Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
10 articles on this page
PORTRCWL URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL

PORTRC&WL URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL NEW MEMBER CO-OPTED. "FACTIOUS AND CORRUPT." INTERJECTIONS BY MEMBER OF PUBLIC. The usual monthly meeting of the Porth- oawl U.D. Council was held on Monday, Mr. T. James presiding. Then;; were aliio present Messrs. R. E. Jones, T. G. Jones, Daniel Davies, D. J. Rees, and T. E. Deere, with the clerks (Me^rs. Evan Davies and W. Chorley), and the surveyor (Mr. T. Hatcher). Several matters of more than average in- terest were discussed. The business of co- opting a member to take the place of Mr. John Grace came as near producing a scene as makes no matter. In addition to the pre- sentation of a memorial on the subject, from a number of ratepayers, there were three separate plans submitted to the Council for dealing with the question—open voting, ballot, and the referendum—by way of public meeting. In the end, the ballot had it, and the Council—or rather the majority— promptly availed itself of the privilege of secrecy by electing Mr. D. Jones, thus ignor- ing the memorial in favour of ex-Councillor Wm. Griffin-a. procedure that drew from Mr. J. E. Thomas, who formed an audience in himself, the indignant interjection of "Factious, corrupt!" Nothing perturbed by this outbreak, the Council quietly proceeded with the discussion of allotments, small holdings, and an ingeni- ous scheme for saving the town's waste paper that evolved from the fertile brain of Mr. T. G. Jones. MISS SAUL'S RECITAL. The Deputy Clerk (Mr. W. Chorley) an- nounced that as a result of Miss Saul's Dickens' Recital a sum of P.21 had been sent to Lord Burnham for the Soldiers' and Sailors' Christmaz Pudding Fund. (Hear, hear. ) DISTRICT NURSE. A letter was read from the County Nursing Association on the work of health visitation in the Council's area. Sixty cases of child- birth had been attended. All the oases were satisfactory. Some of the new arrivals were excellent little specimens a few were delicate, but were now doing well. CHRISTMAS CLOSING. A communication was read from the South Wales and Monmouthshire Association of Wholesale and Retail Confectioners, on the question of Sunday closing. The thousands of retail confectioners (said the memorial) were already severely hit by the Closing Order and the Association expres&ed its very strong opinion that the Order, so far as confectioners were concerned, ought to be entirely sus- pended for the period December 11th to Janu- ary 6th. The Association asked for the Council's support foe a memorial to the Gov- ernment to that effect. Mr. Dan Daviea asked whether the ques- tion might not more suitably be dealt with by the Chamber of Trade. Mr. T. E. Deere, to test the meeting, moved that the Council support the Association in the matter. The proposition was not seconded, however, and accordingly fell to the ground. THE COUNCIL COMPLIMENTED. The next communication read was of a nature that could not fail to be gratifying to a Council modestly proud of its achievements in the direction of war activities. It was a request from Treorky, couched in extremely flattering terms, for particulars of the Coun- cil's scheme for providfng coal and coke at cost price to the dependents of soldiers and sailors. The Chairman: This is not the first time this Council has been foremost in matters of this kind, but it has not always been recog- nised. It waa decided to send the desired particu- lars. -1 FLAG DAYS, ETC. A letter was read from the National Patrio- tic Relief Committee in regard to the Rumanian Relief Fund, and laying down the conditions on which a Rumanian Flag Day, if held, must be run. The reading of this communication raised the whole question of Flag Days in Porthcawl. The Chairman reminded the Council that they were more or less pledged to a Belgium Flag Day in the near future, and in this con- nection an appeal was read from. the Na, tional Committee of Relief in Belgium, ask- ing for the Council's co-operation in a great national effort on behalf of the children of Belgium, "among whom, as a result of Ger- man inhumanity and under-feeding, tuber- culosis and other diseases are making alarm- ing in-roads." A "Christmas envelope" waa enclosed, containing the Lord Mayor's ap- peal, and it waa earnestly hoped "one of these may find its way to every Christmas dinner talkie in the area under your authority." The Council was asked to form a local committee, if one did not already exists to distribute and collect envelopes. The Chairman: There are four flag days on the carpet now, and it is impossible to move. I should like the Council to meet in commit- tee, and see what can be done. Mr. D. Da vies moved to that effect. Mr. T. E. Deere: It's not much good unless the ladies are in it. Mr. D. Davies moved that a public meeting be held, in conjunction with the Council, to consider the whole matter. Mr. T. E. Deere howl they would not lose sight of Belgium. Belgium had not failed them in the time of great need. Mr. T. G. Jones reminded his colleagues that the Lord Roberts' Fund for soldiers' workshops was also having a flag day at Christmas. He hoped they would not clash. In the end the matter was left in the Chair- man's hands to make arrangements. STORM DAMAGE TO FRONT. The Surveyor reported that the recent storm had done considerable damage to the east and west timber piers, and to the sea wall. Heavy timbers had been carried away at the base of the piles. These had been re- placed while it had been found possible to run a strip of concreting along the pase of the sea wall. CO-OPTED MEMBER. I The next business was the co-opting of a member to take the place of Mr. John Grace, resigned. In regard to this the clerk read a petition signed by 112 ratepayers praying the Council to co-opt ex-Councillor Wm. Griffin to the vacant seat. The memorial, it was stated, was only started on Saturday, or many more signature could have been got. As it was, there had not been a single refusal, and the memorialista suggested that the peti- tion was one which the Council could not very well ignore. The petition having been duly read, Mr. T. G. Jones moved that the election be by ballot. It would save personalities. We have a memorial before us," said Mr. Jones. "We want to be fair to that memorial. There is a gentleman named in it, and the fairest way is to ballot. Mr. D. J. Rees would be very sorry to see the ballot adopted. He himself was prepared to vote openly. He was not afraid of any- body. Mr. R. E. Jones said it was not a question of being afraid. Y, reconded the motion. An amendment by Mr. D. J. Recs that the voting be open meeting with no seconder, Mr. T. E. Deere moved as a further amend- ment that mstoad of taking the matter into their own hands they should cast the onus on the ratepayers. Let the ratepayers them- selves choose Mr. Grace's successor, and who- ever it was, let them (the Council) welcome him in a hearty manner. Mr. R. E. Jones would welcome the amend- ment if the matter really went to the rate- payers. How did Mr. Deere propose to man- age it ? Mr. T. E. Deere: By calling a public meet- ing. If the ratepayers are interested they will come. Mr. R. E. Jones: In that case I cannot fall in with the proposal. Such a meeting would not in my opinion be representative of the ratepayers. You would have at most 300 or 400 people, and you know that you or I or anyone could pack such a meeting. Mr. T. G. Jones agreed. They all knew from recent experience what a ratepayers meeting could be. The decision of the meet- ing he alluded to was upset and routed when the people had a chance of deciding for them- selves. It was war time, and he hoped that most of them had buried the hatchet of con- tention. (Hear, hear.) For himself, he could only say that latterly they (the Coun- cil) had somehow or other not done their work as they used to do, and if they were not capable of co-opting a member according to the Act of Parliament, then the sooner they gave way and Jet the people elect a new lot altogether the better. His reason for advo- cating a vote by ballot was in order to ensure that the man who was elected should come to that chamber on a unanimous vote. If he (Mr. Jones ) named a man some other member would name someone else. There would be a fight. One of them would win, and the new man, whoever he was, would come in with the feeling that some of the members were against him. That was not desirable. The Legal Clerk: A public meeting would of course have no power of actual election. The Chairman thought the matter should be "done by ballot, and done now." On the matter being put to the vote, the decision, on the casting vote of the Chair- man, was for ballot. A ballot was accor- dingly taken, Mr. T. E. Deere abstaining, when the figures were:— Mr. David Jonea .3 votes. I Mr. Wm. Griffiths .2 votes. I Mr. Jones was therefore declared elected, Mr. J. E. Thomas (from the spectators' seats): It is factious—corrupt—unfair to the I ratepayers. The Chairman: I must ask you to retire, sir, unless you can behave yourself. I SMALL HOLDINGS. I I Mr. T. G. Jones raised the question of food production "from the standpoint of local administration." The Small Holdings Act I allowed that Council to grant holdings up to o acres to any applicant. The time had come I to act on that permission and to take steps to encourage the application for small hold- ings. He proposed that a Committee of the whole Council be formed to that end, and that it should seek to co-operate with the County Council and to make inquiries as to holdings over 5 acres. He had been told that there were many people waiting for al- lotments of from 5 to 50 acres, and could not get them, and he thought it was time they remedied that state of things if it existed. Mr. Dan Davies seconding, agreed that it was abouVtime the Council moved. Mr. R. E. Jones supported. This war made the cultivation of every inch of ground a most important question. He would like to ask, however, were they making the best of their present allotments? He had seen some uncultivated, and he thought if a man would not use his allotment they ought to take it from him. The Legal Clerk pointed out that several of the allotment holders were on active ser- vice. Mr. R. E. Jones: I am very sorry. It was my ignorance. Mr. T. E. Deere suggested that these un- cultivated allotments might be let tem- porarily to other people on condition that they paid the owners a small percentage of the produce, the Council to hold the allot- ments for the owners at the front, and on the understanding that they should be han- ded back when they returned. I The matter was eventually referred to a Committee, as was also the larger question of small holdings. PAPER SHORTAGE. I Mr. T. G. Jones called attention to the serious shortage of paper in the country, and proposed that they establish a municipal de- pot for waste paper, the public to be invited to save their waste paper in bags, which could then be collected by the town scaven- gers on their regular rounds. There were 600 houses in the town, and he calculated they could make a profit of from JE5 to £10 a week at the present price of paper, which they could devote to some charitable object. A machine for immediately condensing the paper could be bought for 23 10s. Mr. Jones gave details of his scheme, par- ticularly as regards the collecting by the town scavengers. Mr. Deere, who seconded, criticised these, and suggested instead a collection by the schoolboys of the town, and also that, to in- duce people to enter heartily into the scheme, the proceeds should go towards the benefit of their own town. This niatter also was eventually referred to a Committee for the threshing out of de- tails.

MINIATURE RIFLE SHOOTING NOTES I

MINIATURE RIFLE SHOOTING NOTES (By SHARP-SHOOTER.) j BRIDGEXD v. PORTHCAWL. j This match, which was shot on the comfort- able Range of the Porthcawl Club last Satur- day, turned out to be more exciting than was expected. Seeing that Bridgend started the season with an extraordinary score agSinst Bryn, piling up on that occasion a total which averaged 97 points per man, the visi- tors were quite justified in expecting an easy win over such a young club as Porthcawl, especially as this was the latter's first match since their advent to the league. The glorious uncertainty of the sport, however, was shown by the seasiders winning on the last squad by five points, the totals being 570 against 565. There is joy in Porthcawl town! The visiotrs took their reverse like the good sportsmen they are, knowing, they would no doubt level matters up at their next meeting at Bridgend. The skipper, Mr. J. P. Leat, was best man for the seasiders. Reserving for himself the difficult post of last man down and knowing that his side was one point behind, he put up the good score of 98 (one nine being really a doubtful bull) and won the match with five points in hand. The assistant secretary, W. R. Evans, who happened to be home on short leave (and who by the way looked well in khaki) was a great help to his side with 96. W. Thorne, who is recovering his old form, also made 96, while Henry C. Riley added a further 96. S. J. Phillips registered a responsible 95. M. Grace registered a modest 89. Total (6 men) 570. For Bridgend J. McCIellan was top man with a fine 98, his two last shots being good nines; following his century score against Bryn this is good shooting. That excellent shot, Tom Lewis had a good card spoilt by an unaccountable seven, and he had other hard luck with his 94. W. Thomas and the youth- ful J. David shot below form, their acores being 94 each. The same may be said of W. James with 93 and A. Davies with 92—both good ahots. Total 565. Mr. J. H. Tapp, the Glamorgan lidague secretary (who was present at the above match) has arranged an excellent series of post matches with some of the best clubs in England against Tondu, the league cham- pions. This should give the Tondu men splendid practice, which they will doubtless take advantage of. The post match idea is oommendable and well worth copying. Mr. Tapp tells us he has great difficulty in getting in touch with Gelli and Cymmer, and it is to be hoped these clubs will make a special effort to keep their engagemente. Perhaps this reminder in the "Gazette" will help Mr. Tapp, who is working hard for the league. We understand the Porthcawl V.T.C. is open to shoot matches with neighbouring volunteers. These cannot fail to be advan- tageous to our citizen soldiers. Tondu, Bridgend and Kenfig Hill please note.

liB JAMES WINSTONE ON EXPLOITATION

liB. JAMES WINSTONE ON EXPLOITATION." HIGH FOOD PRICES. I PLEA FOR STATE CONTROL OF MINES. I Mr. Jas. Winstone and Mr. A. J. Williams, National Union of Railwaymen, were the principal speakers at a demonstration at Tondu on Sunday to protest against the high cost of living. Mr. T. Prescott presided. Mr. A. J. Williams said the increased price of bread was not due to a shortage, but to exploitation by shipowners and others. He supported this statement by allusion to a cargo of wheat valued at £ 18,000,. which, he said, was recently brought into Bristol, the freightage of which was £ 50,000. The far- mer was also getting the benefit of the in- creased price of home-grown wheat, and the local bakers, too, were benefiting from the (inoreased price of bread. The regulation with regard to the price of milk was disap- pointing, for it allowed milk-sellers to in- crease the price of milk to 6d. a quart, which was not justified. The remedy was the State control of agriculture and the estab- lishment of municipal milk-shops. Mr. Winstone dealt with the position in the South Wales coal trade. There could be no oompromise, he said, on the application for an increase in the general wage-rate of 15 per cent. A joint audit of the items which made up the increased cost ofproduo- tion should be obtained after the terms of reference had been agreed to by the parties. The Government ought to have controlled the coal mines, and also the shipping. A resolution was passed protesting against the "high food prices, expressing appreciation of the appointment of a food oontroller, and urging the Government to take complete con- trol of the necessaries of life. A further resolution was passed urging the Government to increase the allowances to de- pendents of soldiers and sailors, and com* plaining of the prevention of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Families Association from taking into consideration the extra cost of- Iving when fixing supplementary allowances.

Advertising

ir t-'in i ————'———— a Women Wor k ers' Series.— N o. 8, j u J ?' ? I used to laug al H ( ?? ? J?\v ?l ???? t? y ( yf/ph him a little. /? ? ?-??

REST BAY RESCUE I

REST BAY RESCUE. I REV. D. S. SAMUEL, PORTHCAWL, f HONOURED. At the meeting of the Porthcawl Council on Monday Rev. D. G. Samuel, curate of All Saints, Porthcawl, was presented with the Royal Humane Society's certificate for his efforts in saving a youth from drowning in 1 the Rest Bay in July last. The presentation was performed by the Chairman, who s^id he had the greatest pos- J sible pleasure in doing so on behalf of the Society. When a similar certificate was pre- sented some time ago to a dock labourer in Cardiff the recipient was asked to sign his name in the Distinguished Visitors Book. He (the Chairman) was sorry that they had no Distinguished Visitors Book, but he could as- sure Mr. Samuel that they in Porthcawl ap- preciated a deed of valour as much as anyone. The Legal Clerk then read the inscription, after which the Chairman handed the testi- monial to Mr. Samuel. Mr. Samuel acknowledged the gift in a few modest well chosen words. He had not, he said, expected the matter to be done in pub- lic, but he understood the Society expected it, so that it should be an incentive to others. As regards the Act for which they were honour- ing'him, he could only say that he had done it simply at the call of duty-nothing else. He might mention that, if someone could be found to take his place there in Porthcawl he was hoping to be able to go out to the front as an army chaplain. (Hear, hear).

KENFIG HILL

KENFIG HILL. COMPETITIVE MEETING.—A very pleas- ant evening was spent at Moriah C.M. Chapel, Kenfig Hill, on Saturday evening last, when the Young People's Mutual Improvement So- ciety held the first of a series of competitive meetings. Mr. John Davies, M.E., who pre- sided, paid a tribute to the work of the So- ciety. A noticeable feature of the meeting was the high standard of the music rendered. The recitations also were excellent. The ad- judicators for the evening were:—Music, Mr. West; literature, Mr. John Lloyd (loan Cyn- ffig), and Mr. Phillips (schoolmaster). The accompanist for the evening was Miss Nancy Thomas. OBITUARY.—There has passed away, after a severe illness, at the Bryndu (G.W.R.) Crossing, a highly respected inhabitant of Kenfig Hill, in the person of Mr. William King. Deceased, who was a native of Corn- wall, came to Wales in the early sixties. He found employment under the old Llynfi and Ogmore Railway Co., and was subsequently transferred to the G. W.R. when that Com- pany took over the local railways. He was of a very genial and cheerful disposition, well- liked by all his follow workmen. The funeral took place on Sunday, the 26th inst., Rev. A. Jones officiating at the house. After the Scriptural reading and prayer, the hymn, "Lead, Kindly Light," was fervently and de- votionally sung. The Rev. D. J. Arthur (Vicar) officiated at the church and grave- side. There were several wreaths, one from the children of Mr. W. King (superintendent, Bridgend) and family, and another from the Lukies family, Helston, Cornwall. Deceased was 77 years of age, and leaves a widow, two sons and a daughter to mourn their loss.

Advertising

Advewt»e in the Glamorgan Gazette." If yole want to sell, bU1 or exchange; you cannot do better. C ?  J J t   ?t pj TH8 I! m ?S PJtANOS -SS j t M?=.S-S iingroven"ts a" are  ?T V ALUE ?M? '"S- ?f'  ? ?S !? t rmM tad ? Mtnt

INDUSTRIAL TRUCE AFTER THE WAR

INDUSTRIAL TRUCE AFTER THE WAR. To the Editor. Sir,—I have not the pleasure of Mr. Lewis' acquaintance, so do not know what his avoca- tion in life is. Anyhow, I treat him as a Trade Unionist, who, in a weak moment, is prepared to oompromise with a power, which is diametrically opposed to his interests. He says that such things as profit-mongering should not prejudice our opinions or make it difficult or impossible for Capital and Labour to declare a truce. Capitalism, as it stands to-day, solidly entrenched, with its huge re- serve funds, its growing combines, is not do- ing this for the benefit of Labour after the war. As Trades Unionists, we owe a duty to those at the war, and it is this-to ensure that they come back to conditions and privi- leges identical with those they enjoyed in pre- war days. Does Capital think, in the face of public knowledge and opinion, that they are to be allowed to crush the employee, composed as he will be then, into submission? If the public does so, then it is not worthy of the name. I do not believe they will. The time has come when the nationalisation of mines, shipping, and railways has booome a dire necessity—not as Lord Rhondda suggests, for I a period, but for ever, for the benefit of the nation. This will take time, but until then, jno truoo.-Yours, etc., I KenJig ill. CHAS. G. FORESTER. KenHg HU1.

I PORTHCAWL

I PORTHCAWL. PROPERTY SALE. Messrs. Michael Davies and Co. offered for sale at the Pier Hotel, Porthcawl, on Tuesday, two freehold villas. Thornborough, New-road, Newton, Porthcawl, let at JE19 per annum, with a stable let at L6, tenant paying rates and taxes.— Withdrawn at JE330. Eaton House, situate in the same terrace, with a strip of land at the rear, let at L20 per annum, ten- ant paying rates and taxes.—Withdrawn at L330. Put up together the property was withdrawn at L670. Messrs. Lewis and Llew- ellyn, Bridgend, were the solicitors.

Advertising

Up-to-Date Appliances for turning Out every class of work at competitive pricea* at ft(;Iamorsm Gazette" !-rhittD&Wœt8..