Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
10 articles on this page
PORTHCAWL AND THE EISTEDnFOD

PORTHCAWL AND THE EISTEDnFOD NOTES BY BRIDGENDER." Porthcawl has (doubtless) all the virtues un- der the sun-but one. Not even her worst enemies could call her exactly modest. In fact, if she wants a taking title for herself- an alliterative affix, shall we say, after the approved fashion of Breezy Brighton, Sunny Southport, 'Appy 'Amstead, and so on, there wii. be small difficulty in suiting her ladyship. Obviously, the only name for her would lH, Pushful Porthcawl. Ill Well pu.shfulne.ss is a great quality and a valuable, as the late Mr. Joseph Chamberlain proved. If the gods reward Porthcawl's push- fulness, as they ought, that go-a-head town cannot fail t-o get-what she has set her heart on—the 1918 Eisteddfod. Well, well, we are not jealous—no, not even though we have sneaking belief that Bridgend is a far, far better centre, etc., etc. I I 1 As we say, we are not jealous. Porthcawl wants the. eiateddfod. And as (evidently) she won't be happy till she gets it, why, let her get it by all means-if she egn., Perhaps the grapes are sour, as far as we are con- cerned. At any rate we can afford fo smile at pitying smile as we look on at our neigh- bour's frenzied efforts to win and wear her prize. Til By the way, Porthcawl's recent exploits in the publicity line show that she does not mean to emulate the example of Kipling's "General Bobs,"—at least in one respect. You will re- member the poet says of Lord Roberts that Oh, he's little but he's wise, He's a terror for his size, And he doesn't advertize. Do 'yer, Bobs ? Ill True, Porthcawl is certainly a terror for its size. That is a fact that 'nobody can deny.' It is also a fact that Porthcawl is little (compara- tively) and wise (without any comparison at all). But here her resemblance to the late honoured Field Marshall stops. She not only does advertize, but she means to advertize more and more. Ill Well, she is welcome to do so for us. (Few newspapers, it will be noticed, are against ad- vertising "per se,") We will even help her with an idea or two—as everybody knows, all newspapers have ideas to give away. Ill For example, why not poetical puffs- 'vertiaements in vivid verse? The method though not absolutely novel, would have the advantage of freshness, and that is half the battle of advertising. Ill See how well it would sound. For example- Fill the can and fill the cup, Porthcawl, sir, is going up; Fill the cup anp fill the can, Porthcawl's only just began. lit The grammar of the la#t Jine is H bit rocky, we admit, but what of that? What's a poet if he can't take a liberty with grammar now and then? Here goes for another try, in a different vein this time—'Ercles vein, shall we say?:— Smell'st thou the stinging brine from far; Hear'st thou the ocean's call? Come with your little ones, Ma and Pa, Come and invade Porlhcawl t 111 If neither of these choice specimens of the puff poetic be thought suitable—and we ad- mit they may not suit all tastes—what about the fallowing ?— Come where the undertaker starves, And the doctor pines for bread; Where you regularly feel Like a jolly conger-eel, And you want to stand on your head.

PORTHCAWLS BID FOR NATIONAL EISTEDDFOD 1918

PORTHCAWL'S BID FOR NATIONAL EISTEDDFOD, 1918. The Bridgend justices have passed a resolu- tion in support of Porthcawl's claim to the 1918 National Eisteddfod. An admirer of Porthcawl has sent JE5 to the guarantee fund from "somewhere in France."

THE INCREASED COST OF LIVING

THE INCREASED COST OF LIVING. At a time when the increased cost of living is a matter of national importance, every housewife will welcome the announcement made in our pages to-day by Messrs Christr. Thomas and Bros., Ltd., reducing the price of the famous Puritan Olive Oil Soap by one halfpenny per pound. We invite the attention of all our readers to this important announcement which means an immediate and considerable saving in every housewife's household budget.

BETTWS

BETTWS. BAPTISM.—At the Sardis Baptist Chapel, Bettws, on Sunday night last there wdre seven candidates for membership baptised by immer- sion by Rev. John Jenkins, pastor. PRESENTATION.—A presentation meet- ing was held on Saturday evening last by the Bettws branch of the Bristol and West of England Society, when Councillor George Cadwgan, Pontycymmer, was present to hand over to Bro. Thomas Bailey a framed address, presented by the General Council, for valu- able service rendered for a period of nine years as treasurer to the branch. Bro. David Lewis (secretary of the branch) followed with a speech, and gave a good account of the man- ner in which Bro. Bailey had kept his books and accounts during the whole time of his office.-Bro. Joel Griffiths, senr., presented Bro. Bailey, on behalf of the members of the branch, with a silver-mounted ebony walking- stick suitably inscribed.—Bros. E. Riggs and W. Evans also spoke of the good work done by Bro. Bailey.—Bro. T. Bailey having re- tained thanks for the gifts, a hearty vote of thanks to Bro. Geo. Cadwgan for his presence brought an enjoyable evening to a close.

Advertising

     ????? cost of 18 8 d \¡ /? living, I t IfP^PURITAN ? JL ?Jt?JL JLjHLJL? II j_? the oUve ?11 SOAP I i is now reduced in price by one half- II i1j|l|1j1lr => penny per pound. 1 ''

PENYBONT RURAL DISTRICT COUNCILI

PENYBONT RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL. I SKER FARM FIELD PATH. I APPOINTMENT OF LADY HEALTH VISITOR. Apart from the more ordinary business of the day-including the important ask of de- ciding on the general district rate for the en- suing half-year—the Penybont RID. Council once more discussed the Sker Farm footpath question at length. The Council is entirely unanimous in its view on this (to the inhabi- tants of the particular district) important matter, and the members feel very warmly about it, and are bent, if possible, on saving the path-and consequently access to the fore- shore—for the Margam public. The Council also discussed a number of mat- ters which, if somewhat academic ar the pre- sent time, were nevertheless of importance and interest. Among these were resolutions in favour of a general adoption in this county of the Decimal system, and the institution of a Faculty of agriculture in the University of Wales; and a motion supporting the applica- tion by Porthcawl for the 1918 National Eis- teddfod. Mr. William Evans was in the chair, and there were also present: Colonel J. I. D. Nicholl, Messrs. G: Jeanes, Rees John, T. Woods, D. H. Price, J. Jones, T. Butler, T. Morgan, W. A. Howell, T. Davies, J. T. Sala- thiel, W. B. Loveluck, Edward Morgan, T. Prescott, and Rev. T. P. Bevan. I THE DISTRICT RATE. I The first business of the Council was to consider the estimate of the Finance Commit- tee for the general district rate for the ensu- ing half-year. On the motion of Mr. D. H. Price, seconded by Mr. Rees John, the com- mittee's recommendation was approved, which means that the rate will continue at 9d., as against lOd. for the corresponding period of last year. The question was again before the Council of a refuse nuisance in a private road at Aber- kenfig belonging to a Mr. Jones. It was re- ported that the nuisanoe was unabated, and the question now, as before, was, was it the Council's business to undertake the abating of it, or ought they to compel Mr. Jones to do so ? The nuisanoe, which consists in the tip- ping of household refuse, is committed by Mr. Jones's tenants, and it was contended by some members that it was "up to" Mr. Jones to stop them; he being responsible to the Council for his own property. As Mr. W. A. Howell put it, "the owner is the guardian of his own property." This was the attitude taken up by Colonel Nicholl and Mr. Howell. Mr. Prescott, on the other hand, took the view—in which he was supported by other members—that the Council itself ought to re- move the rubbish, Mr. Jones being personally in no way responsible for the nuisance, etc. He moved that a committee be appointed to go and inspect the spot and report.—On the question being put to a vote, the Council was equally divided, whereupon the Chairman, amid laughter and cheers, gave his casting- vote for the coercionists. SKER FARM FOOTPATH. I There were two communications before the Council referring to the vexed question of the "Sker Farm Footpath." The first was a Jetter from the Pyle Parish Council urging the Penybont Council to "do their utmost to keep open the three footpaths leading to Sker Beach and the Porthcawl Golflinks. The other was from Mr. Godfrey Lipscomb setting forth the other point of view. After ventur- ing the opinion that the Council was "under a complete misapprehension of the facts," the letter went on: "The late tenant of Sker Farm allowed people on payment to camp on ground in his occupation, and allowed them certain facilities with regard to obta:ning water. The present tenant desires to perpetuate neither of these facilities because they destroy his privacy. Mr. Morgan, the late tenant, told me that as he paid water rates and obtained no corresponding facilities he thought he was quite entitled to ask the District Council to bring the water from the well on his farm,. to, the house. It cannot possibly be suggested that your Council having done this gives them any ground for claiming that the tap in Mr. Donne's yard is a public one. With regard to the well from which this water is taken, this is inside a private field, and not on the line of any footpath. There is a path runn- ing on the other side of the wall, which is occasionally used by the public, and I do not think there would be any objection to a pump being fixed outside the field to this well for the use of the public, providing the privilege j were not abused. These two letters having been read, Mr. T. Woods, on behalf of the sub-committee appointed to investigate the matter on the spot, rose to make a statement. He ex- plained that there were three paths in dis- pute, namely, (1) the path from Penymynydd Common to the gate leading to the field called Cae Newydd, through the rickyard to the well; (2), the path leading from Waunymer to the Beach; (3), the path from Pare Newydd leading diagonally across the field in the direction of the Rest. All these, said Mr. Woods, had been now closed to the public, but the sub-committee, having interviewed many of the old people of the district and others, were thoroughly convinced that this was an illegal act, and that the paths were public. Many of the old people declared that they had used them without let or hindrance all their lives. One old man of eighty said he had used them for 63 years. Another had travelled along them. unmolested. and unchal- lenged for 60 years. The paths led to one of the finest spots to be found anywhere on the coasts thereabouts. "And I think, and the committee thinks," said Mr. Woods, "that it will be a great shame if the Council allows them to be closed after being used by the public all those years." He moved that a committee be appointed to deal with the matter and see the place for themselves, and talk to the ol inhabitants, and get informa- tion from them. Mr. J. Jones seconded. The Chairman suggested that the local members would be the most suitable for suph a committee. Mr. Woods: No. The local members know all this. We want some of the other members to come and see for themselves. Mr. W. A. Howells agreed that the composi- tion of most of the Council's committees was on wrong lines. As regards these paths. it seemed a great pity that so picturesque and historical a spot should be lost to the public. A committee was then appointed, consisting of five members of the Council in addition to I local members, and a day of meeting fixed. HEALTH VISITOR. I Early on in the sitting the Council, addressed itself, with that modesty which is one of its most charming characteristics, to the delicate business of interviewing the two ladles, selected out of the dozen or so of appli- cants, for the post of health visitor. These, as it turned out, were both young, and of distinctly attractive appearance, and both wem, as a member put it, "good candidates" from the qualification point of view. But J the bulk of the opinion of the Council was unhesitatingly for Miss Elizabeth Jones (Fair- lawn, Coity Road, Bridgend). Miss Jones had had much the longer and better training as hospital nurse, and as Mr. Howell put it, hospital training was a must be the basis of all the rest. Miss Jones was accordingly appointed. On the motion of Mr. W. A. Howell, the Council voted an honorarium to Mr. J. Simon Davies, in the shape of an increase of salary of JE5 for the year, for the disagreeable and wholly uncontemplated work he had per- 1 formed of superintending the removal and burial of no fewer that 18 carcases of horses. I INSPECTORS' REPORTS. I Mr. E. W. Davies, Sanitary Inspector, No. 1 District, presented his report. There had been 29 cases of infectious disease notified during the month, including cases of diph- theria, scarlet fever, measles, and tuberculosis. Of the 29 cases, no fewer than 23 were of measles, the patients being children between the ages of one and six. Colonel Nichol: Are the majority of these measles cases due to defective drains ? Mr. Davies: Yes, undoubtedly. Continuing, Mr. Davies said the water sup- plies of the district had been constant during the month, but all the sources were very low. In regard to certain necessary work at one of the reservoirs, he anticipated having to pay 8d. an hour for labour. Questioned by Mr. D. H. Price as to the shortage of water at Cefn Cribbwr and Cwm Kenfig, Mr. Davies repeated that the sources were undoubtedly very low. Mr. Price: I was told that the pipes had been choked at Cefn Cribbwr. They were practically without water for nine day. Mr. Davies: It was entirely due to the low state of the springs, certain springs, that is, not all. Questioned by Mr. Woods as to the sewer- age scheme at Coraclly, MT. Davies said that he had had an interview with the proprietor of the quarry that it was propose d to use; also with several other occupiers of land in the neighbourhood, and they all took the same view—they objected to the drain being carried to the quarry. In fact the proprietor had flatly refused to allow it. Col. Nichol: Then he is a very short sighted man. He does not object to the open drain being near his house, but does object to the sewage being taken right away out of sight to a field, and allowed to percolate into the ground. Mr. Woods said that something ought to be done. The stench was really awful. Mr. J. T. Salathiel thought that the com- mittee in charge of this matter should see these people and point out that they are not dealing fairly with their neighbours. After discussion, Mr. Salathiel's suggestion was adopted, and a committee appointed to interview Mrs. Bowen, the owner of the land. MT. Davies reported that according to in- structions he had filled up the Local Govern- ment Board form showing what public works the Council had in contemplation. These in- cluded a 500,000 gallon service reservoir at Cefn Carfan, estimated cost, £ 1,800; addit- ional sources of water supply at Cefn Carfan, estimated cost, 2650; Newcastle Higher and Penyfai Sewerage Scheme, 9,1000; Pyle and Tythegston Higher, 500,000 gallon supply ser- vice reservoir, £ 1,800; private street works, £1,500, etc. To which was added, on Mr. Thos. Davies' suggestion, a public slaughter- house for Aberkenfig. The list was approved by the Council, and authority given for it to be dispatched to the Local Government Board. As regards Mr. J. Simon Davies' report for No. 2 district, which followed, the only out- standing feature of public interest was the pleasing announcement that there had been no notification of infectious disease during the month-an announcement which the Council reoeived with hearty "hear, hears." A letter was read from the the Ynysawdra Parish Council drawing attention to the dan- gerous state of Bryn Road. Horses, the Council averred, could not keep their feet on the slippery surface, and a meeting of horse owners had been held to protest. The Surveyor (Mr. Ernest Jenkins) ad- mitted that the surface of the roads were a little more slippery this year after tar-spray- ing, as certain chemicals had been take out of the tar. THE DECIMAL SYSTEM. As stated, the Council had before it one or two questions of a more or less academical character. The first of these ws a communi- cation from the Decimal Association, London, soliciting the Council's sympathy and support for the movement to establish the Decimal System in this country. "The present time," said the circular, which accompanied the leaflet setting forth the Association's aims and objects, "seems to be peculiarly suitable for putting forth special efforts in support of our claims. Con- suls abroad continue to reiterate that much of our trade is lost to this country through unwillingness to adapt ourselves to the re- quirements of our customers." The circular went on to enumerate the many advantages likely to accrue from the adoption of the deci- mal system, not least of which would be the "immense saving in booking-keeping and clerical power," and "the saving of time and brain-fag to children in schools." The subject, perhaps, was a triflle out of the Council's depth. At anyrate there was no rush to#'catch the speaker's eye." Mr. D. II. Price at length rose somewhaf diffidently to support the suggestion of the circular— that the Council should pass a resolution in favour, and send it up to the proper quarter. He felt it was a really important question. By the adoption of the decimal system children's schooling would be shortened, and it would undoubtedly enable us to extend our trade with foreign countries. Mr. Rees John, who seconded, said it would certainly simplify matters. Mr. Thomas Davies thought that we got on very well on the old system. Col. Nichol, while in full sympathy with the motion, felt that it was a counsel of per- fection. It would be a tremendously difficult thing to put into operation. We should have to alter our standards and measurements— our barrels, glasses, measurements of all kinds. They would never get a farmer, for instance, to get these new ideas into his head. An acre he knew, as his father had known it be- before him. "So much an Acre," —that was a proposition he was familiar with, and could understand. But if you began to talk of kilo- metres 1 On the question being put to the vote, the "Noes" were declared to have it, and Mr. Price's motion was therefore negatived. AGRICULTURE AND FORESTRY. I The other matter of a similar nature con- sidered by the Council was a communication I f,rom the Wrexham Urban District Council, soliciting support for a resolution of which the following is the giBt :HaTing regard to the present inadequate product,of the soil in Wales, the exceptional importance of the in- terests in live stock of the principality; the large proportion of afforestable land existing in Wales, and the grossly insufficient provision for agricultural education and research allo- cated to the principality, we strongly urge the establishment in the University of Wales of the following facilities, adequately endowed and equipped." (The three facilities were those of agricul- ture, veterinary science, and forestry). Mr. D. H. Price, again gallantly stepping into a breach which his eolleaguee were none too eager to venture on, said he agreed with the resolution. We in this country did not grow nearly as much food as we ought. Mr. W. A. Howelk Yes. We all admit that, and there is no doubt that science will will har eto be brought to bear on the matter. Col. Nichol laid stress, so far as WaJes was concerned, on the need of forestry.

Advertising

PIANOS! PIANOS! PIANOS! MS^B All British Made Best Value in the World An immense Variety to Select from. CASH or EASY TERMS. NBtHNBBBSSSS'Et Z A WRITTEN WARRANTY WITH EVERY INSTBUMKNX. We challenge any Firm to Offer Better Value, Terms 01 -Prices.- • «-1j/ WRITE FOR CATALOGUE AND COMPARE OUR STOCK. Thompson & Shackell, (Ltd.), Invite DspectloD ef the Latest Designs by the Leading Britlsb Manufacturers. brinsinead, Broadwoo«i Player Pianos, ffupkiiison, Challen & Son, Collard & Collard, Moore & Moott. Crowley, 4jello, Cramer, &c., &e. Largest 3DIsoazzimto for Cash, Old Instruments taken in exchange.—Sole Agents for the Celebrated Estey Organs. Quotations Given for Pianos and Organs by any Maker i" the Kingder". Tunings and Repairs a Speciality. Repairs of every description. Estimates Free. Music and Small Goods in Great Variety. A THOMPSON and SHACKELL, Ltd. JL. PIANOFORTE MANUFACTURERS & ORGAN BUILDERS' 1, Wyndham Street, 13 111-11 D G IE IN X). WITH BRANCHES THROUGHOUT SOUTH WALES AND MONMOUTHSHIRE V Advertise in the "Glamorgan Gazette." If you want to sell, buy or exchange; you I oannot ho better. I

IPENCOED

PENCOED. THANKSGIVING SERVICES.—On Wed- nesday and Thursday evenings thanksgiving sen-ices were held at St. David's Church, Pen- prisk. The preacher on Wednesday evening was Rev. John Thomas, Tonyrefail, and on Thursday evening (in Welsh), Rev. Twynog Davies, Cardiff. The attendances, especially on Wednesday evening, were large. The church had been decorated as usual by the ladies of the congregation. MISSION OF REPENTANCE.—On Mon- day morning a service was held at St. David's Church, when Rev. Prebendary Burroughs, of Tiverton, was present as the messenger of the Archbishop of Canterbury, in connection with the projected National Mission of Re- pentance and Hope. Those present were privileged to listen to an address of the highest value. For an hour the Prebendary outlined the need for, and the methods of, the Mission. The three national sins (he said) were intem- perance, immorality, and irreligion. The address was one of real force. BRASS BAND COMMITTEE. —The final meeting of the committee entrusted with the special effort on behalf of the Pencoed Brass Band was held at the Public Hall on Monday evening, Mr. W. A. Howell presiding, sup- ported by the secretary, Mr. T. Davies, and the treasurer, Mr. L. V. Evans. It waa an- nounced that the house to house collection in the village (with donations from a wider area), had resulted in the splendid sum of L75 17s. 7d. being available for the purpose of paying off the debt on the instruments. This meant, it was explained, that the instru- ments now became the property of the Pen- coed Band, besides which there would be a balance in hand. The chairman bore testi- mony to the magnificient support of the public and of the good work of the committee. Ten pounds more than was required had come to hand. He referred to the fact that another local effort was run at the same time, and both had been brilliant successes. He sug- gested that the new band committee should endeavour to get new blood into the band, but not to shelve the old. He would also like to see the band in uniform. He believed that the efforts put forth in the village for various objects during the last nine months constituted a record in Glamorganshire. Some record of them ought to be kept, and he sug- gested that the Parish Council was the proper body to carry it out. On the proposition of Mr. T. Williams, seconded by Mr. J. Ed- wards-Evans, it was decided that Mr. Tom Williams, Jack Thomas, and L. Vaughan- Evans be deputed to interview former mem- bers of the band in order to induce them to rejoin. Mr. C. Cole stated that the band would turn out on Saturdays as a token of thanks. The Talygarn and Llanharran bands would also be with them. It was decided to have a banner in the possession with a suit- able inscription of thanks to all who had helped. ♦

ST DONATS

ST. DONATS. DEATH.-We regret to record the death of Mr. John Caniffe, which took place at, St. Donats on Friday last. The deceased, who was a native of London, came to the Vale as a. scaffolder when the Vale of Glamorgan Rail- way was being made. An advanced Labour, thinker, Mr. John Ward, M.P. (now Lieut.- Colonel J. Ward), the then secretary of the Navvies' Union, recognising his ability, ap- pointed him local secretary to the Vale branch of the Navvies' Union, and Mr. Caniffe was very energetic in all matters that arose be- tween Messrs. Pethick and their men. He took an active part in the Board of Trade inquiry held after the disaster to the Aber- thaw River Bridge, and in several compensa- tion cases that arose during the construction of the railway.—The funeral took place at St. Donats Church on Sunday, the Vicar (Rev. —. Jones) officiating. The chief mourner was the widow (Mrs. Caniffe), for whom much sympathy is felt. The coffin, of polished wood with brass furniture, bore on the breast- plate the inscription:—" John Caniffe; died September 22nd, 1916; aged 65 years."

Advertising

ADVICE F.REE-mrs. Stewart, Herbal Specialist, 9 "nes Strwb, BrigoboL