Collection Title: Llais Llafur

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 7 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
15 articles on this page
TOPICS OF THE HOUR

TOPICS OF THE HOUR. Sir Anthony Bowlby, whose name appeared at the foot of the first bulletin issued after the King's accident in France, was famous before the war as a great fashionable surgeon, writes a correspondent. At the outbreak of war he threw up a magnificent practice to go and serve the wounded at the front. That is how it happened that he was on the spot at the time of the King's accident and was able to render first aid, so to speak. Sir Anthony looks very much like a cavalry officer of a certain type. He has a frank personality, a chsering manner which goes far to inspire hope in his patients, and an extraordinary memory for persons. Even in the days when he was assistant- surgeon at St. Bartholomew's Hospital he at- tracted the attention cf those who knew a coming surgeon when they S'aw one. His great opportunity came when he was first called in to a Royal personage and brought the case through to a brilliant success. He distin- guished himself first in his profession as a pathologist, and it is a combination of that specialisation with a. skill almost amounting to genius as a surgeon that has given him his great position. The King could not be in better hands. Commander Evans, ¡he famous second-in- command of the Scott Expedition to the South Pole, in which Captain Scott and his party perished in circumstances of undying glory, is engaged to be married, his bride- e'ect being Miss Elsa Andvord, of Skoveein, Christiania. This will be the gallant Com- mander's second marriage. In 1904, when he was twenty-three and she was twenty, he married in New Zealand Miss Hilda Beatrice Russell, daughter of a barrister of that colony, but she died of peritonitis on the Ctranto in April, 1013, two months after her husband's return from the Antarctic with the tragic news of the Scott party's end. They were retifrning together to England when the fatal illness seized her. None of the people who crowded in the rain to aoe the Lord Mayor's Show had looked for- ward to it more eagerly, says a London corre- spondent, than the Australians and New Zeolande-rs, thousands of whom -arc in Lon- don. All their live« they had heard of this as one of the great sights of London. It is their const-ant regret that thear view of the City is in abnormal one. They long to know w.hat it looks like and how it behaves in ordinary tiu,ce-t,o see the sights of London. It was a great satisfaction to know that they would not miss the famous City pageant. They were, indeed, so pleased about it that they sub- scribed for intstruments for their own band pe.cially formed- for this occasion, and they cheered enthusiastically when their con-tinr gen's reached the Colonial stands at the new Commonwealth and the New Zealand offices now building in the Stcand. But one gathers that the procession as a "whole rather disappointed them. It did not come up to their huge expectations, and it was àvlly dwarf 001 by their memory of the Anzac process-:on which, marched through. Cairo early in the year. Th-at procession, marching through a dazzling sunshine with glinting nxed bayonets, was iilne miles long. The London police would not have welcomed it. Without political bias and without prejudice to official explanations, it may be remarked, says the M, anchester Oucft-dian, that the custody of the seals of the Secretariat of State, and the relative positions of Lord Kitchener and Mr. Asquith as regatei,3 the use of them, have an iruteresting point in the historical and con,stitutiondi sense. There is a tendency nowadays to regard the different Secretaries of State as officials entirely distinct and hav- ing no more to do with each other than, for instance, the Postmaster General. and' the President of the Local Government Board. But this is to forget the character of the Secretariat of State, which is that it is one office, not a number of offices. Just as the office of Lord High Treasurer or that of the Lord High Admiral is permanently in commis- sion, eo is that of the Secretary of State. Originally the Sovereign had) only one Secretary of State. As business increased) the number was added to from time to time. But the theory of the single office has never been destroyed. Any one of the five Secretaries (for Home Affaire, Foreign Affairs, War, India, and the Colonies) of State signs an official document as "one of H.M.'s Principal Secretaries," and: in theory every Secretary of State is competent to perform the duties of every other, so that if some instrument during Lord Kitchener's absence needed Secretarial sanction it could- be supplied by Six John Simon or any of the other Secretaries of State. A member of the Junior Bar who has joined one of the branches of the Naval Service, was, at the initial glance, not recog- nised by a K.C. friend, saye a writer in the World. Then—explanations. At first," said the K.C., "I thought it was a man who had come to read the gas-meter." The same junior was later addressed from the Benoh aa Captain." "Not yet, my Lord," said the blushing young man. In a case which was recently decided one of the parties was a Lieutenant-Colonel. When the case began he was a Captain, and soon afterwards a Major. This is an in- stance, it should be explained, of the rapidity of promotion, and not of the slowness of litigation. A year or two ago it would have been almost unthinkable that the Heir to the Russian throne should be taken to any point of dan- ger, but the Czarewitch, who is now eleven years of age, has been within range of guns on a. visit to the wounded, and he is to be re- warded—if the Czar p-erm^ts-—with a medal. This young man may claim, without fear of contradiction, to be the meet valuable boy in the world, for if he succeeds to the Russian throne he will inherit the enormous private fortune of the Romanoffs, which is estimated at £ 40,000,000, and will have control over 500 est a tea, employing 30,009 servants. In addi- iion the Government has made him a.n allow- anee of £ 15,000 a, year since his birth. j It is interesting to note that Captain Frank R. Kerr, one of the T.A.M.C. officers who was recently awarded the D.S.O. "for con- spicuous gallantry and splendid devotion to duty, 18 one of the Rhodes scholars at Ox- ford. Coming from Melbourne to University College at the beginning of 1914, he soon be- came popular among his fellows, but had en- joyed. the privileges of the University for )

INEvVS IN BRIEF

NEvVS IN BRIEF. I KING'S GOOD PROGRESS. Although no further formal bulletins as to the King's condition are to be issued, it is stated that his Majesty is enjoying better jights, and is making very good progress to- wards recovery. I PRINCE'S RETURN TO THE FRONT. The Prince of Wales, attended by Lord Claud Hamilton (Grenadier Guards), left Buckingham Palace on Monday on his r,rurn to the front. GUN FROM THE EMDEN ON VIEW. I A 4.1in. gun from the German cruiser Emden has been added to the captured guna an view on the Horse Guards Parade. OUR FIRST BULGAR PRISONERS. I" Eighteen Bulgarian prisoners of war were landed at Plymouth on Monday to be interned. "WE MUST BE TOLD THE TRUTH." The Archbishop of York, at Newcastle on Monday night, said we were told we must not give any advantage to the enemy, but no ad- vantage to the enemy could be comparable to having a restless, unsettled nation. We must trust the Government; tell it to be courage- ous to govern to take the war with a strong hand, he said. If the people trusted the Gov- ernment, the Government must trust the people. WELL-KNOWN GOLFER KILLED. Mr. John Tulloch, jun., the West of Scot- land amateur golfer, has been killed in France. He figured prominently in the ama- teur championship at Prestwick in 1911, when a member of the Dundonild Club. QUEEN INSPECTS TROOPS. It was the intention of the King to visit Salisbury Plain on Monday for an inspection of troops, but as his illness cancelled the arrangement the Queen undertook the inspec- tion for him. Her Majesty was accompanied by the Princess Mary. MID CORNWALL VACANCY. The Mid-Cornwall Liberal Association has selected Sir Francis Layland Barratt as can- didate for the Parliamentary vacancy caused by the death of Captain Agar-Robartes. Sir Fra-ncis was formerly Member for Torquay. I WAR COUNCIL OF THREE. I The Cabinet, it is understood, has elected a War Council of three members, Mr. As- quith, Mr. Balfour, and Mr. Lloyd George, to which general questions of State or strategy will, by consent of the twenty-two I Ministers, be referred. I LORD KESTEVEN DEAD. I Official intoimation has been received at Casewick House, Stamford, of the death of Lord Kesteven. He was twenty-four years of age. He joined the Lincolnshire Yeomanry five jtears ago, and was gazetted Captain, after serving in France. RUSH FOR NEW ZEALAND LOAN. For the £ 2,000,000 loan for Public Workp I in New Zealand, says Reuter, the applica- tions total nearly £ 4,000,000. CAPTAIN DISMISSED. I Temporary Captain Cleveland Fyfe, the Manchester Regiment, has been dismissed the service by s-enteuce of court-martial. SPY SENTENCES IN BELGIUM. I Three Belgians at Brussels have been sen- tenced to death and one to twelve years' im- prisonment for espionage on the railway. ALL-BRITISH CREWS. The Admiralty has Lssued notice to the owners of all Admiralty transports that they should as far as possible only employ British or British coloured crews. SHOT DETECTIVE CASE APPEAL. The appeal of Richard Gorges, a retired Army offie-er, who was sentenced at the Old Bailey to twelve years' penal servitude for shooting a detective who eaine to arrest him at his house at Hampstead, was dicsmissed in the Court of Criminal Appeal on Monday. A COLONEL DIVORCED. A decree nisi was granted by Mr. Justice Hargrave Dean e in the Divorce Court on Monday to Mrs., Helen Emily Hulton, be. cause of the d-es-erdon and misconduct of her husband, Colonel Frodt-rick Courtney Hulton. There was no defence. MR. I. T. T. LINCOLN. I Owing to legal formalities in the United States in connection with the extradition pro- ceedings it is doubtful if Chief Inspectoi Ward, of Scotland Yard, will arrive in Lon- don with Mr. 1. T. T. Lincoln, ex-M.P. foi Darlington, before Christmas. MISS VICTORIA MONKS' DEBTS. I Miss Victoria Monks, music-ball artist, has lodged a proposal to pay her cred.,tori a com- position of 5s. in the £ —2s. 6d. in the £ to be paid within three months of approval by the, court, and 2s 6d. ll the £ within six months. Payment' of the composition was guaranteed by two persons. Mko. Ai'onks estimates her liabilities at £ 1,201). SOLDIER'S WIFE MURDERED. I MM. Kaye, ag-ed twenty-eight, wife 01 Private Ernest Kaye, now at the Front with the 10th Battalion Duke of Wellington's Weist Riding Regiment, was found murde-red in bed in her cottage at Honlev, near Huddersfield, on Sunday, her throat being cut. No weapon was found, and the police are searching for < man who had recently visited Mrs. Kaye. I NEW TYNESIDE INDUSTRY. r I As an outcome of the war a new glove in- dustry has been started in Newcastle, where an extensive plant has been laid down. It is the only industry of its kind in the North. A hundred years ago s?ove-makin? wa.s an import- ant business on the Tyneside, but it died out. SIR J. FRE)('CH'S-' DRIVER FINED. r John Robert Clarke, who said he was Lon- don chauffeur to Sir J. French, was at Felt- ham, Midd)cs?x. on Monday fined £4 for motoring at thirty-two miles an hour. BATH'S GRAND PUMP ROOM. I The historic Grand Pump Room of Bath was formally reopened on Monday after re- decoration and remodelling. The Mayor said the alterations had been necessitated by the increasing use made of Bath by the military authorities, the bathing establishment having been placed at the disposal of the War Office, much less than a year when war broke out. The long vacation he spent in, a. voyage to I South America. Immediately on his return he offered his services to the War Office, telling his friends that he thought battlefield surgery would be good practice. That he has found in it also the opportunity for the exercise of some of those qualities upon which the election to a Rhodes Scholarship depends as much as upon scholastic attainments—" manliness, courage, and devotion to duty"—the story of his latest exploit, the Westminster Gazette re- marks, abundantly proves.

r AIRRAID INSURANCE I

r AIR-RAID INSURANCE. I SIXPENCE MINIMUM PREMIUM I Mr. H. Samuel (Postmaster-General) in the I House of Commons on Tuesday announced I that a scheme had been framed by which any member of the pubLic will be able to apply at the counter of any post-office for a certificate of insurance, and on filling in his name and address on the certificate and- counterfoil and paying a sum of 6d. his property will be in- eured by the Government to the amount of £ 25 for a period of twelve months against de- struction or damage directly or indirectly I caused by attacks by aircraft or by shells used against aircraft, or by bombardment from the ¡ sea. A payment of 1.9. will effect an insurance of F,50, and of h. 6d. an insurance of £ 75, which is the maximum amount. Insurances I for £ 100 and over can be effected under the previous Government War Risks lns-urance scheme. The Post Office insurance is not in- tended for property worth more than ;C I M. nor does it apply to buildings, nor to loss of life or bodily injury. In the event of dam- age covered by the insurance claims may be made through any post-office, and wiU be dealt with by the Government War Risks Insurance Office.

I400000000I

I £4:00,000,000. I I THE NEW VOTE OF CREDIT. I I The Supplementary Vote of Credit which Mr. Asquith moved in the House of Commons on Wednesday afternoon has been issued in the form of a White Paper, the amount asked for being £ 400,000,000. Previous votes are set out as follows: £ Original Vote of Credit, 1915-6 250,000,000 Previous Supplementary Vote 250,000,000 Ditto 150.000,000 Ditto 250,000,000 j Add-Sum now required 400,000,00077- I l Total £ 1,300,000,0000 The Supplementary Estimate is the amount required to be voted towards defraying the ex- penses which may be incurred during the year ending March 31st, 1916.

AIRRAID NIGHT FIRE I

AIR-RAID NIGHT FIRE. I I SIX MONTHS FOR INSURANCE FRAUD. Found guilty of setting fire to his bungalow with intent to defraud certain underwriting members of Lloyd's, Edward Rossiter, dealer, was sentenced to six months' hard labour at the Essex Assizes. Rossiter, it was stated, was insured against aircraft risks only, and his story was that on a certain night his bungalow was destroyed by fire caused by a bomb dropped from an enemy aircraft. Evidence for the prosecution denied that hostile aircraft were in the vicinity of Roa- siter's house at the time stated, or that ex- plosive or incendiary bombs were dropped in that district. Portions of bombs were found. in the debris, but expert evidence proved that these were parts of two incendiary bombs, whereas Rossiter's statement was that only one crash was heard. The prosecution suggested that these portions had) been placed on the premises.

I PLYMOUTH BANK FAILURE i

I PLYMOUTH BANK FAILURE. I GRAVE CHARGES AGAINST PARTNERS. Arising out of the failure of the Naval Bank, Plymouth, the two surviving partners, Mackworth Praed Parker and Frederick Thomas Bulled, were charged, at Plymouth on Tuesdiy with coii, on Tuesday with conspiracy to obtain credit to the amount of £ 580,586 by fraud and with conspiracy to obtain from the bank's cus- tomers large sums by false pretences. Bulteel was separately charged with converting £ 23,191 to his own use. For the prosecution it was stated that for mix years the defendants continued to invite deposits knowing the bank to be hopelessly insolvent, and, it was alleged, deliberate mis- representation. and concealment were re- sorted to freely. From 1998 to 1907 the bank's deficiency rose from £ 9,295 to £ 111,000. By 1913 the bank's losses amounted to £ 146,000. Bulteel had drawn over £ 25,COO in salary and overdrafts. The defendants endeavoured to maintain pu-bhe confidence in an insolvent concern by .improving the premises, By open- ing new brandies, and by living as men of great wealth and prosperity. The hearing was adjourned.

SHIP OF MANY ADVENTURESI

¡ SHIP OF MANY ADVENTURES. r THE DACIA TORPEDOED AND SUNK. The French steamer Yser, formerly the Dacia, was torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine off Algiers in the Mediterranean on Tuesday. The Yser had just saved the crew of the Italian vessel Elisa Francesca, which had been torpedoed, when she herself was struck. The passengers and crew reached the shore in safety. The Dacia, a vessel of 3,545 tons, which for- merly belonged' to the Hamburg-American line, was purchased some time after the war began, it will be remembered, by Mr. Brei- tung, a German-American, who attempted to run a cargo of cotton to Germany on the vessel under the American flag. The owner hoped to provide a test case if the ship was captured by the British, and to stir up trouble between this country and the United States, but his benevolent anticipation came to nought. The ship was seized by a French warship, and our Ally's Prize Court subse- quently decided that her seizure was justified.

I NO HAIRPINS NO NAILED BOOTS I

NO HAIRPINS: NO NAILED BOOTS. WOMEN MUNITION WORKERS' DRESS. Owing to the dangerous nature" of the work carried on by large numbers of women in the mullition factories, the Government have found it necessary, says the Daily News, to lay down, strict rules as to the dress which may be worn. The filling of cartridges, for instance, is done in the danger buildings, and every woma.n engaged on this work must wear a fire- proof cap and overall, which are, provj-doo by the Government and kept at the factory. As soon as the women. cartridge-fillers arrive at the works they must take off their ordinary boots amd put on a special pair made without nails. Any metal coming inito contact with the matelrial dealt with would cause an explo- sion, and the restrictions even extend to hair- pintS, which must on no account be worn. Each woman on prese-nuing hex-aelf at the factory has heT dress carefully examined, and any neglect to carry out these rules must be reme- died before she is allowed to enter. The Lord Mayor of London, as Chairman of the National Committee for Relief in Bel gium, is appealing to the peoples of the British Empire for 3,000,000 sixpences to ell. able the National Committee to celebrate King Albert's FAte Day by feeding on tha day the 3,000,000 Belgians who are destitute in Belgium.

NEWS IN A NUTSHELL

NEWS IN A NUTSHELL. Mr. Asquith concluded his speech at the Lord Mayor's banquet at the London Guild- hall with the words: Be the journey long or short, we shall not pause or falter until we have secured for the smaller States of Europe their charter of independence and for Europe itself its final emancipation from the reign of terror." The Premier, referring to Lord Kitchener's mission, said he had gone to survey at close quarters and in intimate conference with our Allies the whole situation of the Eastern theatre of war. In the House of Commons on Tuesday Sir Edward Grey said Great Britain had been giving, and was continuing to give, Serbia all the assistance in her power. The question of sending British troops to Serbia was broached by Serbia in July, but at that time the British military authorities considered that we could not spare the men. According to an Athens message the Greek Government has asked for a new EI,600,000 loan from the Allies. The new Greek Premier announces a con- tinuance of the policy of the old Cabinet— benevolent neutrality towards the Allies. It is stated in Sofia that the landing of the Allied troops at Salonica continues at the rate of 5,000 a day. It was reported at the N-ewca-sitle Exchange on Tuesday that Sweden had prohibited the export of timber to the United Kingdom ex- cept in cases where arriving steamers are granted licences to take back coal. Mr. Lansing has decided to protest to Great Britain against the inclusion of cotton and other important articles in the British list of contraband goods. The reply to the last American Note is awaited, however, says a New York message, before the second, is sent. I Dr. Charles O'Brien Harding. has been elected Mayor of Eastbourne, at a salary of jE190 a year. The usual s-alary has been £ 300, but it was stated that the Council felt that I they should economise in the Mayor's salary. The London County Council reports that the trade school for the training of girls as grocery assistants is so suce-essful that every student has been able to secure a situation at I satisfactory wages. The classes are to be continued. A Berlin telegram says that fifteen miners have been killed and seven wounded by an ex- plosion of fire-damp in the Deutsche Kaiser ¡. Pit, near Hamborn. The New York Presbyterian Bo&rd of Foreign Missions learns that the Armeni.an refugees at Tabriz arc dying of cholera at the rate of 100 per day, a.nd tha.t Urumia is also affected. Lieutenant Moir, the son of the Comp- troller of Munitions Inventions, died in France on Monday night. He had been suffering from jaundice. Mr. E. S. Willard, the well-known actor- manager, died early on Tuesday morning after a long illness which was the result of a nervous breakdown. One of the lots offered at a sale at Ashford, Kent, on Tuesday, on behalf of the fund for the relief of agriculturists in the Allied coun- tries was a sheep which contained in its shoulder a piece of & bomb dropped by a Zep- pelin. The animal realised £ 5 6s. According to the Harrovian, the distinc- tion of being the oldest Harrovian on active service abroad belongs to Colonel A. Sprot (late the Carabiniers), who went to the Head- master's House in 1867 and is over sixty-two years of age. He has been with the British Expeditionary Force since November last year. The three sons of Mr. Robert Lee, late of Reading, now of Aberdeen, have the distinc- tion of serving together as officers in a regi- ment which they joined as privates after the outbreak of war. They are Second Lieu- tenants in the Gordon Highlanders. The re- cord is unique in the annals of the regiment. A verdict of found drowned was returned at Brighton, at an inquest on the body of Mr. William Henry Nagle, fifty-one, retired bar- rister, whose body was found on the seashore half-buried in the sand. Het was left £ 18,000 many years ago, but lost it on the Stock Ex- change, and had since been a beneficiary of the Barristers' Benevolent Fund. While sit-t-ing in his chair Mr. William Henry Snow, late Town Clerk of Southend, died suddenly on Tuesday afternoon, aged fifty-seven. Mr. H. Underdown has given his country house, Buckingham Hall, Norfolk, to the British Red Cross Society for hospital purposes. Agricultural labour is so scarce in Berwick- share that school children have been given a week's holiday in order to assist in potato lifting. One of the oldest members of the Crimean and Indian Mutiny Veterans' Association at Bristol, Mr. John Fisher, who enlisted in t ocn 1 31 O S -1.1.- x. iclim, Iras uieu, a g eu. eiguiiy-bwo. The Cama prize at Cambridge for candi- dates who distinguished themselves in the examinations for the Indian Civil Service has been awarded to H. B. Shivdasani, B.A., of St. John's College. Coventry City Council has accepted a tender amounting to E191,000 for the immediate erec- tion of 600 houses for munition workers. The Ministry of Munitions wdlil pay 20 per cent. of the cost. More than 650 workers have received certifi- cates of proficiency after attending the train- ing courses for munition workers organised by the London County Council at the request of the Ministry of Munitions. The maeter of the Constance-road Work- house, Camberwell (Mr. J. Flint), having de- cided to enlist, the Board of Guardians, sub- ject to the approval of the Local. Government Board, will appoint his wife to act aa "master" till he returns. The Austro-Hungarian Government have asked the United States Ambassador to in- form the British Government that the condi- tions at the Grossau (Lower Austria) intern- ment camp are now improved. Robert Ralf Jone, a German seaman, was renfcenced to six months' imprisonment at Liverpool on Tuesday for making a. false state- m-ent to an aliens officer; he said he was a Canadian, but was betrayed by his German accent. JeweLlery given by the people of Dover to the King's Gift Fund for the Red, Cross has realised at auction £ 427 10s., and over £ 400 has been given in subscriptions. Fines racing from 910 to 420 were im- posed on Tuesday at, London police-courts for non-compliance with the lighting regulations and for driving motor vehicles at an excessive speed. Nearly 2,500 picture houses throughout the United Kingdom gave the whole of their takings on Tuesday to the Cinematograph Trade Ambulance Fund, to raise EM,000 to buy a convoy of fifty motor-ambulances. Mr. Tenn-ant stated in, Parliament on Tues- d'ay that steps were being taken by the Wai Office to compete successfully with German activity in the production of large, fast aero- planes. A man of no fixed abode, Hugo Schroder, fifty-one, charged at Marlborough-street, Lon- don, on Tuesday, with begging, was said by a police constable to have squandered £ 20,G<>C in fifteen years: and he wa-s sentenced, as a rogue and vagabond to six weeks' imprison ment with hard labour. The Home Office has issued a notice thrt all • male British subjects of nineteen, years and over who intend to etm;g\i-«>ie must apply foi passports at the Foreign Office before em- barkation. Special instructions a.ro issued is c"c,e3 where passports are refusttL.

WILL CASE SETTLEMENT

WILL CASE SETTLEMENT. UNLUCKY PLAINTIFF. A settlement was arrived at on Tuesday in the action concerning the will of Walter John Chate, of Ulverston, Lane# which occupied the attention of Mr. Justice Bargrave Deane and a common jury in the Probate Court for several days last week. Deceased made a settlement in respect to estate valued at about 417,000, giving his wife EIOO a year. Later he executed a will giving her another £ 100 a year, but subsequently made wills in favour of Miss Dora Castley, giving her his free estate, said to be now worth nothing. Miss Castley propounded the last will of January, 1912, while the widow set up the earlier will in her favour, alleging that the deceased was not of sound mind, owing to drink, when be executed the later wills. This was denied. Counsel representing all parties, after a long consultation with the Judge, announced that the parties had- come to terms. The mem- berB of the family, said Mr. Hume Williams, K.C., for the plaintiff, were willing to 6ee that the same allowance, namely £ 200 a year, went to t.he widow as i.n her husband's life- time, and she would have £ 200 in respect to costs, while the will of 1912 would be pro- nounced for. Miss Castley, said counsel, would get absolutely nothing under the will she propounded, and of which she was execu- trix, and he thought the young lady deserved deep commiseration for having to come to court. In add-ition to that, since the case started, Miss Castley had re-ceived insulting letters, both anonymous and from the wives of some of the witnesses called. His Lordship pronounced for the will of January, 1912, at the same time deprecating the sending of anonymous letters to people.

j FRENCH PRESS CENSORSHIP I FRENCH PRESS CENSORSHI

j FRENCH PRESS CENSORSHIP. FRENCH PRESS CENSORSHI AMUSING EXAMPLE. An amusing instance of the thoroughness of the Press Censorship in France is given by the Paris correspondent of the Standard. He says: Last week, the rather daring weekly, the Cri dt. Paris, appeared with a curious front page. The article ran M. (three blank lines.) 'M Briand. (four blank lines). M. Briand (four blank lines again). M. Briand (two and a-half blank lines). Salonica (two blank lines). 'The Dardanelles (one blank line). The Cri de Paris was at its jokes again, so we thought. Not at all. The above is what remained of an article, and this week's Cri de Paris prints the article. When the two are compared, the words in the blank article are found to fit accurately into the printed one. The latter merely turns out to be a paragraph about the Balkans, and one wonders why it was ever censored. Anyhow, M. Briand has allowed the paragraph to appear this time."

THE IRISH EMIGRANTS

THE IRISH EMIGRANTS. MISUNDERSTOOD MOTIVES. I An authority on Irish emigrants in Eng- land who was seen in reference to the Cunarder incident at Liverpool said to a Manchester Guardian writer: "Until more is known of the actual facts judgment should be suspended. These young Connachtmen are a very simple and credulous race, and it is quite impossible for the average English- man to enter into their minds merely from what has so far been related in the Press. What is probable is that they have been actuated by the circulation in their districts of some extraordinary story as to what was in store for them. If we could get at that story we should know more about the matter. To think of these men as cowards is ridiculous. To class them with what the Englishman calls at the moment shirkers' is equally ridiculous. But the ordinary man, even the ordinary trained reporter, will not get at their ¡' story. It will only be got by someone who can approach them as one of themselves. Pro- bably even an Irishman from some other part of Ireland than their own would fail. To m* mind there is something very ?thetic in these lonely and friendless young fellows, started I' off on their 3,000-mile flight from some mys- terious evil which is not in the least what is supposed (though it is quite probable that the war and conscription are the first links in the chain), standing dumbly there on the quayside while a foolish crowd jeered at and badgered them. It is a tragedy of misunder- standing fundamental misunderstanding — both on their part and that of the people who are attacking them."

I A SECOND LIVERPOOL I

"A SECOND LIVERPOOL." GRAVESEND'S SCHEME FOR DEEP WATER WHARF. Gravesend Corporation are supporting a scbeihe which may have an important effect on the development of the Port of London. It is proposed to use the liver frontage of Graves- end, extending fromOthe pier of the South- Eastern and Chatham Railway on the west side of the town to the Town Pier on the east, as a deep water wharf, so that any ships at all states' of the tide will be able to come up to it and discharge. At the rear of the wharf there will be innumerable warehouses and huge cold storage buildings, fitted to meet adequately the needs of the southern district -.an advantage which the south at present lacks. It is the view of engineers that the II scheme, if carried into effect, -would make Gravesend a second Liverpool.

IGIRL FALLS FROM TRAIN

I GIRL FALLS FROM TRAIN. GETS UP UNINJURED AND WALKS TO SIGNAL-BOX. I A curly-headed little girl, named Laura Worm&ley, climbed the steps of a signal-box between Nottingham and Derby at midnight on Sunday, says the Daily News, and in- formed the startled signalman that she had fallen out of a train. When the signalman had recovered some- wha.t from the shock, his little visitor lisped that she was five years old, and lived with her grandmother, who was expecting to meet her at Beeston. She had travelled by the 11.40 from Nottingham, and after falling out found herself on some grass. Two express trains had passed, but, with the exception of a few bruises, she was little the worse for her extraordinary adventure. Horrified passengers who saw the child dis- appear in the darkness stopped the train, and subsequently Private John Hudson, who is just recovering from being gassed, set out from Beeston to find the body. His delight at discovering the girl practically unhurt was only exceeded by the signalman's amazement. Bi,iiop liury, speaku:^ .1 meeting of the Colonial and Continei « Church Society, said there were fear /vi^Jish clergymen within the German lines, and three were chaplains of the society. One of them, Mr. Moore, had been considered so faithful and zealous in his ministrations that he had been accorded the privilege of Hsiting the Ger- man wounded. i

I CHIPS OF NEWS

I CHIPS OF NEWS. Seven Welsh coalmines were idle last week, with a loss of over 30,000 tons output. The price of bread was advanced in „ Birmingham on Monday td. per 41b. loaf, making it 9d. for best and. 8d. too- seconds. The village of Mollington, in the Rugby division, according to the National Registra- tion returns, does not possess one man of mili- tary age. Mr. James Winstone was the only nominee before the Merthyr Borough Labour Party Conference on Saturday night, and was adopted Labour candidate for the borough. The golden wedding of Mr. and Mrs. William Noble was announced in the Times on Monday. Mr. Noble is the founder of t-he. Blue Ribbon Gospel Temperane-e movement. Through scratching the middle finger of his left hand on a bone while working at Smith- field Market, William Butler, thirty-eight, a butcher, of Stoke Newington, has died from acute blood-poisoning. Over 1,000 new Old-Age Pensions wera granted in London last quarter. It has been decided that pensions are not to be reduced where incomes have been increased becauso of separation allowances. Wheat rose Is. at most of tho:, provincial corn markets on Saturday, making, on an average, 57s. a quarter. The British steamship British Prince, which g,rounded: off the coast of German South-West Africa, is a total loss. Captain J. Nicholson WM found shot on Saturday morning at Avington camp, near Winchester. It is supposed that he was clean- ing his revolver. Miss J. L. Griffiths, of Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service Reserve, has been accidentally killed with the Medi- terranean Expeditionarv Force. Dodford, the picturesque Korthants village, will be sold by auction early in the New Year with other outlying portions of Sir Charlea Knightley's Northamptonshire estates. Twenty people wre killed and more than fifty hurt in a panic which followed a fire in a four-storey wooden building in Brooklyn 00 Saturday, states a New York correspondent. Sixty-nine cadets of the Royal Naval Col- lege, Dartmouth, were confirmed on Su-ndaj by the Bishop of .Exeter, among them being Prince Louis of Batten-berg, son of Prince and Princess Inù5 of Batten berg, who wert present at the »ervioe. The London County Council refuses to give special war allowances to employees who obtain commissions, taking the view that if the salary is not sufficient it should be ia. creased by the Government and not supple- mented out of the rates. The Echo Belgt states that at Liége nine persons, including a Frenchman, have been shot, while several others, inludiag a Spaniard, were condemned to varying terms of imprisonment and hard labour. A Bombay telegram announces the death el Sir Pharozshalh Merwanje Mehta, K.C.I.E., one of the members of the Council of "be Governor of Bombay. At St. Saviour's, Jersey, on Saturday, a lad named Giddy was accidentally shot by his college companion, a lad named Henry Le Broeq. The lads were at play, when a shot gun carried by young Le Brccq suddenly went off, and the charge entered Giddy'shead. The death is announced at Philadelphia of Mr. P. A. Widener, the millionaire. Mr. Widener was prominent in the United States as a man of affairs, financier, and art col- lector. He was a few days from his eighty- second birthday. The Swedish Government prohibits the ex- port of unworked pinewood, siliceous iron, siliceous ferromanganese, unworked copper or copper otre and refined copper, scrap iron, plates, bands, bars, nails, rivets, bolts, pipes, and bronze powder. Lieutenant-Colonel J. R. Beech, 2nd Scot- tish Horse, D.S.O., died at Louth on Satur- day. He caught a chill in ct;imp, aad iearfc .ailur,e following untul-non. a was the cause of death. He was to r' a leading instructor of Egyptian cavalry. The Hon. Mrs. Epst-t" Fiennes, wife of the Member for North Oxfordshire, has received from the French Government the Gold MedaJ and Brevet of the French Foreign Offic^Je ktedal her services in providing and maintaining a hospital at Dunkirk. For being drunk and creating a disorderly scene at Hope Baptist Church, Bridgend, South Wales, Edmund Hea-ly was fined 10s. He was ejected from the pulpit. Second-Lieutenant C. E. Taylor, 1 st West Yo.rks Regiment, whos-2 death in nction has been announced, wa« the son of Dr. M. H. Taylor, J.P., the East Surrey coroner, who lives at Richmond. Major Steimmetz, the Bedford Regiment, has just sent his little son a-t Bedford a tortoise which he picked up at Gallipoli. It arrived sa.fely, packed in straw, little the worse for its long journey. In conseqjience of the increased postal rates, which came in.to force on November 1st, the Post Office has duiring the past week collected in surcharges about £ 2,000. Evidently the public have largely failed. to take notice of the rise in rates. Miss Isabel Swinburne, sister of the poet Swinburne, died on Friday at Onelow-square, South Kensington. The deceased lady, who had been an invalid for some time, was sixty- nine years of age. Heart failure was the cause of death. The Bishop of London, spf,-akiq,.g at a woman's intercession service at St. Martin's- in-tihe-FieWs, London, said his clergy in the Ea-st End had told, him thaJt they had' never known such an orgy of drinking amongst women as they had in the last twelve months. The Archbishop of the Armenians in Western Europe has written from tjie Arme- nian church at Manchester to the Lord Mayor- of London thanking him for his efforts to alleviate the sufferings of a martyred people. News has be-en received of the death in his sleep of Trooper E. Pellowe, of the Surrey Yeomanry, who had been serving with his regiment in France for over a year. He was one of the best-known swimmers in the I Thames Valley. Walter H. Gardiner, twenty-eight, of Lev- tonstone, a G.P.O. telephone wireman, while removing wires from the top of a pole 45ft. high in the garden of a house at Kingsland, ) was killed by the collapse of the pole through dry rot in the portion below the ground. ( A dynamite fuse has been found in the main building of the Cleveland Foundry, Cleveland, Ohio. The fuse was burning at the time of the discovery. The foundry ia working on- war orders for the Allies. Mr. James Sinclair, for many years editor of the Live Stock Journal, has died at his residence in London, after a brief illness. He was the author of the History of Shorthorn Cattle" and many other standard works on live stock. At the Islington Coroner's Court,, on Satur- day, Joseph Shipway was -.)mrriit ted for trial on the Coroner's warrant "11 the jury's ver- diet of wilful murder aga t him in connec- tion with the death of" I r. Charles Edward Garton, who was stabbed 1 'i'¡) of a tramcar on the evening of OctS)ber I. Francis Leonard 'Woott of Epsom, the well-known jockey, has b< •> ed C4 4s. at Croydon for motoring at ■ rnte of thirty eight mrlos an hour Oc :r 14th. For the defence it, was rt.ttd tlwtt had lateli been employed < ■ a militr chauffeur on the east cOf" -1 ha-d thus o n tract.ed a habit of rpatt4