Collection Title: Llais Llafur

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
13 articles on this page
Advertising

i G. C. DEAN, The Tailor, ♦ Is prepared to pay return X fare within 20 miles of Swansea to any customer ♦ giving an order upon pro- ? duction of Railway Ticket. Please Note the address 22, Castle St., Swansea.

Advertising

The Prosperous: Up-to-date Tradesman X Advertises. ——— Do You Advertise ? <► If not, become pros- X ? If not, become pros- { ? perous. ? ? Enquire for Rates. {

THE MORAL of SOUTH AFRICA

THE MORAL of SOUTH AFRICA Economic Security the Reali Goal. I I ADVICE FROM MR HARTS HORN f By Mr V crncoll Hartshorn. I I What the British soldier fought for in South Africa was not. the establishment of freedom, nor the creation of a. Com- monwealth in which economic justice and sound law should prevail, but f c;r Capitalistic domination, the rule of un- scrupulous. financiers whose class inter- ests have become the first and foremost ,t,on,-iti.cratioii of the Botha Government. The events in South Africa were full of tremendous significance to the organised Labour movement all the world over, and they teach many lessons which we need to learn in this county. The ques- tion of the attitude of the State towards Trade Unions and industrial problems is coming more and more into prominence, 'and it is bound to become, ere long, far and away the most import-titt question in our National politics. THE STRIKES OF THE FUTURE. I These are, the days of vast organisa- tions and amalgamations, both among capitalists and workers. The old days of sectional struggles between employers and we,rkmt,ii-s,trugL, s which affected certain restricted area-have passed awav for ever. Trade Union action of the future will be on a larger scale. The tendciicy is towards the geueral strike. Disputes between employers and work- men are thercfcre certain in the future to demand a greater share of the atten- tion of Governments than they have ever had in the past. A struggle between employers and workmen on a National I scale, where the whole of the men em- ployed in any particular clasi of in- dustry act together, a,nd especially where a number of Trad e Unions combine, is bound to involve the Government of the day before a settlement is reached. Strikes of the future are thus bound to have political characteristics as well as industrial, and the workers will find the truth forced upon them that political power must necessarily acoompa-nv in- dustrial power if the industrial goal of the Trade Unions is ever to be reached. THE SOURCE OF POWER. I When we analyse the power of the capitalist we find that in its essential elements it is political. The power of the capitalist over the wages and con- ditions of the workers in the industrial sphere is founded on 'his ownership of the means of production. Ownership is bafed on political power. As the work- ers adopt a more and more aggressive policy in the industrial arena the nature of the task before them becomes plainer. There has been a marked tender.' during the industrial unrest of tte past few years for the employers by a more open use of their political power.' W hen the Trade Unions marshal their forces on a national scale against the Em- ployers' Associations they now ;>wbhnly find themselves faced bv th^ imj/oyers as private individuals, but by tlio em- ployers as the Government, controlling the law or suspending it ;>.i will, and using the military forces. The revelation is fast itg anchor delusion long cherished by no;i. classes—the delusion that Governments stand for the interests of the people as a whole, a.nd that the law has no class bias. They are discovering that when dealing with industrial unrest the Govern- ments of to-day stand ultimately for the preservation of the interests of the capi- talist class, and in the task of preserv- ing those interests Governments are pre- pared to go to extreme lengths, to defy the law or misinterpret it, or if needs be suspend it, and execute their own will through the medium of a. military de- spotism, ironically termed martial law. A POSITION FULL OF DANGER Labour will not commit the folly of trying to argue against a Maxim gun, and I have no doubt that the workers will learn the lesson that they must capture from the capitalist the political power he now exercises and themselves rol the Government, the administra- tion of the law, and the forces upon which are ordered society must depend in the last report. But in the meantime it behoves all citizens to watch very closely the attitude Governments may take up in industrial disputes. The pre- treut position is full of danger and if Governments are going to become mili- tary despotisms seeking to crush Labour bv the iron heel there is very serious trouble ahead. The industrial struggles are bound to go on, and, Mr D. A. Thomas proves that he has insight into the position of affairs when, he says that "Ho does not now look forward to any final mttlemotit. Until Labour and ability have won emancipation from the payment of unearned tolls on the wealth they produce there cm be no final settle- ment in the struggle between Capital ana La-bour. That will pa on until we reconstruct our economic system, and the part that Governments will play in the struggle now becomes the greatest problem in politics. ECONOMIC SECURITY As a political industrial problem, one ol the many arising out of our present economic system that Governments will have to deal with in. the future, it will become more and more promment- though not more aeute--as the State takes over various industries. It is the economic conditions that determine the nature of almost all our social and in- dustrial problems. (Continued at bottom of next column.)

THE MORAL of SOUTH AFRICA

(Contia-med fr*m proofing oolumia). State ownership will not solve the problems unless State ownership puts the system on a. proper basis. The trouble on the State owned railways of South Africa is due to the fact that a. capitalis- tic State runs a national concern on the economics of capitalism. The unrest is ca.u.sed by the fact that the South African railwaymen like all other workers in a capitalistic State, do sot possess any, economic security. The right to work or maintenance must be conceded by society if the position of the workers is to be anything like secure, and if social stability is to be realised. Economic security is the real goal of all industrial action, and that means a re- construction of the social system. This task is political as well as industrial, and a. condit ion of success is the conquest of political power by the working classes.

30 A WEEK MINIMUM

30 A WEEK MINIMUM. MR VvILL CROOKS ON THE HARD- SHIPS OF THE POOR Mr. Will Crooks. M.P.. has been ad- dressing a meeting of the An coats Brotherhood in Islington Hall, Man- chester, on "How to Rear a British Family on 30s. a Week or Less." The address really consisted of "a series of pathetic and humorous stories, descriptive of slum life in London. He described the perpetual struggle against poverty which his own mother had— his father being maimed—to bring up a family of seven, all of whom lived in one room. The hungry tramping through the country in search of work of his early manhood he also detailed, and he gave a. touching picture of his hungry wife and children waiting at home for the postal order which he could no chance of earning. A Cabinet Minister whom he had shown the slums expressed surprise that people living so were as good as they were. Mr. Crooks pleaded especially that the nation should do something to improve the lot of the little children of the slums. It should do in its own interest, for the nation depended on its little children. Nowhere on arth was there such noble heroism, devotion, and philan- thropy as there was among the poor women—mothers who worked night and day to keep their offspring in food. People said the nation was not suffi- ciently well off to deal properly with all these children. He denied that. It was wealthy enough to care adequately for all of them. They saw the results of the present system in the overfilled asylums, hospitals, workhouses, and prisons. In workhouses the average cost of food for children was 2s. 4d. a week, and for adults 4s. 8d.If it cost that feeding people on wholesale lines, it must cost more outside. At least it must cost 24s. 8d. a week for food a.nd rent, without counting anything for ooal, light, and clothes, and therefore he claimed that no working man should be asked to work for less than 30s. ft week in this country.

D A

D. A. CAUSTIC CRITICISM OF TH • CAMBRIAN CHÂIRAit.:t' I "Diognes," in the "Daily Citizen," I addressed the following undelivered letter to Mr. D. A. Thomas, the chair- man of the Cambrian Combine:— Sir,—I have been reading the report of your characteristic remarks at the annual banquet of the Monmouthshire Colliery Officials' Association. They have interested me, not because they were in themselves valuable, but be- cause they afforded an insight into that consuming egotism that makes you-well. that makes you D. A. Thomas. I am quite sure that you do not exaggerate when you say that if you were a miner you would be a big agitator. But permit me to believe that you would generally be an agita- tor in a minority of one. Your antagon- ism to your comrades for the society in which you would not be an irrecon- cilable has yet to be imagined. Your humour resembles that of Sir Anthony Absolute, who was always easy to get on with as long as he had his own way in everything. At such times, and when coal is up, you would not be unamiable if you could control your habit of say- ing nasty things; for you have a very effective rasp to your tongue. But anyose who had studied that physiog- nomy of yours, with the stone-wall brows and the jutting jaw, would trust himself rather to a she-bear robbed of her whelps than to your goodwill. Per- haps that is why you miss something that you would wish to find in the policy of the miners' leaders. You say you would like to see them "mix their policy with a little more intelligence." Are you quite sure that it is intelli- gence that is lacking? Isn't it just possible that it is confidence? Mr. Chamberlain once reminded us, as you may remember, ."Who sups with the devil must have a long spoon"; and no doubt the guests who bethought themselves of that injunction were re- garded as very stupid persons by their host. In considering miners' policy you have one incurable disability—you are a inineowner: and it! is more difficult for the mineowner to enter into the point of view of his miners than Sor a camel to pass through the eye of a needle. You and your kind ought to spend a year at the coal-face.

THE SENGHENYDD INQUIRY

THE SENGHENYDD INQUIRY. Interesting Points in Evidence. SOME AMUSIXG PASSAGES The Home Office inquiry into the cause of the Semghenydd explosion was con- tinued at Cardiff, on Friday last, by Professor R. A. Redanayne, Ii.il. chief inspector of mines, who is accompanied by Ifr Evan Williams (chairman of the South Wales and Monmouthshire Coal- owners' Association) and Mr Robert Smillie (president of the Miners' Federa- tion of Great Brita.in) as assessors, and also by Mr H. K. Beale, Birmingham, solicitor to the- Commission. SAND AND WATER TO OBVIATE DANGERS. The examination of David Morris, j under-manager of the west side, was re- sumed by Mr Clement Edwards, M.P. (representing a. number of bereaved families). Mr Edwards, questioning th-e witness regarding the cavities in which gas could accumulate, asked if pneumatic pumps to pump in sand would not obvi- ate the dangers. Witness said he did not think pumps could pump sand into some of the cavi- ties. The Commissioner explained that it would net be dry sand, but sand and water. Mr Edwards suggested that if steel bar arching were used that would be a basis for the sand. The witness was unable to express an opinion en the point. The Commissioner remarked that it was rather an expert point. Mr Edwards examined witness con- cerning the, water supply in th? colliery, and suggested that there were not suffic- ient water pip: to effectively fight the fire. Witness could not say. Had you, in fact, sufficient pipes to effectually fight this fire?—If wo had as much water as we liked we couldn't fight it. The Commissioner Had you sufficient pipes down to adequately fight the fire ? Witness admitted tha'tj they had not. because others w ere put down. But some of the pipes were broken and, had to be repaired. ff Mr "Edwards DortV you think that with the possible dangers of this colliery there should be very much greater pre- cautions taken as to the water supply below ?—Yes. Answering Mr Edward Williams (for the Federation of Colliery Examiners' Association), witness said he did not think it would be advisable fcr one man, paid by the State, to be stationed at each colliery as a local inspector. The collieries were already State-inspected. IMPORTANT POINTS Mr Williams suggested that it would be a good thing if firemen were sup- plied with a tracing of their district and of the adjoining districts. Witness thought some good might ocme of it. The Commissioner said the court would take note of the suggestion. The Commiitioncr asked the witness whether he did not think it would be a good thing if the method of testing for gas with a lamp or a. rod were doro away with and the testing done by the lamp in the hand. Witness I agree, if you think so. The Commissioner Well, give it ser- ious thought, will you?—Yes. Wm. Williams, the day shift overman for the Pretoria and Aberystwyth dis- tricts of the mines, told the Commissioner that he was away ill on the day of the explosion. The Commissioner Very fortunate for JV' LAMP ON A STICK. The Commissioner You have heard this way of testing for gas in these high places with a. stick. Do you think it is a satisfactory way?—Yes, I think it is satisfactory. The Commissioner poiritedi out that as the eyesight, of people varied, one man might be able to tee the flame flicker and another would not. Would it not be better, he asked, to make doubly sure by testing for gas with the lamp in the ha.tMi ? Witness Yes. Answering Mr Smillie, witness said he agreed with Mr Shaw's theory that the explosion originated in the lamp station. Mr T. Richards, M.P. (for the South Wales Miners' Federation), caused much amusement when, in asking the witness questions concerning colliery labourers, he read the following list of occupations from which it had been suggested col- liery labourers were recruited Music- I ians, butlers, music-hall artistes, coach- men, gardleners, drivers, University graduates, seamen, railwaymen, tin and steel plate workers. (Laughter). Witness said he did not remember see- ing that list in the newspapers. Mr Richards remarked that he was afraid the lawyers' profession was too profitable for them to find their way into the collieries. (Laughter). MIRTH-PROVOKING ANSWER Where do the labourers come from to your colliery? Witness God knows; I don't. (Loud laughter). Witness added, in reply to Mr Rich- ards, that they go agricultural labourers in the coal districts also. Mr Richards put it to the witness that the labourer did not get any different treatment from the skilled collier. Witness No. Is there anyone who give him any in- struction whatever before he enters the pit with his safety lamn as to the pur- pose of his being supplied with an in- (Continued at bottom of next column ) t"L': ii' ,1

THE SENGHENYDD INQUIRY

(Oeotiauet from preceding column). strument, like that instead of a torch, which would a better light?—I can't say what the lampman does. Do you think he does 7-1 don't think he does. Do you remember a.nyone telling a young man coming to the colliery for the first time anything about the safety lamp 7-Yes, we generally tell him. LIKE LOOKING INTO A FURNACE D. H. Thomas, the head night over- man on the east and west side of the colliery, described what he saw when he went down the pit after the explosion. He said that he went across to the east side and saw five or six men blown- down. By the indications, added the witness, they had been sitting down having a chat. Looking along the Lancaster Level it was exactly like looking into a furnace. From what he saw he did not think the canal would have stopped it. The Commissioner suggested to the witnesses that it would be a good thing if there was some organised rescue sys- tem so that when a disaster occurred trained men would go to their places and confusion would be avoided. In answer to Mr Smillie; the witness said it was usual on the night shift, at any rate at Sengheny,dd Colliery, for a man who was going down the pit for the first time to be given instructions on top as to the use of the lamp, and also to be placed with an old hand for a week or so. In consequence of other engagements of the representatives of M.F.G.B. and the South Wales Miners' Federation, an adjournment was made until 10.15 yes- terday (Thursday) morning. I': ) ;> .L,#

MACHINE GUN

MACHINE GUN FOR MINERS ON STRIKE. MARTIAL LAW IN BRITISH COLUMBIA How the miners on strike in Nanai- mo, Vancouver Island, British Colum- bia, were coerced Hnd dragooned by British troops in a British colony was emphasised at the meeting of the Executive Council of the Miners' Federation of Great Britain at the Westminster Palace w • oce!. The Chairman Robert Smillie) called attention to a resolution passed by the miners at a conference in Lon- don some time ago in connection with the action of the authorities in Van- couver Island, during a prolonged coal strike there. British troops had been used to over- awe the strikers, and Mr. Ashton (the general secretary) was instructed to write to the officials of the United Mine Workers of America to find out what were the facts. Mr. Ashton had written to Mr. Green, the treasurer and secre- tary of the Mine Workers, who had forwarded the following letter writ- ten to him by Mr. F. Farrington, sec- retary of the Vancouver section of the organisation:— "I now write to advise you that the information conveyed to Mr. Ashton is true in every respect. As a matter of fact the indignities imposed upon the Vancouver Island mi ners have been i even worse than Mr. Ashton seems to understand. "T was present in the meeting to which he refers in hi: letter, and the hall was not only surrounded by a regiment of British soldiers, but they also had one machine-gun mounted in front and one in the rear of the meet- mg-place. Colonel Hall was in charge of the troops. "AA-lien the meeting was ready to disperse we were. allowed to leave only in squads of 10, being compelled to pass through a file of soldiers, and were es- corted up to the court house and searched for firearms. Because of this process it was fully four hours after we had completed our work before all the men were allowed to leave the hall. SUPPRESSING TRADE UNIONISM. "In addition to this. there is not the slightest particle of doubt, but that the provincial Government of British lumbia, and the Dominion Government as well, have combined with the em- ployers and are determined to do every- thilng within their power to prevent the growth of Trade Unionism in Cana- da. Our men have been arrested on trivial charges, and a number of them have been sentenced to as much as two years in the penitentiary. "Military forces have prevented peaceful picketing. They have even gone to the extent of 'restricting' (i.e., placing out of bounds) certain sections of the city of Nanaimo, and to be found within the restricted district between fixed hours is sufficient to warrant the arrest of those so found, even though they are not in any way interfering with anyone; the mere fact that they are found in the section of the city during the time specified by the mili- tary authorities means arrest. "Mr. Ashton can secure considerable valuable information which will tend to show the attitude of the Govern- ment if you send him a copy of our official journal of Dec. 25 and the issue following. There are two articles there- in, written by myself, which leave no room for doubt as to what is the atti- tude of the Government authorities to- wards the miners on Vancouver."

wi 60000 RACE ROUND THE WORLD

.w. £60,000 RACE ROUND THE WORLD The Panama Exhibition authorities has offered L60,000 in prizes for an aero- plano race round the world. The com- pany will give half this sum if the rest can be raised by subscription. The first prize, it is proposed, shall be £ 30,000. There is already one entrant in the per- son of Captain Thomas Baldwin.

PONTARDAWE COUNCIL

PONTARDAWE COUNCIL The fortnightly meeting of the Pont- ardawe Council was held on Thursday, Mr. Owen Davies presiding. There were present, Messrs D. T. Jones, Jos. Thomas, Dd. Jenkins, R. A. Jones. J. M. Davies, J. G. Harris, Herbert Gib- bon, D. Lloyd. Rev E. Davies, Dd. Lewis. R. Thomas, W. D. Davies, W. Davies (B.). H. J. Powell, M. Davies W. Davies (Y.), E. Hopkin, L. Davies, F. R. Phillips, together with the offi- cials. THE COUNCIL AND TENANTS. The Clerk stated that it had been reported that a tenant at Heol Varteg (Council Houses, Ystalyfera) was still keeping lodgers, notwithstanding the letter which had been sent to the tenant. Mr. Dd. Lewis moved that the tenant should be given a fortnight's notice to dismiss the lodgers. The Rev. E. Davies seconded, and this was agreed to. It was further reported that a tenant was in the habit of grazing a pony in the back garden, that the passage of the pony broke up the asphalt leading to the garden, and that he kept a fish and chip cart in the front street oppo- site his house all through the day. Fourteen days' notice was given for the nuisances to be abated. The Engineer reported that he had carefully considered the question of providing a fence to divide the two gar- dens iof each block of the Council houses at Ystalyfera. and found that the cost of three classes of fencing would be as follow: brick wall 3 ft. 6in. high on the "tip and run" system, £3 12s. per house; cheap iron fencing, £2 5s. per house; privet hedge includ- ing double netting, 15s. per house. The 'latter in time would form a good fence and the netting would last three years to protect the plantings. The cost of the privet hedge for the whole of the houses would be £21, against £ 58 for the iron railings, and t98 for the brick walls. It was unanimously decided that pri- vet hedges should be provided. COUNCIL NOT RESPONSIBLE. I The Engineer reported that he had received a letter from Mr. Glyn Price, coroner, respecting the inquest held on the 29th Dec. last as to the death of D^vid Jenkins at the side of the Upper Clydach river opposite the Victoria Inn, Pontardawe, and stating that a rider was added to the verdict that a gate should be placed near the spot where the deceased died to prevent persons passing from the road to the river. Decided to forward a copy of the letter to the County Council. PROPOSED GWAUNCAEGURWEX I STATION APPROACH. THE SPIRIT OF PAROCHIALISM I RAMPANT. The Engineer further reported that he had inspected Pwllywrach-road, Gwauneaegurwen, and found that it was under 9ft. in width at several points, and for the purpose of making a safe approach to the Great Western ltailway station it would be necessary to procure about three perches of land and to also purchase a retaining wall 72ft. long by 9ft. high. The cost of the improvement would be about JE80. The Rev. Evan Davies, in accordance with notice of motion moved that the Council should grant a contribution to- wards the construction of a road lead- ing to the new station. It was an in- sult to call the present approach a road; it was only a lane, and he was certain that the Engineer would agree that P-80 was inadequate, because the road could not be repaired owing to the fact that there was rock on one side, and a river on the other side. It would be false economy to spend the money. He said he was bold enough to make a proposal that the Council should grant jEl.50 instead of £80, because if they spent only £ 80 to start with, they would find that it was necessary to spend money continually. If the Coun- cil granted E150 towards the improve- ment there would be an end to the trouble. Mr. Dd. Lewis said the road would serve future generations, and he iseetmd- ed the last speaker's proposal. "Some of you," he said, "don't live at Gwaun- caegurwen, but you might come to live there. Mr. R. A. Jones: God forbid. Mr. Gibbons said it would be better to adjourn the question until the esti- mates come ug for discussion. Mr. Harris said if they granted E150 in this case they would have similar calls from other places. Mr H. Thomas said it was against the policy of the Council to spend public money ont private property, and to grant the money would not be fair to other landlords. The Clerk said he had received a. letter from Mr David Jones, Pwllywrach farm, G.C.G., stating that in reference to the proposed approach to the G.C.G. station he had been approached by some of the most influential residents of the district and had arrived at the decision that he was prepared to sell the land at 30s. per porch freehold, subject to access to the adjoining fields. He hoped the Council would consider the offer a most gener- ous one, and that it would be possible for the present residents of the neigh- bourhood and future generation to bene- fit by the proposed facilities. The Engineer, in reply to a member, stated that the land was about 40 perches. Mr R. A. Jones seconded Mr Gibb- ons' amendment that the matter bo de- ferred. 11. I Mr F. ri. Phillips said he would vote against the proposal to grant the money. He would like1 to knew more of the con- dition of th2 place. He thought it would be decidedly unfair to make a contri bution of the serf out cf the general funds. Mr H. J. Powell stated that he had been fighting for the Ynismeudwy road for a considerable time. Mr D. T. Jones said it was a principle they were called upon to decide. They had plenty cf work with the estimates without discussing principles. Whail they ought to decide upon was whether they wt-re going to grant the money or not. Mr R. Thomas moved that they refuse the application. The Chairman said G.C.G. had a moral claim to the road, and he suggested that a committee formed of the local members and one member from each district should view the place. They should go and view the place in fairness to the local members, who had been working hard to get the road. Mr J. Thomas said he felt inclined to favour the proposal. Some time ago he I had failed to get a. promise from the Council for a grant towards the making of a road leading to the proposed rail- way station at Godre'rgraig, and they had been asked to bring an estimate of tae cost of the read to the Council, and to get a promise from the landlord that lie was prepared to give something to- wards the road, and then the Council would be prepared to consider it. The matter was still in abeyonce at Godre'r- graig. They had a promise from the .Midland Railway Company that a station would be provided if a road were made. The Chairman said the two cases were, not similar. They had a road leading towards the station at G.C.G., and the engineer estimated that it would cost £ 80 to make it. He would suggest putting another L80 to the sum suggested. Mr H. J. Powell said the, people of Godre'rgraig had already collected be- tween EBO to £10; The Railway Com- pany were prepared to build a station if a road were provided. Mr Phillips: It is there on paper! Mr Powell Some years ago they col- lected about L100, and there is some kind of a road leading to the proposel station. The Godre'rgraig people were in the same boat exactly. If they granted the money to G.C.G. they would also have to grant it to Ystalyfera. Mr W. D. Davies thought the sug- gestion of the chairman a very good one. Mr R. Thomas said it opened up a very big question. If G.C.G. were en- titled to money towards the road, then Clydach. should have a sum granted for the improvement of Capel road. The Rev. E. Davies replying to the criticism, said some of the speakers were very wide of the mark. The cases of Ystalyfera and G.C.G. were not analag- ous. He was quite prepared to wait nntil the estimates were prepared in April. To spend £ 80 would be useless. If they saw Pwllyrwrach road once they would dream of it for months. Mr R. A. Jones If we saw Colbren road, we should have nightmare—(laugh- ter). I a.m going to vote for the dreams anyway—(renewed laughter). It was decided that a committee should be formed consisting of the Chairman, vice-chairman, local members, and Messrs. J. M. Davies, H. Thomas, D. Jenkins, Joseph Thomas, Lewis Davies, and D. T. Jones, and that they view the road, and report. LOCKING THE STABLE, etc. I Mr. Morgan Davies, in accordance with notice of motion, moved that the question of providing fire extinguishing appl,iances for the district should be discussed by a committee. It was neces- sary that they should do something to avoid losing property and perhaps lives. There was an urgent need that some- thing should be done and he thought a committee should be formed to draw up a report and present it at a future meeting of the Council. The Clerk suggested that as the mat- ter would have to do with the provi- sion of hydrants that it be referred to the Water Supplies Committee.—This was agreed to. STATE OF THE COUNTY MAIN I ROADS. The Chairman said that because he had received numerous complaints by the users of vehicles who had occasion to use the main roads, he desired to say that the Council should call the attention of the County Council to the state of the roads under their juris- diction. A friend of his had recently ridden to Neath in a trap and had had to hold on to the side of the trap nearly all the way for fear of being thrown out. The motor 'buses had all been fitted up with the latest improve- ments to avoid oscillation, but the state of the roads made it a torture for any- one to use the 'buses. The roads round Bridgend and Cow bridge were kept in excellent Tepair, and he thought it full time that the same attention should be paid to the roads in the Pontardawe district. He moved that the attention of the County Council be called to the dangerous and disgraceful state of the roads, and that they be asked to im- prove them as soon as possible; and also that copies of the resolution should be sent to all the local members of the County Council. Mr R. Thomas seconded, and it was unanimously agreed to. Mr F. R. Phillips said the matter had been discussed the previous evening at the Cha.mber of Trade-(laughter). The Chamber h ad been successful in obtain- ing some improvements locally, and no doubt they would succeed in doing other things in spite of the jeers of some of those present. Mr R. A. Jones It is swelled head they suffer from—("No, no," and laugh- ter). Mr Phillips expressed surprise at the ejaculation made by Mr Jones. The i m-in roads in the district had not re- ceived proper attention during the last two years, and that was the reason why they suffered. Mr M. Davies said the Chamber had embodied in the resolution they had I .,¡ ?' passed that the narrow portions of roads should be widened. lie thought iiio Council should embody that in their re- sol ut ion. Mr R. A. Jones protested that when the Council had the opportunity of prejL- ing upon the County Council the neces- sity of widening the roads, at the time when the Council proposed to run t2,ü tramway to Ynismeudwy, they hcd. bnrked the question. Had the Couniil supported Councillor Fraiicis and hjrr- self at that, time, they would considerable goad. The road, in thcu" district were the worst in the county, ard yet they had allowed the best- chance they ever had to slip past. Mr J. M. Davies supported the re- solution. He understood that the Couirly Council were likely to appoint a superin- tendent to look after the roads lllSpE, J- ois, especially in their district. The resolution was passed, and the sug- gested addendum added. MORE RESPONSIBILITY FOR TEB COUNCIL. The Roads and Bridges Committee met on 2nd February, anj inspected Graig- ynysderw road, and found that all im- pi-ovements suggested had been c;;rri-d out, and recommended that the rcad be taken over as a district highway from the point where it joins Glanrhyd roo(i onwards for a distance of 250 yareb. Agreed to. SCARLET FEVER AT G.C.G. Mr W. Davies, Brynamman, a-skedi whether it was the open rubbish tip on the G.C.G. common that was responsible for the prevalence of scarlet- fever in Lø district. Children played up the tips; and milking cows were also turned oi the Common in proximity to the tips. The Sanitary Inspector said the cors- timied prevalence of the disease "was more likely due to people visiting houses where scarlet fever was, and they would never stamp it out until they refrained from doing so. It was resolved thfct the M.O.H. should be asked to visit and report on the condition of the place. LIGHTS PRACTICALLY INVISIBLE A letter was received from Mr. y. Geo. Higgs, together with his report on the electric lighting of Clydach and Gwauncaegurwen. He made tests at Gwauneaegurwen in January 26th, and also on January 30th. Referring to the lighting of New-road from the Public Hall to G.C.G. Old Pit, he stated it was very unsatisfactory. From about midway as far as the old pit the lamps were of little use and further on they were practically invisible. STATE OF SWAN-LANE, YSTALY- FERA. The Sanitary Inspector reported that Swan-lane, Ystalyfera, was owned by Col Gough, and served as an approach to fourteen dwelling-houses. Half of the "road" was covered with .pools of water and slush which made it moet difficult for residents to use it. It was decided to write to Col. Gough calling his attention to the matter.

What Labour Fights For

What Labour Fights For MR RAMSAY MACDONALD ON THE CONFERENCE Speaking on Friday last at a great de- monstration held in Glasgow in connec- tion with the Labour Party Conference, Mr J. Ramsay Macdonald, M.P., said that was a magnificent meeting in the midst of a magnificent conference. From the point of view of Labour solidarity their conference had been a great success. It would inspire delegates to go back to their districts and advance the cause and interests of the party to which they be- longed. When they looked round and saw the poverty of the people was there one of them who would say that the Labour Party would not require the strength to fight for the downtrodden ? The people would not always remain blind to the causes of their poverty or deaf to its remedy. In South Africa they had seen what had been done to destroy Trade Union- ism. Those comrades of theirs who had fought against martial law would be given a worthy reception when arrived in England. The Labour Party would fight for these men. It would also fight to enfranchise the wives and daughters of workers. This they were determined upon despite the attempt of some to kill the cause of votes for women on the threshold of its triumph. "m ?n,d qu.tin -?, l r Referring to the land question Mr Macdonald said that nationalisation was their goal. Everything they did in the House of Commons would be directed towards that end. They came there after eight years' fighting covered with dust, but with their arms full of bene- fits for the workers, whose cause they stood for all the time. Mr Macdonald spoke, despite continued interruptions by suffragettes, who were planted all round the hall. He fought his way through to the end, however, and at the conclusion was rewarded with round after round of cheering. During a melee, due to the ejection of interrupters one woman made to jump over the bal- cony, but her mad project was frustra- ted. Another interrupter sat upon a neighbour woman, who safeguarded her- self with an umbrella. Thereupon a feminine bout ensued, to the discomfiture of the militant. Miss Margaret Bondfield delivered an address on housing.

No title

i The innovation of printing the "W est- minster Gazette" on green paper drew from Mr Gladstone an intimation that he preferred the violent contract of black 1 and white, and from Mr Bernard Shew the characteristic comment that while in "good light the colour was first rate." in the railway carriage of a certain com- pany "it would make even the Rev. Hugh Price Hughes pubjicly damn h!s eyes. 'f >t:I.1 I.