Collection Title: Glamorgan Gazette

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 3 of 4 Next Last
Full Screen
15 articles on this page
Advertising

-===-==-"=:==-==-==-=-==:-=::A.P-=-. -=- ID IF CD ?An?one can ake a Frock Like This .1 if they only get the right material. It's not a bit of use making up the prettiest material if it won t stand washing. I made this Frock myself and I wash it myself and its the nicest little Dress I ever had." g That's the point-will it wash ? You can rely I upon it that the daintiest Printed Voile, Zephyr, I Delaine, and Muslin, you can buy from us, will behave itself perfectly "in the wash." There never were nicer patterns or more charming colours to choose from and the cost of a Dress Length is only a few shillings. So will you call in and see the Fabrics or let us send you pattern books to-day? I C. Stuchbery, Caroline I stpeet, I BRIDGEND.

Family Notices

BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, and DEATHS. BIRTHS. VERITY.—April 14th, at Penllwyn, Bridgend, to Graham and Constance Verity, a daughter. DEATHS. CORBETT.-On Wednesday, at the Isolation Hos- pital, Llantrisant, Miriam, beloved wife of W. C. Corbett, Plumber, Pontyclun. Funeral Saturday, 3 p.m., for Llantrisant Church. 58 POWELL.-On April 18th, at Marias House, Pyle, David Morgan Powell. Funeral Monday, leaving "house at 2.30 p.m. for Pyle Church- yard. Friends please accept this intimation. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. THOMAS.—Mrs. R. Thomas and Family, Bryn Awel, Llangeinor, sincerely thank all kind friends for the heart-felt sympathy extended to th'em in their sad bereavement. 82 IN MEMORIAM. THOMAS.—In Loving Memory of our Dear Brother, Pte. Edwin G. Thomas, Gloucester Regiment, who died of wounds received carry- ing a message to the firing line, April 21st, 1916, with Relief Force to Kut.—Alice and Arthur. 49 ADAMS.—In Loving Memory of Our Dear Mother, Mary Adanis (late Bryndu, Kenfig Hill), who passed away April 21st, 1912. Flowers we lay upon the grave Wither and decay, But the love for those who sleep beneath Will never fade away. —Ever remembered by her Children. 32 WILLIAMS.—In Lovin g Memory of Darling 'little Ronnie, dearly beloved Son of Albert and Laura Williams, who passed away April 22nd, 1316, aged 13 months. Safe in the arms of Jesus." —Sadly missed by Mamma and Dada, Grandpa and Hughie. 54

NOTES COMMENTS I

NOTES & COMMENTS. A report will be found in another column of the annual meeting of the Galrw Medical Aid Society—a nclile institution if ever there was one. We note that a maternity nurse has been appointed with full C.M.B. quaLifi- cations-that Lg to say, with all the skill and knowledge that it is possible to acquire- in the art and science of midwifery—and that the confinement fee lii,-A been reduced to 7s. 6d. Leaving out of count for a moment the indi- vidual and! humanitarian aspect of this po- licy, attention may be drawn to its true-and enlightened patriotism. To put the highest skilli and knowledge at the disposal of the very poorest-whieh is what the policy aims at, '.rid' what it does—is to save an enormous number of lives for the nation. What this means in face of a lowcst-or,-record birth rate and a marrige rate that during the next few years is also bound to touch low water mark, we need scarcely point. out. Whatever has been the case in the past, during the next quarter of a cAntury the British nation, like all the other belligerent nations—Germany certainly not the leRst- will needaH the young life it can rescue out of 1$ie maw of that grim monster we call "Infantile Mor- tality." Infant mortality is of it prsveiv £ ib}e, as we know, and1 though it does not by any means occur entirely or even. chiefly at birth, there can be no doubt what- ever that proper care and advice to the mother at the very beginning will go far to prevent the other and later causes of child1 mortality.

I L C A NEWS 1

I L C A NEWS. 1 TED MARTINS DRAWING is again postponed for a week. 84 Call at H. Woodward & Co. e, Ltd., The Noted Wholesale and Retail Warehouse, Adare Street and Near Station, for your Tobaccos and Fancy Goods. 9400 OLD MEETING HorsE (bottom of Newcastle Hill). Sunday, April 22nd, at 6.30 p.m. Preacher: Rev. W. Priestley Phillips, "BA.An. (Minister of the Church): Subject: «An Israelitish Folk-Song." WALLPAPERS.—Secure your Wallpaper now at' last year's prices. There is no time like the present. Good selection.—D. Thomas, Decorator, 11 Noltou. Street, Bridgend. Popular Bridgend Man Wounded.—On Wed- nesdav, Mr. and Mrs. Corbett (Oldcastle) re- ceivetf the news that their son, familiarly known as Charley," was wounded in the foot in the "great push" in France. Before attaching him- self to the 12th South Wales Borderers, our hero was in business in Nolton Street as a hair- dresser and tobacconist. Charley's brother ("Cliff") is in the Cardiff City Battalion. Both are brothers of Mr. Alfred Corbett, the es- teemed manager of Bridgend Conservative Club. Sale of "Ravenhurst.There was a good at- tendance at the Dunraven Hotel, Bridgend, on Wednesday afternoon, when Mr Michael Davies, F.A.I., upon the instructions of the owner (Mr. Rogers), offered to public- competition the very desirable residence known as "Ravenhurst," in close proximity to Bridgend County School, overlooking the tennis and hockey ground, and held for 99 years from 1906, at a ground rent of k3 8s. The bidding started at £ 200, and the property was knocked down for iC445 to Mr. John Lewis (saddler), who will at once enter into occupation. Welshmen in Egypt.—We have received the programme of a concert, given in the Albamha Theatre, Alexandria, Egypt, by the Alexendria Welsh Military Male Voice Party, of which the conductor is Lieut. W. T. Davies, son of our respected townsman, Mr. Michael Davies. The party rendered "Killarney," "Comrades in Arms" (AdGlphe Adam), "Charge of the Light Brigade" (Christmas Williams), and other pieces, including The Father of Heroes," specially-composed for and dedicated to the I party by Mr. Robert Bryan. The concert was a great success, and a substantial cheque has been sent to Sir W. J. Thomas for the Welsh Hospital, Netley. Bridgend Fruiterer's Affairs.—The first meet- ing of the creditors of James. Hiley Bryant, 14 Charles Street, Coity Fields, and Derwen Street, Bridgend, lately residing and carrying on business at 68 Nolton Street, Bridgend, as "Bryant and Sons, fishmongers and fruiterers," took place at the Official Receiver's Office, Car- diff, on Tuesday. His gross liabilities were X410 13s. Id., of which X399 15s. 5d. are expected to rank. The deficiency was JE348 lis. 6d.—Debtor alleged the causes of his failure to be "loss of business in consequence of my sons and a work- man joining the Army and leaving me without sufficient, assistance to carry on business as be- fore, and high prices and shortage of supplies." —The Official Receiver remains trustee. Officer W ounded.-Officlal notification. has been received of the wounding in action of 2nd- Lieut. Stanley Williams, son of Mr. David Williams, Caroline Street, Bridgend, C.S. for the Mid-Glamorgan District of Oddfellows (Manchester Unity). Lieut. Williams, it is understood, has been hit in the shoulder, and is now in hospital at Fervent, France. Before the war he was in the offices of the Glamorgan In- surance Committee. Immediately on the out- break of war he joined the Glamorgan Yeo- manry. Rather more than 12 months later he was gazetted to a commission in the Welsh Re- giment, from which, however, he was subse- quently transferred to the Machine Gun Corps. He went out to the front in August of last year. He was lucky enough to come unscathed through some of the hottest fighting on the Somnie, and his present wound, which all hope will not prove serious, was received in the new "big push" now going on. An old boy of Queen's College, Taunton, Lieut. Williams is the well-known Cardiff Rugby three-quarter, and he has played from time to time for Bridg- end, Swansea, and the county. His only sister, Miss Marjorie Williams, has been serving as a Red Cross Nurse in No. 3 Stationary Hospital, Rouen, for the past two years. Sad Death of a Bridgend Lady.—On Friday night, at the Bridgend Police Station, Mr. Dd. Rees (coroner) held an inquiry into the circum- stances of the death of Mary James, Morfa St., widow of a farmer, who passed away suddenly at midnight on "the previous Tuesday, under cir- cumstances alrradv reporte(I.Miss Esther Annie James (daughter) said she occupied the same bedroom as deceased, who in the course of the night was attacked by a choking sensa- tion. A doctor was summoned, but before his arrival, death had taken place at twenty minutes to 1. Deceased suffered occasionally (though not seriously) from lpitation "hoef r the heart, but witness had never known her to faint.—Dr. W. Edmund Thomas attributed death to an apoplectic seizure; and a verdict to that effect was returned by the jury, whose fore- man was Mr. Gomer Richards. Policeman-Soldier's Funeral.-Pte.. William John Thomas, of the Welsh Guards, a former police-constable stationed at Porthcawl, who died in a London Hospital on the 13th inst., from wounds received in France, was interred with military honours on Tuesday, near his home at Llanedarne. He was the son of Mrs. Thomas, of Pantglas Farm, and was 29 years of age. The funeral was attended by a posse of the Gtamorgan Constabulary, among whom de- ceased was very popular. This division was re- presented by the following :—Bridgend Inspec- tor Rees Davies and Sergts. Snow and Loveluck. Nantymoel: Sergt. Lister. Laleston: P.C. Stockford. Llanharan: P.S. Lee; and Ogmore Vale: P.C. Ingham. A firing party was sup- plied by the Royal Defence Corps, and the band of the Welsh Regiment played the "Dead March." Deceased was an all-round athlete, and was a boxer of more than average ability. I Singing; Festival.-The' annual singing and catechising festival of the Welsh Congregational Churches of the district was held at Tabernacle, Bridgend, on Easter Monday, and proved a great success, large numbers of children being present h em the churches. The singing, under the leadership of Rev. D. J. Hywel, Heolycyw, was bright and cheerful. Miss Muriel Stradling, Bridgend, was at the organ. The Ebenezer | (A1 erkenfig) Orchestra, under the leadership of V-. Phillips, accompanied the singing. The morning meeting was presided over by Mr. John Rees, Brynmenin; the afternoon meeting by Mr John Stenner, CefR Cribbwr; and the evening meeting by Mr. John David, Coity. The secre- tarial duties were in the capable'hands of Mr. E. Hopkin, Aberkenfig. Ur. J. Tucker, Bridg- end, was treasurer. The friends at Tabernacle, as usual, prepared tea, and all passed off satis- factorily. Gclden Wedding.—On Monday last, Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Lewis, Cae Derwen, celebrated their golden wedding. Mr. Lewis is 84, and Mrs. Lewis 82. Both are wonderfully well preserved both physically and mentally. Mr. Lewis is a justice of the peace for the county, treasurer of Hope Baptist Church, Bridgend, and for nearly 40 years superiatendent of the Sunday School, a director of the Bridgend Gas and Water Com- pany, and for many years hon. treasurer for the district of the National Society for the Preven- tion of Cruelty to Children. Mrs. Lewis, who has been twice married, is by her first marriage the mother of Sir Thomas Hughes (chairman of the Welsh Insurance Commissioners. She is the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. William Yorath, who were well-known Vale of Glamor- gan agriculturists. The late Mr. Yorath, like his daughter, was married twice, and it is worthy of note that he celebrated his diamond wedding, his married life with the second Mrs. Ycrath lasting altogether 63 years. Mrs. Lewis was married to the late lir., Thomas Hughes in 1854. There were four children of the mar- riage, of whom there are two survivors, namely, Sir Thomas Hughes and Mrs. Cook Jenkins, Llandrindod Wells. Mr. Hughes died in 1864, and the widow married Mr. Lewis is 1867. By the second marriage there were three children, naineiv, Mrs. Arthur Morgan, The Mount, Llan- daff; -Air. Ycrath Lewis, engineer, London; and Mr. Harry Lewis, solicitor, Bridgend. The possessor of a wonderfully retentive memory, ?. Lewis has a vivid recollection of events in South Wales from the year 1850, and well re- members riding from Bridgend to Cardiff Mar- ket when there were only a few houses in the Cardiff district. She has always been a staunch supporter of the Baptist cause in South Wales, and her knowledge of the history of most of the churches and their ministers, like Sam Weller's knowledge of London, is extensive and peculiar. She has two brothers Octogenarians, namely, Mr. Llewellyn Yorath, St. Brides Major, who, although 85, still carries on farming, and Mr. Thomas Yorath, Swansea, who is 80 years of age.

POULTRY SHOW AT BRIDGEND1

POULTRY SHOW AT BRIDGEND. 1 Bridgend and District Poultry Society, in its way, is doing a national service in striving to promote a keener interest in the keeping and breeding of poultry—especially with a view to the production of more eggs, the call for which is becoming more and more insistent and im- perative. With this laudable object, and for the first time in conjunction with the Kenfig Hill Open Bantam Association, the second mem- bers' exhibition was held on Wednesday, in Morris & Dobbins' Stores, Quarella Road. There were upwards of 60 entries, and by experts "and amateurs alike, the show was pronounced as "splendid." The veriest tyro could not fail to be struck with the excellence of the arrange- ments, which reflected credit upon the commit- tee and its zealous and indefatigalbe secretary, Mr. Charles Woolls. All the efforts and re- sources of the Society are being concentrated and held in reserve for the open show, which it is hoped to hold in the good time coming after the war. Mr. F. Bray (Bryncethin) was the judge, and appeneded are his ,awards:- Class I.-Game: 1, W. E. Davies; 2, P. Tatem. Class 2.-Broods: 1, G. W. Tubb; 2 and 3, W. Welbury. Class 3.—Breeding Hens (Light) 1, W. Wiggall; 2, W. J. Dver; 3, C. Weaver. Class 4.—Breeding hens (heavy) :1 and special, Spen- cer Pitt; 2, Charles Tucker; 3, W: Welbury; v.h.c., G. W. Tubb; h.c., C. Tucker. Class 5.— Heavy females: 1, Charles Woolls; 2, ditto; 3, Jack Hitt; 4, G. W. Tubb; v.h.c., S. Pitt. Class 6.—Heavy males 1 and special, Ch. Woolls; 2, T. H. Phillips; 3, W. Welbury; v.h.c., ex-Alder- man Williams.' Class 7.—Light femals: 1 and special, W. Clarke; 2, and 3, W. Bradshaw (Foundry); v.h.c., W. Clarke. Class 8.—Light males: 1, and special, Ben Williams. Bantams (open): 1, V. and H. Prior; 2 and 3, Brown and Harry. Eggs (white): 1, T. H. Phillips. Ditto (brown): 1, G. W. Tubb; 2, W. Welbury; 3, Chas. Tucker.

COITYI

COITY. I Tea and Concert.—Gilead Sunday School held its annual tea on Good Friday. The following ladies and gentlemen assisted 4n carrying out the atraiioements :Mrs. Hugh Jenkins, Mrs. F. Martin, Mrs. Frances Thomas, Mrs. Mar- garet Watkins, Misses Cassie John, Annie Thomas, Mabel Evans, Katie Davies, Gwladys Thomas, Mona Thomas, Edith Thomas, Mary Jane Watkins, Jane Hopkins, Lizzie Warren, Mary Catherine Roberts, Irene Jenkins, Eliza- beth Ann Edwards, Messrs. Wm. David, Morgan David., Wm.'Thomas, and Wm. Evans. In the evening an enjoyable entertainment took place, over which Mr. John Lewis, Bridgend, pre- sided, and in which the following took part:— May Roberts, Mrs. Jenkins, Anita Thomas, Beatrice Edwards, Annie Thomas, Margaret Thomas, Cintheg Spiller, Lottie Howells, Mary Edith Howells, Winnie Thomas, Gwladys Thomas, Catherine John, Irene Jenkins, Eliza- beth Ann Edwards, Kenneth Lloyd, Glanmor Spiller, Evan Watkins, Francis Thomas, John Thomas, Rhys Evans, and L.-Cpl. Thomas. Mrs G. R. Griffiths was the accompanist, and Mr. Morgan Watkins, secretary.

BETTWS I

BETTWS. I Easter Vestry.—Rev. Morgan Thomas (Rector) presided. The statement of accounts showed a credit balance of nearly £ 16, exclusive of J64 in hand in connection with the Sunday School, which is in a flourishing condition. Mr. John Crook was re-elected Rector's warden for the thirtieth consecutive time. Mr. John Jones was elected people's warden; and Mrs. G. E. Llew- elyn (Barngarw), Messrs. John Davies, Y. Cockram, H. Phillips, W. Dowdeswell, and A. Matthews were appointed sidesmen.—A vote of thanks was accorded to Mrs. G. E. Llewelyn for supplying flowers for the altar on Sundays dur- ing the past year, etc.; and to Mr. G. E. Llewelyn for coal, free of charge, and a dona- tion of JG5 towards the choir fund. Sympa- thetic reference was made to the loss sustained by the Rector and his family by the death of their youngest son, who laid down his life in action, in France last year.

BRIDGEND DISTRICT COUNCILI

BRIDGEND DISTRICT COUNCIL MR. J. G. J EKINS-THE NEW CHAIRMAN I WILL THIS BE PEACE YEAR? I The annual meeting of Bridgend Urban Dis- trict Council was held on Tuesday evening at the Council Offices, when all the members were in attendance, except Mr. Edward Preece, junr., who unfortunately its still indisposed, and Mr. E. Loveluck, who is doing duty with tne colours. Mr. George Harris was put into the chair pro. tern., and there were also present: Messrs. Geo. Bevan, Morgan Stradling, W. Jones, J. G. Jen- kins, J. T. Hitt, and lienrv Abbott, with the clerk (Mr. J. T, Howell) and the deputy clerk (Mr. Ivor M. Howell).—At the outset, Mr. Mor- gan Stradling rose, and proposed Mr. J. G. Jen- Kins as chairman for the enduing year—a pro- position which was briefly seconded by Air. W. Jones."—Mr. Henry Abbott proposed Mr. J. T. Hitt, who, he observed wa-s a "young member." More or less, it had been their cutom to "go round for the chair," though they had not at all times exactly followed the custom.—Mr. Hitt thanked the la-t speaker for his kind re- ferences, but said he diet not feel inclined, this year, to accept the honour.—Mr. J. G. J'enkins was then unanimously elected.—Vacating the seat, in his favour, Mr. Harris cordially con- gratulated the new chairman, and wished him a happy and a prosperous year.—Other members tendered their felicitations, and Mr. Jenkins ex- pressed his acknowledgments,, and his apprecia- tion of the honour conferred upon him. He prayed that this year might be "peace year," and that (as their Chairman) it would fall to his lot to welcome the boys from the frent-which he assured them, would be one of the greatest honours, and one of the greatest pleasures of his life. (Hear, hear.) No doubt it would be a strenuous and a critical year for the town, and the country at large. He would not be sur- prised if they were called upon to undertake morp work than hitherto, and if it should turn out to be so, he hoped they would not'hesitate to invite some of their fellow-townsmen to come to their assistance. If they had to do Govern- ment or administrative work-work that always involved certain difficulties-he really thought it would be their duty to appeal for outside help. (Hear, hear.) If the submarine menace was not overcome, they would no doubt have to estab- lish communal kitchens, as a part of the scheme of communal feeding that would be set up all over the country. That would mean ar- duous work, and work that would necessitate outside help. In conclusion, he promised that as chairman he would do his best to carry on the work of the Council as efficiently as possible, and he felt that at all times he would be able to rely upon their sympathy and support. (Hear, hear.) Committees.—On the motion of Mr. George Bevan, the Finance, Works, Electrical,' and Cemetery Committees were re-elected.—Discus- sion ensued upon the constitution of the Lib- rary Committee, which Mr. George Bevan moved to consist of members of the Council only. They were last year promised great re- forms, but he failed to see that anything had been accomplished. They as Councillors were custodians of the public purse, and they alone should be on the committee,—Mr. W. Jones seconded the last speaker's resolution.—Mr. J. T. Hitt moved as an amendent the retention of the three co-opted members—Rev. W. L. Mor- gan, Mr. H. J. Randall, and Air. C. E. Lloyd— who (he said) had all been most helpful at the meetings he had attended.—Mr. Abbott seconded, primarily for the reason that the gentlemen named had not to any extent been called upon to co-operate.—Mr. Morgan Strad- ling agreed tlmt- the co-opting of members on the committee had been proved to be beneficial. —After some further discussion, Mr. Hitt's pro- posal, as a substantive motion, was carried by 4 to 2.—The Fire Brigade Committee was re- appointed.—Messrs. G. Harris and W. Jones were re-elected as the Council's representatives on Bridgend Hospital Committee; and the same with the representatives on Ogmore Small Pox Hospital Committee.—Name d again as manager of the Non-Proyided Schools, MT. J. T. Hitt asked if it wasn't a "bit of a farce"? and pro- ceeded "I don't think I have been called to a meeting for the last twelve months. The last time I was alone, and there was no agenda." (Laughter.)—The Chairman: You represent the Council on the Education Committee. I think some member of the Council should take upon himself the duty.—Mr. Hitt: All right, Mr. Chairman; thank you.—Messrs. II. Abbott, G. Bevan, W. Jones, and Morgan Stradling were re-elected on the Penybont Main Sewerage Board.—Mr. G. Harris having proposed the re- election of the overseers, Mr. Morgan Stradling, one of the overseers, asked that his name be withdrawn.-Mr. Hitt said Mr. Stradling was an expert at figures, and they would be sorry to lose his services.—Mr. Morgan Stradling I have a lot of work to do, and people don't turn up as they should before the auditor. It is put- ting too much on the cart horse. (Laughter.)— The Chairman: You should esteem it an honour. (Hear, hear.)—Re-elected. Allotments Discussion.—Mr. Henry Abbott said there were* now some 400 allotments, and he thought the time had come when an Allot- ments Committee might render good service in view of the questions-the perhaps grave and in- tricate questions—that might arise. He moved that a committee be formed for the purpose.— Mr. Harris suggested the whole of the Council. -:MI;. H itt: I second that, and I am glad Mr. Abbott has brought it on. I should like to co- opt some members of the.Allotments Association who, I am llre, would be most helpful to us in many ways. (Hear, hear.)—Mr. Geo. Bevan What's the point? What do you expect to crop up? I fail to see that any difficulty can arise. The allotments are all defined. We have taken the responsibility, and the allotment-holders have their agreements. We have already quite enough work to do, as the Chairman just now intimated. Perhaps we shall have to do Gov- ernment work, and I don't think we should bur- den ourselves unnecessarily.—Mr. J. T. Hitt, rising to a point of explanation, pointed out that if they co-epted three members of the Allotments Association, it would help to retain the allotment holders, which, after all, was the great thing. They had taken the land, and they must see that the allotment holders re- tained the land. Co-opted members of the Association would be a great delp to them.- The Chairman Why not elect the whole of the members of the Council, and three outsiders?-— Mr. Hitt: That's what I -was going to suggest. —Mr. Abbott: One of the members of the depu- tation that waited' upon us recently, on behalf of the allotment holders, made allegations of trespassing, and breaking down of fences. We should see that the fences and everything are in a proper state, and that being so, a committee may be found to do all that is required.—Mr. George Bevan But you have the surveyor, who is always get-at-able. If anything does arise, it might easily be disposed of in two or three minutes' conversation; and I fail to see any necessity for it.—Mr. Morgan Stradling feared that the mixing of the allotments committee with the Council might lead to difficulties. would have no objection to joining the allot- ments committee, but he did not think it right to go outside, as proposed. They were respon- sible for everything in connection with the Council, and if they fell in with the committee they could report to the Council.—Mr. \V,. Jones: Nominations from outside will keep all the allotment people together. Depend upon it, they will keep together. Once they are on the land, they won't let it go, and land will be cheaper next year.—Mr. Hitt's amendment for a committee consisting of the whole of the mem- bers of the Council, with three co-opted mem- bers, was finally adopted by the casting-vote of the Chairman.—The following were co-opted Air. W. M. Powell (chairman of the Allotment Holders' Association), Mr Fank Hodges (miners' agent for Garw Valley), and Mr. Petty (G.W.R. Inspector), each representing one of the three wards into which the town is divided.

No title

The late Mr. Morgan Morgan, of High Corner | House, Llanharan, was the oldest follower of the Llanharan Hounds, and of wide reputation in sporting and farming circles in the Vale of Glamorgan. The Maesteg Tribunal have passed a resolu- tion requesting the Military authorities to per- mit Mr. T. E. Hopkins, J.P., the military re- presentative, to wear uniform. Mr. Hopkins is an old sergeant-major of the 2nd Volunteer Battalion Welsh Regiment, and is a regular at- tendant on the Magisterial Bench at the Bridg- end Police Court.

Advertising

WASTE PAPER. SCHEME-FOR "GAZETTE" READERS. Help the Country, and Make Money at the Same Time. IN view of the grave shortage of paper in the country, the "Glamorgan Gazette" has arranged with the Ely Paper Works for the purchase, and re-pulping, of all waste paper sent in from the district. Readers are, therefore, invited to send lid books, newspapers, magazines, wrapping paper, cardboard boxes, and odds ard errds of paper of all description and in any con- dition. The following conditions should be noted (1) Parcels must not be less than Silbs. in weight, and must be firmly packed and tied with strong cord. (2) Parcels must bear a plain label show- ing sender's name and address. (3) The price paid for waste paper If any « description will be 3,6 par ewt. (4) Parcels must be carriage paid, and directed to "THOMAS OWEN and CO., ELY PAPER WORKS, CARDIFF." Earlier in the war the Boy Scouts collected an immense quantity of old newspapers, and the proceeds went in aid of war charities. Here is another opportunity for this and other energetic organisations. It is also an opportunity to help finan- cially such organisations as the local Soldiers' Funds, the Red Cress Society, Dr. Barnardo's Homes, the Waifs' and Strays' Society, and such-like deserving institutions.

VALE NOTES

VALE NOTES. I (By Pela-gius.") At last the agriculturist- of this country are ,,i i s coui. y are put to the test. Near and far they have pro- tested their patriotism, and asserted that if the Government would give them a guarantee that for four or five years wheat should not fall in price below 6s. per bushel, they would grow wheat. Well, this guarantee is. now given, the 'figure varying from 65s. to 45s. per quarter for five years—(the average per quarter for the years preceding the war was 35s.). In addi- tion, they have a guarantee that rent shall not be raised; also security of tenure is guaran- teed—that is, if the land is properly cultivated. So now we can expect to see the production of food increased. We are glad that the Board of Agriculture is inserting a clause in the Bill safeguarding the country to the effect that the farmer must do his part now that the Govern- ment have granted a minimum price for home- grown corn. Many farmers need not fear thaff clause. They are increasing their corn crop before" the Bill is passed. Others, up to the present, do not seem to realise their duty to the country, and have added little to the land under the plough in 1913 to 1916. Mr. Prothero has demolished the dug-out" some have made for themselves, where they held out behind their fat beasts and mutton, by declaring that live stock must be slaughtered, so that the staple food of the people (corn) can be in- creased. < < < The marvellous thing during this war has been the whole-hearted way the workers have thrown their strength into winning it for the workers. A war never benefits the masses. While it lasts, they suffer and die. After it is over, they and their families sniffer from trade depression and lack of work, while thousands will be maimed and crippled for life. To their eternal credit, the "classes" have given their -sons, their brothers: aye, their sisters as nurses; they have freely laid down their li-i-es for liberty and honour. But it is the "masses" who wifl most feel the after-effects of this war, and to them is the greater credit for realising the mag- nitude of the stake. < < But when will our statesmen realise the dan- ger of alienating this enthusiasm? Why will they continue to play into the hands of the enemy by allowing war profiteers to flourish? Would it not be safer to follow Dr. Wilson, who, in addressing the American people on what was required of them, defined his policy thus: "There shall be no unwarranted manipu- lation of the nation's food supply by those who handle it on its way to the consumer. Let me say to middle-men of every sort, whether en- gaged in handling foodstuffs or the Taw mate- rials of maufacture, or the produce of our mills and factories—the eyes of our country will be especially upon you. I shall expect you to de- serve and win that confidence."—Let us in Eng- land tell our own Government: "We expect you to do likewise. Then the people will trust and support you to win the battle for the liberty of the democracy of the world. If not, make room for those who will."

NEWS OF THE VALE BOYSI

NEWS OF THE VALE BOYS. I Drowned on His Seventeenth Birthday.—On I Sunday a telegram was received by Mr. Thomas Hughes, Fishers' Bridge, Boverton, with the sad news that his son, Pte. David Hughes, E.F.A., had been drowned in the Ouse, at York. The young lad, who joined the forces when only 16!- years of age, and was drowned on his. 17th birth- day, was serving temporarily with a farmer, and went for a row on the river, in company with a young lady. The craft was carried by the current against the abutment of the Skel- dergate Bridge, and was over-turned. Hughes swam for the shore, but suddenly sank, and up to Monday evening his body had not been re- covered. The young lady clung to the over- turned boat, and was rescued. The greatest sympathy is felt for Mr. and Mrs. Hughes in their sad loss of a brave bey of bright promise. Their eldest son, Sgt. Wm. Hughes, is in the Welsh Regiment, and is now in North Wales. Wounded; Now Conva

I PENCOED

I PENCOED. Allotments Association.—On Thursday last! week Mr. Yeo (horticultural demonstrator i under the Glamorgan County Council) attended .a meeting at the Public Hall, and assisted in the formation of an Allotments Association. There was an excellent attendance. Mr. W. A. Howell was elected president of the new Socity; Mr. Hawkins, secretary; and Mr. W. David, treasurer. The meeting was presided over by Mr. Thomas Thomas, chairman of. the Parish Council. Death of Local Soldier.-TLe tragic news reached Mrs. Roberts, Plasnewydd, Penprisk, on Friday or the death in action on Easter Monday of her husband, Pte. J. R. Roberts. The de- ceased soldier had only been out a little over eight weeks. He joined last year a battalion of the Lancashire Fusiliers, with many Welsh- men in it. In civil life Pte. Roberts was local agent to the Prudential Assurance Company. He was a member of Bryn Seion Welsh Inde- pendent Church. A widow and four children are left to mourn his death. Mutual Improvement Society.—The closing meeting of the Session took the form of a gentle- men's social. Mr. W. J. WTalford presided. There was a large attendance of members, and the evening was enjoyably spent. After tea, musical items were rendered, and some games playd. The Society's winter session has been a great success. There has not been one poor meetings. The attendance of the members has been most satisfactory, especially as regards the younger members.

I CORRESPONDENCE

I CORRESPONDENCE. I HISTORY OF THE VALE. I To THE EDITOR. Sir,—May I crave a small space in your columns to explain briefly to numerous readers, who are interested in the history of the Vale of Glamorgan and its antiquities, that I hope to further contribute, at some future date and time (when the exigencies of space will permit) several further articles of interest referring to the historical old-world village and parish of St. Athanil-Yours, etc., ¡ T. M. PRICE, I April 16th, 1917. (Late of BoYertonL April IGth, 1317. t

1SMALL TALK

1 SMALL -α- TALK. Most of the old-time customs which clustered around the 1st of April and contributed a sort of gaiety and humour to the most prosaic every- day life of the community have fallen into the limbo of forgotten things. The most careful re- search has failed to ascertain the exact origin of the observances, and somebody has hazarded the theory that they beiran with the a oven t of the second man on earili who nought to try the eSect? of a practical joke on the Rr?t. From a letter a Bridgend man has received from his son who, "somewhere in I ranee," is a corporal in the R.F.A., it would seem that the aforesaid "dash of gaiety and humour" (strangely enough) is seen more at the front than in these parts, where gloom, heaviness, and oppression cover too many as with a garment. < < List to the corporal, who gaily kicks off in this ^train "First April, 1917. Hope ou success- fully evaded All Fools' Day jokes, the same as myself. We have had some rare fun here (they have 6ince had some still rarer fun), but I was just a iittle bit too much for them all. One Tery smart youth did a roaring trade, though, as a bookie. Had bets on all round the ehgw that the war would be over before April 31st. Odds of 3 to 1 on the field.' Of course, they all thought it was simply a matter of shovelling money in at 3 to 1, and so placed their francs accordingly. Before 12 (noon), though, the artiul booki«' told hii ciients' that thero were only 3#4 days in April. The gamblers' have been scratching their heads ever since!" Such letters these plainly indicate the "spirit" and the "stuff" of our overgrown boys, which excites so much pride and admiration at home. An official communication to* the Penybont Council on the subject of cinemas laid it down that films should not contain "any representa- tion of living personages." < This was enough for the humorists of the Council. Among others, a certain wittv mem- ber, whose name often appears in this column, rose, with a gravity befitting the occasion, to ask the ruling of the clerk as to whether it would be offensive "within the meaning of the A$t," to "shew the Kaiser as the de,ii": To At?i,ch Mr. J. T. Salathiel rejoined that it would certainly be "offensive" to show him as an angel. Speaking last Saturday at the Penybont Coun- cil on a letter from the Women's Municipal Party, urging the co-opting and electing of women on local bodies, Mr. W. A. Howell ob- served Cannot we reply that there are a lot of women on most of the Councils we knew"? < The title of the cantata, "Fnder the Palms," so creditably performed by Ruhamah Welsh Bap- tist Choir, Bridgend, conjured up sunny scenes not at all suggested by the wintrv weather we have lately experienced. One of our oldest re- sidents says he remembers only once having such weather, and that was more than GO years ago, when on a Good Friday, at the end of April, he trudged through snow up to his knees selling hot-cross buns. < Happy is the called-up business man in these days who can dispose of his business. We note that Mr. J. S. Griffiths, confectioner and. tobacconist, Wyndham Street, Pridgend, who is among the latest of our local men to join up, is in this fortunate position, his premises having been taken over by Miss Violet E. Laurence, daughter of Mr. F. W. Laurence, of Messrs. Thompson & Shackell. < < The world, indeed, has wagged a-pace." In his racy and inimitable work on "Seventv Years of Irish Life" (the first edition of which was published in 1893), the late Mr. W. R. Le Fanu. writing of the many changes in the dress and habits of the Irish country people, observable even in those far-way days, tells us, amongst other things, that "in the food of the people, too, there has been great improvement. In old days most of them had nothing but pota- toes; now there are very few who have not, in addition, bread and tea, and not infrequently meat of some kind." Truly, the whirligig of time has produced a state of things which Mr. Le Fanu, in his most imaginative mood, could not have dreamt of. Still we have bread (war bread!) and tea (at a priced, and "not infre- quently meat, of some kind." In those old days "most of them had nothing but potatoes"! —whereas in these times, we may procure al- most anything (again at a price) "except pota- toes" That of which we once had a glut, is now, by not a few, treasured as a souvenir. • • • In these days of restrictions and regulations, "ignorance or the law' is pieaaed witn some show of justification, and often with more suc- cess than in the pre-war days. r- nder the Defence of the Realm Act pleasure trips are now llegal, and in the interests of all whom it may concern, it seems well to say so in view of the hackneyed defence "first he had heard of it," which is sure to be trotted out in the event of a possible prosefcution in these part- At Mer- thyr the other day, Ivor Edward Lewis, Nanty- glo, the owner of a motor-car, and Robert Clifford Fanner, of Tredegar, the driver of a party, were summoned for using motor spirit cn a pleasure trip. They pleaded that they under- stood the passengers were on business. Each defendant was fined .£3. 0 0 People who ha ye no respect for the living are not lively to have any reverence for the dead. The Germans are no longer taking pains to con- ceal the fact that their dead ■so ldiers are being "rendered down" to secure oil and other pro- ducts. In The Times" is found this message —Herr Karl Rosner, the correspondent of the Berlin "Lokalanzeiger" on the Western front, published last Tuesday the first definite German admission. In a description cf the battlefield north of Reims he writes:—"We pass through Evergnicourt. There is a dull smell in the air, as if lime were being burnt. We are passing the great Corpse Exploitation Establishment (Kada- ververwer ungsanstait) of this Army Group. The fat that is won here is turned into lubri- cating oils, and everything else is ground down in the bones mill into a powder which is used for mixing with pigs' food and as manure." What a reward for the poor patriot who has laid down his life—which j" all he has to cffei,- upon the altar of sacriSce! Surely, it were better to be taken prisoner (in view of the com- parative ease and luxury of the captive flu]}'" lot in this country) than to be "rendered dowrf;" and turned into pigs' food and manure. 0 The fighting parson can hold his own well enough, and was never known to be knocked out, or to come off second best in any brawl, however fast and fiir", us Indeed, he is often able to render even greater service than the man in blue! • • • A well-known Brictc-ild resident, who for some reason desires to conceal his identity under the pseudonym of "An Eye-Witness," writes:—On Good Friday I happened to be in Cardiff, and witnessed a fine exhibition of the ministerial mind and muscle—an account of which I thought might be of some interest to ycur readers. In the evening I attended service at the Tabernacle (Hayes), and saw Principal Ed- wards leave with Itev. D. S. Jones (Bridgend) and Bill Griffiths, the Caerau ex-fighting evan- gelist, better known as "Billy Sunday," author of "From Prison to Pulpit." < The trio had just reached the Bachelor Monu- ment, when they were shocked to see a fight in full swing between a soldier and a civilian. "Billy Sunday" and the pastor from Bridgend rushed between the combatants. Of the two, the man in khaki was the more determined, and the most violent, until the ex-pugilist applied a "grip" and a "twist," which effectually did the- trick, as no doubt many a time before, in the old pre-conver-ion days. A bye-standing police- man passed the comment "Leave "(>m alone to these gentlemen; they'll manage 'em all right"— and sure enough they did 1 • • R* the tons of seed potatoes, practically spoilt: —as stated last week in this column—it is some cousointion to know that Glamorgan Countv Council has definitely promised another supply in substitution. (