Collection Title: Llais Llafur

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
21 articles on this page
Advertising

THOROUGH Sight Testing? and Spectacle Fitting J Mr. ERIC REES: F.R.M.S., F.S.M.C., Et< ? t 2G CASTLE ST. SWANSEA ".)'(;CASTILE ST. SWANSEA The condition of your sight will ♦ be demonstrated and all imformia- + tion willingly given J FREE OF CHARGE. -♦ Telephone: Central 520. X♦♦♦♦♦♦❖❖♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

Advertising

 ? t COLLIERS  IN i CONFERENCE. ? i SEE PAGE 2. i ♦ T ♦ } ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

bHIPPIHG AND TRADE

bHIPPIHG AND TRADE. LESSONS OF THE WAR. STATE ORGANISED LABOUR. At the annual meeting held on Mon- day of the Liverpool Steamship Owners' Association a highly interest- ing report was presented by the Secre- tary (Sir Norman Hill) dealing with the war's effects upon shipping amd upodi the trade and labour of the coun- try. The Association, embraces mem- bers owning 21 per cent, of the total British steam tonnage afloat and 35 par cent. of vessels of over 5,000 tons. For the maintemance of overseas trade during the war the report ex- presses deep gratitude to the Navy, without the protection of which the trade must have ceased to exist. It was largely helped to continue also by the -N,ational Insurance scheme and the prompt and effective steps taken by the Government in co-operation with the banks to maintain the internation- al financial credit of the country. For the last ten years the Association has pointed out again and again the peril in which the nation stood so long as adequate facilities were wanting for insurance against King's enemy risks, and it is. not its fault that those facilities were provided only just in time to save the country from grave disaster., ABNORMAL DEMANDS. Although financial difficulties were overcome in the main by the end of September and the flow of inter- na-tional trade restarted, the abnormal demands imposed in the loading and discharging facilities of the ports in the attempt to deal with both the trade which had accumulated as well as current trade increased most serious- ly the cost incurred and the time oc- cupied in the handling of the cargoes. This and the disa ppearance of the mer- chant fleets of Germany, Austria, and Hungary, together witii the discon- tinuamc-e of the oversea trade of those countries and Belgium, representiasg in normal times about 22 per oent. of the world's t.rade, imposed serious re- strictions on the flow of international trade, which in consequence, during the last five months was substantially below that of normal times. In the United Kigdom the falling off in vailue amounted to nearly 30 per cent., and it was probable that the general over- sea trade of the world had suffered not less than that of the United Kingdom. The report proceeds: -"Although the volume of trade to be dealt with has thus diminished, the difficulties amd the delays in its handling have, in the United Kingdom, been accentuated by the heavy demands the State has been forced to make upon the ships, the ports, and the railways. These diffi- culties must increase as the volume increases, and as international trade adjusts itself to the altered conditions .resulting from the war. The main, tenance of the flow of international trade is essential to the maintenance -of the country's fighting strength, for it is largely by rfreans of that trade that we are feeding, clothing and arm- ing not only our own fighting forces, 'but those of our Allies. Further, the continuance of that trade is essential to the maintenance of our financial strength. The question, must there- fore be dealt with in the interests of the nation as a whole, and not as it affects the interests of any particular class of traders. SHIPOWNERS, DIFFICULTIES. The Association conceives that it can best heilp the nation to arrive at a. right ) solution by making cle&r the difncuJtiea with which the shipowners have now to • contend. To this end it has caused' an inquiry to be made into the volume of I tra-de dealt with in the last five months in the ports of the United Kingdom. The 7inquiry has established that the exist- ing congestion in the ports, and the con- sequent rise freights, in the cost of "handling and in prices, has not arisen from either the want of ships, or the shortage of quay space. The report Youmm,ari.g the principal causes of the ..congestion of the ports as (1) shortage of labour, (2) the heavy demands of the Admiraltv on the mercantile and marine for officers and men, (3) the heavy de- raands of the Admiralty on appliances such as tugs and lighters, so essential to the flow of trade through the ports, and of the Army upon the railway facilities, and (4) the heavy and unusual demands upon quay and warehousing epaee in the ports resulting from the Government "importation of sugar, which should be removed at tho earliest possible moment. STATE ORGANISATION OF LABOUR. With regard to the niain difficulty of the shortage of labour the report expres- ses the view that it could be overcome by a better (•rgrmis-a tion of labour resources, provided that when organised they were used to the best advantage. In the course -of a. series of suggestions to this end it 1s stated "there are good grounds for be- lieving that there are sufficient men in -the country to deal with at least the nor- mal traffic on the quays and on the rail- ways, but if these men are to be made available they must be organised by the 'State. RAW MATERIALS. Regarding the high importance of an ininteirupt.d s'"poiy of row ircttemfa for fom*ue" 'be tMrttMi 1 MM sommu.)

bHIPPIHG AND TRADE

(Continued from preceding oolumnj industries, it is added "In the use of the appliances and facilities of our ports and rail ways, it is of first importance that the State should recognise that the raw material must be carried to our fac- tories before the manufactured articles can be made available for our fighting forces, and that our fighting forces and the nation at large depend mainly for their food on our imports. It must be farther recognised that our imports of raw materials can only be paid for by the exports of our manufactures if our financial credit is to be maintained and prices to be kept at a reasonable rate." The report contains a criticism of the Stxvtog war risk., insurance scheme, based on th-e v-/nv tlvit ,m in the end cost' j the nation subst?ntinJIy more than a scheme of free indemnity.

I L P CONFERENCE AT CARDIFF

I. L P CONFERENCE AT CARDIFF. THE MOVEMENT DOING GOOD WORK. The annual conference of the South Wales Division of the Independent La- bour Party took place during the week- end at Ruskin Hall, Cardiff. There was a very good attendance of delegates from local branches, Ystalyfera and Ystradgyn- lais being among those represented, and interesting business was transacted. Councillor Morgan Jones, Bargoed, pre- sided, and opened the morning session with an address. Speaking on the war Mr Jones said that they as Socialists had reason to be proud that their teachings could stand this great test. The I.L.P. preached peace in peace, and they also preached peace in war; they believed in the unity of the workers and preferred the clasp of the hand tq the clip, of the trigger. They were convinced of the justice of their cause, and although their task was a great one, the cause was right. The financial report was then read, the outstanding feature being the clear- ing of the Abercynon libel fund. The president said that it had been decided I to publicly restore the deeds of the pro- perty of Mr. Wilton to him. The reports of the branches were very satisfactory, and were read by the sec- retaries of the federation of branches. Mr. Llew. E. Morgan (Ystradgynlais), in presenting the report of the branches of the Swansea Valley Socialist Federa- tion, said that owing to the war many of the schemes of the district had had to be abandoned. Mr. Morgan. spoke of the phenomenal success of the Ystradgynlais branch; they had gained 16 new mem- bers since the war had commenced, and had now an institute and grounds of their own. A handsome sum was being weekly added to the funds of the move- ment. In the afternoon session Mr. Ivor H. Thomas, the district representati ve oj. the N.A. C. gav a report of the last con- ference that was held at Bradford. Mr. Thomas explained the position of the Misses Kippin's legacy. Th: money, h:1 said, was really intended for -he persor.a' use of Mr. Keir Hardie, but he had hand- ed it over to the I.L.P.,and as r suit they benefited by over £ 8,000; many other donations had been received since the war, amounting to over ESOO., Mr. Thomas said that the N.A.C. were prepared to pay 30s. a week towards the salary of an organiser for the district. Mr. J. Bruce Glasier addressed the delegates on the position of the I.L.P. regarding the war. Mr. Glasier gave some excellent advice to the branches, which was very much appreciated. Several reso- lutions were passed, amongst them being the following :— That this conference urge upon the Government to take over the food sup- plies of the country. That the policy of Great Britain after the war shall be based on four points (1) No transfer of territory shall take place without the consent of the population of that territory; (2) All treaties entered into shall be subject to control of Parliament; (3) A policy shall be directed to the creation of a concert of Powers and an Inter- national Council; (4) Great Britain to propose a plan for the reduction by con- sent of armaments of belligerents and an' attempt to be made to secure general nationalisation of the manufac- ture of armaments. The treasurer amd secretary (Messrs. J. D. Morgan and Jas. Watts) were re- elected, and Mr. J. E. Edmunds (secre- tary to the Cardiff Trades Council), was elected vice-chairman. —————

I TOWY FISHERIESI I

I TOWY FISHERIES I I GRANT SOUGHT FOR MARKING AND HATCHING FISH. Alderman Lewis D. Thomas, Carmar- then, was elected chairman of the Towy Board of Conservators on Friday, and Lieutenant-general Sir James Hill-Johnes V.C., G.C.B., vice-chairman. It was decided to reduce the awards paid for cormorants' heads from 2s. each to Is.. Mr Thomas Smith asked upon what grounds was the reduction made, and added that the cormorants were use- ful fish poachers. Mr Mervyn Peel stated that the board got no more cor- morants' heads now hät thy spent jE8 than when they spent 94. The board decided to make applica- tion to the Development Commissioners for a grant of £ 300 for marking smelts and kelts, and for the erection and main- tenance of a hatchery for salmon, and trout.

RAILWAYMENS PROTEST I

RAILWAYMEN'S PROTEST. I I DEARER FOOD CAUSES UNREST. "Nineteen-fourteen was to have been a memorable year for railways," said Mr J. H. Thomas, M.P., at a railway workers' dinner on Saturday might in Kentish Town. He went on to suggest t halt the memorable vear may now be 1915. But for the war a determined effort was to have been made to reduce the hours and increase the wages of the men. These reforms were long over- due yet they would have belied every principle for which t'hey stood if they had taken advantage of the unfortun- ate crisis in August to enforce their demand?. Instead of .that they went on serving their country. Unfortunately their example had not been followed by certain employers. "W e arc proud of our navy," he went on, "but we protest against any few individuals reaping a profit and re- ward from the sacrifice, and valour of our fleet by cornering the foodstuffs of the peopf-f- l (Loud cheers). "That is why railwaymen of all grades on all railways from John O'Groats to Land's End are, seething with discon- tent. This discontent can only be al- layed by the railway companies and the Government recognising immediate- ly that an advance of wages is due to the railwaymen." (Loud cheers). "Your society recognise that they calnnot hope to be continually keeping I you in check u-n-less there is an im- provement iiDJ your position., but I hope you will not take spasmodic or hasty action." ————— —————

I GOOD DIVIDENDSI

I GOOD DIVIDENDS. I I FIRMS MAKING BIG PROFITS JN WAR TIME [ Dinctors of the Lancashire and York- shire Railway have declared a dividend at- t:.I rate of 6 per cent. for the year, placing £ 20,000 to reserve and carrying forward £ 45,998. A year ago the distri- bution was at the rate of 5i per cent., and E40,780 was carried forward. At the annual meeting of Messrs. Bell and Nicholson, Ltd., in Birmingham, Mr. S. Hollingworth said that, despite I the war, they proposed to pay a 10 per cent. dividend against 6 per cent last year. These abnormal times were times when the funds put aside for equalising the dividends should be drawn on. SHARING THE "PLUNDER." Mr. W. C. AndeTson, M.P., addressing a crowded Labour meeting at Bristol, said there ought to be public control of merchant shipping as of railways. There had been no increase of freights on the railways, but the shipowners were in a position to demand practically their own terms. The supply of wheat and coal should also be under public control to avoid extortions by middlemen. American speculators, British farmers, and shipown- ers were all having a share of the plun- I der, at the expense mainly of the work- ing classes. A resolution was passed pro- testing, calling on the Government to assume control over all necessaries of life. NEW ZEALAND ACTION. I From Wellington it is reported by Reuter that the New Zealand Govern- ment has arranged to buy a million buahels of Canadian wheat for delivery in July. ————

AIR RAID THAT DID NOT COME OFF I i

AIR RAID THAT DID NOT COME OFF. i LONDON LOOKING FOR PHANTOM ZEPPELINS. I m There was something of a Zeppelin j scare in London and in many parts of Essex on Monday. A rumour was in circulation that a fleet of Zeppelins was on its way to the Metropolis. ) The rumour began on the coast, tra- I velled inland rapidly, and soon reached London. It was stated that the special constables had been called out, that the police had been warned to look skywards II and take all necessary measures. Inquiries 'poured into the city from various telephone offices. One report was that five of the Kaiser's airships were on their way from Hornchurch. Other in- I quiries gave varying numbers. I The Romford and Hornchurch police II treated the matter as a joke, and tele- j phone calls to Harwich, Cromer, South- end, Tilbury, Ipswich, Grimbsy, Sher- ) ingham, King's Lynn. Yarmouth, Hull, ) Colchester, etc., elicited the reply in each case that all was quiet, and that no raiders had been seen. Authorities in London, however, were evidently determined to leave nothing to I chance. At certain railway stations lights were put out altogether or considerably diminished, and trains passing over the bridges did so in darkness. r Scotland Yard was on the qui vive, and special constables were told to report I themselves at their headquarters. The telephone exchanges were kept busy for more than two hours with subscribers anxious to know the latest. But no air- craft of any kind came. None were ac- tually seen.

Advertising

I W. A. WILT.TAMR. Phrenologist, can I i <*w«nlted daily at the Victoria Arcade (near the Markeltl. ttwaraeo.

I HUMANITYS TRIUMPH OVER IVENGEANCE

I HUMANITY'S TRIUMPH OVER I VENGEANCE. Never is tHe Bi-itish bluejacket more truly BritisJi' or more worthy of the fine traditions of the service than in the hour of victor. Pride at having triumphed over the enemy is tempered with a humane sympathy for the taUen and many are the stories of personal sacrifice and efforts being tola of the action in the North Sea. "No action is complete without the Arethusa," writes a member of the crew of tiiat famous ship to his, mother as lie begins to describe the fight and the scenes which followed the sinking of the Blucher. "At last," he adds, "we have got what we have been long- ing for for nearly five months, and it has come—a victory." It was the Arethusa that finished the Blucher, and the writer tells how it was done. "We let fire two torpedoes, which found their mark. Both hit in the bows just below the water-line. She heeled over at once; then eased back again; then she lay on her starboard side for about ten minutes. "Her crew were all lined up along the side ready to be rescued, and when we had steamed about 80 or 100 yards from her she gave her last heave. Then the Germans all let go and jumped in- to the water. It was a sdgJit 1 never want to see again. "Fancy 500 men struggling in. the water trying to save their lives. Rope's ends, life-buoys, life-belts, bits of wood, anything that, we could get hold of was over the side in a minute. Once I hauled a German up with the aid of another seaman. He had no sooner got on board than he put his arms around my neck and kissed me. I dare &ay he would have done a few more things if I had not nearly pushed him back over the side. I took him forward and clothed him with some of my spare clothes. He said he did mot know how to thank me. He wanted to give me some of his morley; but I dldn."t take it. It would. have been no good ,to me—only as a Efoiic, of course, and I did not like to take it. "I let him sit down, itn our mess, and left him, and went on deck again, hauling up Germans for about half an hour. Altogether I picked up about 18 to 20 Germans, so I think I did a little bit towards saving the lives of some of them. It was a terrible ex- perience to see the sailors drowning. One poor felow—one of the last to be rescued—was dragged through the water, and it took us ten minutes to haul him in. He was nearly dead, and I and three others tried artificial respiration, but it was of no use, and he died. "I have often said that if I happened to come across a German I would crown him with anything that was near at hand, but the sight was so terrible that one oould not see human beings being drowned. "But supposing it had been the re- verse. We should have been, down, at the bottom of the sea, I suppose. They would not have trobuled about us, but have done a war dance. Providence was on our *do, and that is enough." was -on our w.

WELSH COMMANDER FOR WELSH ARMY

WELSH COMMANDER FOR WELSH ARMY. Lady Hamar Greenwood, speaking at a public meeting held at Colwyn Bay on Thursday night, made a spirited refer- ence to a discussion which took place at a recent meeting of the Newport Welsh Society as to the appointment of Sir Hamar Greenwood to the com- mand of the 10th Gwenrt Battalion. Whatever doubt, she said, some people might feel regarding Sir Hamar's nationality, he had no doubts of his own. He was the son of a Radnorshire man, and when the supreme test arose and he had to lead his men into Germany, they would find that he fought like a Welshman. (Ap- plause). General Phillips said that those who were responsible for the training of the troops were desirous that they should live good, steady lives, like the best people of Wales lived. No one could look at the soldiers in the dis- trict without realising that they had come from the best homes in Wales. It was impossible to look at them without feeling that the Third Brigade con- tained some of the finest young men tha.t Wales had ever produced-men who wished to carry out properly the very serious and important task they had undertaken. The British Army to-day was a temperate army, because it waa the army of the people. They were no longer the set of "scalli wags" who at one time were not considered respectable enough to associate with erdanary society. With such splendid material on our aide there could be no possible doubt as to how the war would end. (Applause). He believed that out, of this war Wales would emerge a greater, richer, and better nation. (Cheers).

No title

The sum of £ 8 for mou/rning for a widow and two children was character- ised hy Judge Hill Kelly at Cardiff i County Court as "extravagance.

WELSH MINERS AND THE I MINIMUM

WELSH MINERS AND THE I MINIMUM. In his weekly letter on industrial mat- ters, Mr. Vernon Hartshorn deals with the problem of the termination of the general wage agreement. In the course of his article he deals with the question of united action., and says it would be suicidal for any of the federations to act independently of the others; the whole miners' organisation must act throughout Great Britain, and one policy must govern the whole. I SOUTH WALES POSITION. I The position in South Wales is that at the end of March the general wage agreement becomes subject to termina- I tion by the giving of three months' notice The notice can be given on tfys 1st April. Or it can be given at any subsequent time that the parties to it may choose. The South Wales delegates will have to decide on Saturday next whether notice I to .terminateshall be given, and if so, v,, hen. It is of the utmost importance that South Wales shall not tender notices except as a part of national policy. What- ever decision the South Wales delegates come to ought to be subject to endorse- ment by a national conference. South Wales must fall in with the rest of the coalfields of the kingdom. We cannot afford to let the English and Scottish coalfiields give notice and go on and settle without us We must be in with them in whatever course they may adopt. To stand aside would be to lose, perhaps for ever, the position of solidarity with our comrades of the English and Scottish coalfields which the simultaneous termina- tion of all general wage agreements has now secured for us after years of man- oeuvring. It would throw us back in to the isolated position which has in the past so severely handicapped co-operation between South Wales and the coalfields of England and Scotland. That is a misfortune which we must Avoid by every means in our power. We shall have to keep in the closest touch with our comrades of other coalfields and hold ourselves in readiness to act with them. In the English Conciliation Board area the miners have been negotiating for some time, and it is their intention, if their negotiations with the owners fail, to tender notices on the 1st Anril to bring their agreement to an end. If that does take place it seems to me that there is no possible alternative but for South Wales to tender notices at the same time. There is a strong feeling in the ranks of the Miners' Federation of Great Britain that if the course of the negotiations with the coalowners makes it clear that action must be taken the miners should proceed upon z. national programme which shaJI be embodied in that which will be put forward by each coalfield as a basis for settlement. I NATIONAL PROGRAMME. Sever 

WELSH MINERS AND THE I MINIMUM

(Continuel from preceding column). At the same time we must bear in mind our obligation towards the two Unions in the event of their taking action in support of their own claims; What- ever is done should be done with the ob- ject of at once ameliorating the condi- tions of the workmen and at the same I time preserving the solidarity of the in- j dustrial movement and the strategical ad- vantages which we s £ w possess through the co-ordination of the policies and J methods not only of the coalfields, but j of our comrades, the railwaymen and transport workers, as well. At the same time we must not forget our country and the danger in which she now stands. I feel sure that the South Wales miners will loyally accept the guidance of the National Executive, and abide by what- ever policy the rational conferences may finally settle. Whatever the miners do, they must do all together.

GERMANYS BREAD SUPPLY

GERMANY'S BREAD SUPPLY I REDUCED BY A QUARTER. The new food and bread regulations came into force .throughout Germany on Monday. Until further notice the total quantity of bread and flour to be purchased per head per week is strict- ly limited to 2 kilogrammes. (51b. 7oz.) The public is invited to try to do with less, and is warned not to besaige the bakeries, as the regulation supply will be forthcoming. I The total output of the bakeries is to be restricted to threequarters of the normal output. Restaurants will be aUowed to purchase only three-fourths of the average daily amount of bread consumed during the first fortnight of this year. A wheaten roll must not exceed 75 grammes (2oz. 10 drams), but a rye loaf. may weigh from 1 to 2 kilo- grammes (21b. 3¥:,z. to 41b. 7oz.) Cakes must not contain more than 10 per cent, of wheat or rye flour. The pen- alty for an infringement of these regu- lations is six months' imprisonment or a fine not exceeding 275. The Bavarian brewers have decided that. a rise in the price of beer is in- evitable, but point out for the con- solation of the public that the antici- pated reduction in consumption will lead to a highly desirable reduction in the consumption of barley. The public is dissatisfied and considers the in- crease in price unnecessary.

I SPIRITED SWANSEA PROTEST

I SPIRITED SWANSEA PROTEST A mass meeting of workers of Swan- sea to protest against the high prices of food was held on Sunday afternoon. Speeches were delivered. Mr Probert (chairman of the Labour Association) presided. A resolution protesting against the exploiiat-ion of the popu- lation by various capitalistic interests, and calling upon the Government im- mediately to take seeps to relieve the distress of the poorer class by taking control of shipping, coal, and corn was moved by Alderman Colwill. The mover bitterly protested against the want of patriotism of the classes, who were at fault, as compared with the splendid patriotism of our soldiers and our workers. The only thing which had not risen "owing to the war" was wages. In all conceivable ways capitalists were oppressing the people and weakening their powers of resistance. Mr D. J. Morgan, of the Blind Workers' Union, seconded, and said hostility had been accentuated by greed of gain. I Mr W. C. Henderson, M.P. (Shef- i field) said the Navy had cleared the seas only that shipowners nrght reap phenomenal profits. The prices of coal sold to the poor in London had risen from 17s.6d. to 32s. per ton, whilst; the coal sold to the better class hnd only risen 2s. to 4s. per ton. The present position was hurrying on the nationalisation of coal and wheat sup- j plies. Littfe children in London waited for houra m the early mornings in the bne-ad queues outside baker shops for stale bread. (A Voice: It is done in  Swansea), and whilst wheat was at 5&. per quarter farmers withheld supplies hoping for higher prices still at the game time trii--d to stop education a-nd obtain child labour on their farms. The resolution was carried unand- mouslv. )

SWANSEA BOXERS ESCAPE

SWANSEA BOXER'S ESCAPE. Private "Billy" Morgan, of the 2nd Worcester*, a well-known Swansea pugi- list, referring- in a letter to his wife to the manner in which the Kaiser's birth- day was celebrated, says :—"To-day is the Kaiser's birthday, and he is going to take Calais for a birthday present—I don't think. We are giving him a very nice present here this week. Our guns are playing the devil with him. Before going into the firing line we were making trenches in a little village near when the Germans sent over a 'Jack Johnson,' I was very lucky. I was sent into a house for some timber. If I had not been sent I would have met my doom. I can see I am not going to be killed by Ehell. I waa on guard one night when a shell was corning straight into a house where we were sitting round a fire. We heard1 it coming and made a rush for the cellar, but it hit a tree and skidded on the road and did not burst."

i APPEAL TO GOVERNMENT i

APPEAL TO GOVERNMENT. i TINPLATERS AND RUINOUS FREIGHTS. j At a meeting of the Llanelly Cham- ber of Commerce, Mr E. Willis Jones, the newly elected president in the chair,, a resolution was adopted calling upon the Government to expedite ar- liangemenxs for bringing boats now engaged in its service for trade pur- j poses and thus relieve the grave short- j age in the supply of raw material for the staple industry of the town and district. j The Government were further asked in view of the embargo now placed on tinplates to several European coua- tries to "take such steps 38 may be assumed necessary to prevent the in- creasing importation of tinplates from the United States of America to such prohibited countries as, failing this, the South Wales tinplate industry will certainly permanently lose the oom- manding position it now occupies in these markets. i MANUFACTURER'S VIEWS. Mr Dan Williams, J.P., the well- known tinplate manufacturer, second- ing the resolution which was sub- mitted from the chair, referred to the high freights. As an instance he men- tioned that a limit of 13s. a ton had been placed that day, he said, on a. cargo of coal to be shipped from Swan- sea to Dieppe, whereas in normal times at that time of the year the freight would be 5s.6d. As an offer of 18s. per ton was ultimately made for the boat it could not be got. The demur- rage on boats to France was extras ordinarily heavy, and lie knew of a c where JE200 had had to be paid. It therefore paid the owners to keep their boats idle. DliD;g with the tiniplate industry, Mr WiUiajns said it a Ititeiv mean.? the closing up of all the tinplate worka unless something can be done Lo re- lieve the exorbitant prices now being charged for freights which, in his opin- ion, were absolutely unnecessary. An aniendmenit by Mr D. Jeriminp that in the opinion of the Chamber the time had arrived when the Govern- ment should commandeer all found no support. STOCKS ACCUMULATING AT SWANSEA. The delay and rarity of the issue of li4cencett for shipments of tin-plates to prohibited countries i.s., states a repre- sentative issued on Monday, causing sorn^e (dissatisfadt ion i'n the t imp late centres of South Wales. Large oon- sigarments of plates are collecting in the warehouses at Swansea, some of which have been awaiung licences for weeks. —————

BILLIARDS AT AMMANFORD

BILLIARDS AT AMMANFORD CHAPEL OPPOSITION. "MANHOOD, PATRIOTISM, AND SPIRITUAL ISSUES." At Ammanford licensing Sessions on Monday a number of billiard licences were applied for, and the police offered no objection. One of the applications was for eight -t.tbl, at Ammanford. Another application was for twelve tablet., also at Ammanford. Other applications were made from C-ai-liant, Aiiimaniei Hendre. With reference to the last-named a petition was presented by the Key. Mr Francis, Calvinuatic Methodist minis- ter ,Capel Hendre, in which over 20v persons objected to the licence being granted, among other reasons stated being "that it would be against the interests of manhood, patriot iban and spiritual issues in the great conflict of nsations. The objectors gave instances where they said billiard-playing had been de- trimental to the reading habits of young men, and in one ca.se allecreki that a home had to sold up because the head of the family had taken to bil- liards. Mr Francis was cross-examined by Mr H. Noyes, solicitor, as to whether he was not also against football play- ing. He replied that did not object to the playing, but to the circumstances under which it was carried on. The people of his church objected to a billiard licensed house in the neigh- bourhood as being detrimental to the young manhood. Have you ever had a game of hillazda yourself ?-I believe that does not anise. I am entitled to ask you ?—I am ØIb- titled not to answer. Have you anything againet. the game?—No, personally I have nothing against the game- Don't you thank it is a very sane and reasonable recreation for young meraP ■—I don't think it serves any purpose for me to srive my personal opinion. Ultimately the magistrates granted all the licences except that for Capel Hendre.

Advertising

T7. A. WILLIAMS. Plmiwlnghit., "an- 6e mnsnt)tegi daily 1M th«> Victoria ArctieUf (near the Market), Swtnm.