Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
13 articles on this page
PORTHCAWL URBAN DISTRICT I COUNCIL

PORTHCAWL URBAN DISTRICT I COUNCIL THE "SURCHARGE"CANARD. I CH-EAP COAL FOR HEROES' DEPEN- DENTS. NO TROOPS FOR PORTHCAWL. A.n artiiuary meeting of the Porthcawl U.D. Council was held on Monday. Mr. T. James; waa in the chair, end there were also present: Messrs. T. E. Deere, R. E. Jones, T. G. Jones, D. Davies, and Rev. D. J. Arthur, with the legal clerk, the deputy clerk, and the sur- veyor. Before beginning the business of the sitting, the Chairman rose to make a reference to the lamented death of Major J. L. Lambert. The late officer, he reminded his colleagues, waa for nine years a member of that Council, and for twelve months had presided over its delibera- tions. He had given his life for his oountry, and lay buried in a foreign land, and the Council would doubtless wish to mark their deep sense of the occasion in an appropriate manner. A vote'of condolence with the family of the late officer was moved and seconded respeo- tively by Messrs. D. Davies and R. E. Jones. Mr. T. E. Deere, rising to support, said the matter touched him very near. His con- nection with the late Major Lambert was of long standing, and had been very close in- deed, as they knew. Major Lambert had died as he lived, game to the last His last words were, "I have finished. Thank you, gentlemen, for all you have done for me." The rote was passed by the members stand- ing in silenoe. NO TROOPS FOR PORTHCAWL. Letters were read from Colonei Pitcairn Campbell, Headquarters, Western Command, Chester, in reply to the Council's letter re- minding him of his promise to endeavour to send troop6 to Porthcawl for the winter. Col. Campbell wrote that, much as he should like to send troops to Porthoawl this winter, he Seared it would be impossible to do ao. They had now sufficient huts to accommodate prac- tically all their men, and very few men indeed would be put in billets this winter. If, how- ever, it should be found necessary to accom- modate any of the men in billets, then Porthoawl will certainly be borne in mind, as its capacity for billetting troops is well-known here." This "ply was something of a blow to the Council, who had set their hopes high oo getting troops for the town. But, in face of Col. Campbell's letter, there was nothing to be said, and the Council passed oo without comment to the next business. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE. A reminder was read from the clerk to Uni- versity College, Cardiff, that the Council "should now proceed to the election of a re- presentative to the Court of Governors, in ac- cordance with Clause M of the Charter, whereby one representative is allotted to every town of over 3,000 inhabitants." The retiring Governor was Mr. T. G. Jones, and that gentleman was re-elected. THE SEWERAGE LOAN. The next business was the now notorious question of the sewerage loan, oonoerning which correspondence, etc., had recently ap- peared in the daily Press. The Deputy Clerk (Mr. Wm. Chorley) read out the letter that had been received from the Local Government Board, sanctioning the bor- rowing of a first instalment of the sum asked for. It was this letter, presumably, inter- preted by someone imperfectly acquainted with the facts, that had set the ball rolling in the daily Press. It ran thus:— To the clerk of the Porthcawl U.D.C.— Dear Sir,—I am directed by the President of the Local Government Board to state that he has had under consideration the report made by the Board's Inspector, Mr. Crosthwaite, on the inquiry held by him with reference to the explication of the Urban District Council of Porthoawl for sanction for the borrowing of farther moneys in respect of works of sewer- age. "It has been decided to comply with the application to the extent of 2949, and formal sanction of a loan to that amount is forwarded to you herewith. This sum is arrived at as follows:— Expenditure on Works provided for on Accepted Scheme £749 Storm Gullies 45 Surface Water Drainage h_ 156 E949 The Board are not prepared to sanction the loan at the present time in respect of the remainder of the expenditure. No payment should be made out of the loan to workmen in the Council's permanent employ, or to any salaried oiffcer of the Coun- cil, except in the oase of payments (if any) due to yourself for legal work in connection with the object of the loan and not within the scope of your ordinary duties under the terms of your appointment as clerk to the Council." The letter having been read, the Clerk (Mr. Evan Dariea) made a statement which was practically a repetition of what he had al- ready explained in his letter to the Press. He pointed out that in the first place the Coun- cil had asked for a loan of P,1,790, which sum was amended at the L.G.B. inquiry to £ 2,400. The amount aanctioned was the sum that was required Immediately. As regards the grossly inaccurate report that some misguided person had aent to the Press, he had thought it right to reply to it immediately, so that the public should not remain a moment longer than was necessary ander the impression that the Coun- cil was being surcharged. He thought it was a stigma both on the town and on the Coun- cillors, M-. 2 IL Deere moved the confirmation of the Clerk's action. Mr. B. E. Jones seconded. It was a great pity that the report had gone out, frighten- ing the ratepayers. COAL FOR SOLDIERS' DEPENDENTS. I A mgmy sarcastic letter waa read from one I of the coal merchants in the town, cmqai- I menting the Council on its philanthropy "at the ratepayers' expenses" in carting coke for the use of amall consumers prac- tically free of cost, and hoping that the Coun- cil would see fit to extend its philanthropic efforts by performing the same kind offioe for private merchants. Mr. T. G. Jones (a member of the Gas Com- mittee, which is primarily responsible for the measure) said the letter called for little com- ment. What the Council was doing was only a small step in the direction they ought to take. They might go further, and include coal as well as coke. In fact, he would like to move The Chairman reminded Mr. Jones that the matter would OOllie up for discussion on j the report of the Gas Committee, and on this understanding Mr. Jones waived his motion for the time being. I The Gas Committee's report having been presented, it was pointed out that under the new regime there had been a considerable saving in wages over the corresponding period of last year. t Most gratifying," was Mr. R. E. Jones' comment on the report. If they went on in this way they were going to convert the gas- works into a highly lucrative undertaking. Mr. T. G. Jones said that the committee, with the invaluable assistance of Mr. Chorley, had practically re-modelled the business of running the gasworks. There was now a better system of accountancy, of ordering, etc.-As regards the inducement given to the dependents of men on active service to get coke from the works, the scheme had been highly appreciated. And in this connection he would now raise his motion in regard to the extension of these facilities to coal. The committee thought that the time had come when coal might be supplied to soldiers and sailors' wives and dependents at practically cost price, namely, 26s. per ton. It might be argued that they would thereby interfere with the legitimate operations of local traders. But coal merchants, he was sure, did not want to exploit the poor dependents of our brave defenders. The committee would like to ex- tend these facilities to all working people this winter, but at any rate, let them make a start with soldiers' and sailors' dependents. Mr. T. E. Deere seoonded, if the proviso were added that not more than one ton per month was supplied. Mr. R. E. Jones thought that half-a-ton a month was as much as any working class household would be likely to use. The Chairman agreed with Mr. R. E. Jones, because there was the coke aa well. The maximum amount was accordingly al- tered to 10 cwt. a month. ARMY CHRISTMAS PUDDINGS. Communications were read from the Cen- tral War Charities Committee. General in- structions and principles as affecting local war charities were laid down for the Council's guidance. One communication referred in particular to funds for providing men at the front with Christmas puddings. The Coun- cil was informed that the privilege of handling such a fund has been entrusted exclusively to two great London newspapers, the "Daily Telegraph" and the "Daily News." The fund worked by these two papers was the only one authorised for this particular purpose by the Government, and all money raised to provide plum puddings for the Army would have to go through them. A letter from the newspapers was also read stating the number of puddings purchasable by various stated sums. In connection with the above, a letter was read from Miss Kate Saul, the well-known elocutionist, offering to give a Dickens recital to raise money for the fund. Mr. R. E. Jones: I am sure it is a very generous offer on Miss Saul's part. If be- tween us we could raise £21, which would supply a battalion j Mr. T. E. Deere: In face of that letter, I move that a committee be formed of the whole Council to arrange with the lady, etc. He suggested the money raised be devoted to puddings for the Pioneer Detachment, which included most of their Porthcawl lads. On the motion of Mr. T. G. Jones, it was decided to ask Miss Saul for a date after the 14th November, so as to give the committee a fortnight to work the* matter up. MISCELLANEOUS. A letter was read from Pyle Parish Council announcing that it gave its whole-hearted sup- j port to Porthcawl's application for the 1918 National Eisteddfod. Arising out of the minutes of the Works Committee, it was reported that the supply of luminous paint had given out, and that, failing that method of rendering the vgaa standards less dangerous in the dark, some of the more central street lamps had been prepared so that they could be lighted in such a manner as to comply with the requirements of the police. Mention was made of an allotment at New- ton that had not been worked, nor the rent paid, for two years.—It was proposed to put up notices at the allotments inviting applica- tions for it from prospective cultivators, but Mr. R. E. Jones reminded the Council that I they had a number of waiting applicants on their books, and proposed that this vacant allotment should go to the first in the list.— This was agreed to. On the clerk's recommendation, and on the motion of Mr. T. E. Deere, seconded by Mr. T. G. Jones, the seat vacated by the retire- ment of Mr. John Grace was declared vacant. At their next meeting the Council will pro- ceed to the election of Mr. Grace's successor. On the motion of the Chairman, it was de- cided to place seats on the Common for the use of wounded soldiers, many of whom were I unable to walk far.

PYLE ABSENTEE I

PYLE ABSENTEE. I Thomas Rees Davies (24), oollier, Ton Kenfig, Pyle, was charged at Bridgend on Thursday last week with being an absentee under the Military Service Act.—Inspector R-ees Davies said that defendant had been idle for two months. Defendant told witness that he had been ill, but could not produce a medical certificate as he had been under the doctor's care for one week only.—Defendant was banded over to the military authorities.

THE PLOUGH INN CEFN CRIBBWR I

THE PLOUGH INN, CEFN CRIBBWR I WET "-INSIDE AND OUT. I Visits by the police at three public-houses had their sequel in as many convictions, at i Bridgend Police Court on Saturday-before Alderman W. Llewellyn and other Magis- trates. The firlit ease was that in which Mary Ann John, widow, licensee of the Plough Inn Ale- house at Cefn Cribbwr, was summoned for being party to a sale of beer during prohibited hours. Defendant was represented by her son, who spoke valiantly for his mother. ) Inspector Rees Davies deposed that at 4.25 p.m. on the 20th inst., with Sergt Morgan (id j plain clothes) he visited the Plough Inn kept by Mrs. John. In the front room six men were found sitting on a form, and all except I John Edmunds, were in their working clothes- with glasses in front of them containing beer. James Williams and Thomas Richards had in I front of them pint measures half-full of beer, while David John was in possession of a pint with a spoonful of something in it, which 1 we both tasted, and found to be beer," anil j so it was also in the case of another, named George Myers. Llewellyn Williams and John I Edmund a had full pints in front of them. As they (the police) entered, they saw the land- lady supply Williams and Edmunds with two; pints, which she* put on the table in front of them. Witness asked the landlady for an I explanation, but she made no reply. All the men were similarly reticent except Llewellyn I Williams, who exclaimed: That's my drink," pointing to a glass on the table con- I taining "stone ginger." Witness took posses- sion of the beer, and poured it into bottles, which he corked in the presence of the defen- dant and her visitors. The latter represen- ted that "each paid for his own." The land- lady, on being informed that she would be re- ported, replied: "I am very sorry. They came in for change, and I supplied them with one pint each." Another man, John Morgan, a collier, in his working clothes, had no beer in front of him, This being the case, defendant's son said his mother, who was unable to attend, had in- structed him to plead guilty. The men, he explained, called for change. They repre- sented they had been "working in water all day," and felt very cold. His mother, tak- ing pity on them, was prevailed upon to supply them, and she was in the act of serv- ing the pints "when the Inspector walked in." Defendant had been in the house 53 years— since birth. Were she convicted, she might have to leave the house, and was not in a posi- tion to take another, or able at her time of life to take up some other occupation. Wit- ness added that he buried his father last year, and had two sisters at home, and two brothers in the Army. The Superintendent, in reply to the Bench, said he had nothing to say against Mrs. John. Mr. L. M. Thomas (Port Talbot) appeared for the six men-,couiers of Cefn Cribbwr— —Jamea Williams, Thomas Richards, David  John, and George Myers, who were charged with "consuming beer"; and Llewellyn Wil- liams and John Edmunds, with "attempting to consume beer"—between 2.30 and 6.30 p.m. on the day in question. Admitting the offence, Mr. L. M. Thomas hardly knew what he could say to justify his appearance in miti- gation of penalty. Four of the defendants j held important positions in collieries, and had never been there before. They called for change, and feeling wet and cold, they asked for, and were supplied, each with a pint. In asking for a light penalty, he made the sug- gestion that as the Plough was situated in an "outlandish place," the people there were not so likely to be familiar with all the provisions I. of the law. Alderman Llewellyn (after consultation) said they took into consideration the number of years defendant had lived in the house; the fact that there was nothing against her, and the further fact that to some extent she was placed in an unfortunate position She would be fined E3, and the other defendants £21. each.

IDONT DRUG YOUR STOMACHI

DONT DRUG YOUR STOMACH. I MAGNESIA WILL NEUTRALISE THE I, HARMFUL ACID. Drugp are a curse instead of a blessing to I the mail or woman who employs them indis- criminately. They numb the nerves, and al- though the trouble may be subdued for a time by the use of ever-increasing doses it is not cured, and sooner or later it will manifest itself in a serious if not incurable form. Especially is this true in the treatment of in- digestion and dyspepsia. To subdue or quell the symptoms of these all too common ail- ments, drugs and artificial digestants are ex- tensively used, yet it has often been demon- strated that such things are usually useleag as well as dangerous. Digestive trouble, in I nine cases out of ten, is due to an excessively acid condition of the stomach, and the simplest and best way to neutralise this acid is to take half a teaspoonful of pure bisurated magnesia in a little water after meals. This is neither a drug nor a medicine, but a simple antacid, which achieves one object thoroughly —that is, it neutralises the acid, and by so doing it prevents the food fermenting, and removes the chief cause of pain and unpleas- antness after eating. Bisurated magnesia will enable you to discard your drugs and artifi- & cial digestants, and make it posible for you to enjoy good meals without fear of resultant pain. Obtain a little to-day and prove it, II but Be sure you get the pure bisurated mag- nesia, which is absolutely distinct from the I acetates, citrates and oxides, or the equally unsuitable mixtures of bismuth and magnesia. You will find that it is stocked by J. Jones, of 31 Caroline Street, and most other high-class chemists everywhere. 8961

Advertising

Up-to-date BppbjLnow for turning out *rrmry I slom of work "t competitive prices. Okt ".M I-mtmorwn. Gamtte" Printing Works. _&"MIME Women Series-No.4. "How are you getting on t. -he said. t. How are you getting on, Alice?" he said. "Fine," I replied,, but I was munHmt feeling a bit tired though I didn't want to own to it. What with pushing past people standing inside and the climbing up top, I wML can tell you it does take it out of one a bit. "Women don't eat enough," he said; why don't you take a cup of cocoa ?-it turns m IIHL a biscuit into a meal." But somehow I wouldn't, just because it was his idea and not mine. One night I came in extra wet H ?M?MHMKMMWZ?M???'? tPh and cold and there was his Rowntree's 6 (Wi/WaKHt r' lflfii f r"*0 /?? .? Cocoa steaming in the jug, and it had such a lovely fragrance that I drank the whole 8g a lot up. "Hullo," he said when he came 1 7 8;1' in, id where's my cocoa?" Then I had to H A own up that I had drunk it, but I didn't ■ E B care a bit, for I was feeling so fresh i ? F ? ?t? and happy. I wouldn't go without my V Rowntree's Cocoa now for anything- I. £ hj* ctCbcoa night and morning. B jj ?? ? .?? night and mornin g [ ad" a Sidcuit Mo a meai J 1.. _-a -at V n.

TONDU AND ABERKENFIG I

TONDU AND ABERKENFIG. TRADE UNION LABOUR COUNCIL.—A meeting of the Tondu and District Trade Union Labour Council was held in the Carey Hall, Aberkenfig, on Friday last, Mr. G. Hill, Coytrahan, presiding.—The question of the proposed Public Hall was discussed. It was agreed to continue to press for the workmen to be officially represented upon the commit- tee and trustees.—In regard to the disputed right-of-way near Tondu, attention was called $9 the recent prosecutions for trespass, which resulted in the dismissal of the cases. It was resolved to ask the Newcastle Higher Parish Council to take every possible step to main- tain this right-of-way—The question of the price of milk waa raised. It was reported that the local milk vendors had given notice of their intention to increase the price of milk from 5d. to 6d. per quart, as from the 1st of November. After very strong protests had been made by the whole of the delegates, it was resolved to appoint a small deputation to interview the Milk Vendors' Association, and failing an agreement to allow the present prices to' stand, that a mass meeting should be held to decide what further action shall be taken.—It was reported that a public meeting would be held to endeavour to raise funds to provide adequate clothing for the children of soldiers, whose separation allow- ances and pensions were insufficient for that purpose. It was agreed to appoint represen- tatives to attend that meeting, and to ex- press the Trade Union view upon this ques- tion.

NATIONAL UNION OF RAILWAYMEN

NATIONAL UNION OF RAILWAYMEN ORPHAN FUND CONCERT AT ABERKENFIG. Under the auspices of the Tondu Branch of the National Union of Railwaymen, a grand concert and children's aoenic revue took place on Wednesday of last week in the New Cinema Hall, Aberkenfig, before a crowded house, with the object of raising money for the or- phan fund of the Union. Rev. J. Rees, B.A., curate-in-charge of St. John's Church, who presided, drew attention to the great national work railwaymen were performing, and the strong claim they had on public support for their orphan fund. He was delighted to find such a ready response at that concert. The artistes were:—Madame Emilie Jones, Mr. Tom Davies, Mr. Ronald Nickless, Mr. David Bowen, Mr. Richard Vaughan, Mr. Tudor Dagg, Mr. Yeo, Mr. W. L. Hitchings, Mr. T. Thomas, Mr. W. Birtles, Misses Ada Hughes, Minnie Watts,. Dolly Crumpton, Florrie Beard, Louie Newman, Katie Lee, Enid Puffit, Elvey Conibear, Dolly David, Daisy Phillips, Rosie Hopkins, Katie Chappel, Ivy Hughes, Irene Hopkins, Violet Anthony, Elsie Anthony, Gertie Hayward, Cissie Rich- ards, Sylvia Rattenbury, Mrs. Franks. Miss Rosie Hopkins and Mr. R. Nickless shared the duties of accompanist, and Mrs. J. W. Hopkins conducted, assisted by Miss Marjorie Crumpton. The stage manager was Mr. W. Davies. It is hoped that a sum of nearly JE30 will be available for the orphan fund after the whole of the expenses have been met. The initia- tive for this effort is to be credited to Mrs. J. W. Hopkins, the conductress, who made her- self responsible for the whole of the pro- gramme. The stage properties for the soenio effects in the tableaux were lent by Mr. W. Davies, the manager of the Cinema Hall.

CEFN CRIBBWR I

CEFN CRIBBWR. I FUNERAL.—The mortal remains of the late William J. Lennox, Bedford Road, Cefn Cribbwr, who passed away on Wednesday of last week, at the early age of 27, were laid to rest at the Pyle Burial Ground on Satur- day. The Rev. D. J. Arthur officiated at the graveside. There was a large attendance of workmen from the Aberbaiden Collieries, some of whom acted as bearers. Previous to being incapacitated by his long and painful illness, deceased was employed at the Aber- baiden Collieries, where he was much re- spected by his fellow workmen. Mr. Lennox had been in failing health for the last three years, and had been confined to his bed for ten months, seven months of which were spent in the Cimla Sanatorium Hospital, Neath. The chief mourners were: Mrs. Lennox (widow), Mr. and Mrs. D. Lennox, Newport (father and mother); Mr. and Mrs. J. Lennox, Bryncoch (brother and sister-in- law) Mr. G. Lennox, Maesteg (brother); Miss S. J. Lennox, Peterston-super-Ely (sis- ter); Mr. and Mrs. A. Lennox, Cardiff (uncle and aunt), and Mrs, T. Edwards, Bridgend (aunt). Deceased leaves a widow and two children to mourn his loss.

EXCESS PROFITS

EXCESS PROFITS. To the Editor. Sir,—"I believe we shall all agree that the firms and companies who are supplying the State with munitions of war should not be entitled thereby to make undue profits out of them." This pronouncement formed part of Mr. As- quith's recent speech to representatives of Trade Unions at Newcastle, who had just agreed to the temporary suspension of their restrictive rules and customs, so as to facili- tite an increased output of munitions. Well, what are the factsP Here are some figures of excess profits made by some of the firms al- luded to by Mr. Asquith, up to June, 1916- profits, that is, over and above those of 1914: —Cammel Laird's, £ 192,000; The Projectile Co., £ 188,000; Brunner Mond, £ 272,000; Cur- tis and Harvey, 2124,000; Fife Coal Co., £ 134,000; United Collieries, £ 116,000. Munitions" for the inner man show the following excess for the same period Spillers and Bakers, £ 406,000; Argentine Meat, 2584,000; Consolidated Tea, L274,000; and two other side lines—Imperial Tobacco Co., £ 524,00; Lever Bros., £ 274,000. These Co., 2524,000; Lever Bros., £ 274,000. Where is the sacrifice here ?—Yours, etc., CHAS. G. FORESTER. I Aberkenfig, Oct. 31st, 1916.

PORTHCAWLI

PORTHCAWL. BRITISH AND FOREIGN BIBLE SO- CIETY.—Mr. T. James presided over the an- nual meeting of the Porthcawl auxiliary branch of the British and Foreign Bible So- ciety on Thursday of last week. The Rev. N. Moss Weaton, of Swansea, attended as a deputation from the parent society. I

No title

"In a radius of twelve miles of Wolver- hampton there are thousands and thousands of tons of potatoes locked up," was the state- ment made by a member of the Wolverhamp- ton Town Council on Tuesday, when he se- cured the unanimous adoption of a resolution protesting against this policy and urging the Government to take the neoessary steps to prevent exploitation in such an essential article of food.

PEHCOiD MANS CHEERY LETTER

PEHCOiD MAN'S CHEERY LETTER LLOYD GEORGE THE MAN." A letter, of which the following is 8G ex- tract has been received by Mr. J. D. 'frinyi— Penooed, from his son, Pte. Emrys Peacce, Royal Flying Corps. Although still a y".ng man, Pte. Pearoe has already aeen mvoh of the world. It is now several years ftinpn he emigrated to Australia, whence he paanati on to New Zealand, and later to South AI.. Pte. Pearoe wcites.- Lloyd George is 'the man' with the sol- diers now, and we can safely Bay t.b.at our land in him has produced one of the giaija of history. Our armies out here worship him for his plain-spoken speech the other day, Keep out of the ring.' The Germans are whining now that they are being poinded hard. They say now that they are fighting for existence. Not so long ago they boldly de- clared their programme to the worJd-ihe crushing of France and of Russia, a path to India, and the conquest of the seas. Now that they have deplorably failed, they have another tune. Thiepval, the fort we have recently cap- tured, was a tremendous stronghold. They were 80ft. underground, with an elaborate system of corridors and rooms, filled up like castles, and lit up by electricity. Kovel, Warsaw, Liege, and Novo Geongievsk were nothing to it. Our feat in winning it is re- markable, as we were ignorant of its strength. It gives you an idea of what our armies have done in driving them back on the Soflwne. People at home have not the remotest ooftcep* tion of their terrific strength there; the achievement of our troops is marvellous, and our artillery is magnificent. Of course, we are paying the price, and it is not finished yet. Maybe worse is to come, but the booI of England has found itself, and its spirit. Many bodies of our soldiers will carry on. Many a thousand have gone west since it staxted; thousands of hearts in the British Empire have been stricken; the women suffer, but still they carry on. The forces of hell nerer conquered. When there is a bombardment on bare, and shells are raining down, the air quiveong with the rush of missiles like wind through trees, one is numb; you cease to think, and the purpose of it all is lost. Then you hear them land on the trenches with an awful crash, and one wonders."

OGMORB VALE

OGMORB VALE JOINING THE COLOURS—An interesting little ceremony took place on Friday last at the Blandy Arms, Ogmore Vale, when Mr. E. Beynon, foreman of the Co-operative Stores, Ogmore Vale, was presented with a purse of money, on his leaving Ogmore Vale to join the colours. Mrs. Williams, the hostess, made the presentation in a neat little speech, befitting the occasion. Mr. Beynon suitably responded. Speeches were also made by Mr. Thomas, Mr. Powell, Mr. Gullett, and Mr. J. Swash. Mr. Beynon was an active member of the Shop Assistants' Union, and his loss will be keenly felt. A musical programme followed the presentation, and was very much enjoyed. Songs were given by Mr. J. Wil- liams, Mr. Morris, Mr. Corpe, Mr. Gould, Mr. David (Peel), Mr. Dague Pryor, and Pte. K. Waygood; and recitations by Mr. Jim Swash. The pianist was Mr. Dague Pryor, and Mr. Jim Swash presided.