Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 8 of 8
Full Screen
21 articles on this page
BRIDGEND COUNCIL AND THEI CARNEGIE LIBRARY

BRIDGEND COUNCIL AND THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY. To the Editor. Sir,—The Chairman of the District Council is reported to have said "the Library had better not be let for anything of a controver- sial character. Will it surprise this gentle- man to know that the prohibited subject has been discussed in that building without any serious result in the past? I think, for the benefit of the District Council, they had better get in touch with the Parliamentary I Debating Society's officials, and make them- selves acquainted with the various subjects considered by the Society before committing themselves to such statements as that quoted. Is it not in the nature of a libel to suggest that the residents of Bridgend or the locality cannot discuss the advisability of State owner- ship of public-houses without danger or dam- age to the Council's property ? The Bridgend Council ought, in these times, to show a livelier tolerance of other's views and a greater confidence in the ability of their townsmen to conduct themselves with dignity and credit upon such occasions.—Yours, etc., -0 NIMROD. I

LATE COUNTESS OF DUNRAVEN

LATE COUNTESS OF DUNRAVEN. To the Editor. I Sir,—I quite endorse your opinion that the death of the Countess of Dunraven will be much regretted by many in the Vale of Gla- morgan, especially by the tenants of the Dun- raven Estate and other residents who had the privilege of her acquaintance. But I wish to correct your statement with regard to the time when she entertained the Royal party at, Dunraven Castle. It was in the month of September of the year 1888 that the late Duke and Duchess of Teck and Princess May, who is now our Queen Mary, visited Dunraven Castle. I have a distinct recollection that the Countess of Dunraven and her three daugh- j ters, together with the Royal party, visited my parish of Llanmihangel during that month of the same year, which is just 28 years ago and not 26 years, as stated in your report, j They took a great interest in inspecting the architecture of Llanmihangel Place, the j Parish Church (which was then being re- j stored), and also the fine avenue of yew trees I attached to the house.-Yours, etc., Llanmihanryel Rec E. JENKINS. Llanmihangel Rectory, Sept. 30th, 1916.

REMEMBERED I

REMEMBERED. I The following verses were written by a wounded soldier in Tasker House Red Cross I Hospital, Southerndown, and recited by Mr. D, J. Gwyn at the soldiers's concert last week at Hardy's cafe, Southerndown, re- ported in our last week's issue. To Southerndown in the South of Wales, Six others and I were sent. The horrors of war had left their mark, And on recovery we were bent. And our thanks for the welcome they gave us there, Must really find a veiffc. Of the matron first I want to say, She's just as good as they're made. We owe her a debt of gratitude, And we'll see the debt is paid. She's punctual to the minute- That, I grant, is true; But then there's heaps of love in her heart, For the work she has to do. And then there comes the commandant, With her sweet smiling face— Her gentle manners and winning ways, Shed love about the place. And the quarter master too-by gosh! Is as good as purest gold; With her smile of loving cheerfulness, She's good e'en to behold. And next comes Sister Dulcie, who (I'm very pleased to say) Is just as cheerful as she can be All the live long day. Three better or sweeter sisters These eyes never did see, For they bring both peace and happiness Wherever they may be. And next of good Nurse Edmunds, Tl-js only I would say- She's one of the nicest ladies I've met for many a day. She's my massage-my ''rubbing" —nurse, And her heart is in the work. My bones can vouch for the truth-that she Her duty does'nt shirk. And all the other nurses dear, We honour them one and all. God knows they've nobly answered The dear old country's call. They do their bit (as the saying goes), And with such lovelit faces They banish sorrow, and scatter joy In the darkest saddest places. And gosh! The food in the hospital I I think it, and I say, The best we've had, by a good long chalk For many and many a day. She cooking is simply scrumptious— Such meals as we there had! They made us feel quite hungry, Although we were really bad. Broken and poor as are these words, Spoken e're we depart, They flow, believe me, ladies all, From a deeply thankful heart. Farewell to you, then, matron, Farewell dear nurses all, We leave you now, for we hear again The dear old country's call. —PTE. E. FOWLER, l-4th Y and L. Regt. 8;: Red Cross Hospital, Southerndown. j I

COWBRIDGE

COWBRIDGE. Ash HaU Prize Drawing (Model of Barque).— (Winning number, 705. L.-CORPL. FRED GIBBS. We are pleased to announce that Mr. J. Gibbs, Cow- bridge, has now received definite information that- his son, Lanoe-Corporal Fred Gibbs, Machine Gun Corps, who was reported as "missing" in last week's "Gazette," is a pri- soner of war in Germany-at the internment panjp at Gefaugeuenlager Dulmen,

AUCTION SLE AND SPORTS AT BLACKMILL

AUCTION SÁLE AND SPORTS AT BLACKMILL. FOR CCYTRAHEN RED CROSS FUNDS. Unflagging perseverance, with unit y and combination, and a healthy competitive spirit will surmount any obstacle, and carry the day anywhere. And so it was with the auction sale and sports held at Blackmill on Wednes- day afternoon, when good business was done, and a handsome sum, running into hundreds of pounds-how big a sum exactly is not yet known—in aid of the Coytrahen Red Cross Fund. The sale was successful, and so was the sports; though the anticipated "after- noon's treat in the country" was somevdlat of a failure, for reasons it was not possible for mortals to obviate. The weather was dis- appointing. tliough that might well have been worse. Rain threatened,' yet happily only little came of it, thanks to a gusty wind, giv- ing little time to the fleeting clouds to throw cold water upon the earth, and upon the I spirits of the crowds who flocked from the valleys for the lists of events the Blackmill and District Farmers' Society had provided I for their entertainment, as means to the great end of helping the Red Cross Fund, and rendering medical aid and service to the gal- lant men who, in fighting for their country and for us, have fallen by the way. The event, perhaps, should have been held in the summer time, when the precious hours of sunlight were, or should have been, more than they are, and not now, when not even his Majesty's Government could save light, when there is none to speak of to save. That by the way. As the case stands the committee have had only a week or two to develop their plans, and to make arrangements, and on all hands it is admitted they have done remark- ably well in the short time at their disposal. The secretary was Mr. C. T. John, Ynislas Farm, Blackmill (secretary, Farmers' Associ- ation), who infused tremendous energy into everything he undertook, and whose enthu- siasm was happily contagious. Of sports there were some interesting events, and in this department every credit is due to Mr. D. P. Evans (Blackmill), who capably discharged the secretarial duties. The events comprised: Tugs of war" for men and ladies, live- weight guessing competitions, foot races, long jump competitions, and last, but not least, a baby show, for infants under 12 months, the prize a silver cup given by Mr. E. M. Need- ham, Bridgend. The sports' handicapper was Mr. J. Hodgson. Tea was provided in a large marquee, many ladies giving willingly of their services, so that others might have a really good time, and a treat to be remem- bered. The Ogmore Vale Temperance Band was in attendance, and played a spirited selec- tion of music. Mr. John David, Cowbridge, was the auctioneer, and no Trojan could have worked harder. He was at it for hours- never faltering, never flagging, his very heart in the work, and his voice attuned to it, too— with shafts of wit and humour, which kept everybody laughing and in good humour, so that wherever the auctioneer went, the crowd hung upon his words. And the sale is ex pected to produce quite a fabulous sum, and the same with the raffles. There was a little speech-making early in the afternoon. Miss Nicholl, Merthyrmawr, was present, as might have been expected from one so closely identified with Red Cross work, and upon that lady the Chairman of the Society (Mr. Thomas John) called to open the proceedings. Miss Nicholl made a charming little speech, and started the sale, the first lot being a framed photograph of the late Lord Kit- chener, which realised a substantial sum. There was then offered for sale 90 head of fat sheep and lambs, some prime pigs, about 100 head of poultry, and a miscellaneous lot of household articles, etc., vying with Whiteley's for variety. Thanks were conveyed to Miss Nicholl, on the proposition of Mr. W. Bartlett, seconded by Mr. T. J Job (vice-chairman of Bridgend Board of Guardians).

PENCOED I

PENCOED. I CARNIVAL.—We understand that the sum realised in connection with the recent carni- val was 280, which will be equally divided be- tween the Red Cross Society and Blind Sol- diers' Association. The carnival was held under the auspices of the Pencoed and Dis- trict Farmers' Co-operative Association. Messrs. Tom Beavan and Edward Plummer were the joint treasurers of the Carnival Committee, and Messrs. T. W. Jones (IJan- ilid) and John Morgan, the joint secretaries. FUNERAL OF A CHILD—On Wednesday the funeral took place at St. Peter's Church, Pontardawe, of the child of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Davies, Ffosyfelin, Pencoed. Mrs. Davies left home with her child last Saturday week. There did not then appear to be any- thing seriously the matter with the little one, but in a few hours after the arrival at Pon- tardawe it was seized with consulsions and passed away.—The Rev. D. W. Howell officiated at the house, and Rev. Jones at the church and at the graveside. The chief mourners from Pencoed and district were: Mr Charles Davies (father), Mrs. Davies, Maesy- wern (grandmother), Mrs. Hawkins, and Miss A. Davies, Maesywern (aunts); Messrs. Tom and Enoch Davies, Maesywern (uncles); Mrs. and Miss Jenkins, Porthcawl.

LLANGEINOR I

LLANGEINOR. I HARVEST THANKSGIVING.-The har- vest festival was held on Sunday and Monday of last week at Llangeinor Parish Church. The preacher was the Rev. D. E. Thomas, of Penygraig, who preached excellent sermons to large congregations; and on Monday even- ing, when there was again a large attendance, Rev. D. J. Arthur, Vicar of Pyle, preached (in Welsh), an eloquent and impressive ser- mon. The singing was excellent throughout, the choir, and choirmaster and organist, ably carried out their respective duties. The church was beautifully adorned with flowers and fruit.

IBLAENGARW MUSICALI SUCCESS

BLAENGARW MUSICAL I SUCCESS. At the recent examination of the London College of Music, Miss Frances E. Waite, 8 Queen Street, Blaengarw, was successful in gain- ing the diploma of the above college. She is now entitled to wear the cap and gown; also to append A.L.C.M. after her name. She is no-. open to receive pianoforte pupils, and en- gagaments for concerts, eistedd- fodau, etc. 8774

PORTHCAWL PRIVATES DEATH

PORTHCAWL PRIVATE'S DEATH. Pte. Llewellyn John Lewis, eldest son of Mr. Morgan Lewis, of Not- tage, Porthcawl, who was an engine- driver on the Great Western Rail- way, joined the Royal Engineers in March last, and was drafted to the East about two months ago. He was smitten with illness which ended fatally. He was a prominent Trade Unionist. Deceased has left a widow and two children.

No title

Miss Frances E. Waite, A.L.C.M. I

GARW MALE VOICE PARTYS I CONCERT 1

GARW MALE VOICE PARTY'S I CONCERT -1 TO WOUNDED SOLDIERS AT COY- I TRAHEN HOSPITAL. A grand entertainment was given by the Garw Male Voice Party (under the conductor- ship of Mr. J. Butler, L.T.S.C.), on Saturday, Sept. 23rd, to the wounded soldiers at the Coytrahen Red Cross Hospital, Tondu. Mr. Richards, of Brynmenin, who presided, men- tioned that 40 members of the party had al- ready joined the colours, two of whom had been killed in action, several wounded, and! one, Pte. W. J. Ridgeway, had gained thel Military Medal. (Applause.)—All the items I in the programme were highly appreciated, especially the pianoforte solos given by Miss S. Butler, L.R.A.M., the accompanist of the Society. The programme was as follows:— God save the King," followed by the "Sol- diers' Chorus," by the party, which was ren- dered in a spirited manner, with good tone; bass solo, Y Marchog" Mr. E. Griffiths, the possessor of a good bass voice, which enabled the singer to do full justice to the song; pianoforte solo, Miss S. Butler, L.R.A.M., which was rapturously received, being exe- cuted in fine style; Mr. D. Bowen, the posses- sor of an excellent pure tenor Voice, gave a most artistic rendering of "Forth to Battle," while Mr. D. L. Thomas, who is well known in the locality as a fine baritone vocalist, gave an inspiring rendering of The Trumpeter." In the selection by the party, "Italian Salad," the solo was sung by Mr. Isaac James. Both solo and chorus were rendered in fine style. Mr. J. Butler (the conductor) gave a majestic rendering of the tenor solo, "The Lilac Tree," while the Banner ein Gwlad" was sung in a patriotic manner, with good tone, by Mr. Dd. Bowen. A selection by the party, "Crossing the Plain," was greatly appreciated. Mr. Isaac James' tenor solo, Island of Dreams," was very ably rendered. A selection "In ab- sence," by the party, brought forth an en- core, the party responding with The Men of Harlech." A vote of thanks to the party and soloists was proposed and seconded by two of the wounded soldiers, who spoke highly of the singing. Mr. E. James, in a few well-chosen remarks, suitably responded on behalf of the party. Hen wlad fy nhadau," the solo taken by the conductor, brought a most enjoy- able evening to a close. During the evening cigarettes and matches, which had been kindly contributed by friends, were distributed to the wounded soldiers by the party.

FATAL ACCIDENT TO PENCOED FARMER

FATAL ACCIDENT TO PENCOED FARMER. HORSE SLIPPED ON TARRED ROAD. On Saturday morning an accident, unfor- tunately attended with fatal results, occurred near Coychurch. Mr. and Mrs. loan Williams, of Bryngwenith Farm, near Pen- coed, were driving in their trap to Bridgend, when the horse slipped and fell. Both Mr. and Mrs. Williams were thrown out. Mrs. Williams escaped with slight injuries, but her husband was seriously injured. For a while there was no one to assist Mrs. Williams in attending upon her husband. The first trap to come along was one belonging to Mr. Thomas, Tanylan Farm. The injured farmer would have been brought home in Mr Thomas' trap, but a motor-car belonging to Mr. L. V. Evans, The Court, came along, and the suf- ferer was placed in the car and driven by Mr. Evans to Bryngwenith Farm. Mr. Williams never really rallied, and on Monday morning he passed away. He was well-known in the district. He held office as a deacon at Rhiw- ceiliog Calvinistic Methodist Chapel The inquest was held on Tuesday evening at Bryngwenith Farm by Mr. D. Rees (district coroner), Mr. W. Howell being foreman of the jury. Mrs. Williams, the widow, said her husband was a farmer, and was 76 years of age. She and deceased were on their way to Bridgend, when, a little this side of Coychurch/the horse slipped on the tarred road, and they were both thrown out of the trap on to the road. De- _1_- '.tl1l ceased. spoKe very nttie alter tne accident. The doctor saw him on their return home. Dr. E. B. Macdonald Atkins said he saw de- ceased at Bryngwenith shortly after the acci- dent, but could only make a superficial exam- ination, as deceased was in a state of collapse. Later he lapsed into unconsciousness. The primary cause of death was concussion of the brain; the secondary cause was the rupture of a blood vessel on the brain. The arteries were in a brittle state. The jury returned a verdict in keeping with the medical evidence. On the motion of Mr. W. Howell, J.P., seconded by Mr. Jonah Davies, a vote of sym- pathy with the widow and family was passed.

MAESTEG I

MAESTEG. GIPSY LEE, Palmist, Top Entrance Market llace, Maesteg. Daily. fee, 6d., 1/ Last few days. 8794 BILLIARD TOURNAMENT.—A benefit uilliaid tournament, in aid of the Maesteg Red Cross Hospital and the Maesteg Cottage Hospital, was held during the week at the Central Billiard Saloon, very kindly lent with the six tables, free of charge for the whole period by the proprietor. The proceeds amounted to R16, which will be divided equally between the two institutions named. FLANNEL FAIR.—The half-yearly October flannel and pleasure fair was held on the Mar- ket Ground on Monday and Tuesday. The quantity of flannel consigned was much below the usual mark for the October fair, a fact largely accounted for by the scarcity of the material. The fair, from the pleasure seeker's point of view, was also marred by the deluge of rain that fell on these days, in consequence of which the attendance generally was much below the average, the stall holders suffering in consequence. "MABON" AT MAESTEG.—The Right Hon. W. Abraham, M.P., occupied the pulpit at Tabor Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Chapel on Sunday morning and evening. The veteran Labour leader evidently proved an attraction, a.3 the attendance on Sunday evening especi- ally was very good. "Mabon" is a powerful and convincing preacher, and his sermons on Sunday were much appreciated by those who were privileged to hear him. "Mabon" gave the officers of the church some of his experi- ences in his boyhood days in connection with Maesteg, when he used to walk from his home in Cwmavon to Maesteg to "Adrodd Pwnc," a great event in those days with the Metho- dist denomination. The right hon. gentleman took advantage of his visit to Maesteg to spend a week-end with his son and family at their residence at Brynmawr Place. Mr. Abraham (junior), is now an established citi- zen of the old parish, and a popular official at Messrs. North's Navigation Collieries.

BLAENGARWI

BLAENGARW. I C.E.M.S.—The members of the St. James' branch, at the early celebration of the Church of England Men's Society made their corpor- ate communion on Sunday last, the Rev. J. Davies, L.D., being the celebrant. READINGS.—The first of the series of read- ings held in connection with St. James Church tok place at the Hall on Tuesday last, the Rev. J. Davies, L.D., presiding. The ad- judicator throughout was Mr. W. J. Williams, A.T.C.L., whilst Miss F. Waite, A.L.C.M., accompanied. The awards were.—Boys and girls solo, Miss Florrie Elsbury, and a special prize to Miss Clara Salmon; open solo (adults) Mr. Harold Elsbury; open recitation, Mr. David Hughes; general knowledge, Miss Thomas (D. Watts and Co.); tailing the don- key, Miss B. Singleton. The following was the programme:—Recitation, "Tommy's Dug- out," Miss Annie Morris; tenor solo, "Lovena," Mr. Isaac Morris; tenor solo, "The Soldier's Grave," Mr. Ben Jones; recitation, "Break," Miss Maggie May Williams, recita- tion, "Lily's Rose," Miss Elsie Williams. NATIONAL MISSION.—A general meeting of churchpeople in connection with the Nat- ional Mission of Repentance and Hope took plaoe at St. James' Church Hall, Blaengarw, on Sunday evening last, Rev. John Davies, L.D., presiding. After a full explanation of the scheme by the chairman, Mr. D. Watts Thomas was elected to act as secretary for Blaengarw district, and the following ladies and gentlemen were appointed missioners: Messrs. H. G. Fowler, W. Plummer (junr.), J. Sloane, G. RastaH, C. Sansom, A. Davies, J. A. Williams, J. Lewis, H. B. Jones, A. Gwynne, W. J. Pembroke, J. J. Williams, G. H. Simon, J. W. English, Wm. Morgan, Evan Griffiths, D. J. Vaughan, Mesdames Rowe, Plummer, T. Morris, Gea, Slade, D. Morgan, W. Trigg, Forey, Wright, James, J. A. Wil- liams, J. Lewis, T. Morris, Evans, Potts, Gough, Warden, Jones, A. Harries, Ingram, Misses A Jones, K. Watts-Thomas, Thomas, R. Rees, and Hoare. 0.

NANTYFFYLLON

NANTYFFYLLON SCHOOLMASTER CALLED UP.-Last week Mr. W. L Williams, headmaster of the Nanty- ffyllon Boys' School, was. called up for ser- vice with the colours, and the occasion was marked by the presentation of a beautiful gold-chased and suitably inscribed fountain- pen, subscribed for by the staff and scholars. Mr. Williams visited the school previous to his departure, and thanked the subscribers for the present, promising to keep in touch with his scholars, wherever his duties led him. Already Mr. Williams has experienced a little of German IlfrightfnlnesA"-happily overcome by British marksmanship. He was privileged to witness the bringing down of the last Zepp. wrecked at Potter's Bar.

I NANTYMOEL I

I NANTYMOEL I ANNUAL MEETINGS.—On Saturday eve- ning, Sunday all day, .and on Monday evening the half-yearly preaching services of the Dinam Welsh C.M. Church took place. The special preachers for the occasion were Revs. Edward Thomas, Clynog, North Wales, and David Jones, Crynant. Their discourses were thoroughly evangelical and earnest in tone. The singing was under the leadership of Mr. John Jones, and Miss Phillips presided at the organ. DEATH.—We regret to record the death of Mr. Joseph Hunt, of 62 Oakfield Terrace. He had reached the ripe age of 80 years, and had not been able to work for some years; and a concert had been arranged to take place for his benefit and that of his wife. He had been a soldier, and his services reached back to the time of the Indian Mutiny. He was buried on Tuesday at Blaenogwy Cemetery. Rev. M. W. Mollin conducted the service at the house and at the grave-side. FUNERAL.—On Friday last the funeral took place of the late Mrs. Jones, wife of Mr. John Rhys Jones, Ogwy Street. Deceased had been an invalid for many months. She was a respected member of Saron Welsh Bap- tist Church, and a goodly number came to- gether to pay her a last tribute of respect. The burial rites were performed by Rev. M. W. Mollin, assisted by Revs. T. Hirwain Jen- kins, M. J. Mills, and R. T. Gregory. The following were among the m<)urners:-Mr. J. R. Jones (widower); Mrs. Edmunds (mother); Mrs. Daniel (sister), Narbeth; Rev. and Mrs. T. Edmunds, Aberdare (brother and sister-in- law); Mrs. Jones, Porthcawl (sister-in-law); Mr. Edward Davies, Bridgend (uncle); Mrs. Edwards, Nantymoel (aunt); Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Jones, Nantymoel (uncle and aunt); Mr. I W. Richards, Nantymoel (uncle); also the fol- lowing cousins:—Mrs. Edward Edwards, Mr. James Edwards, Misses Edwards, Mr. and Mrs E. L. Davies, Mr. W. J. Davies, Mr. and Mrs. Pearce, Mr. and Mrs. Evan Edmunds, Mrs. Bale, Mrs. Nation, Mrs. Banford, Miss Ban- ford, Mr. W. H. Jones, Mr. J. Jones, Mrs. M. A. Evans, Mrs. Phillips, Bridgend; Mrs. Webber, Pencoed.

GLYNCORRWG COLLIERS SUDDENI DEATH

GLYNCORRWG COLLIER'S SUDDEN I DEATH. The District Coroner (Mr. Lewis M. Thomas) has been furnished with particulars of the death of Wm. Milsom, aged 40, collier, 14, Heol-y-Coed, Glyncorrwg. It appears that deoeased and a fellow lodger, Joseph Cham- berlain, got up at 5-30 on Tuesday morning, but finding that it was raining heavily, they went back to bed. Just before 8 o'clock Chamberlain heard Milsom groaning and tried unsuccessfully to rouse him. Dr. Fisher was summoned, but when he arrived life was ex- tinct. Milsom had been heard to complain of pains in the chest. An inquiry before the district coroner (Mr. Lewis M. Thomas), was held at Glynoorrwg on Wednesday evening, respecting the death of Wm. Milsom, aged 40, collier, who lodged at 14, Heolycoed, and died suddenly on Tues- day mdrning. Mrs. Milsom, who lives at Radstock, Somer- set, and is left with nine children, said her husband had only worked at Glyncorrwg about six weeks. Joseph Chamberlain, a fellow lodger, stated that Milsom and himself got up at 5-30 on Tuesday morning, had breakfast, and as it was raining heavily, went back to bed. Mil- som became unwell and died before the arrival of a doctor. D. Walter Fisher said the cause of death was heart failure. The deceased came to con- sult him the previous evening. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

BRIDGEND POLICE COURT I

BRIDGEND POLICE COURT, I Thursday (yesterday).—Before: Mr. D. H. Lloyd (in the chair), and Dr. E. J. Parry. SOCIAL PEST.—MENACE TO FARMERS. Sarah Clarke (34), defiant and disrespectful, and reckless in her use of language, was put into the dock charged with acting indecently in Bethania Street, Maesteg. P.C. David Jenkins proved the case, stating that at 9-15 on the previous evening he saw prisoner in Bethania Street, under circum- stances he detailed, and it was with great difficulty he brought her to the Police Station. Not long before he had occasion to warn her. Defendant: He's saying lies. Mr. Walter Hughes (clerk): You were here quite recently on a similiar charge. The Chairman: How long have you been out of prison? Clarke: Since Saturday, sir. Inspector Rees Davies complained of the woman's conduct since she had been liberated. The Chairman asked where could such a woman find a place to sleep. P.C. Francis Evans (who corroborated) re- plied, "On farms, frequently in barns." Pri- soner, ever since she had been in Maesteg, had been a perfect nuisance. She was often drunk, and under cover of darkness, accosted, and misconducted herself with men on the roadside. Farmers were afraid she would set fire to their hay and stock, and no end of complaints had been received. On the last occasion accused was committed for a month. The Bench now increased it to two months. WILLING TO BE A SOLDIER. I Charles Hawkins, labourer, with no fixed place of abode, was charged under the Mili- tary Service Act with absenting himself at Bridgend since July 29th. Defendant: I tried to join the Army, and failed. P.C. Stockford deposed to arresting the pri- soner, whom he found imbibing in the "Bell" at Laleston. Charged with absenting himself he said he was willing to join the Army, and made an effort in that direction 12 months ago. Inspector Rees Davies: If he is medically unfit he would have a certificate to that effect. Still protesting his willingness to serve he was haided glat 1i the Military authorities.

OGMORB VALE

OGMORB VALE. SILVER TEMPERANCE BAND.—The Og- more Valley Temperance Band attended the Olympia, Ogmore Vale, on Friday night, when » Mr. Dage Pryor, a local composer, acted as conductor. Mr. Pryor's works are as follows: "Odin," march; "Pumpkin Pie," two step; "Rag-a-muffin" and "Vespers," waltzs. All the items rendered were enthusiastically re- ceived by the large audience present, and we are pleased to know that we have such musical talent in the valley. Mr. Gillard, the K- J J Xl_ i waiiuuuioit:i, vuuuiuueu vile programme with a rattling march. Miss Margaret Davies was the solo pianist, and Messrs. Jim Davies and Cliff Davies solo violin and 'cello respectively < PRESENTATION.—An interesting presen- tation took place on Monday week last at the Non-Political Club, Ogmore Vale, when the late steward, Gunner T. Biddies, of the R.G.A., was presented in a crowded meeting with a handsome marble clock suitably in- scribed. Mr. James Harrison, presided, and Mr. E. Hares, who made the presentation, in a stirring speech paid a high compliment to the late steward, to which the latter suita- bly responded. Gunner Biddies was one of the most popular boys in Ogmore Vale, and was ever ready to do a kind action. He will be a loss to the Valley, but a gain to the Army. A most enjoyable evening concluded with songs by Messrs David (Peel), and friends. The secretary was Mr. Barnet, and the treasurer, Mr. F. Padfield. HARVEST THANKSGIVING.—The har- I vest thanksgiving services in connection with I the Wesleyan Church, Ogmore Vale, were held oil Sunday last. Special sermons were preached morning and evening, by the Rev. T. Biltcliff, Porthcawl, chaplain to H.M. Forces, and special anthems were rendered by the choir. At a service in the afternoon, musical selections were given by the choir and friends, the singing being of a high order. The soloists were Miss Gwen Price, Master Kenneth Evans (boy soprano), Mr. Will Davey (baritone), and Mr. H. Mackney (tenor). The congregations were large at all the services, and the church was nicely decorated with fruit and vegetables. Much of the credit for the success of the singing must go to Mr. Hugh Jones, conductor, and Mr. Owen Jones, organist. HARVEST TEA.—The harvest tea and dance, in connection with St. John's Church, Ogmore Vale, was held on Wednesday last, at the Ogmore Vale Workmen's Hall. The building was crowded. The following ladies presided at the tables: Mrs. Richards, St. John Street; Mrs. Owen, Ardwyn; Mrs. Owens, Meadow Street; Miss Doris Goodwin; Miss E. Goowin; Mrs. Freeman; Nurse Per- kins; Mrs. Gladwin; Mrs. Cinderby; Mrs. Skinner; Mrs. Chilton; Mrs. A. Howells; Mrs. Matthias. The following gentlemen were also in attendance: Mr. Parsons, Mr. Cottrell, Mr. Laity, Mr. D. Griffiths. After tea a dance was held, the M.C.'c being Messrs. D. John and D. Rogers. The pianist was Mr. Ben Davies. Messrs. P. Bye and N. Bootyer were respectively secretary and treasurer, and ably carried out their duties. WEDDING.—The wedding" look place on Saturday last at Kenfig Hill Church (the Rev. Alewyn Jones officiating) of Mr. Fred Barrett, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Barrett, Kenfig Hill, and Miss Mary J. Jones, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Jones, of 12, Gorwyl Place, Ogmore Vale. The bride was tastefully dressed in a navy blue costume, with grey hat to match, and was given away by Mr. W. Barrett, father of the bridegroom. Miss Cassie Barrett and Miss Emily Thomas, both of Kenfig Hill, were the bridesmaids, and the bride's parents and ,many friends were present at the ceremony. The wedding breakfast took place at the residence of the Rev. Alewyn Jones, where, previous to her marriage, the bride was an old and trusted servant. The honeymoon is being spent at Cardiff. The presents were numerous and costly.

iHEOLYCYW

i HEOLYCYW. OBITUARY.—We regret to announce the death of Mrs. Jones, beloved wife of Mr. Dd. Jones, Maqsffynon, Rhiwceiliog, who passed away on Friday last, at the age of 53, after a long illness patiently borne. Deceased, who was a native of the parish, was highly es- teemed by all who knew her. Her early death is mourned by a large circle of friends, and much sympathy is felt with the bereaved hus- band, and three children, viz., Mrs. Phillips, and Messrs. Stephen and Gomer Jones. The remans were interred at Rhiwceiliog Chapel burial ground on Wednesday, when the Rev. D. Howell, Pencoed, performed the last rites. PRESENTATION.—Mr. E. D. Davies, licensed lay reader, recently severed his con- nection with Heolycyw Church, where he had officiated for three years, and where he has won the respect and love of all sections of the community. On Saturday evening last he was presented with a testimonial subscribed for by the'church. A large company partici- pated in the function, which took the form of a social tea, followed by an entertainment, held at the Central Hall of the Council School, and presided over by Mr. John Evans. After the various testimonies had been given to the high esteem in which Mr. Davies was held in the village, Mrs. Clatworthy presented Mr. Davies with a substantial roll of Treasury notes. The following were responsible for the musical part of the programme:-The Misses Daisy Palfreyman, K. Hawkins, Mrs.. W. Par- sons, Mrs. B. Parson, Mrs. Clatworthy, Miss E. Dando, Miss E. Evans (Brynmenyn), and Messrs. Tom Oliver, J. Richardson, Bees Davies, and Wm. H. John. The accompanist was Mr. G. Henry.

Advertising

Advertise in the "Glamorgan Gazette." If you want to sell, buy or exchange; yen cannot do better. PBINTBD AND PUBLISHED by the CINTBAL GLAHOBAAK PBIRTIRO AND PUBLISHING COMPACT, LTD., AT the 11 GLAMORGAN GAMTTH" OVNCU, OVUM BTBER, BBIDGKND, GLAMO-RGAJT. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6th, 1916.