYNMENIN ATHLETIC SPORTS. Successful athletic sports were held on Sat- urday afternoon at Brynmenin (near Bridg- end), under the auspices of the, St. Brides Minor Reception Committee for wounded soldiers. The most suitable spot chosen for the list of events was the charming field; at the rear of Abergarw Brewery, kindly lent by Mr. Howel4 Williams, C. The Tondu Silver Band was in attendance, and the accompani- ment of music was an added and a most appreciative pleasure. The fixture reflected credit upon the committee, Messrs J. H. Hut- chinson, M.E.; E. H. Llewellyn, M.E.; W. Johnson; C. H O'Regan; W. D. Howell H. Caruso, the starter Mr. T. D. SchofiekJ (Bridgend); and the indefatigable secretary, Mr David Lewis. The results were as follows: -120 yards Open Handicap—1, R. Howells, Coity, 17 yards; 2, O. Parrv, Gilfach Goch, 12 yeards; 3, Stanley Roberts, Brymcethin, 14 yards. 440 yards Open Handicap—1, Hugh Evans, Maesteg, 10 yards; 2, William Hayter, Cefn, 30 yards. 120 yards Boys Race -1 D. Morgan, Bryncethin 2 T. Jones, Cefn; 3, T. Pugsley, Bryncethin. Sack Racç-D. Morgan, Bryncethin. Race for men over 50 —Tom Evans, Garw Valley. H Miles Open Trotting Handicap for Horses not over 14.2- 1* David Morgan's (Bryncethin) Betty, 260 yards; 2, Owain Glyndwr's Captain, 40 yards; 3, David Evan's Welshman, 30 yards.

I TONDU AND ABERRENFIG

I TONDU AND ABERRENFIG. PARK RED CROSS HOSPITAL.—About 40 woun-ded soldiers have arrived at the Hospital. This Bs the largest contingent that has been accommodated up to now. MARINE ON THE, 1, WAIRISPITE. n -The people of Penyfai have had the most satir-i- flatoryevi.dence that the "Warspite" is not where the Germans say she is, by the arrival home of Private Kemp, son oi Mr. and Mrs. Kemp, Penyfai, who served on the "War- spite" as a marine. Private Kemp gave a very interesting account of the battle, though being of a retiring disposition some difficulty was experienced in getting him to talk about himself. The chief thing he said was, he was proud to have been able to do something for his country. ST. JOHN'S, TONDU.—The Rev. I. Rees, late of Penarth, has succeeded' the Rev. H. R. Protheroe as curate in charge of St. John's. Mr. Rees is not entirely a stranger to Aber- kenfig people, having preached at St. John's during the time he was in charge of Lales- ton, under the present Vicar of Newcastle. Mr. Rees spent five years at Laleston, during which time he made a large number of friends, not only in the Established Church, but also in all religious, circles., being yery active in alll movements having for their object the improvement of the community and the eleva- ting of the masses. His stay at Penarth was not of such long duration, but his work there gave evidence of ocontinous labour. It is pleasing ..to note the very generous reception accorded to Mr. Rees at Aberkenfig, the church being filled on his first Sunday service. Every confidence is expressed that the inter- est will be maintained.

1 I I PANTYGOG 1

I I ,'< PANTYGOG. -1 PRESENTATION.—On Saturday evening last a number of friends gatnered at Forester's Hall, Pontyrhyl, under the presidency of Mr. T. C. Jones, for the purpose of doing honour to Private Levi Williams, Cuckoo Street, Pantygog, who has returned home after spending nearly 10 months in various hospitals as the result of severe wounds re- ceived in the battle of Loos. Private Levi W-illiams is a married man, and was one of the first to volunteer his. services at the out- break of war, joining the Black Watch. Mr. Eli Pugh (manager) in presenting the wounded soldier with a beautiful medallion and trea- sury notes on behalf of -the official's of Duchy Colliery and' friends, said "Levi" was a good citizen and an excellent workman, amd he was sure there was not a more gallant andl loyal soldier in the British Army. Speeches were madle by Councillor W. Williams and Mr. T. Pugsley, who spoke in eulogistic terms of Private Williams. Mr. John Dix and Mr. Wat Rees rendered songs in excellent style, and votes of thanks concluded a memorable meeting.

Advertising

TfiiU CILEIIIMTBO ""wAnöfÑóï-oN 1 ts are    f WADDINQTON & S0N5^LM* t Established 1838.; » eatatoluel Post Free. VALUE iti Ta Wo D- Call and illspect the lostmtneats. W ADDlNOTON A- .so\ STIT(OlftóIÍf(ö;¡::Ië: Schoo!s? MRT TAMOT. I POUNnS SAVED BY DEALING WITH THE ACTPAL PIAWO MAKERS SELLING DIRECT to the PUBLIC