Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 3 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
11 articles on this page
Advertising

BEAN b ci F BEVAN & COMPANY, Ltd., Wales' Largest Furnishers And Pianoforte Merchants, CARDIFF, PONTYPRIDD, SWANSEA, &c., &c. A visit to our Show-rooms will show you the kind of Furniture you require-tastefully de- signed, soundly constructed of the best materials, and carefully finished—Furni- ture that will last a lifetime and be a source of pleasure all the time. Our huge stock caters for all tastes and all pockets, and is always open for free inspection. You are cordially invited to pay us a visit, and we shall be pleased to give advice ( and quotations if desired, to help you in furnishing your home in the best, most comfortable, anti at the same time most economical manner. Delivery free 200 miles! # FURNITURE FOR THE MILLION I Commodities of every kind have considerably increased in price, but few things to a greater extent than all kinds of Furniture; in- fact, some Furnishing requisites are practically unobtainable! With the foresight resulting from their Sixty-five years' business career, and in confident anticipation of such advances, BEVAN and COMPANY utilized their great Warehouses in connection with their numer- ous Branches by cramming them with Stock of every description at pre-war prices I The result is that they are now in the happy position of being able to offer these vast Stocks far below to-day's value!

FUNERAL AT NANTYMOELj

FUNERAL AT NANTYMOEL. f- POPULAR PREACHER AND PASTOR. Last week we announced that Rev. John Hughes, Welsh Baptist minister, Saron, Nan- tymoel, had entered into his eternal rest. On Monday last week his funeral took place. There was an exceptionally large number of people present, representative of every class in the community to pay their last tribute of re- spect. Deceased had resided in this neigh- bourhood for the long period of 35 years, lab- ouring with great success. His church, when he took charge of it at the first, was only 90 in membership, whereas to-day it has close upon 250. The rev. gentleman baptised 412 at Saron during his ministry, and worked assiduously with the children and young people. His pulpit ministrations were al- ways effective and acceptable, and his ser- vices were in great demand for anniversary gatherings. He was richly endowed with the preaching gifts, his discourses were always Scriptural, his own spirit well saturated with spirituality, and his melodious voice, which was always kept under command, did good justice to the peroration generally known as the Welsh "hwyl." He had a rich human nature, full of geniality, and adorned with strong common sense. He was a strong moral force in the neighbourhood, always on the side of the right, the pure, and the good. He will be sadly missed by all. He had many of the honours of his denomination, and he ac- quitted himself well under every trust reposed in him. His church thought highly of him, and really loved him, and acted honourably towards him. When it was found that his health was failing, they voluntarily ap- proached him to ask him to take a long rest. They acted in all tenderness in his long ill- ness, and they have seen to it that he should have a burial in every way becoming and worthy. The deacons of the church acted as bearers. The burial service was under the guidance"of Revs. W. Paron Griffiths, Black- mill, «nd Goronwy Lewis, Ogmore Vale. The service in the house was conducted by Revs. Edward Parry, Aberdulais, and H. Hughes, Briton Ferry. A public memorial service was held at Saron Chapel, the spacious building being filled with sympathisers. The intro- ductory devotions were taken by Revs. — Williams, Kenfig Hill, and Thomas, Cwm- park. Then Rev. W. Paran Griffiths, Black- mill, called attention to the scores of letters received conveying sympathy with the family and the cAurch, and regretting inability to be present at the funeral. Letters from the following were read :-Revs. E. T.. Jones, Llanelly; Charles Davies, Cardiff; and Mr. J. Hinds, M.P., London. Then the following' gentlemen delivered short and appropriate addresses :-Rev. R. Johns, Tondu; Rev. Richards, Llantwit Vardre; Mr. Thomas Hughes, Cwmbwrla; Rev. M. J. Mills, Nanty- moel; Rev. Iorwerth Jones, Maesteg; Mr. Shem Davies and Councillor E. Griffiths, Nan- tymoel. Rev. D. C. Jones, Penygraig, closed with prayer. The short service at the grave- side was conducted by Revs. J. Griffiths, Aberdare, and W. Saunders, Pontycymmer. Among the mourners were the following:— Mrs. Hughes (widow); Messrs. R. 0. Hughes, L. J. Hughes, and W. O. Hughes (sons); Miss Creselda Hughes (daughter); Mrs. Roberts, Anglesey (sister); Mrs. Thomas, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Owen, Mr. and Mrs. David Harries, Mr. and Mrs. John Jones, and Mr. and Miss Mason, Ystrad (nieces and nephews); Mr. and Mrs. John Hughes, Liverpool (cousins). The following Baptist ministers were pre- sent:—Revs. Hugh Jones, Llanelly; D. C. Jones, Penygraig; T. T. Jones, Clydach Vale; I. Griffiths, Aberdare; D. H. Harries, Porth- cawl Uevs. Edward Parry, Aberdylais; H. Hughes, Briton Ferry; W. S. Jones, Llwyn- pia; R. L. Morris, Cwmavon; E. Edmunds, Swansea; Iorwerth Jones, Maesteg; W. Saun, ders, Pontycymmer; W. Reynolds, Pontycym- mer; T. E. Thomas, Porthcawl; D. Jones, Tonyrefail; Davies, Troedrhiw; Davies, Pencoed; Ben Jones, Maesteg; R. Allen (sen- ior), Maesteg; John Allen (junior), Maesteg; Thomas, Philadelphia, Ogmore Vale; B. V. Davies, Abergwynfi; I. F. Williams, Glyn- corrwg; Williams, Kenfig Hill; Ben James, Tumble; R. Johns, Tondu; G. R. Cole, Tondu; Thomas, Cwmpark; W. Evans (G. and L.), Blaen-Rhondda; Evan Jones, Gelli; Goronwy Lewis, Ogmore Vale; D. J. Davies, Ogmore Vale; Wm. Jones, Ogmore Vale; T. Basset, Maesteg; T. J. Hughes, Caerau; E. J. Samuel, Treorchy; W. D. Lewis, Nebo, Ystrad; — Pritchard, Ferryside; E. King Jones, Bridgend; D. S. Jones, Bridgend; Thos. Davies, Bridgend; Watkins, M.A., Llan- elly; W. Hill, Penfai; Humphreys, Aber- aeron; Richards, Llantwit Vardre; M. W. Mollin, Nantymoel; I. Griffiths, Black Mill. Ministers present from Nantymoel and other places outside the Baptist denomination included: -Revs. J. R. Pugh, B.A.; E. A. Adams, B.A.; Hirwen Jenkins; J. Glanmor Jenkins; W. J. Bryant; D. J. Williams; R. V T. Gregory; M. J. Mills; — Evans, Gilfach Goch; Hughes, Nebo, Blaengarw; Jones, 1 Bethania, Ogmore Vale; Davies, Ebenezer, Aberkenfig; M. Jenkins, Abercwmboi. The following lay-men were present :-Dr. D. J. Thomas, J.P., Nantymoel; Alderman Llewellyn, J.P., Ogmore Vale; Mr. T. E. Lewis, J.P., Blaengarw; Councillor Jenkin Phillips; Councillor Evan Griffiths; Messrs. Thomas Richards, secretary of the church; John Williams, Bridgend; Thomas Thomas, Bridgend; John Davies, Pontycymmer; Daniel Davies, Pontycymmer David Griffiths, Blaen- garw David Morgan, Bridgend; E. David, Nantymoel; Councillor Job Baker, Nanty- moel; Messrs. J. R. Evans, school master; W. D. Williams, M.E. manager; Herbert Davies, under manager Thomas Hughes, Cwmbwrla (president of the West Glamorgan Baptist Association); Evans (late of Beehive, Nantymoel); and T. J. Job, Llanelly.

PONTYRHYL FARMER SUES BOYS AT BRIDGEND I

PONTYRHYL FARMER SUES BOYS AT BRIDGEND. CASE COLLAPSES FOR WANT OF CORROBORATION. FIELD OR COMMON? The rights of boys to play football and other games on what is claimed to be Common land, at Pontyrhyl, was the outstanding fea- ture in a case tried at Bridgend Police Court on Monday—before Mr. D. H. Lloyd (in the chair) and Dr. E. 0. Parry—and from the lively interest manifested, if the question is carried to a Court with jurisdiction to decide the point, the people of Pontyrhyl will speak with no uncertain voice. The case was one in which Mr. Federick John, farmer, of Ffdwyddog, Pontyrhyl, prosecuted a number of boys-so many that they filled the dock— for malicious damage and injury to certain fences and swedes, on September 25th. The lads were Ivor Thomas (17), Rees Davies (17), David Oates (16), Redvdrs Job (16), Charles Gray (14), Walter Taylor (15), David J. Davies (14), David Davies (14), and Elias Evans (14). Mr. W. M. Thomas conducted the defence. Prosecutor, in evidence, said he had some swedes growing in one of his fields, and on September 25th he saw defendant, Rees Davies, in that particular field, and four of the other defendants on the wall., He knew these four very well, and had warned them all a good many times. Closely examined, wit- ness said: Last year they came into the gar- den and took gooseberries. Mr. Walter Hughes (clerk): That's a long time ago. ( Laughter.) Mr. W. M. Thomas challenged witness to pick out from the dock the four boys to whom he referred. Witness: I am sure of the four I saw on the wall, but I can't pick them out. I have cau- tioned them many times. Mr. W. M. Thomas: Don't you want to clear away all boys off the Common? Witness: I am on the committee, and we have decided that no games shall be played there. Mr. W. M. Thomas: Defendants were play- ing football on the Common?—They were playing on the field. On the Common first of all?-No, sir; I saw them on the. field. You desire they should not go on the Com- mon because they have no right there to play football ?-I say they have no right to play on my ground, what I am paying for. Mr. Thomas persisted: Is it not the whole of the trouble in the case that finding this question of title arise, with which the Court has no jurisdiction, you introduce this allega- tion of trespassing on your land? Mr. John (emphatically): They did trespass on my land. Mr. Thomas: Did you complain to P.C. Headstone about these boys in the field?- Yes. Where is Headstone?—If you like you can have the case adjourned for his attendance. Did you tell Headstone anything about the boys in the swede field on Monday ?—Yes. How many?—Only one. At this juncture a notice was put in which witness said had been "posted through the parish," and Mr. Thomas, on scanning the document, said it had no effect on anybody, and was "only intended to frighten people." Turning to the witness he asked: Because the Parish Council have passed a certain reso- lution, you have endeavoured to fence in Common land, and the fences have been taken down by the Commoners?—No, sir, never. I have not enclosed anything that does not be- long to me. But if anyone walks on the Common you send them off?—No, sir. There is a footway. Mr. W. M. Thomas objected that there was not a tittfeS of evidence except against Rees Davies, and asked that all the other defend- ants should be at once released. The Chairman said they would first of all finish the case. Mr. Thomas then said the issue whether the boys were entitled to play on the Common was a matter for another Court. When prosecu- tor approached he was most abusive, and had a pike in his hand, and he set a dog or dogs on the boys. The question of the right to play on the Common was a question in regard to which only the County Court had jurisdic- tion, and if prosecutor thought he was right, his proper (and only) course was to apply to the County Court for an injunction. Rees Davies (one of the defendants), living at Bryn Cottages, said they played only on the Common, which "Mr. John tries to call his field"; and with other boys he had played on it for years. Witness also denied having been on the wall, and said prosecutor caught Ivor Thomas by the "scruff of the neck." Thomas Thomas (father of Ivor) said prose- cutor made no allegations to the police con- stable about either the swede field or the sitting on the wall. Ivor Thomas was the next witness. He said it was not a fact that they crossed the hedges into John's field, and none of them got on the wall. The Chairman here enquired of John why he had not brought witnesses to substantiate his case. Prosecutor: I don't know much about the law. The Chairman: You know enough to under- stand that if you had witnesses to establish your claim you would have a better chance of success. Addressing the boys the Chairman added: We dismiss the case to-day, and hope you wo.n't worry the man by going into his field. Mr. W. M. Thomas: They are entitled to go on the common, and play to their hearts con- tent, and if Mr. John desires to prevent it he will have to get an injunction.

PONTYCYMMER

PONTYCYMMER. OBITUARY.The funeral of little Emrys Samuel, aged 9 years, son of Mrs. S. Samuel, St. David's Street, Pontycymmer, took place at the Pontycymmer Cemetery on Monday. The decease d child died of diphtheria at the Blackmill -Hospital on Friday last. Thet family are very faithful members of Taber- nacle Church, Pontycymmer. Rev. John Hughes (Nebo), Blaengarw, officiated, in the regretted absence of Rev. David Hughes (pas- tor of Tabernacle), through illness. The. mourners were:—Mrs. S. Samuel (mother), Messrs. Philip, John, William, and Tom Samuel (brothers), and Miss Mary Lizzie Samuel (sister). Another brother, David Samuel, A.B. on H.M.S. Iron Duke, was un-. able to get leave to attend. Also present were:—Messrs. John and Herbert Lewis, Pontnewydd (cousins); Mr. and Mrs. David Samuel, Treharris (cousins); Mr. and Mrs. Jenkins, Abercynon (cousins) Mrs. S. Samuel (aunt); Mrs. B. Samuel (aunt); and Mrs. Williams (cousin), Treharris. Floral tributes were sent by:—Mother, brothers and sister; Miss Bessie Rogers; Sergt. and Mrs. Evans and family; Mr. and Mrs. Thomas, Ponty- | cymmer Hotel; Mr. and Mrs. Drew, and Mr. and Mrs. Evans, Pontycymmer. HARVEST FESTIVAL.—The English Con- gregational Church, Pontycymmer, held its harvest thanksgiving services on Sunday last. The chapel was beautifully. decorated with fruit, vegetables, etc., kindly given by mem- bers of the chapel and friends, and the special illumination by electric light added to the effectiveness of the scene. Services were held in the morning, afternon and evening by the pastor, Rev. D. D. Evans, D.C., and attracted exceptionally large congregations. Also ser- vices of songs were given at which many beau- tiful solos were rendered.. Appropriate hymns were sung under the conductorship of Mr. J. R. Jones, and Miss B. Polmeer (the organist) presided at the organ throughout. The following were responsible for the musical portion of the services:—Miss A. J. Bevan, Miss Lloyd, Miss Lily Ivy King, and Mrs. Robert Price, Messrs. Gwilym Lewis, E. W. Davies, Ben Davies, and W. T. Hengoed. Elocutionists: Misses May Bowen, Ruby Jones, arid Mr. Baden Powell Griffiths. The collections were in aid of the church. On Monday evening, when a large number was present, a sale of the generous gifts took place at the Social Cafe, and realised a large sum of money towards the expenses of the church.

Advertising

STANDARD MEDICINE Is very essential because there are so many different strength and quality Drug products on the market. Thou- sands of people ask for Kernick's Vegetable Pills Knowing them to be effective ALWAYS. The reason is that they are compounded from the highest quality of ingredients commonly pre- scribed for Intestinal Irregularity, Flatulency, etc. The strength is aI-I ways the same. One day you may need them. They are sold at Chemists' Shops for 9d. and Is. 3d. per box-.

NEWS OF THE GARW BOYS

NEWS OF THE GARW BOYS. oiw- GARW AMBULANCE MAN AWARDED MILITARY MEDAL. Mrs. R. Ridgeway, Pontycymmer, has re- ceived a letter from her husband, Pte. Wm. John Ridgeway, R.A.M.C., 130th St. John Field Ambulance, 38th Division, B.E.F., stat- ing that his commanding officer drew out his unit on parade, called out his (Pte. Ridge- way's) name, and on his stepping out of the I Pte. William John Ridgeway. ranks, informed him that His Majesty wished to congratulate him for his great deeds on the battlefield, for which he was awarded the Military Medal. Garwites will be delighted to learn of the conferring on Pte. Ridgeway of this much- coveted honour, as he was one of the most popular boys in the Garw Valley. He has obtained several ambulance certificates, in- cluding the medallion, and he was for many years a very faithful member of the St. John's Ambulance Brigade, Garw Division. He has also obtained a colliery fireman's certificate, and for many years worked at the Ffaldau Colliery, Pontycymmer, prior to enlistment. During his service at the hospitals in France he has organised many concerts, and has taken part in several. He was a member of the Garw Male Voice Party. Many wounded soldiers who have returned to the district have spoken in glowing terms of Ridgeway. To quote a Pontycymmer wounded soldier who has been attended by Ridgeway: "No soldier will die in hospital if Ridgeway is present, as he keeps the whole ward laughing." Pte. Ridgeway is the son of Mr. and Mrs. William Ridgeway, Alexandra Road, Pontycymmer, who are old and highly respected inhabitants of the Garw Valley. I PONTYCYMMER SERGEANT WOUNDED r AND MISSING. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas, Thornton Crescent, Pantygog, Pontycymmer, have received noti- fication from Shrewsbury that their son, Sgt. Eddie Thomas, 10th Battlion R.W.F., was wounded in the battle of the Somme between the 16th and 19th August last, and is missing. He enlisted two years ago, and his promotion to the responsible position of sergeant was rapid. He was very popular with his company in France, and well known as a footballer in the Garw. His parents will be pleased to re- ceive any tidings as to his whereabouts. LLANGEINOR PRIVATE MISSING. ] Pte. Ivor Carvell, Welsh Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. Carvell, Llangeinor Arms, is officially reported missing in Mesopotamia. In reply to her inquries, the fol- lowing letter from Corporal Sidney Abel, R.A.M.C., Victoria General Hospital, Bombay, India, has been received by Pte. Car- vell's grandmother, Mrs. Mary Davies, King Edward Street, Pontycymmer:— I am sorry to inform you that after searching and inquiring at the var- ious hospitals in Bombay, I have not up to the time of writing, come across Pte. Carvel; but I have left word in the proper quarters of each hospital to immediately inform me of his ar- val; so if he arrives in due course, I will let you know his hospital and condition by the next mail leaving for England." In addition to her grandson, Mrs. Davies has had one of her own sons killed in action in France, on the 16th October, 1915, viz., Sapper Gomer Davies, Tunnelling Section, Royal Engineers. Two other sons are also ser- ving their king and country: Pte. William Davies, Signalling Section, Munster Fusiliers, served in France seven months, and was in- valdied home with trench fever, and is now at Bere, co. Cork, Ireland; Pte. Llewellyn Davies, 10th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, served 12 months in France, and was wounded in a bayonet charge, in the hand, and twice gassed, and is now at Kinmel Park, North Wales.

Advertising

I POUNDS SAVED BY DEALING WITH THE ACTUAL PIANO MAKERS SELLING DIRECT to the PUBLIC "c.(:,I¡:F THII CRLEBRATEO IS J  M!   )PIANOS  wld are ? ???????nprovemc.ts ?d ?i  ?? ? ?LUB ? Tm WO? ? J) CaM and inspect the instruments. i Catalogues Pest. free. WADDINGTON & SO-Ud) (ESTABLISHED 1888.; STATION ROAD (Opposite the County Schools) PORT TALBOT.

a I Garw Gleanings i

a I Garw Gleanings i J (By LLOFFWR Aft ALL) The putting back of the clocks on Satur- day night caused some inconvenience on Sun- day morning. Ill Many people wondered to hear the church bells ringing at 7 a.m., instead of 8 a.m., un- I til it was "gleaned" that the bell-ringer had forgotten to put his watch back an hour! Ill We also learn that many workmen turned up an hour too soon at some of our collieries on Sunday morning-very profitable for the companies. Ill We regret to learn that Sergt. Eddy Thomas, A Company, 10th Batt., R.W.F., is reported "wounded and missing." 1 1 1 He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Thomas, 15, Thurston Crescent, Pantygog, Pontycym- mer. Ill A prominent chapel-goer attended the Pantygog Sunday Market and was very in- terested in the selling of a trap. 111 We trust he won't continue such a practice! 1 1 1 Corporal W. W. Stone, chemical section, R.E., who has been "gassed," and who was a certified teacher at the Nanthir Boys School, paid a visit to the school this week, and was given a great reception. 111 Since the War Charities Act has come into operation we should like to remind all organ- izers of benefits that come under that head- ing that they are expected to make applies tion to the Council for permission to carry the matter on, and also submit their accounts to the Council for audit. Ill No more little flag-shows. Ill We are pleased to learn that Mrs. Hum- phries, Bridgend Road, Pontycymmer, has re- ceived a post-card from her husband, who was reported "missing, '5 stating that he is now a prisoner of war in Germany. 1 1 1 A Blaengarw fireman, anxious to keep the work going, volunteered to shoe a horse. Ill Is it true he tried to shoe the horse with "Brattice nails ? 111 For some time two young ladies are not on speaking terms, and all caused through putting the clocks back. Ill Who was the young gent that asked a young lady at a certain shop if she remem- bered his order? And did she reply, "Oh, ves, fivepence change." Ill Did a certain individual take five weeks to find out his finger was broken ? I Ill Worked out in proportion, how long would he take to find out if he broke his neck. 111 We are very sorry to learn that Rev. Dd. Hughes, past-or of Tabernacle Chapel, Ponty- cymmer, is still laid up, and we hope and trust he will have a speedy recovery. Ill We also trust that his son, Staff-Sergeant- Major Ieaun Hughes, 23rd Welsh Pioneers. who is down with fever at Salonica, will soon be again convalescent. Considerable inconvenience was caused last Sunday night by the foolishness of many young ladies sheltering in the doorways of various places. Ill Unless they immediately refrain from caus- ing annoyance to passers-by with their um- brellas—they will perhaps find themselves in Court. We hope the young men from the lower part of the Valley who were baptised recently are playing "trumps." Ill Is it right that a Bettws knut should visit the Garw in great style and borrow sixpence on the way?—"Some" swatk-! Ill To be taken home on a wheelbarrow is no doubt a bit of a novelty—but what explana- tion did a certain knut give upon returning the barrow ? 111 Some ladies serving green-groceries actually stayed up all night studying the latest fashions I 111 We sympathise with the ladies who went blackberry picking and got drenched and were seen later drying their clothes at a rail- way station! Ill The lady that tried to hang herself with her sisters garter must have enjoyed the ex- perience-as it was an elastic one!

NEWS OF THE OGMORE BOYS

NEWS OF THE OGMORE BOYS. PTE. D. L. EVANS, OGMORE VALE. Private D. L. Evans, of the 19th Cheshire Regiment is lying seriously wounded in 'East- bourne Hospital, but we are pleased to inform his many friends that he is progressing favour- ably. He is the son of Mr. E. Evans, draper's foreman at the Ogmore Vale Co-operative Stores, and though not yet 18 years of age has seen active service in France. TROOPER J. H. PUGH, PRICETOWN. The many friends of Trooper J. H. Pugh, of Pricetown, and Ogmore Vale, will be pleased to hear that he is in good health. "Harry," as he was known amongst his com- rades, joined the First Life Guards shortly after the war started, and has seen much active service. He is still in France doing his little bit. He was one of the most popular boys in the Valley, and is the son of Mr., Pugh, who for many years was a sergeant in the police force at Nantymoel.

LLANGEINOR

LLANGEINOR. FUNERAL.—The funeral of the late Mr. John Thomas, memorial sculptor, Llangeinor, took place at the Llangeinor Cemetery on Saturday last. Deceased was 60 years of age, and was born at Llangeinor. He was very highly respected in the village, and was a faithful member of the Llangeinor Burial Board. He was a member of the Tylgwyn Baptist Church, being one of the stalwarts of that place of worship, and was interested in all Christian movements throughout the val- ley. At the house, Rev. John Jenkins, Llangeinor, conducted the service, and at the graveside Rev. Hugh Thomas, M.A., Vicar of Llangeinor, officiat-ed.-The chief mourners were:—Mr. and Mrs. David Thomas, Llan- geinor (brother and sister-in-law); Mr. Win* Thomas, Llangeinor (brother); Miss Annie Thomas, Pandy 1sist-er); and Mrs. Rees, Pandy. Floral tributes were sent by bro- thers and sisters; and Mr. and Mrs. Prosser, London( cousins).

Advertising

Advertise in the "Glamorgan Gazette." If you want to sell, buy or exchange; you cannot do better.