Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
11 articles on this page
Advertising

Condon Rouse Exertional Bargains IN Silk and Lustre Coats, Cotton, Yoile and Print Frocks Gabadine and Covert Raincoats, Millinery and Children's Outfitting. |7T|fr ii xfrezncuj n i]|i n >Q< H TKlZu—fo: n-—t||i—U—^>Qc n t [□* I EARLIER THAN USUAL, [ Owing to the Exceptional Difficulties in fiji obtaining Supplies, we are holding our n ? Sale now, in order to clear the way for | | Early DeHvery of Autumn Goods. | 12 (< n aQg n i |fams»Q<—nZIj|"i n {

PORTHCAWL NOTES I

PORTHCAWL NOTES. I (By EXCELSIOR.) I I am very glad to find that an effort is to i be made to resuscitate the Porthcawl Cham- ber of Trade. It is a very great pity that this body was ever allowed to decay; but somehow this seems to be usual occurrence with everything that is started in Porthcawl. The Chamber of Trade has on many occasions proved that such a body in a growing holiday resort can be of incalculable value, and every effort ought to be made to keep it going. 1 1 1 By the way, might it not be advisable to call it The Ratepayers' Association," and drop the Chamber of TraSe title? My rea- son for suggesting this is that several house- holders have replied, when asked to join, that they have nothing to do with trade or busi- ness. Certainly, this should not be the spirit of anyone, as anything done by the Chamber of Trade, which benefits the town, benefits the individual householder indirectly. Neverthe- less, such a spirit has been shown. By calling the new body "Ratepayers' Association," it would include everyone. Ill To lose your false teeth when bathing, and then to find them in practically the same spot next day, is a remarkable experience, but that is what happened to a visitor to Porthcawl last week. Ill Much is made in various papers of good and kind actions that have been done by different bodies in the particular town or towns in which they circulate. But somehow Porth- cawl seems to get very little notice in this way. For instance, a few weeks ago a para- graph appeared in a South Wales daily to the effect that a Cardiff Sunday School had given money, usually spent on an outing, to a par- ticular war fund. Yet the children of All Saints' Church Sunday School had already done such a thing, though I Question if half-a- dozen people outside the Sunday School teachers knew about it. There is another matter which I don't suppose anything will be said about, and that is the money being got together by the Brogden R.A.O.B. Lodge for the Prisoners of War Food Fund. This lodge is only in its early days, yet the amount to be forwarded to this fund will exceed that of some of the older lodges. It is only fair that notice should be taken of such charitable actions as the above. Ill Many expressions of regret will be heard at the death of Captain the Hon. Roland Philippe, who has been killed in action. Al- though perhaps not quite so well known in Porthcawl as in some places, he was neverthe- less very popular with those who did make his acquaintance. It is a sad coincidence that both candidates for a Parliamentary consti- tuency sfioukl be killed in the war, and within about two months of each other.

Advertising

Ladies-Blanchard's Pills Are unrivalled for all Irregularities, etc.; they speedily afford relief, and never fail to alleviate all suffering, etc. They supersede I Pennyroyal, Pil Cochia, Bitter Apple. Blanchard's are the Best of all Pills for Women. Sold in boxes Is. lid., by BOOTS' Branches and all Chemists, or post free, same price, from LESLIE MARTYN, Ltd., Chemists, 34 Dalston Lane, London. Sample and valuable Booklet post free Id.

I PORTHCAWL URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL

I PORTHCAWL URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL ATTACK ON THE GAS COMMITTEE. I NEW COMMITTEE FORMED. I An ordinary meeting of the Porthcawl Urban District Council was held on Monday. Mr. T. James presided, and there were also present: Messrs. T. G. Jones, D. J. Rees, D. Davies, and Rev. D. J. Arthur, with the legal clerk, the deputy clerk, and the surveyor. Before beginning the business of the meeting, the Chairman said he thought they could not do less than pass a vote of sympathy and condo- lence with Lord and Lady St. David's on the death of their son. This was moved by Mr. D. J. Rees, and parsed by the members rising in their seats. Proceeding with the business of the evening, the Deputy Clerk read a letter from the Porth- cawl Chamber of Trade notifying the Council that their first meeting had been fixed for Tues- day next. A letter was read from the Federation of British Health Resorts. The Federation re- ported that the officials of the Board of Trade in London had been approached in the matter of something being done to meet the serious sit- uation at the health resorts. The urgency and importance of some measure to relieve the situ- ation was pressed upon the Board. Captain Prettyman, in reply, said the Government had no objection to increasing the railway facilities at once if the railway authorities could manage it. A representative of the Railway Board who was in attendance, however, pronounced this to be absolutely out of the question. All he could suggest was that, after the war they might be able, and would endeavour, to provide greatly increased facilities, so as to make up as far as possible for the present unavoidable loss. DRAMATIC LICENSE FOR PAVILION. I A letter was read from Mr. Powell David, solicitor, Bridgend, on behalf of Mr. Conrad, asking for a license for the Pavilion for stage plays, etc. This, on the motion of the Rev. D. J. Arthur, was agreed to. The Works Committee reported that the sur- eyor had been in communication with the Lily White Laundry Company in regard to the smoke nuisance from the company's chimney. The surveyor had proposed certain measures to the company for the abatement of the nuisance, and hoped to be able soon to report an improve- ment. In regard to the painting of the shelters, etc., on the front, the Surveyor hoped to be able to commence the work forthwith. The committee strongly recommended that a boat be procured to patrol the beach during bathing. In regard to the appointment of a day in celebration of the second anniversary of the outbreak of war, the committee recommended that a public meeting be held on the 4th August in the Band Stand. With reference to the offer, or, rather, the re- quest, from the Cwmcarn Male Voice Choir to give a concert on the front on August Bank Holiday, the committee recommended that this be granted. The minutes were confirmed, on the motion of Mr. Dan Davies. THE GAS COMMITTEE. I At this point, Mr. T. G. Jones rose to move a resolution in regard to the Gas Committee. He did so, he said, at the request of several mem- bers of that Council. The resolution was that a Gas Committee be appointed at once, at that meeting. It was true they had a Gas Commit- tee already, but it was a committee of every- body, and what was everybody's business was' nobody's business, and the fact was the gas affairs of the town were not being looked after as they ought to be. For example, their wages sheet for the last three weeks showed that, though there was a saving of 200,000 feet of gas over the corresponding week of last year, they were paying exactly the same wages. Although they were in the middle of the season, he pro- posed they appoint a new committee at once, to consist of four members. Mr. Dan Davies, who seconded, said he was in favour of the proposal for several reasons. He himself had asked the question, How is it the wages are not less? The Council ought to tackle the matter, so as to make the gasworks I a paying concern. Mr. D. J. Rees said he thought they would agree that the proposition was entirely out of order. Still, if the Chairman accepted it, that didn't matter. He agreed that that particular branch of the Council was not working pro- perly, and as one who supported the principle of the motion at the annual meeting, he would support it nor. But he proposed three mem- here instead of four. They were only seven altogether at present, and three was quite enough. Rev. D. J. Arthur said he could not support the resolution. He did not think the remedy proposed was the only bne, and it might frighten the ratepa3-e s -He would like to see a reversion to the plP. of having a special night for the Gas Committee. On the question as to whether the motion was in order, the Clerk ruled that it was if the proposed new committee were taken to be a sub-committee. Otherwise, of course, not. Mr. D. J. Rees: Is it agreed that the num- ber be three instead of four? Mr. D. Davies: But in that case the Chair- man would have a casting-vote, and you might as well have a committee of one. Mr. T. G. Jones, referring to Mr. Arthur's suggestion, said that that plan, a meeting of the whole Council on a special night, had already been tried, and had proved an abso- lute failure. As to Mr. Rees' proposal, that the committee should consist of three instead of four, he would agree to that-the commit- tee to report direct to the Council. I' The matter having been thus amicably ad- justed, the three members of the conttiittee were appointed—Messrs. R. E. Jones, T. G. Jones, and Dan Davies, with the chairman (Mr. James) ex-officio. Mr. D. Davies rose to move a resolution, to the effect that the Council have leaflets printed and distributed, asking the public to help in the economising of labour by burning all stray paper instead of dumping it into re- ceptacles pi-ovided-thus saving scavengers' labour. The Clerk Is the paper to be burnt indoors or out of doors ? Because, you know, we have certain regulations in regard to chimneys on fire. (Laughter.) In spite of the legal clerk's little joke, Mr. v Davies' motion was carried. In regard to the dispute over the pond, said to have once stood on the spot where the gas offices are now built, the Legal Clerk re- ported that a representative of the Charity Commissioners had come down and heard the evidence of a number of witnesses, who all said they did not remember a pond there for the last 40 years. The objector was pre- sent. The Commissioners' representative ex- pressed himself rather strongly to the effect that he ought never to have been fetched down to look into such a case, and that he I did not think the spot had been used as a I pond for 40 years. As for the providing of a water trough, he did not think the spot was a suitable one for the purpose. 'I

Advertising

Advertise in the "Glamorgan Gazette." I If you want to sell, buy or exchange; you cannot do better.

PORTHCAWL SEPARATION I

PORTHCAWL SEPARATION. I TREALAW POSTlNMASTER AND HIS WIFE. ELDERLY COUPLE'S DIFFERENCES. On Saturday at Bridgend Police Court—be- fore Alderman W. Llewellyn (chairman) and other Magistrates—Mrs. Eva Norman, of Adel- phi Cottages, Philadelphia Road, Porthcawl, summoned her husband, William Norman, livery stables proprietor, Holly House, Station Road, Trealaw, for desertion. Mr. W. M. Thomas (Bridgend) appeared for the complainant; Mr. G. W. Spickernell (Tonypandy) defended. Mr. W. M. Thomas, in stating the facts, said this was an application for a separation order and maintenance, on the ground of desertion. The facts were shortly these: Applicant and defendant were married 40 years ago at Sardis Chapel, Pontypridd, and resided in Trealaw district up to January of this year, when differ- ences took place, and from that time applicant had lived at Porthcawl, her husband contribut- ing to her maintenance down to April this year, when the contributions ceased for reasons that would be afterwards detailed. The advocate proceeded to say the difficulties were of such a nature that it was absolutely impossible for complainant to return to the defendant. In April last year, complainant came into some insurance money on the death of her mother. Previously her husband had allowed her 30s. a week for household expenses. Immediately she received the insurance money, however, he ceased payment of his weekly contributions, and endeavoured to get the insurance money, which created a bad feeling between them. Of an ungovernable temper, he came to the house and quarrelled about money matters. In Jan- uary this year, defendant came home one night and a row took place about the son. Appli- cant had in the house some furniture which had come to her from her parents, and this furniture and certain crockery defendant smashed with a poker, and finally he threat- ened to "brain" his wife if she did not turn out immediately. She cleared out, as desired, and it was arranged that her husband should allow her 10s. a week, and send the furniture after her. She went to Porthcawl, defendant assisting in the removal of the furniture. In addition (said Mr. Thomas) defendant's son lived .near, and some little time ago defendant had the telephone removed from his own premi- ses to his son's. The removal of the telephone, it was suggested; was really only a trick, be- cause when defendant went to the son's house to attend to the telephone, whilst the son was performing his duties as a cab proprietor, Mrs. Norman, from a conversation everheard be- tween her husband and daughter-in-law, was convinced that certain improprieties had taken place, and that caused considerable argument and differences. In January (as he had said) his client was forced out of the house, the fur- niture was removed to the house she had taken at Porthcawl, and the contributions of 10s. a week were regularly paid down to May 17th, 1916. In a letter sent by defendant to his wife he wrote "You threaten me with proceedings. You can take what proceedings you like. I have no money to spend unless I rob someone. It takes .£6 extra to keep the horses going. I lost 2130 last year, and my sight is going. You went away of your own accord. One fire, one gas, one rent is enough for me. You must have a share of what I have got." During their 40 vears of married life, whilst defendant had drunk heavily, his wife had looked after his business and kept it together, and, in addition, as a saving woman she had assisted in the ac- quisition of the substantial property of which defendant was owner at Trealaw. He could well afford to pay his wife more than 10s. a week. He had forced the woman to go away, and leave him, and she now asked for a separa- tion, and for the opportunity, in the cottage she had furnished, to live a peaceful life, un- disturbed by the bullying threats of her hus- band. In asking the Bench to make the order, Mr. Thomas impressed it upon their Worships that los. a week was much too little a sum. Mrs. Norman was then called, and re-stated the facts in evidence. Her husband told her she had "no business" to keep the insurance money. He wanted it from her, and when she refused he became "nasty." During their mar- ried life he had purchased a lot of property, and he conducted a very large business, includ- ing seven or eight horses, six houses; though there was a mortgage—to what extent she could not say. Her husband also owned two motor cars, and contracted for funerals and going- away parties. Defendant had a hot temper, and had threatened her. In January last he told her she had better go for fear something would happen to her, and he would allow her 10s. a week. When she was packing up the furniture, and was about to go, he smashed some crockery and pictures. He paid the I money up to May last. Witness communi- cated with him, because he was in arrears. De- fendant sometimes was "very nice." Only when he was in a temper had she reason to complain. In reply to Mr. Spickernell, witness admitted that her husband claimed some of the things she proposed to take away. In the presence of P.C. Evans (who was called) defendant said she could have the business, but not the bank book. When she asked for money, he said, "You can have the lot, and manage for yourself!" If her husband had lost a large amount of money, and the business didn't pay, she could not help it. She had always done her best to save money. He had never told her he had failed to make both ends meet by X130. She wanted more than 10s. a week, but if those con- tributions were continued, she wouldn't make a bother about it. Defendant was called, and denied haying sep- arated from his wife. He had (he said) hoped that she would change her mind, and return to him. He denied the threats. P.C. W. Evans (Trealaw), who was called in on the occasion of the incident of the smashing of the crockery, said defendant offered to make over everything to his wife if she would stay and become responsible for the business. Finally, the Bench granted a separation order with maintenance at 12s. a week, defendant to pay costs. Mr. Spickernell then asked the Bench to state a case on the point of law he had raised, show- ing there had been no desertion. The Clerk: Apply in the usual way.

IPORTHCAWLI

PORTHCAWL. I RESCUE ON THE BEACH.—Some Cardiff bovis were bathing near The Rest, Porthcawl, w hen one of them got into difficulties. The Rev. D. G. Samuel, curate of All Saints, Porthcawl, rushed into the water in his clothes and' by wading up to his neck, succeding in effecting a. rescue. The lad quickly recovered from the effects of his fright. OFFICERS WOUNDED.—Mrs. ELeoek, Newton, has been informed that her son, Lieutenant Reginald Elcock, King's Liverpool Regiment has been wounded. Lieutenant Elcock is a brother of Mr. VI. Elwy Jones, The Cottage, Llanishen. He joined' the Glamorgan Yeomanry as a trumpeter during the South African war, in which corps he served for a number of years. Information has also been received at Newton, that Second Lieutenant Yonge, of the South Wales Bor- derers, has been shot in the leg, and is in hospital at Rouen, France.

FALSE PRETENCES

FALSE PRETENCES. John Iticketts (69), wheelwright and small farmer, of St. Bride's Major, was charged at Swansea Assizes on Tuesday with obtaining £51 by means of false pretences from Thomas Witney, at Folly Farm, near Cowbridge. Prisoner was found guilty, and sent to prison for twelve months with hard labour, and the E51 was ordered to be restored to the prosecutor.

I IPYLE CASE COLLAPSES

I- PYLE CASE COLLAPSES. Benjamin Jones (50), farmer (on bail), was charged with receiving a mare, value £20, the property of Thomas Jones, well knowing the same to have been stolen, on May 2nd last, at Pyle. Mr. Trevor Hunter (instructed by Mr. Walter Hughes) was for the prosecution; and Mr. Marlay Samson (instructed by Mr. W. M. Thomas) defended. The charge broke down, and by the Judge's direction the accused was found not guilty, and discharged.

COYCHURCH

COYCHURCH. LETTElt FROM THE FRONT.—The fol- lowing letter has been received from Gunner Robert Tanner, who before the war was a farm hand in the employ of Mr. Lewis, Coedy- mwstwr Farm, and who has been out m France sillee the commencement of the war :— You have heard about British activity out here, and that the roar of the guns could be heard on the East Coast. Well, we have been waiting for this, and now we are at it hammer and tongs. We knew that our bat- tery, which had been mentioned in despatches by Sir Douglas Haig, were not sent down' in, this part of the line for nothing. We have been waiting for "the day," and now we are in it we mean to give the Germans a warm time. The very ground trembles with the roar of the guns, and it would make the munition workers' hearts glad to see their shells blowing the German trenches to smithereens. The fighting in"fast and furi- ous. Snell a fight cannot be won without sacrifice, but the dash of the British troops is wonderful, and they gave the Germans a good gruelling. The bombardment is still .raging, and the noise is deafening. I still continue to have some narrow escaes. We look on these escapes as the spice of adventure, for life is dull without excitement."

Advertising

Rheumatism-Kidney Trouble Rheumatism is due to uric acid crystals in the joints and muscles, the result of excessive uric acid in the system that the kidneys failed to remove as nature intended, and this acid is also the cause of backache, lumbago, sciatica, gout, urinary trouble, stone, gravel, dropsy. Estora Tablets, a specific based on modern medical science, are the successful treatment, and have cured numberless obstinate cases after the failure of all other tried remedies, which ac- counts for them superseding out-of-date medi- cines sold at a price beyond all but the wealthy. Estora Tablets fully warrant their description—7 an honest remedy at an honest price, 1/3 per box of 40 tablets, or 6 for 6/9. All Chemists, or postage free from Estora Co., 132 Charing Cross Road, London, W.C. Bridgend Agents, Boots, Cash Chemists. ADVICE FREE.—ilrtV epmialist, I Guinea Street. Bristol. 1871