Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
16 articles on this page
PROHIBITION AND THE WORKERS I

PROHIBITION AND THE WORKERS. I To the Editor. I Sir,—It would be interesting to know the opinion of the Labour world in reference to the proposed prohibition of alcoholic bever- ages, and what their attitude would be in the event of prohibition coming into the realm of practical politics. The most surpris- ing thing about the whole matter is the ap- parent apathy with which the question seems to be viewed by the working classes. It would seem as though any misguided body of cranks could push their pet nostrum down the throats of the workers without protest being made. It is certain that had they taken the matter seriously, the promoters of the petition could never have obtained the two million signatures they are reported to have taken.—I am, etc., 1-?. Bridgend. A LICENSED VICTUALLER. I Bridgend.

COYTRAHEN PARK HOSPITAL I

COYTRAHEN PARK HOSPITAL. I To the Editor. u I I Sir,—While i thank you on behait of the Lady Chairman and Commandant (Mrs. Ernest Llewelyn), for the excellent report roncerning the above Hospital, which ap- peared in the last week's issue of your paper, I regret to state that a rather serious error has been made by you with Teference to the ngures of maintenance cost per head. Al- though one of the patients at present at the Hospital paid a very high tribute to the Com- mandant, Matron, and Staff for the kindness meted out to the wounded soldiers there, the ngures as quoted in the "Gazette" last week are calculated to give your readers the im- pression that the patients are treated with unexampled generosity and luxury. I will therefore thank you to publish the following corrections In your next Issue:— (1) The average cost of maintenance per head was 3s. 6.8d. per day, or 24s. 11.6d. per week; and not jE3 6s. 8d. per day, or R24 11s. 6d. per week, (2) The cost of maintenance per head, after deduction of War Omce capi- tation fees, etc., was Is. 3.6d. per day, or 9s. 1.2d. per week, and not jBl 3s. 6d. and JE9 Is. 2d. respec- tively. (3) The extra cost of maintenance, over and above the War Omce estimate of 2s. 6d. per head per day, was only Is. 0.6d., and not JE1 Os. 6d., as mentioned in your report. iou see, your compositor has missed the I "point" (!) in each case. There is one other correction I should like I to make. The G.W.R. Loco. Department have agreed to contribute, in addition to the I ,J65 for moath, the amount of 3E1 -per week—that is, 5s. per ted per week, and not 5s. per bed per month.-i-Yours, etc., 19th August, 1916. EDGAR W. LEWIS. I l&th August, 1916.

FOOD ANDCOAL PRICESI

FOOD AND 'COAL PRICES. I To the 'Editor. I Sir,—I agree with Mr. Payne that some- thing should be done to stop the exploitation of food stuffs that is going on in our midst. But Mr. Payne tells us that we miners are to blame, and, furthermore, that we are con- tented ourselves as long as we get an in- crease of wages. Granting that this charge does not altogether lack foundation, our fellow-workers in other grades—railwaymen and transport workers, for instance—must share the responsibility with us. They, too, are guilty, if we are, in this matter. Both these bodies applied for War Bonus, and got it, and the Government had to give the em- ployers the right to Increase the rates to the general public, which, of course, has had the effect of increasing the burdens and hard- ships of the community generally. I wonder whether my fellow-workers have noticed that, whenever we are successful in obtaining an in- crease in wages, the purchasing value of our sovereign is decreased, sometimes by more than the amount of our increase? Many a syndicate and trust is anxiously awaiting the Award of Judge Pickford regarding our demand for a 12! per ce.nt. increase of wages; and should we be successful they will not be long before finding some excuse to increase the price of some essential commodity of life. Most of us have realised before now the neces- sity of taking action, not merely as miners, but as general citizens. I would urge all my fellow workers to attend our lodge meetings and demand that the executive of our triple alliance not merely hold meetings in our dif- ferent areas, but lay down a policy to safe- guard the prices of food, etc., by compelling the Government not only to provide a sur- veyor of Income taxes in our district, but a surveyor of prices of food, regulated from time to time, not by any powerful syndicate, but by representatives of the community. The dependents of many of our gallant com- rades are dreading the coming winter, with the inflated prices of food and coal. So let us up and be doing.—Yours, etc., ONE OF THE RANK AND FILE. I

Advertising

Puritan Pictures No. 4. ? M ?""—————'———————————"? ?? r7???

IKENFIGHILL

KENFIGHILL. DEATH OF AN OLD KENFIG HILL MAN.—A former resident of Kenfig HiU in the person of Mr. W. J. Marks, late post- master of Aberfan, passed away on Tuesday, the 8th inst., the interment taking plaoo on the following Friday at Aberfan Cemetery. Among the mourners were Mr. Marks, Kenng Hill (father of deceased) Mr. Jeffries (fatlilar- in-!aw); Messrs John, Thomas, Morgan, and Tudor Marks (brothers); Mr. D. J. Jeffries (brother-in-law), Mr. Howells, Kenfig Hill; and others. Among the writers of the numer- ous letters of sympathy and condolence re- ceived were Mr. and Mrs. Williams, Kenfig Hill; Mr. and Mrs. Davies, Kenng Hill; Mr. and Mrs. Jenkins, Gilfach Goch; Mr.-And-Mrs. 1. Da-vies, Kenfig Hill; and the R.A.O.B., Windsor Lodge. Deceased was a native of Kenfig Hill, where as a young man he was employed, as a clerk in a neighbouring iron- works. He migrated to Aberfan in 1893, and his lamented death has occurred, in his 41st year.

BLAENGARWSOLDER MtSStNG

BLAENGARW"SOLD)ER MtSStNG? Mrs. E. Williams, Marian Street, Hlaen. garw, is in fear that her son, Pte. Thomas Williams, Signal Section, 9th Battalion R.W. Fusiliers, is "missing," as she has not hear

PORTHCAWL I

PORTHCAWL. I DEATH AND INQI KST.—A verdict cf '-Death from natural %i-.is returned nt an on Saturday en. W. F.ees, or Apoth&cary Cottage, Porthc-aw!. The (:f>C2:d, who in his 8-')t.h y<-ar. worked as a ccaltnmm-er at the POI.thc; iY Dock from the time it wa& opened until the dav it was closed. NATIONAL ELSTEDDFOD FOR PORTH- CAWLS—We understand that Porthcawl's ambition to get the National Eisteddfod of 1918 is quite seri.ous. Pcrthcawl means busi- ness. Already numbers of people have seen the chairman of the council (Mr. T. James) in connection with the matter, and have urged upon him to call a town's meeting at an early date. He has also been offered -tlf.)O towards a guarantee fund. Illl probability a mtd- ing of the townspeople will be called early in September to discuss the project. NATIONAL EGG ed meeting in promotion of the national egg collection for wounded soldiers, presided over by }Ir. T. James, was held at the Council Chamber, Porthcawl, on Monday evening, when Mr. Bolwell, the chief organiser of the society, delivered an -Addrem. Porthcawl was divided into areas and workers allocated to each, and it was resolved to Invite the Lady Mayoress of Cardiff to Porthcawl for the nas, day on Wednesday. Col. Herbert Lewis, who was present with Mrs. Lewis, the comuianda.nt of the Rest, promised that the wounded men at the Rest should help on Wednesday, and heartily supported the society.

TONDU AND ABERKENFIG I

TONDU AND ABERKENFIG. I RED CROSS FETE.—The AberkenRg and District Chamber of Trade is again to be con- gratulated on doing something for a good cause—in this case, for the Coytrahen Park Red Cross Hospital. On Thursday last week, through the generosity of Mr. Freeman, the well-known amusement caterer, the Chamber (through their secretary, Mr. Anthony, Lion Hotel), had the free use of his roundabouts for the evening, and the public are to be com- plimented for the way they patronised the show at thp Fairground. The arrangements were entirely in the hands of Mr. Anthony, who was assisted by the Red Cross nurses and a good band of workers, with the gratifying result that the handsome sum of dE26 6s. 6d. was taken. This will be handed over to the Coytrahen Park Hospital, without any deduc- tions whatsoever. The wounded soldiers from the hospital attended, and had reveral rides, and seemed thoroughly to enjoy themselves. DOING HIS BIT." —In this gigantic struggle for freedom, one of our Tondu boys has ngured prominently, and as the saying goes, "done his bit excellently." Private George Dove, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Doye, Oak Villa, Tondu, and a brother of Mrs. Lewis ThBmas, Cefn Cribbwr, was In India with his regiment, the South Wales Borderers when war broke out. He had just completed his nrst term of service, but like majiy others his services were retained, and Ii3 took a very active part in the campaign in the Far East. he.Iping our Allies, the Japan- ese, to wrench from German hands those so- called impregnable fortresses, which the f enemy had established in the China Seas. ? Afterwards his battalioji was ordered home, and subsequently to the Dardanelles, where Private Doye was one of the nrst to land and one of the last to leave, being one of the men selected to form the re.ar-gua.rd of his division. Needless to say Private Dove has had many miraculous escapes, and experienced a rather rough time. Returning to England, 11e was again ordered to France, where he was wounded In the right shoulder. He is now at Hayling Island Hospital, and it is gratifying to leam that he is making good progress to- wards recovery. —————

NANTYMOEL I

NANTYMOEL I OBITUARY.—The death took place on Tuesday last week, after a brief illness, of Mr. Domenico Lusurdi, the proprietor of the Italian Refreshment Rooms, at Ogwy Street and Commercial Street, Nantymoel. De- ceased, who was only 34 years of age, had resided in the town for many years, where he was held In high esteem by the inhabitants. He was of a very amiable disposition, and was always ready to give a helping hand to any deserving cause, and many local charities and societies for the inauguration of sports, etc., will keenly feel his loss. The funeral, which took place on Friday, was a large and repre- sentative one, all classes of the local com- munity being strongly represented. The body was conveyed to Bridgend by the 3.35 p.m. train from Nantymoel, and was in- terred In the Roman Catholic portion of the Bridgend Cemetery. The comn (of solid oak, with massive silver nttings) was covered with beautiful floral tribues from a large number of friends and many different organisations, as follows:—Ogmore Valley Horse Show So- ciety Messrs. Murrazzi and Co.; Messrs. Strinati, Llanelly; Messrs. Vitoneto and Co., Swansea; the Italian Trade Protection Asso- ciation of South Wales and Monmouthshire; Messrs. Franchi Bros., Bridgend; Messrs. Belli Bros., Maesteg; Messrs. Rabaisth, Gil- fach; Marrini Caraew, Maesteg; Berni Bros., Neath; Mr. Caleagni, Ogmore Vale; Mr. Ringozi, Pontardawe; laso from the Nanty- moel Workmen's Club and Institute, and the Nantymoel and Pricetown Musical In- stitute. In addition to the floral tri- butes sent by deceased's countrymen, a not- able feature was the attendance of representa- tives from all their branches in South Wales and Monmouth. The omclating minister was "the Rev. Father of the Roman Catholic Church, Bridgend, who conducted a service at the house, and performed the customary rites < at the graveside. Deceased leaves a widow and four children, the oldest son being In Italy. Much sympathy is felt with the grief- stricken widow and family.

Advertising

Advertiae in the "Glamorgan Gazette." If you wamt to seH, buy or exchange; you cannot do better. LONDON HOLLSE S A L -F -4 LAST TWO DAYS! ? SALE FINISHES TO-MORROW (SATURDAY) FINAL REBUCTIONS IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. flU GfiES & SOS, Bcidgend.

KENFIG HILL SOLDIER MISSING

KENFIG HILL SOLDIER MISSING. SERGT. TOM EDWARDS. The many friends of Sergt. Tom Edwards, Kenfig Hill, of the Lancashire Fusiliers, will be pained to learn that he has been omcially classed as "lissing" since July 8th. Sergt. Edwards was in charge of a bombing party in a night attack. The party had reached the second line of German trenches, when he" was missed, and though instant search was made for him, the party had to return without him.. Sergt. Tom Edwards, Kenfig Hill. Sergt. Edwards, who stood a good 6ft. in his socks, was very popular in Kenfig Hill, where he worked as a colticr, and hej)roved to be no less popular as a soldier. That this was fully recognised by his superior omcers is shown by the fact that an exception was made in his case to the rule that when a man is promoted sergeant he must be transferred to another platoon. He was allowed to re- main among his old pals, and when he was missed attempt after attempt was made to find him and bring him in, notably by Sapper G. Harris, an Aberkeniig boy, until the omcers stopped it as being too dangerous. Letters of condolence and sympathy have been received by his wife from the omcers of the company, from the sergeants' mess, and from all the Kenng Hill boys who were in his platoon. The following is from a letter from Sergt. Bevan:—" I saw him just before we made the attack, but all I can tell you is that he is missing. It is just possible he may have been wounded and taken to hospital, but I have not heard anything. I cannot -sumciently praise your husband. He was a fine chum, and a good soldier, and was'well- liked by all in his company—omcers, N.C.O.'s and men."

AN OVER PRODUCTION OF POISON

AN OVER PRODUCTION OF POISON SonM people produce urn-acid twice as fast as others, and an overload of Jhis poison is a serious thing for anyone. It comes in diner- ent ways, but the most productive causes are over-exertion and eating too much, particu- larly of meat. Some allowance should be made to those suffering from uric-acid complaints, for they c&n't haJp being nervous, moro&e, cross, aus-j pkions, headachy, dizzy, &t times, and racked' with all sorts of queer pains The rheumatic sufferer knows what real pain is like, and it is no wonder be grows old too fast-and sooner or later develops heart trou- ble, sciatica, gravel, dropsy, or hardening of the arteries. The sensible thing to do is to take warning at the nrst sign that uric-ac.d is developing- eat less meat, and not too much of an3i food. Drink plenty of both milk and water. Take regular exercise, and get eight hours sleep Seven nights .a week. Use Dean's Backache Kidney Pilla to repair the weakened kidneys and help them niter uric-acid from the blood. You can't be really well while an excess of this poison remains in the system. There is scarcely a man or woman in Bridgend who has not a good word for Doan's Backache Kidney Pills, the special kidney medicine that does not claim to cure every- thing. 4 All dealers, or 2s. 9d. a box,from Fos- ter McClel'an, Co., 8, T7eUs Street, Oxford Street, London, W.

WAR PENSIONS I

WAR PENSIONS. I CALL FOR GOVERNMENT ACTION AT KENFtG HILL. At a large and enthusiastic meeting re- cently held in the Talbot Institute, Kenfig Hill, the following resolution, ably proposed by Mr. E. Harris( dentist, KecRg Hill), ,and seconded by Mr. George Willey (chairman of the Aberbaiden Colliery), was unanimously passed We, the undersigned sincerely urge upon the attention of His Majesty's Gov- ernment the vital and immediate necessity of making proper and sumcient provision by way of special legislation for our wounded and invalided soldiers, their widows and children, so that it may be of permanent and substantial benefit to them when the enthusiasm now expressed in a I voluntary way will have disappeared. We beg and pray that no effort will be spared to further the Interests of those who have stood between us and social annihilation. We fully recognise the immense responsi- bilities of our leaders at the present time, but we believe that this matter, being of paramount importance, is deserving of very careful consideration, and that a measure with this object as its basis would be en- thusiastically acclaimed by all political parties. We. earnestly appeal to the Government to give this great problem Its deepest consideration." This resolution has been since forwarded to Mr. Hugh Edwards, M.P., and to the Labour Members of Parliament, also to the various chapels and churches of the district, to the Soldiers and Sailors' Families' Association, and to the Miners' Federation, who are urged to take the matter up with a view to laying it before the Amalgamated Society of Trade Unions.

PONTYCYMMER SOLDtER TAKENj PRSONER

PONTYCYMMER SOLDtER TAKEN j PR!SONER. Mrs. Sarah Humphries, 23 Bridgend Road, Pontycymmer, has received a letter from Lieut. R. Mark Bell, omcer commanding A Company, 10th King's Royal Rifle Corps, stating with regret that her husband, Rine- man Thomas Humphries, who was under his command, was taken prisoner whilst on patrol. He also states that he is quite con- fident that Rifleman Humphries is unhurt. He had been 16 months in France, and had volunteered as a bomb-thrower. His brothers, Private WilHam Humphries, 5th Welsh, is now in Egypt, and Corporal Rich- ard Humphries, 9th Welsh, is now at Cardiif, and quite convalescent after having been wounded in the battle of Loos. He is new attached to the 5th Welsh, and is expected to again leave for the front at an early date. I, The three soldiers mentioned are sons of Mr. and Mrs. Humphries, 3 Railway Terrace, I Pontycymmer.

ITHE CAPTURE OF MAMETZ WOODS

I THE CAPTURE OF MAMETZ WOODS. ) 'Twas a glorious July morning, And one I shall never forget, When, with but a few hours' warning, We were told the wood to get. That night we slept out In the open, ?, Our thoughts went to those at home: To mothers and fathers and brothers, And loved ones f&r ever the foam. At daybreak jthat beautiful morning Our troops advanced to the fray, Just as the light was dawning- The light of another day. We charged the wood like madmen; My God! what a charge we made; The observers who watched behind us Said 'twas better than on parade. There was many a Garw boy felt that morn, With never a thought of fear. It never seemed to cross their minds That for them the end was near. There are plenty of names I could mention, But one I shall always revere, And that's brave Captain Lawrence, The tried old Fusilier. You have heard of the deeds of others- Deeds that have never been hid, But why so very little of what The Welsh Division did? —Pte. SYDNEY HATHERELL, ¡ (The well-known Garw Footballer), I Lower Church St., Pontycymmer:

SOLDIERS DEPENDENTS I

SOLDIERS' DEPENDENTS. I To the Editor.. I Sir.—Re Mr. Paync's letter, I am glad to see someone has a little thought for the sol- ,diers' vd ependents. Is It not time something was done for them, with the winter approach- ing and coal at its highest, and Hie cost of living getting steadily higher? Everyone knows what their separafon allowance is; is it fair that those who sacrifice most are the worst paid, or that the soldier on his return is to be faced with debt? For my own part, I thinik the strain of having the bread-winners In the danger zone is quite enough without nnancial worries.—Yours, etc., A SOLDIERS WIFE.