Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
10 articles on this page
ROYAL VISIT TO DLRA YES I

ROYAL VISIT TO DLRA YES. I To the Editor. I Sir.—I have read with much interest tne interesting letter of the learned Rector of Llanmihangel, referring to the late Countess of Dunraven, and the great interest the de- ceased lady took in the Vale of Glamorgan, and the tenants of the Dunraven Estate. I may point out that the Earl of Dunraven and the late Countess who entertained the late Duke and Duchess of Teck and Princess Mary (now our present Queen Mary) in the year 1888, also visited several other places of his- torical interest in the Vale of Glamorgan, in- cluding the Roman remains at Caemead, near Llantwit Major, wheich were then being ex- cavated, and Flemingstone Court, the old home of the Flemings and Jenkins families for many ages. It is interesting to note that the disting- uished party visited the pretty old-world village of Llanblethian twice, and were en- tertained to tea at the old Factory Cottage, Llanblethian, by the lat-e Mr. Charles Howell, and Mrs. Howell, now residing at Oswestry, Shropshire. Mr. Charles Howell, Caerphilly, a son of the late Mr. Charles Howell, Llan- blethian, still treasures the antique tea ser- vice, about three centuries old, which was utilised on the auspicious and memorable occasion.—Yours, etc., T. M. PRICE, Caerphilly, October 7th, 1916.

THE METRIC SYSTEM I

THE METRIC SYSTEM. I To the Editor. Sir.-May I be permitted a space in your valuable paper to express my sympathy with the members of the Penybont Rural Dictrict Council, in having "got lost at sea" over a certain proposition placed before them on Sat- urday, September 23rd. I refer to the De- cimal (Metric) System. This system, as most people know, is used in all the countries of Europe, except the United Kingdom and Russia, as well as in the United States. Some years ago the metric system was legalised in this country by Par- liament, but was not made compulsory. In view of our iuture policy after the war, the extending of our trade overseas, by reason of the fact that Germany may not be re- garded as such a formidable competitor in the future, one cannot help tv 'nking that the Council have allowed an opportunity to slip, and the children of the present, and perhaps the future generation, may thereby be pre- cluded from being allowed to learn a system (because of a foolish belief that the present system is "good enough"), that would go very far in extending our trade with almost every country. Take Col. Nicholls plea for the "Noes," the change in barrells, glasses, and so forth, and Giles and Co. worrying over so much per "kilometre," when himself, and his father before him, knew it as "so much per acre." I venture to say that the only ob- jection would be, not so much from the far- mers standpoint as in the estate office, where acres would have to be dimensioned into ares," and hectares." The farmer would not trouble much as long a-s he had the ground-he is very seldom troubled with the burden of owning it. Kilometres would hardly come into his calculations unless he were charged for the length of his fencing. It is a pity to think, in our enlightened times, that this was beyond the depth of the "first men" in the rural districts, and one may congratu- late Mr. D. H. Price in supporting this mea- sure. I really think the Council should make another attempt at this proposition, and sup- port the Decimal System. To look ahead should be their policy, and not to keep the future generations from sharing in the advan- tages of a continental system, that has only two countries out of it, and thus link up our commercial interests bv simplifying matters by adopting identical methods. Yours, etc., CHARLES G. FORESTERr Corresponding Secretary, Aberbaiden Lodge, S.W.M.F., Garw District.

BRIDGEND COUNCIL AND STATEI PURCHASE

BRIDGEND COUNCIL AND STATE I PURCHASE." To the Editor. I Sir.—The report of the proceedings of the Bridgend Council in your issue of the 29th ult., mak es somewhat extraordinary reading. As the members of the Council (who are also the custodians of the Free Library), are some- what in the dark on the question of State Purchase of the Liqour Traffic, they will, I am confident, be grateful for the following in- formation. The State Purchase of the Liquor Traffic is a suggested solution of our grave and vexed drink problem, which Mr. Lloyd George pro- posed in Parliament last year, and which it is believed, he means to propose again at no distant date. It is really an attempt by the Coalition Government to settle the drink pro- blem by consent. Prior to making the proposal the Govern- ment appointed a particularly strong commit- tee of experts, including such men as Sir Her- bert Samuel; Lord Cunliffe, governor of the Bank of England; Sir Edward Coates, M.P., of the London Stock Exchange; Right Hon. Sir John Simon; and Mr. Philip Snowden, M.P. to inquire into the official aspects of State Purchase. The committee, we are assured, went care- fully into the whole problem, and was abso- lutely unanimous in recommending the Government to buy up the whole of the Liquor Trade. The proposal is very widely and very influ- entially supported in the country. Among the temperance reformers who are in favour of it nrght be named Mr. Arthur Sherwell, M.P., Mr. Joseph Rowntree, Sir Thomas Whittaker, Mr. A. F. Harvey (secretary of the Temperance Legislation League), Mr. Charles Smith (sec- retary of the British Temperance League), Mr. R. B. Batty (ex-secretary of the United Kingdom Alliance, Lady Henry Somerset, and a host of others. Among the more exalted ecclesiastics who support it may be named the Bishops of Oxford, Winchester, Chester, Liver- pool, Bristol, Dr. Campbell Morgan, Dr. Forsyth, Dr. Horton, Dr. Bartlett. I hope I shall give no offence if I say that the proposal is such an important one that public men and the public generally ought at least to be informed on the matter, and for that reason one is trying at some inconven- ience to arrange these conferences.— Yours, etc., Swansea. J. T. RHYS. Swansea.

ILALESTON LABOURER AND FAMILY

LALESTON LABOURER AND FAMILY GIVEN ANOTHER OPPORTUNITY. At Bridgend Police Court on Saturday-be- fore Alderman W. Llewellyn (chairman) and other Magistrates, William J. Woodham, lab- ourer, High Street, Laleston, was summoned for neglecting two of his children-Edward (6) and Matthew (2)-in such a way as to cause them unnecessary suffering. Defendant pleaded not guilty. Mr. David Llewelyn, acting for the prosecu- tion upon the instructions of Inspector Richard 13est (N.S.P.C.C.), in his opening statement, said defendant had a wife and four children, and these were the two youngest. Besides, he had a daughter (18), who had been ill in bed for some weeks, and a boy of 10 (William Jame<), who was not living at home. For some reason defendant did not live with his wife and children, but lodged in another house two or three doors down the street, and he had left his family very poorly provided for. The Inspector, in supplemtnary evidence, said that on the occasion of his visit (September 23rd) he found Edward's body covered with ver- min bites, and his shirt in ribbons, clad in an old jersey, and with his boots and stockings "very bad." Matthew was pale, thin, and deli- cate, and similarly verminous, and there was no food in the house. The beds were of sacking, whilst two old tables and a chair were the only furniture downstairs, except the improvised bed on which the sick daughter slept. Her case was a sad one, as, evidently, she was very ill; and it was painful even to look at her. De- fendant lodged with a woman named Mrs. Wil- liams. Witness told him about the state of affairs, and explained to him that if it con- tinued the case would be brought before the Magistrates. He promised to improve, and did SQ for a time. Defendant persisted that he contributed 15s. weekly, and also provided articles of food, which the woman denied. The Chairman, addressing defendant, re- minded him that if he spoke the truth, the amount was altogether inedaqute. Giving corroborative evidence, P.C. Stockford said he knew of no reason why defendant should not live with his wife. The man drank a little, but he bad never had any complaints about him. Mrs. Woodham said her husband had now re- turned to her. She did not know why he went, and he had no reason for living apart. Not having sufficient money, she was forced to go out to work, and got on as best she could with the help of her daughter (when she was healthy and fit), and the assistance of a sister at Tondu. She was afraid of her husband, who was a "drunken blackguard and always had been." On her hands and knees she had prayed to him for money. She admitted that he was not afraid of work, and worked regularly. He had only once given her his weekly wages, and that was the first week after marriage. He had struck her many times, and she had twice summoned him. The Chairman (to defendant): We are satis- fied you have not done your duty, but there is nothing against you, and we don't want to send you to gaol. We will adjourn the case for a fortnight to give you an apportunity of making provision for your wife and family. You will appear here in a fortnight, and then we will give our decision.

IPORTHCAWL

PORTHCAWL. REDUCTION OF RATE.—A special meet- ing of the Porthcawl Council was held, under the presidency of Mr. T. James, to consider the estimates for the ensuing six months. On the motion of Mr. T. G. Jones, seconded by the Rev. D. J. Arthur, the Council fixed the new district rate at Is. 8d. in the J6. The summer rate was 3s. lOd. in the R. m

IBRYNCETHIN I

BRYNCETHIN. ST. THEODORE'S CHURCH.-The har- vest festival was held on Sunday and Monday of last week. The special preachers were: Rev. D. Ambrose Jones, M.A. (Vicar of Kid- welly) on Sunday; and Rev. J. R. Pugh, B.A. (Vicar of Nantymoel), on Monday. The church was tastefully decorated by the lady members of the church and choir, under the supervision of Mrs. C. H. O'Regan. The singing by the choir (under the leadership of Mr A. G. Hibbs, showed a marked improve- ment on previous years. The solos in the an- them were beautifully taken by Miss G. Takel. Mrs. Morris, of Penyfai, presided at the organ during the festival. At the close of Monday's service a sale of fruit and vege- tables took place, the proceeds going towards the tobacco fund for soldiers and sailors.

Advertising

STANDARD MEDICINE Is very essential because there are so many different strength and quality Drug products on the market. Thou- sands of people ask for Kernick's Vegetable Pills Knowing them to be effective ALWAYS. The reason is that they are compounded from the highest quality of ingredients commonly pre- scribed for Intestinal Irregularity, Flatulency, etc. The strength is al- ways the same. One day you may rreed them. They are sold at Chemists' Shops for 9d. and Is. 3d. per box. Up-to-Date Appliances for turning out every class of work at competitive pnoaa, at lb* "Glamorgan Gazette" Printing Work*. .A .L' I" I ¡ ¡ ¡ Ii I i ¡ I h I- _I P. II It is the olive oil in Puritan II II Soap which saves the II ¡ ¡ clothes from wash-day I wear and tear. F II i II For this reason alone thou- II I sands of housewives say j II quite truly that | ¡ I II PURITAN R s?j??? I 1 ¡ t I i > H ii saves its cost every week II Ii in the clothes it saves. II i j jj Will you order Puritan Soap J i j j from your grocer, oilman or I i ¡ stores? It is sold in several j | sizes—a size for every need. II I CHRISTR. THOMAS & BROS., LTD. BRISTOL. I m i l 

PENYFAI SOLDIER HERO

PENYFAI SOLDIER HERO HONOURED AT THE FRONT. DOMESTIC HOSTILITIES AT HOME. A sad commentary upon the exuberance with which (in patriotic vein) we sing about "Keep- ing the home fires Burning" and the like, was afforded in a case before the Bridgend Justices on Saturday, when the most unreflective could not but take pity upon the man who stood in the dock, the relic of the strong man he once was, suffering from shell shock, and in a tremor, as one stricken of the palsy. The poor fellow, formerly a collier, is invalided out of the Army-he is the hero of 17 bayonet charges —and at home, where peace reigns, he is still at war, in the little world of Penyfai, and in his own particular domestic castle. By name he is William Edward Martin (Penyfai), and he was summoned for persistent cruelty by his wife Mrs. Louisa Martin, now of 23 Avondale St., Ynysyboeth, Abercynon. There were two sin- gular features in the case. The trouble arose not, as usual, from the malign influence of a mother-in-law, who (worthy soul) does not, as a rule, deserve any (or hardly any) of the unkind I things so nnsympathetically said about her; but from the presence in the household of the wife's j brother, to whom the husband objected—especi-! ally in regard to one incident, in which the wife on her birthday, rejected the offering of a pair of new boots from her husband-though later she accepted the offering of a similar gift ftrm her brother, thereby exasperating "hubby," who was much incensed with his wife and her brother, and displayed a peculiar aversion for the boots that found favour in the eyes of his beloved. Mr. David Llewellyn appeared for the wife, and Mr. W. M. Thomas conducted the defence. At the outset, Mr. W. M. Thomas said the parties had been married since 1902. Defend- ant served in the South African war, and at the outbreak of the European war he joined the forces, and was with the forces until June of this year. He left the service with an excellent character, and all the unpleasantness had been caused by the woman's brother, who lived with them. Under the circumstances, he suggested that this was a proper case for a settlement. Mr. D. Llewellyn: The charge is persistent cruelty, and my client ia not prepared to go back to him. The Chairman (Alderman W. Llewellyn), to i Mrs. Martin: You have heard the suggestion made—that it is desirable there should be a settlement of some sort. Complainant: I have forgiven him on several occasions. I have given him every chance be- fore bringing him here. Mr. W. M. Thomas: He is desirous that she should live with him, and is also desirous to have the custody of the children, of whom he is very fond. There will be no difficulty if her brother will only keep away. Complainant: I am afraid to go back to him. The case then proceeded, and was opened by Mr. Llewellyn, who said the parties married on January 5th, 1902, at Coleford, in the Forest of Dean, and there were three children of the mar- riage. During the first two years of their mar- ried life they resided at Coleford. Even at that early stage, the husband's conduct was bad, and his wife was forced to summons him at the local Police Court. The first summons was withdrawn, and the second was adjourned for a month with the view of the possibility of a settlement. Mrs. Martin returned to her hus- band, and the summons collapsed. After a few years the parties came to this district, residing at Llanharran, and latterly at Penyfai. The wife, all the time, was most unhappy through the ill-treatment of her husband, who was very much addicted to drink, and also was abusive and threatening, and frequently she had to leave the house to avoid him. At the beginning of the war (to her great relief) defendant at- tached himself to the Welsh Regiment. He was on active service in France, and was discharged on June 1st last on medical grounds. The brother had lived there for 11 years, because complainant was afraid to live alone with her husband. For her own safety, it was abso- lutely necessary that she should have some- body to look after her, and it was noteworthy that in the presence of her brother defendant had never abused his wife. He was incensed because she had taken a pair of boots from her brother, and had refused a pair from him. The wife, giving evidence, alleged that the ill- treatment started a few weeks after the marri- age. Defendant was more often drunk than sober, and he had threatened to take her life. Without her brother's compaionship and protec- tion she could never live with her husband. When defendant was in France, and came home on furlough, he was always drunk, and once she had to escape in her nightdress, through the bedroom window, and seek the protection of neighbours. He left the Army with a pension of 32s. 6d. a week. She had never reason to com-I plain about his not giving her sufficient money for maintenance. What she did complain about was that he had ordered her, and her bro- ther, out of the house, and she was afraid to return to him. After the adjournment, complainant (closely cross-examined by Mr. W. M. Thomas) admitted that during the 14 years of her married life she had always enjoyed good health. Three years ago next November, her husband threw a loaf at her. It was not a fact that she had continually accused him of infidelity, "Never at any time; I swear it," she added with some asperity. Mr. W. M. Thomas: You can imagine all sorts of hysterical things, but you can only give evidence as to the facts. Witness repeated that her husband was con- tinually drunk. Then Mr. Thomas put it to her: Is your brother a sober man ?—No. He's a big drunkard ?—Yes. "Then, said Mr. Thomas, "you object to your husband who is not a big drunkard, and you don't object to your brother who is a big drunkard. Ain't you very hysterical ?-Not to my knowledge. Don't you call your husband very choice names ?-No. Further examined, witness admitted to Mr. Aomaa tha she haducoaxed" and "scolcfed" her husband, but it was not a fact that she had ever called him a waster, a monkey, or a Rodney. He has been a kind and affectionate father to the children ?-"Yes" witness assented. "And I believe," continued Mr. Thomas, "The workmen at the colliery subscribed and made him a presentation of 95 ?-Yes. And that money he handed over to you?— Yes, Witness, in reply to further questions, said she returned her husband 5s. or 6s. a week pocket money. Whereupon Mr. W. M. Thomas put it to her: Is that sufficient for h;m to make a beast of himself every night at the price of beer at the present time? (A laugh.) Questions were next directed to the hus- band's proffered pair of boots (costing 16a 6d.) and witness explained that the reason of her rejection of the gift was that, in these times, she would have preferred money to boots, at any rate so expensive a pair. "Ah," chipped in Mr. Thomas, "you o b jected to the 16s. 6d. pair your husband bought because it was too much money, but you were quite willing for your brother to buy you a one-guinea pair ? "That was not out of my pocket," was the very prompt, not to say very womanlike, re- ply. You know he is suffering from shell-shock? —Yes, and he has had every sympathy. Doesn't he jump in his sleep, and get very frightened ?-I have never heard it. Doesn't he often complain to you of fight- ing his battles over in his sleep P-No. You have had to complain about his kick- ing?—No, not unless he was drunk. He has continually provided you with money P- Ye8. He has kept you substantially well off ?- Yea. Witness here admitted having said that if her brother was forced to leave her she would go herself. Mr. W. M. Thomas put it to the witness that no Bench of Magistrates would hold the throwing of a loaf to be a crime. Mr. Dd. Xflewellyn said it was scarcely a mark of affection. Mr. W. M. Thmoas: A loaf of bread is not a dangerous weapon, anyhow! Haven't you for years continually taunted him about other women?—"No, sir", (this very emphatically)—"I can't throw it up to him, never! Nor (she went on) had she ever said she would get his pension stopped, and give him a character that would not be listened to in Bridgend t Mr. W. M. Thomas: Have you accused him since his discharge through shell shock, of be- ing a --lunatic? No. Do you know he served in the South African War P-Te& And was a year aad 264 days in this war?-He was not at the front all this time. Do you know that on leaving the service he was described by hie Lieut.-Colonel as a "sober, honest, and trustworthy man"—signed, Scho- field? After that do you say he is a drunkard? —Witness t They don't know him. Aren't you a quarrelsome and most suspicious woman?-No, sir. Mr. Thomas: Very well. You say he has not touched you for nine years, and that you have not suffered in health. Mrs. Leyshon, a neighbour, was called to cor. roborate the story. The burden of her evi- dence was that Martin "did not treat his wife as he should," and that so far as she (Mrs. Leyshon) was concerned, she wouldn't like to live with him. By Mr. Thomas: We (complainant and her- self) are not very friendly. Another female neighbour alleged constant quarreling, denied that Mrs. Martin was the "principal cause," and without going so far as to say that the lady was "very hysterical," con- ceded that she was very "exciteable," or, as Mr. Thomas put it, "showed off and made demon- strations." A third lady delivered her testimony, saying that defendant had not treated his wife as he should; and then Mr, Thomas submitted there was no case to answer, and no evidence of legal persistent cruelty, such as would entitle the Court to make an order. The Chairman, after conferring with his col- leagues, said there was a case to be answered. In reply, Mr. Thomas urged that complain- ant would not get rid of her brother (who was the cause of all the mischief); that defendant gave his wife all his earnings; that, admittedly, he had not toucher her for 9i years, and that complainant gave him only 5s. or 6s. a week pocket money. The man had been in SEVENTEEN BAYONET CHARGES. Besides, he was blown up by a mine, was un- conscious for a long period, and now was suffer- ing from shell shock. In his present state he was incapable of work, and the suggestion that he was lazy was intolerable. The Chairman: What suggestion? Mr. Thomas: It is suggested that he is malin- gering. The X5 presented to him he handed over to his wife; also his earnings, and the sug- gestion of drunkenness was an hysterical sug- gestion. This was a case of a wife who had grown tired of her husband, and had no legiti- mate or proper reason known to the law for get- ting Tid of him. Defendant was called, and giving his own ver- sion, said he had never threatened his wife. He attributed to the woman the strange fancy that she never wanted to see him out of her sight, and when he went anywhere of a night, she was always under the impression that he was "up to no good." He had never been oonvicted and had never touched his wife except once, when he gave her a "slight tap" for making a certain suggestion. The brother was the cause of all the bother, and he started it in the pub- lic-house, about giving his sister the pair of boots. His wife had called him a waster, a fraud, a Rodney, and a lunatic since he had been home. He had been blown up by a mine, and had fought at Festiburg, Neuve Chapelle, Givenchy, and in various other engagements; and was in hospital for twelve months. He was not now able to work, by the doctor's certificate. Asked if his friends didn't sometimes "lush him up," witness couldn't say any different, raised the extenuating circumstance that he was always able to walk home, and said the brother was "always on the booze." His wife said to him (witness) when he was ill in bed, "Will you settle so much on me?" He said "No," and she replied, "Very well; you will lose your pen- sion and your character!" His wife and family (he added) had never wanted for anything, and "rve treated her as well as -she has treated me, and her brother has got to go." The Bench made a, maintenance order of 25s. a week, and also called upon defendant to pay the costs, X2 9s.

Advertising

PIANOS! PIANOS! PIANOS! I IB All British Made Best Value in the World An immense Variety to Select from. CASH or EASY TERMS, IIMBBMMBHBBBBBBBK A WRITTEN WARRANTY WITH EVERY INSTRUMENT. We challenge any Firm to Offer Better Value, Terms ot -Prices.- WRITE FOR CATALOGUE AND COMPARE OUR STOCK Thompson & Shackell, (Ltd.), Invite fnspectlon e! the Latest Designs by the Leading British Manufacturers. Brinsmead, Broadwoort Player Pianos, Hopkmson, Challen & Son, Collard & Collard, Moore & Moo;.u,, Crowley, AjelL-, Cramer, &c., &c. Largest Discounts fOI- Cash. Old Instruments taken in exchange.—Sole Agents for the Celebrated Estey Organs. Quotations Given for Pianos and Organs by any Maker in the Kinfdam. Tunings and Repairs a Speciality. Repairs of every description. Estimates Free. Music and Small Goods in Great Variety. THOMPSON Md.SHACKELL, Ltd. Mm PIANOFORTE MANUFACTURERS & ORGAN BUILDERS' j???BH?? X, WYJMCIIIELJMX Street, SALE, BRIDGEND. WITH BRANCHES THROUGHOUT SOUTH WALES AND ]¥ MONMOUTHSHIRE. f

KENFIG HILL GUARDSMAN KILLED

KENFIG HILL GUARDSMAN KILLED. News has been received of the death in action of Pte. Maldwyn Evans, son of Mrs. Morfudd Evans, of Brynonen, Kenfig Hill. A letter from his chum states that as he was re- turning from the trenches last Sunday night he was struck by a shell. Maldwyn Evans was an active Sunday School worker before he left the district. He enlisted from Cric- cieth in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, afterwards transferring to the Welsh Guards, and went to the front in July last. The deepest sym- pathy is felt with his mother. Mrs. Evans is well known in South Wales as a strong sup- porter of the Women's Temperance Associa- tion, Merched y De," and she is the secre- tary of the Workmen's District Nursing Com- mittee and a member of the Boarding-out Committee of the Bridgend Union.