Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 6 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
8 articles on this page
BRIDGEND POLICE COURTr

BRIDGEND POLICE COURT. r Saturday.—Before: Alderman Wm. Llewellyn (Chairman), Alderman John Thomas, and I Messrs. T. E. Hopkins, W. Powell, T. James, and John Ree- FROM HEOLYCYW. Thomas Griffiths, collier, hailing from Heoly- cyw, was charged with drunkenness in High Street, on Feb. 17th, and on the evidence, was fined 10s. for a first offence. DRUNK AXD DISORDERLY. I The following were fined for being drank and I d; -,orderly: -Dan Keefe, Commercial Street, Maesteg, 15s.; John Jones, collier, Blaengarw, I £1; Sees Owen, labourer, Bettws (Maesteg Road), 15s. AT THE THEATRE. I Haydn Davies, collier, Pontrhydycyfi; Morgan Mordecai, and Thomas Harry, colliers, of Maes- tog, were charged with misconduct at Maesteg, on Tuesday, Feb. 13th. On the evening in question a police officer was called to the New Theatre, Commercial Street, Maesteg, where he saw defendants very drunk and showing fight, and he had to secure the assistance of two other constables to escort them to the Police Station. —They were fined 15s. each. MISCELLANEOUS. I Frank Hart, fireman, Pontycymmer, was fined 15s. for using indecent language in Meadow Street, Pontycymmer, on Saturday, Feb. 17th. Frederick Howells, collier, Cefn Hirgoed, and Harry Thomas, mason, Bridgend, were each fined 10s. for creating a nuisance in Elder St. and in Nolton St., Bridgend, respectively. Evan Davies, haulier, 16 Talbot Street, Aber- avon, left his horse and lorry unattended in Bridge Street, Kenfig Hill, on the afternoon of Feb. 15th.-Defendant pleaded that he had had no food since breakfast, and suffering from hun- ger, he set out for a bottle of Oxo.—Nothing was known against defendant, who was let off on payment of costs. Thomas Bryant and William Davey, hauliers, cf Llangynwyd, were each fined 5s. for driving without lights in Bettws Road, Bettws. Henry Humphries, fish hawker, Nantymoel, wn fined 5s. for a similar offence in Ogwy St., Pricetown. Philip Trevina, music seller, Bridgend, was charged with acting as a pedlar without a license, at Nantymoel.—Defendant, it was stated, has since taken out the necessary certifi- cate, and he was let off on payment of 2s. costs. "Kicking a football, shouting, and creating a disturbance, at the Gwauxv Baut, Pontycymmer, on Saturday night last." Such was the con- duct attributed to Percy Evans, William Mathews, David Mathews, Axthur Davies, and John Tucker, who, on the police evidence, were 'fined 55. ieach. Bradfc/rd Harrison, High Street, Ogmore Vale, refreshment house keeper, was fined 10s. for 'keeping open his premises after 9 p.m. on Feb. 10th; and John Preece, labourer, Ogmore Vale, was fined 5s. for aiding and abetting. Owen T. Arthur, described as a bank clerk, of Heathfield House, Waiufelin, Pontypool, was summoned for carrying a gun without a license at Colwinstone, near Bridgend.—Defendant's father attended, but did not put up any defence. -e d that on -A l oii d ay, Feb. —A police officer deposed that on Monday, Feb. 5th, he saw defendant in the highway with a single-barrelled gun, working the hedge with a dog. He ran away, but was caught, and asked the constable to overlook the offence.—The Magistrates imposed a fine of 10s. THE THREE I The following were summoned for laxity in regard to school attendance, and were dealt with as under:—Edward W. Davies, 29 Blaen- caerau Ed., Caerau, 5s.; John Ford, 8 Albert St., Caerau, 5s.; Catherine Bowen, 2 Dunraven St., Blaencaerau, < £ 1; Charles Barber, 3 Wynd- harn St., Blaencaerau, 5s.; Catherine Clarke, 4 Dunraven St., Blaencaerau, 5s.; Mesach Davies, 22 North St., Caerau, 5s.; David Thomas, Met- calfe St., Caerau, 5s.; David Davies, Tonna Rd., Caerau, 5s.; Thomas Jones, Tonna Rd., Caerau, 5s.; Charlotte Hanaford, Tonna Rd., Caerau, 5s.; Mary Curnock, 52 Basement, Tonna Rd., 5s»; Mary Ann Green, Temple St., Maesteg, 5s.; Wm. Viilliams, Tunnel Cottages, Maesteg, 5s.; John Griffiths, 18 McGregor St., Maesteg, 5s.; Margaret Whelan, Duke St., Maesteg, 5s.; Bridget Brown, Commercial St., Maesteg (order); Wm. O'Connor, Fpper St., Maesteg, 10s.; Phylli., Hanaber, Park Street, Maesteg, 5s.; Philip Walsh, King's Terrace, Nan tyffyIlon, 5s.; Margaret Davies, 20 Princess St., David Thomas, 11 Maesteg Raw, 10s.; Owen Owen, Railway Terrace, Caerau, 5s. I ATTEMPT THAT FAILED. I John Leonard, painter, 9 Maddocks Place, Bridgend, was charged with attempting to travel on the G.W.R. without having previously paid his fare on January 26th. Inspectcr King spoke to collecting the Tondu ticket-, and said defendant was in the train, and produced a ticket with an altered date. He said he had "just booked," and appealed to the. booking clerk, who, however, said: "1 booked him yesterday morning." The Bench imposed a penalty of £ 1. SERIOUS COLLIERY OFFENCE. I Ellis William Roberts, repairer, New Houses, Lhnharan, was summoned fcr unlawfully inter- fering with the signalling apparatus, at the Meiros Colliery, on Feb. 13th. Mr. David Llewellyn (for the prosecution) said defendant, in the presence of the driver, put some dirt on the bell fixed in the signalling Toom, with the result that the bell was put out of order; as also was th £ whole of the signalling apparatus for the district. The ringing of the bell was the signal to start the engine, and if the bell was not rung the w hole of the work was thrown out of gear. Defendant, on being spoken to. was impudent, and the offence with which he was charged was rather serious. The charge, however, was not unduly pressed, al- though defendant and others must be prevented from perpetrating such mischief. In his defence, defendant alleged that some- thing had gone wrong with the signalling, and that it was his object to readjust it. The Bench rejected that view, and inflicted a fine of

No title

E. J. Parry. Mr. i D. H. Lloyd and Dr. E. J. Parry. i TOUCHED WOOD. I On the evidence of P.S, William J. Davies, I Thomas Delay, 36 Bethania Street, Maesteg, and Thomas Aubrpy, also of Maesteg, colliers, were convicted of stealing wood, value Is., the property of the Celtic Colliery Company, and were fined 10s. each. John Ford. Temple Street, and Dan Rich- ards, Bridgend Read, colliers, Maesteg, were charged with stealing a quantity of timber, value 6d., the property of Messrs. North's Navigation Collieries Company. Ford was not in attendance.—P.C. Jones deposed that on Feb. 13th he saw defendants leave the St. John's Colliery, Maesteg, each with a piece of timber, which, on examination, was found to have been originally one and the same piece. They were taken to the manager (Mr. Jenkin Jones), and admitted taking, and sawing, the wood. Richards now raised the point whether the timber produced would be of any use under- ground The Constable: The manager said distinctly it would be useful under-ground—that such timber in many cases is really of more value than new timber. Richards was fined El. and a warrant was ordered to issue for Ford. STEALING COAL. Elizabeth Richards, 7 Duffryn Place, Caerau, was charged with stealing a quan- tity of coal, value 5d., the property of North's Navigation Collieries Company, on Feb. loth, In proving the case Colliery Constable Wm. Culleton said defendant had 10s. a week from the Company in respect of her husband, who was a soldier, and also was allowed free coal from the colliery. The Justices imposed a fine of tl.

IGOOD SOLDIER AND FARMERI

I "GOOD SOLDIER" AND FARMER. I I SINGULAR PENYFAI AFFAIR. I I FINE RECORD SAVED. I At Bridgend on Monday—before Mr. D. H. Lloyd and Dr. E. J. Parry-John Hopkins, an old soldier, in the uniform of the 3rd Welsh, and the possessor of four good con- duct stripes, married and with five children, was brought up charged with stealing £ 1 4s. 6d., from the person of David Evans, farmer, Bryncoch Farm, Cefn Cribbwr, on February 24th. The prosecutor (David Evans) said on Sat- urday, Feb. 24th, he was in the New Inn, and at 7 in the evening came across defendant Hopkins. Witness tried to cash a Treasury note, but failed; and put the note into his waistcoat pocket, and made for home. He had in his possession some silver; he did not know how much—about 4>.—and some cop- pers, and left the New Inn shortly after 7, quite sober, and in the company of another gentleman. Defendant- overtook them at the top of Penyfai, and they went together for some distance talking about the war. The other gentleman leaving, witness was left alone with defendant, and they continued to walk on. Presently defendant asked him if he had any money, and he replied that he had none to spare. Saying that he must have money from somewhere, Hopkins put his hand on his neck. and held him, and after a struggle, hit him on the side of the head, and "down he went." Then he searched in his pockets, and missed the £1 Treasury note and other money, and gave information to the police. He had known Hopkins "since he was a youngster." By the Chairman (Mr. D. H. Lloyd): I was coming from Bridgend. He had not been drinking with me. I had been in the public- house about a quarter of an hour. He was there before I entered. Defendant denied the assault, and alleged that prosecutor gave him the note, and in- vited him home, where he said he had plenty of money. Evans: I said no such thing, and I never gave you anything. You had your knees on me. Defendant: You said how was the war going on, and how was it going to finish? and fellows like me ought to be out there. Prosecutor: Tell the truth. Tommy. P.S. David stated that at 8.30 the same night prosecutor came to Aberkenfig Police Station, and made a complaint. His bowler hat was broken round the rim, and he had mud on his back and shoulders, and on the knees of his trousers. There was also a slight mark on the right side of the head. Wit- ness made enquiries, and went in search of defendant, and at 9.4o found him lying on the side of the road, on the top of Penyfai Common. He was asleep, and very drunk. With assistance, witness brought him to the Police Station, and there searched him. In his right-hand trousers pocket he found the JE1 Treasury note, 4s. 3d. in silver, and 6d. in coppers, and from a tobacco pouch, in his breast pocket, he recovered 4s. lld. Wit- ness detained him. but could not then charge him, owing to his condition. For- mally charged on the following morning, he said, "Only the £1 note I had, and he gave it to me." In answer to the Chairman, witness said David Evans had been drinking, hut was not drunk, and he was able to give all the infor- mation that was required. Accused: The man was drunk, and gave it to me. I did not touch him. Inspector Rees Davies: He has been a good soldier, and for many years has served his King and country in South Africa, China, and India. He is now a Reservist, and an ab- sentee. The Chairman (to accused): We have deci- ded to take a lenient view. We are surprised you should have disgraced your uniform- that after all the service you have rendered to your King and country, you should conduct yourself in this way. You are bound over to be of good behaviour for six months. The Clerk (Mr Walter Hughes): The Magis- trates have come to this conclusion because prosecutor himself was under the influence of drink. They do not convict you. They have saved your record, and you take warning. Defendant was then charged wifti being an absentee from the 3rd Welsh, stationed at Ilh vi-a charge which he frankly admitted, saying he came home on leave, and his "missis" being ill, lie overstayed his time.— He was banded over to the Military authori- ties.

BRIDGEND COUNTY SCHOOLI 6

BRIDGEND COUNTY SCHOOL. I -6 MEETING OF GOVERNORS. I At an ordinary meeting of the Governors, held on Monday afternoon, there were pre- sent: Mr. S. H. Stockwood (chairman), Rev. G. M. Llewellyn, Rev. W. Saunders, C.C., Mrs. Knight (Tythegston), Mrs. Michael Davies, Messrs. Michael Davies, John Grace, and George Harris, with Mr. Jno. Rankin (headmaster) and Mr. S. Daniel (clerk pro. tem.). The Chairman mentioned that in pursuance of instructions, it had been decided to invest L-W) In the new War Loan, making up (with £1,000 before) a -total of £ 1,500. The Headmaster reported that there were 230 scholars, with a percentage of 95 in daily atteiidance-a percentage which the Chairman said was satisfactory. (Hear, hear.) A letter was read from Mr. Harry Lewis (clerk to the Governors), stating that he had volunteered his services in connection with the war, that the Director of National Ser- vice had called him up b^ telegraph, that he therefore had no time to make arrange- ments with a view to his successor, and sug- gesting that his partner (Mr David Llewellyn)' or clerk (Mr. S. Daniel) might act as clerk during his absence. On the motion of Mr. Geo. Harris, it was agreed that Mr. Daniel act as clerk pro. tem., with authority to sign cheques. A communication was read from the Edu- cation Office, Carnarvon, concerning the con- trol of University education, and enclosing a resolution adopted to the effect that the Council learns with alarm the suggestion that the control of the higher administration of the Welsh University shall be entrusted to an official body, appointed by the Government, a proposal which, if adopted, "will violate the elementary principles of democratic govern- ment upon which the University and its con- stituent colleges were first established by the generous enthusiasm and sympathies of the Welsh nation." Rev. W. Saunders thought they ought to do all they could to retain the democratic ele- ment in the government of the University; they did not want to do anything that might militate against efficiency. (Hear, hear.) The University was a national institution, and the common people had made great sac- rifices and contributed out of their poverty for the granting, and for the extension, of educational facilities. He therefore moved to support the resolution. The Headmaster: I think it is a panicky movement, and that there is no real danger. We seem to be crying before we are hit. I am in sympathy with the terms of the resolu- tion, and am only sorry democratic gov- ernment is not more of a reality than it has been. The motion was then put, and carried with- out further comment.

I COWBRIDGE PRESENTATIONI ICONCERT

I COWBRIDGE PRESENTATION CONCERT. ILLUMINATED ADDRESS TO LIEUT. F. J. EVANS. —; On Saturday evening last, at the Town Town Hall, Cowbridge, an entertainment was given, to which the wounded soldiers from the Beaupre, Ash Hall, Souther,ndown, Ponty- clun, Bridgend and Coytrahen Hospitals had been invited. After the soldiers had taken their seats, the doors were opened to the general public, and so great was the rush for seats that the hall was crammed in a very few moments. The programme was one which has seldom been excelled in Cowbridge. The artistes were all new to the town. Pro- fessor Charles Oswald (conjuror and ventrilo- quist, of the Inner Magic Circle, London) mystified and delighted the audience with his really remarkable powers, but, indeed, every item on the programme wa-s well deserving of the appreciation shown. Miss Gwen Morgan, contralto; Miss Irene Price, elocutionist; Mr. Herbert Pockson, humorist; and Miss Hilda Simon, accompanist, were all tip-top. An interesting feature of the programme was the presentation of a,n illuminated ad- dress to Lieut. F. G. Evans, of Cowbridge, by the Town Council and citizens of the [ Borough in recognition of the officer's gal- lantry in winning the Military Cross (aluead'y reported in these columns). The Mayor (Capt. T. J. Yorwerth) handed the address [ to Lieut. Evans, and in a speech which was frequently applauded, congratulated the re- cipient upon his gallantry. Lieut. Evans in a modest speech befitting a soldier, thanked the Mayor, tile Corporation and citizens. "I only did my duty," he said, "and" (he ad- died) "I should like to say that the men who were with me shared the danger equally with myself." Capt. D. Tilley (Cowbridge Fire Brigade), the deputy Mayor, madeaall arrangements, and for Cant. Tilley to take anything in hand iiiva,ria,hIT means "success." We understand that a substantial amount will be handed to the Net ley Hospital.

LLANTRISANT I

LLANTRISANT. I THE FIRST TO FALL.-Neii-s has been I received of the death in action in France of Pu, Wm. Matthias Morgan, a signaller in the Royal Field Artillery, whose home was at Llantrisant, and who was one of four Llan- trisa.nt brothers who joined the Army on the outbreak of the wa.r. They belonged to a well-known family, being sons of the late Mr. Thus. Morgan, LIa.ntrisant, a brother of Mrs. Lkwefiyn, wife of Aid. Wm. Lleii-c,]-Ivii, Ot- nicre Vale, vice-chairman of the Glamorgan County Council and chairman of the Bridg- end Bench. The eldest of the brothers, Pte. George Morgan, was at the outbreak of war engaged in business under his uncle, Aid. Llevi-eillyn, at Ogmore Vale. He immediately joined the Hussars, but afterwards trans- ferred to the Seaforth Highlanders, and saw considerable service in France, taking part in the battle of Loos, and afterwards serving in the East. Ptes. Isaac and Dd. Morgan, the other brothers, are serving in the Welsh Regiment (Machine Gun Section).

I TALE NOTES

I TALE NOTES. It (By PELA-GIUS.) I As predicted in our notes of last week, the greengrocers have no potatoes to sell, so we have a potato-less week. But they took the precau- tion—some at least-to charge 2Jd. per lb. up to Monday, the 18th ult., thus taking two days' leave from the Food Controller. Mr. Neville Chamberlain, in his appeal for civilian service, told his audience: "I have never asked people to do national service be- cause it was to their individual benefit. I ask you to make sacrifices, but I believe these sac- rifices you are asked to make are not more than you can bear, and I feel sure you will gladly make them, if by so doing you will in any way shorten the war." After Mr. Chamberlain's noble words, we leave the public to imagine the feelings of the gentlemen who listened to Mr. Randall's damning remarks on the disappointing response made by the Vale farmers to the appeal to ag- riculturists to make an increase in food produc- tion. To the general public, who had been taught to regard the Vale as the "Garden of Wales," it is a rude awakening to find the farmers of West Wales and the dispised hilly districts giving us a lesson in patriotism. A fanner, when asked what he thought of the War Office offer to place Army horses at the dis- posal of the farmer, replied: The terms are fair, but as we have few depots in this county with spare Army horses, they might as well offer us Lord George Sanger's Circus elephants, which are to be placed at the service of the Surrey farmers; and if we judge the rate they will travel by the few W.O. transport teams and teamsters which have passed this way, it will be many weeks before they arrive." To get sugar you must buy other groceries. To get potatoes you must buy parsnips at 3d per lb.! What next? To get cheese we shall have to purchase chestnuts; to get butter or marger- ine, we must take marmalade or jam. And yet, like Brutus, these shop-keepers are all hon- ourable men! Possibly, some day our Food Controllers will realise it is futile to fix maxi- mum prices unless the seller is also forbidden to compel the purchase of other goods, often at exorbitant prices. This is an injustice to all, and the poor are the greatest sufferers. Professor Bryner Jones has cultivated quite the Parliamentary manner in answering incon- venient questions. For an answer to Mr. James' question-if it was true that the Govern- ment had allowed scores of thousands of tons of artificial manures to go out of the country ?— he replied: "Since the beginning of the war none have been exported except by special licence, and it is to our advantage that a certain amount should go to our colonies." The learned Professor should have known that at the out- break of war, and long after, it was not prohi- bited that phosphates and many other things should be sold to neutrals. It was only trading with the enemy that was prohibited. And it was only in the latter part of 1915 that a licence for the exportation of artificial man- ures became necessary. Is the Professor better informed than the President of the Board of Trade when he says a licence is only granted to export to our Colonies? The President of the Board of Trade, when questioned on the matter, did not deny that phosphates, sulphate of ammonia, etc., had been exported in 1916 to other than our colonies. I If the statement were correct that it is our colonies alone who now get our artificial manures, the test of the wisdom of that policy would be, is it a better economic investment to allow exports to feed the virgin soils of our colonies, and create a shortage and high prices in the United Kingdom, or to prohibit exportation so as to bring down prices and increase production at home? The National Service measure is now launched. Is it, like others, to be ignored in the Va!e without efforts being made to make it a success ? There is a shortage of labour in agricul- tural districts such as the Vale, yet up to the present we hear of no efforts being made to increase that labour, or to get substitutes to replace young men who may be called to the colours. Is it because there is no wish to do so ? Mr. T. M. Price, in his interesting article on "St. Athan," in our last week's issue, says —"It is on record that Rhys Ap Arfach, Prince of Glamorgan, obliged everyone that had lands in the Vale to sow corn in the one- half of it, and those in the mountains In one- quarter of it, and all lands not devoted to growing corn or grazed by cattle should re- vert to the King. This law caused such great plenty that Glamorgan was generally called the lady of the counties." Oh, for a Rhys Ap Arfach to-day! The Food Controller has put us on our honour not to waste food by gormndising. He judges that a fair ration of bread for each person would be 41bs., and of meat 2 Ibs. The doctors at the Cardiff Mental Hospital are allowed 81bs. of bread, and 12ilb. of meat, including bacon. The meat allowed the staff at the Cardiff Workhouse is 91bs. No doubt the doctors and staff do heavier manual labour, and require a large amount of protein to sustain their strength. It would be interesting to know th-2 quantities of bread and meat allowed the staff at other local institutions. Captain Rich, husband of Mrs. Rich (nee Miss M. Re-es, of Llantwit Major), is a pri- soner in Germany. His boat was torpedoed by the enemy, and the captain taken pri- soner by the submarine. We are asked-indeed, comm. a,nded-to raise potatoes and vegetables to help to beat the Hun by sustaining ourselves as far as possible by home production. Our Council

Advertising

"I did but see her passing by" 4't Original 'I)rawing by Hy. Collet )————— T —— 7 ———. ? ?/—?-—————————-——-—————— A rj .????????j??????  t: I. *? ????': -=-   PURITAN SOAP is all that its name implies r.РMade by Thomas, Bristol, Soapmakers for nigh 200 years. I I ,? 1//?1?, 1: Igow ?-'?=?s g     ?s  !SN..2s??-' PIANOS • PIANOS! PIANOS All British Made. Best Value in the Worid An immense Variety to Select from, CASH or EASY TERMS, A WRITTEN WARRANTY WITH EVERY INBTKUMItNT. We challenge any Firm to Offer Better Valoe, Terms 01 — — -Prices.- — — WRITE FOR CATALOGUE AND COMPARE OUR STOCK. K Thompson & Shackell, (Ltd.), Invite Inspection of the Latest Designs by the Leading British Manvitacturepit. Brinsmead, Broadwood Player Pianos, Hopkinson, Chailen & Son, Collard & Collard, Moore & Moore, Crowley, Ajello, Cramer, &c., &c. Largest Diacoanti for Caah. Old Instruments taken in exohange.-Sole Agents for the Celebrated Estey Organs, Quotations Givan for Pianos and Organs by any Maker in tha Kinoism. Tunings and Repairs a Spaciality. Repairs of every description. Estimates Free. Musio and Small Goods in Great Variety. THOMPSON and SHACKELL, Ltd. PIANOFORTE MANUFACTURERS & ORGAN BUILDERS' X, Wyndham Stweet., BRIDGEND. WITH BRANCHES THROUGHOUT SOUTH WALES AND MONMOUTHSHIRE. PO R- OR have not up to the present helped those with- out gardens to procure land to obey the Food Controller's order. The "Wait-and-See's" did not all go out of office with the change of Government. Potatoes we cannot, buy, but chips we get galore. Important to All who wish to Succeed 1 «•» Some firms have an idea that because tncy are well known there is no need to advertise. Ill There are old-established firms whose businesses were made when there was not the competition there is now, and think they can do without advertising. Ill THIS IS A MISTAKE. The FIRMS WHO ADVERTISE are THE SUCCESSFUL ONES. From Father to Son. I^BVINE'S Long-lasting CLOTHES, GET THEM AT Market Buildings, BRIDGENO. Advertise in the "Glamorgan Gazette." If you want to sell, buy or exchange, you cannot do better.