Collection Title: Llais Llafur

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 3 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
15 articles on this page
CARDEN NOTES FOR THE WORKER

CARDEN NOTES FOR THE WORKER. By Llew. E. Morgan, 1st Class Cert. F.R.H.S. We shall look in vain this year for the onion sellers from Brittany. Many a "Johnnie" who has visited our chores with his stock of the succulent vegetable for many a year will try his persuasive powers on us no more. Fair France has called, and his peaceful vocation is ended-for a time, if not for ever. The onion is an important vegetable, and we must make sure of our own supply this year. It is one of the oldest of crultivted plants, and ancient monuments frequently hear depictions of it. It loves a cool season best, and it grows well when the soil is rich and moist, and has a fine surface. Clay soil, and sand are not of much use for -onions; the former cannot be made fine enough, and the latter is unable to resist the effect of drought. Soil which contains much decomposed vegetable matter is splendid for onions, as it can conserve so much moisture. An excellent manure for onions is soot. Of course, this should not be applied directly to the seed bed, but should be placed out to weather for some weeks first. It is rich in salts of ammonia, and it also contains salts of potash and sulphate of lime. It should be applied at the rate of two or three hamifuls per square yard. Poultry manure has been proved to be about the best for onions, and may he used in the form of a top dressing. Manure from the piggery gives also far better results than horse litter. Pig manure should be dug in during the autmn. To prepare the bed give the soil a dressing of soot, then beat the lumps down with a rake and mix. Tread it over with the feet to make it firm. Mark out the rows, about eight inches apart, with the draw hoe, or the edge of the spade. The seeds should not be buried deeper than half an inch. Sow the seeds evenly along the drills and rake the soil lightly over them. When the plants are about four inches high, commence thinning. The plants removed can be used for salad. The operation of thinning should be completed when the plants are about six inches high, and when the remain- ing plants are about nine inches apart. Top dressings of poultry manure can be applied aa necessary, but care should be taken to mix the manure with about six times its bulk of dry soil. The deadly attacks of the onion fly maggot make many gardeners abandon the spring sowing of onions. To help the plants to avoid the ravages of this pest, dust the whole bed lightly with soot, and remove instantlv all plants that show signs of attack. Where this pest is a source of serious trouble the seeds should be sown in boxes, in the house, and the plants transplanted out into the bed when they are strong. Plants that are sufficiently grown can invariably re- sist the attacks Some seedsmen now make a special- ity of onion sets. These are small bulbs somewhat similar to shallots, but much smaller. When planted in well-prepared beds they reach maturity much earlier than those grown from seeds direct. They are practictlly im- pervious to attacks by the maggot fly. Pickling onions can be obtained by sowing seed broadcast on poor land about the middle of May. The most reliable varieties of onions for general use, or exhibition are the Ailsa Crag, Bedfordshire Champion, White Spanish and James' Long-keep- ing. Readers who have small holdings or large gardens can make a good profit by marketing their crops of onions. Eleven to twelve tons of onions per acre are frequently grown. At tlO per ton this brings in a gross total of between JE110 and Cl2o per acre. However, in a garden, more attention could be devoted to the crop. The ground could be cultivated better, and manures could be applied more thoroughly than a large areas. The value of the crop could therefore -be increased in proportion. Onions can also be marketed when young. They are packed in bunches and obtain a ready sale. Crops of "bunching" onions can easily yield from L50 to j560 per acre. It has been officially announced that among the 20,000 women who had registered themselves for "war work" at trie Central Labour Exchange up to Friday evening last 3,6000 ex- pressed a desire to do armament work and 24 agricultural work. Arrangements have been made at the Carlton Cinema, Swansea, whereby par- ties of five persons or more can book the best seats (lone shilling) in advance with- out any extra booking fee—this is a distinct advantage to puties of friends especially as The Carlton is always crowd- ed during the evening performances.

Advertising

I WOMAN 1 CARLTON, SWANSEA Easter Monday. PUBLIC NOTICE I beg to give notice that I shall not bold myself responsible for any debt or debts that my wife, Martha Ann jFrancifi, may contract after the 19th day of Maroh, 1915. (Signed) EVAN FRANCIS. 15 William Street, Yniscedwvn, Ystradgynlais. ▼O LET.—At Alltygrug-road, Ystalyfera, pleasantly situated detached villa, "Brynglas," bathroom, h & c, every con- venience. Rent L26 per annum, tenant paying taits.-Apply at above address. mchl3 I NEW GARDEN SEEDS JUST ARRIVED All of Tested Growth H. A. LEAK, THE SEEDSMAN, 211, OXFORD STREET, AND MARKET STALL, SWANSEA. ALSO AT LLANELLY AND NEATH MARKETS. CATALOGUES GRATIS. 'PHONE 381 CENTRAL. SEED POTATOES. All the Leading Varieties. No better Stocks available. Send for Catalogue. ISAAC POAD & SONS, sfGIdowktRS,° YORK. I f" JOHNSTON FOR NEW VEGETABLE and FLOWER SEEDS AND EVERYTHING FOR ■' THE GARDEN. Catalogues Gratis and Post Free. 27 OXFORD ST. SWANSEA i: TELEPHONE: 567 CENTRAL. I t t 1 4

THE PROBLEM OF EGGS

THE PROBLEM OF EGGS. Why send to England for sittings of White Wyandottes, when you can see what you are getting for your money by calling at 25, College-row, Ystradgynlais. Best Pen 10s. 6d. per sitting; Second Pen 5s. per sitting; unfertiles replaced, or 15 to the sitting. Have won more First Prizes and Specials than any other breeder in the valley.-W. J. HOPKINS, 25, College-row, Ystradgynlais. j 30-ap 24

Advertising

SPECIAL LIST OF IMMUNE POTATOES Scotch seed only. Carriage paid, bags free. Also special strains of Famous Chelsea Seeds for Smallholders) etc., 2d. per packet. ALFRED DAWKINS. Seed Merchant, 17 years Manager, Seed and Bulb De- partment of James Vodrtch and Sons, 408 KING'S ROAD, CHELSEA. GIBBS' ONE FOOT BROAD BEANS SOW NOW the Champion One Foot Broad Bean. The Longest, Straight- est, and Most Prolific Bean in the World. Earliest-and best, Is. per pint (also supplied in 6d. packets), Carriage paid.-E. T. GIBBS, THE PRIZE SEEDSMAN, EAST FINCHLEY, N. DOBBIE AND CO. ROYAL SEEDSMEN, EDINBURGH. Will send a copy of their 1915 Cata- logue and Guide to Gardening, 208 pages, over 200 illustration, FREE, if this paper is mentioned.

IHOPPER ESCAPES DEATH I

HOPPER ESCAPES DEATH. REDUCTION OF SENTENCE TO PENAL SERVITUDE. William Hopper, a sergeant in the re- serve battalion of the 6th Welsh Regiment who was sentenced to death by Mr. Jus- tice Atkin at the Cardiff Assizes for the murder of a private in the regiment named Dudley, had his conviction of murder altered on Monday by the Court of Criminal Appeal to one of man- slaughter and was sentenced to four years' servitude. The appellant, a fair-haired man, stood in the dock dressed in Wiaki awaiting the decision. The Lord Chief Justice, giving the judg- ment of the court, said the verdict of the jury was accompanied by a strong recom- mendation to mercy. The question was whether the judge ought not to have left to the jury the option of finding a verdict of manslaughter. It appeared that the sergeant was, with ten or twelve men, stationed at the docks on Christmas Day. A state of drunken- nes existed among a number of the men. The sergeant awoke from a sleep and charged Dudley with having taken a bottle of whiskey, whereupon either the sergeant struck Dudley or Dudley struck the sergeant. There was a free fight. The lieutenant arrived and ordered the men to march back to barracks, and or- dered that Dudley and another man should be disarmed. Dudley, it was said, threatened to "stick" the sergeant and refused to be disarmed. The sergeant had a rifle with an easy pull. After trying later to get Dudley to give up his rifle he put his own rifle to his shoulder and fired, with the result that Dudley was killed. At the trial the defence was put forward that this was an accident. The court had come to the conclusion that the question ought to have been left to the jury so that if they thought right they could find a verdict of manslaughter. The appellant had borne a very good characted. While giving effect to the evi- dence of provocation the fact remained that, not by accident, he killed a man under his command.

I FROM LABOURS STANDPOINT

I FROM LABOURS STANDPOINT I Events of the Week' J MINERS' HOLIDAYS We do not think that any good citizen will quarrel with the decision of the Executive of the South Wales Miners' Federation regarding the duration of the Easter holidays. At its meeting on Friday, the Executive decided that in vietf of the shortage of coal and the necessity of increasing supplies, they would recommend all miners in the district to terminate the holidays on Tuesday, and return in full force to work on the following morn- ing. There have been considerable complaints of late regarding irregular work in the coalfield, and some of the men's leaders are urging the delin- quents to observe the regular hours more loyally in view of the present circumstances. I Mr Vernon Hartshorn has led the way in this matter, and has given us some rather disconcerting figures. He says that usually there are from 15 to 20 per cent of absentees from the South Wales coalfield, 10 per cent. of whom could and should be at work. We a.re well aware of the temptation to miss a turn when inclination- leans that way" but with the Maesteg leader, we do think that there ought to bo a special effort at present. The greater the productivity the more we can con- centrate our national resources, the sooner the war will be over. That is what all who have the true interests of the worker at heart, want fervently to see. THE FUTURE OF THE WORKERS. When the war commenced, and tor I many weeks following those dark days at the beginning of August, there were many elements in the State en- deavouring to persuade us that the nation was re?'1}' united. We had vivid pen pictures of men differing so much as Lord Derby and Mr Will Crooks speaking from the same plat- form, and we were almost led to be- lieve that there had never .been any really vital difference of opinion be- tween, say,\ Lord Devonport and Mr Ben Tillett.. So great was the en- deavour to impress the world as to the complete unity of the nation that we might almost have imagined that after the war, Britain was to be the para- dise of the worker. This sort of blether might have proceeded until now, had not old enemies of the workers realised the dangerous game they were playing. On their part it was mere trickery, arranged suitably for the occasion. But Labour took these professions quite seriously, and now the conquerors are getting alarmed. The "Times" cut the painter the other day by the publica- tion of an important leading article implying that the workers are a greedy, idle and completely abandoned lot, who have neither a sense of re- sponsibility nor of obligation, and to whom a lesson must be administered without delay. For the future they must become subservient, docile, and contented as of old. Rarely have we seen a policy so completely shattered as was this policy on Thursday last, when the "Daily Citizen" tore the article of the "Times" into shreds. Their exposure was most timelv. Lab- our must recognised what will have to combat when the wa,r is over, and arranged its forces accordingly. THE PASSING OF MR JOHN I WILSON. Although it may appear somewhat late in the day to comment upon the passing of Mr John Wilson (whose death wasrecordoo as we went to press last week), we cannot refrain from adding a word of appreciation of one who laboured nobly and with rare singleness of purpose, to uplift the status of t,e class from which he arose, Mr Wilson was a native of Durham, and probably as a result of his remarkable knowledge of the psychology of the Northmen, combined with his great organising ability, he rapidly rose to the position of general i secretary of the Durham Miners' As- sociation. Mr Wilsen never took that leading part in the National Miners' movement in which the Rt. Hon. Thomas Burt, M.P., was so very oon- spiucous, but as one of the most able of the democratic members of Parlia- ment ho gave the world a new concep- tion of the aims and outlook of the average working man of his time. He was out of touch with the modern labour movement. It is probably true that upon many questions some Radi- cals have been more active and more emphatic than deceased. He was, as a matter of fact, one of those who leaned to the right wing, rather than to the left, in contemporary affairs. But he was a man of great integrity and high minded purpose. We shall do well to honour his memory. WAR WORKERS' WAGES. The Government have done a good thing in agreeing to the demand of the Amalgamated Society of Engineers that in view of their decision to facili- tate the output of muKitions of war, they would put a ban on the greatly increased profits of the employers. All surplus over reasonable returns based on a recent average, are now to go to the State, and as the "Daily News I and Leader'' says, satisfaction will now be expressed with this limitation, as removing one of their chief griev- ances, namely, that the employers were enriching themselves unduly at the cost of the nation. At the sayqe time considerable dissatisfaction is still being expressed by the workers on the Clyde at the result of the find- ings of the Commission as to their claim for increased wages on account of the advance in the cost of living. They feel that, in view of circum- stances, they are not yet receiving due remuneration for their labour and sacrfice. The men asked for an in- crease of two pence per hour. The employers offered three farthings and the Commission recommend one penny. The men point to the abnormal in- ) crease in the cost of living in their ¡ district (palobably greater than any other part of the kingdom), as well as to their continuous work at very high pressure. It is stated that they are already considering the possibility of putting forward a claim to a further bonus, but it is not sure whether this will be pressed forward. IRISH RAILWAY CRISIS. There is very serious trouble among the Irish railway workers. The Com- panies owning the Irish railways have pertsistenly refused to accept the war l bonus agreement between the union and the Companies in Great Britain and have, in the words of the "Daily Citizen," "with equal persistence re- fused even to meet the men's repre- sentatives." Whilst the preliminary negotiations in England a few weeks ago were entirely successful, no good resulted in Ireland. Repeatedly the men's leaders have asked the representatives of the Com- pany to meet them, but in each case a negative reply was received, and it is not in the least surprising that the sequence is a very strong feeling of discontent throughout the country. In Ireland, no less than in England, the great mass of the railwaymen are poor- ly paid, and the pressure of the in- creased cost of commodities has been very acutely felt there. They see that their fellow-workers in England have been compensated for this increase, whilst they themselves have to bear the brunt of the National crisis with- out any consideration whatsoever. Britain would cut a sorry figure at this juncture with a National railway strike in Ireland. We want industrial peace at present, but in the matter under discussion the onus clearly rests upon the employers. They can and therefeore must meet the just demands of the workers. l THE MUZZLING OF DR. LIEB- KNECHT. It is reported from Germany that Dr. Karl t/iebknecht, the famous Socialist leader, who has expressed his uncompromising opposition to the war, has been sent to the front in Lorraine. This is not authoritative, and it would be unwise to attach real importance to the statement until it 'is officially con- firmed. For ourselves, we cannot imagine that the German authorities could be so thoroughly blockheaded as to rouse the resentment of the Ger- man people in the manner indicated. Those who read the magnificent tribute to the brilliant Socialist leader from the pen of A. G. G. in a recent issue of the "Daily News and Leader" will realise that his removal from German politics will mean an uprising through- out Germany, even among those Socialists who have not wholly agreed with his attitude towards the war. Liebknecht has always been more of an Internationalist than a domestic re- former, but the refusal of the German Government to abide by their pledge to give equal suffrage roused his ire, and he is undoubtedly the most dangerous pol^tilcal opponent of the German Government at the present time. If the rumour regarding his despatch to the firing line is true, it can only mean that the Kaiser hopes to silence him for ever, and it gives a new significance to the idea that one reason for Germany's attitude in forcing the war was the strangulation of the Social Democratic movement within the Fatherland. G.A.G.

HOUSING SCHEME DROPPED I

HOUSING SCHEME DROPPED. I Criccieth Council have received a letter from the Local Government Board declining to make a 10 per cent. grant towards the council's scheme to erect workmen's houses, the ground for the refusal being that there was less employment in the building trade in Carnarvonshire than a year ago. The council, therefore, decided to drop the scheme.

MR FISHERS NEXT POST I

MR. FISHER'S NEXT POST. I Mr. Fisher, the Federal Premier of Australia, is, now officially stated to be proceeding to England at the end ctf the year to succeed Sir George Reid as High Commissioner.

Advertising

Bradford & Manchester Warehouse Co. 12, Gover Street, (Late 22, Waterloo Street) SWANSEA. Now Showing the latest deliveries in MS GOODS. Special Lines in Tweeds, Serges, and Costume Cloths. Velveteen in Black, Brown and Navy. Don't delay, but purchase trom House of over 20 years standing. Note the Addrees: 12, Gower treet, SWANSEA. Pianoforte & Organ Tuning REPAIRS of EVERY DESCRIPTION First Class Work, Moderate Charges. PIANOS TUNED FROM 3s .6f.7 JAMES TARR, Compton Terrace, Y stalyfera

I NEWS IN BRIEFI

I NEWS IN BRIEF. I T'. HELP BELGIAN REFUGEES. The Belgian Finance Minister by a Royal decree is authoriesed to constitute in regions where their usefulness is proved committees formed according to the re- gulations established by the Royal decree of December 1. The committees are to be formed to facilitate the obtainment by Belgians temporarily resident in England of advances of money for their daily needs LIEBKNECHT AS A SOLDIER. It is learned from Berlin that Dr. Liebknecht, the famous Socialist member of the Reichstag, has been called to the colours as a. member of the Landsturm (Pioneers), and has already left for Lor- raine. He recently voted aginst the War Budget. DEMOCRACY FOR DENMARK. I After years of violent political antagon- I ism the Danish political parties have entered an agreement to pass unanimous- ly a scheme changing entirely, in a democratic way, the Constitution of Den- mark. The new Constitution will not be put into force until the war is over. THE CENSOR AND WELSH. I Protesting against the continued re- fusal of the censor to permit the trans- mission of letters written from the front to parents who know no English, the father of four Welsh soldiers says "If ¡ Welsh blood is good enough to be spilt I on the plains if Flanders the Welsh I language is good enough to be written." I AMMANFORD INQUEST. I A verdict of "Accidental death from burning" was returned at an Ammanford inquest on Friday on Eleanor Jones (68) wife of Thomas Jones, farmer, of Glyn- taifach. Deceased had been an invalid for two months and confined to bed. Her nightdress caught fire. BELGIAN WAITERS. I Several Belgian refugees have found employment in the Harrowgate hotels, which up to the outbreak of the war were numerously staffed with German waiters. The Belgians are doing exceedingly well. Some are working in the kitchens, while a few have been supplied with dress-suits by the local committee, and have been tranformed into splendid waiters. PEMBROKESHIRE'S GIFT TO THE I RED CROSS FUND. The Pembrokeshire branch of the British Red Cross Socitey, of which Lady St. Davids is the president, has forwarded a donation of JB500 to the headquarters of the Red Cross Society in London. THE LESSER OF THE TWO EVILS. I There has been a great increase in fatal and non-fatal accidents in London, owing to the want of more lights. An authority stated that no me could com- plain, because the authorities, by their action, were after all saving life, for no one desires to be killed by a bomb. ETHER EXPLOSION. Owing to a lighted match being care- lessly thrown away, a bottle of ether exploded in a train proceeding to Moscow Over 40 passengers were injured, thirteen seriously. Two died on the way to the hospital. TOLSTOY'S GRANDSON. I Count Michael Tolstoy, grandson of the famous author, who was captured on the Austrian front, attempted to escape, but was recaptured and has. been interned in a fortress. BRECKNOCKS' NARROW ESCAPE. I Three officers of the Brecknocks, who are now stationed in Aden, had an excit- ing experience recently. According to news which has reached Ystalyfera, Cap- tain Woodliffe (Ystalyfera), together with Lieutenant Howel Morgan (Abercrave) and Lieutenant Butcher, went out in a sailing boat for a day's pleasure. In the evening a gale sprang up, and the sail was blown overboard. The party had no oars, and they were at the mercy of the waves during the whole night and until picked up by a police launch the following morning. CONTRABAND RICE CONFISCATED I The Swedish-owned steamers VeTa and Jeanne, have been brought to Glasgow, and their cargoes off rice confiscated, as it is alleged they are contraband of war. The vessals called in the Clyde for coal. A BEERY PATRIOT. 1 Bassilos Kilossan, a Russian, was fined 10s. by the Barry magistrates for being cPrunk and disorderly in Glebe-street, Penarth, and assaulting P.C. Clarke. Defendant told the Bench that he was singing the Russian National Anthem. MR. AND MRS. PIERPONT MORGAN Air.- J. Pierpont Morgan and Mrs. Morgan were among the passengers arriv- ing at Liverpool on Friday by the Ameri- can liner Philadelphia. Mr. Morgan has come over on business arising out of the financial relations existing between his firm and the British Government in con- nection with the purchase of war supplies I in the United States. He expects to be in London nearly a month. I AUSTRIA AND BOSNIA The Geneva correspondent of the "Echo de Paris" reports that the eight prisoners sentenced for the outrage at Sarajevo have been transported to Bohemia. This precaution shows that the Austrian control feels itself threatened in Bosnia. GERMAN WAR VICTIMS. I A message from Geneva states that t numerous petitions have been sent to the Reichstag asking for an increase of pensions for the families of war victims. The increase asked for amounts to about three-tenths of the wages earned by the dead sofldiers.

Advertising

I W. A. WILLIAMS, Phrenologist, can be consulted daily at the Victoria Arcade (near the Market) Swansea I t MASTERS C LOTHING I First in 1867 I Foremost To=day Iff ACTFHC J?T Pa M&A'!? &&Ja?M? oL V 0 i (CLOTHIERS), Ltd. 18 & 19 Castle Street 282 Oxford Street Swansea 3 Green Street, Neath 17 Stepney Street, Llaiielly, etc. EASTER FASHION DISPLAY — AT — 1 J. W. EVANS I ( — THE ♦ SWANSEA MILLINER. I f We are, now Showing ( Some Hundreds of Dainty Millinery. They are the Very Latesbin Hats. f RARE VALUES J > IN BLOUSES, CHILDREN S COSTUMES, j| | BONNETS, &c.  40 and 41, Castle Street. j

ILONGSTANDING DISPUTE I l

I LONGSTANDING DISPUTE. I l —— 0.- GARNANT MINERS' CONSIDER OWNER'S NEW OFFER. A general meeting of the Raven Col- liery workmen, Garnant, was held at the Raven Hotel, Garnant, on Satur- day night to consider the request of the owners for a reduction of from 6d. to 9d. per ton off the existing price list for cutting and filling large coal, this also to include eight inches of clod, for which the workmen are now paid at the rate of -1d. per ton per inch. After serious consideration, the men unanimously decided against giving any concession, and that they were prepared to resume work on the old price list and the agreements that were in vogue at the colliery, agreed to by owners and workmen in October, 1916, and subsequently confirmed by the Conciliation Board. The meeting was a well-attended one, the speakers being Messrs. Dd. Jones (president), Henry Owen (secretary), and Robt. Edwards (checkweigher). I 21 MONTHS' STRIKE. The dispute at the Raven Colliery is a long standing one, although it originally had no connection with the question of wages. It was in June, 1913, that the men ceased work owing to a grievance respecting a lamp which was alleged to have been unlocked. That matter has been dealt with, and an amicable arrangement arrived at through the medium of the Concilia- tion d. The price list provides that the men shall be paid -1d. per inch for the first twelve inches, and 0. per inch after- wards. The owners' request is inter- preted as meaning that the first eight inches should be cut free, the next twelve inches be paid for at id. per inch, and any remainder at J-d. per inch. The dispute originally affected some 250 men. most of whom have now secured other employment, but the majority retain their homes at Gar- nant and district.

Advertising

I MONDAY WOMAN. I CARLTON

CORRESPONDENCE

CORRESPONDENCE. DULAIS VALLEY DISTRESS COM- MITTEE! i To the Editor. Sir,—A special committee meeting of the above, attended also by the secretary and treasurer. of the Belgian Refugee Com- mittee, was held at Seven Sisters on Thursday, the 18th of March. The letter vihich appeared in year issue of March 6th above the name of "Fairplay" was under consideration. "Fairplay" in this letter accused the Distress Committee of having received more than the j52 12s. actually acknowledged by them. Councillor Proeser at the meeting de- finitely stated that of the money he had received fram P.C. Evans, L2 12a. only had been transferred to the treasurer of the Distress Committee—the remaining portion having been handed over to the Belgian Refugee Gommittee this makea "Fairplay's" accusation false, and more- over, he could hardly expect the Distress Committee to aeknewhidge a sum of money which had been paid into any fund other than their own. We trust, Mr. Editor, you will give this the same prominence as was given "Fairplay'a" letter. We are, yours etc., RICHARD BOWDEN, Secretary of Belgian Relief Fund; G. M. JAMES, Secretary Dulais Valley, Distress Fund. (The above letter arrived too late to appear in our last issue.-Ed. "L.V.")

THE BLAENCWH COLLIERY CO 11 LTD

THE BLAENCWH COLLIERY CO. (1..1) LTD. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that in consequence of the repeated acts of damage and thefts of material which have taken place on the properties of the Company, ANY PERSON OR PERSONS found eo offending will be prosecuted without any ftu-ther notice. The attention of parents of children residing in the locality is especially drawn to this notice. A suitably re- ward will be paid for such informa- tion as will lead to a conviction. CHAS. SMORFTRT, Receiver. Lower Cwmtwrch and New Palleg. Blaemcwm Colliery. 2M27A3