Collection Title: Llais Llafur

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
15 articles on this page
Soldiers on the Landi I

Soldiers on the Land. i I State's Concession to Wales. I I Lord Crawford, the new President of the Bowrd of Agriculture, has now announced his final decision in favour of granting Wales chn experimental farm colony for ex-service men. Sir Hubert Roberts, Bart, chairman of the Welsh party, received from his lordship on Tuesday a letter (accepting on behalf of the Government the Welsh atmendment in the form which the sub- Committee had intimated they would agree to it, namely, that the totial area of the land for the time being ac- quired by the Board of Agriculture shall not tat any time exceed 4,500 acres in England, excluding Monmouth- shire or 2,000 aores in Wales and Mon mouth-shire, or exceed in all 6,000 acres The 'practical result of this will be that out of the 6,000 acres author- ised by the Bill at least 1,500 acres will be definitely allocated to Wales, and cannot be acquired elsewhere. This de- cision has been received with gratifica- tion by the Welsh member, who. it will he remembered, defeated the Govern- ment on Mr E. T. John's amendment rendering it obligatory that 2,000 acres to be purchased should be in Wales. Lord Crawford then invited a committee of Welsh Liberal and Un- ionist M.P.'s to confer with him, and later Sir Herbert Roberts had a further conference with the President, with tlhe above result. Questions of administration have not been overlooked. Lord Crawford had in a previous communication offered to give a definte Commission to the Welsh Agricultural Council to undertake pre- liminary work for the selection of the site of a, suitable conoly for W ales, authorising that body to make Í1n- quiries and examine and forward any offers they might receive for that pur- pose The Welsh members, however, strongly urged the desirability of con- ferine; upon the Welsh .VriculturaJ .L3.J adm, the s-uggestion being ,L' that that, body should act in co-opera- tion with a number of Welsh Parlia- mentary representatives. On this point Lord Crawford has decided that, under existing circumstances, it is impossible to introduce the legislation necessary to carry out the proposal. He has, however, intimated that he is prepared to give official recognition for the purposes of the selection -of a site for the Welsh colony to a joint committee, consisting of the members of the committee a,ppointed by the council to deal with this question and the members of the Welsh Parlia- tnemftary committee appointed in the galme connection. Sdr Herbert Roberts was thus able to report fullly on the matter at this evening's meeting of the WTelsh mem- be re. Having regard to all the cir- cumstances, it was unanimously re- solved thajt the offer made by the President should be accepted. Ap- preciation was also expressed of the manner in which Lord Crawford had met the Welsh request.. a n

MINERS AT WORKI

MINERS AT WORK. I Satisfactory Muster at the Pits. On the whole the miners of the South Wales coalfield have shown a gratifying loyalty to the decision of their delegates, and went to work on Monday and Tuesday in such numbers as to justify the owners in keeping open the pits. In some instances the percentage of absenteeism was high, but it should be remembered that, ..ting on the resolution of the &rst .l( t conference, hundreds of oelel es It once made final arrange- famI les a, "away on what is ur- ments foi g Holiday if, indeed, a nally a BaJ}. r ^hem ?? not ?_ good proportion Of tfiem had not si- ?ady left home ?hen the decision was rescinde »the fm-daS Coal and Reports p lltl)e c,&ff Coal an,(l Shipping Exchang s J n v that the re- turn of the mmers t ??? exceed ed turn of the miners to one or expectatwns. n it wa?? ??ated tha.t iwo big collieries it ,-as put in the number of men N?,b, h,acl ut in an appearance was round ?"' ?Q p?r cent., in other cases it ran g e d as ?)?h cent., in other cases It lang.  ??t as 75 per cent., ?nd it is "P,_to(, tlia,t the average will he between 60 ,,4cl 70 per cent. The shipment of 

No title

A large party of Sco?t'ish puMiC school-boys are during August actingI as lumbermen on a Government wo be fell.ed.

Suez Canal Scenes I

Suez Canal Scenes. Work in the British Camps to I the" Chant of Aiabs." In view of the British success against the new Turkish offence near the Suez Canal the following letter by a member of the Sanitary Section of the R.A.M.C. in Egypt will be read with interest The great camp world that has come into being along the Suez Canal pre- sents within its sun-baked area of sand all the contrasts of war, and through the thronged encampments the leisure- ly caravans of the East wind day in day out, whilst beneath the date palms and blossom-laden acacias and wister- ias that line the streets of the little town near our camp the vociferous Egyptian native world barters and clamours. Above aeroplanes roar through the hot air, and the clank and rattle of the great canal dredgers falls incessantly on the ear. Big motor-lorries clatter along the newly-constructed lake-side roads, and the dispatch riders whizz by on their motor-cycles, while from far across the desert there conies daily the dull vi- bration of big guns at practice. Out of the lonely places of the desert stately Arabs mounted on camels con- stantly appear over the glittering sand ridges and watch the scene with curious eyes. But to me the chief figure of camp life is the childish, in- credibly disreputable individual who serves in the Egyptian Labour Corps, for it is with him I have chiefly to do. He it is who does the fatiguo work of the Army. WORKERS OF THE DESERT. I have been out in the desert in charge of a gang of 29 to-day. If a camp needs cleaning up, or stores need unloading, or incinerators have to be built, or latrines erected, or native villages purified, you just ask for the ^irtimber o £ aaiwwji afppointcd hour you find them squatt- ing beneath the dusty trees outside your camp ready for duty. Their clothing is scanty in the extreme; they seldom have a complete shirt. A few flapping rags or fragments of sacking constitute their attire, ex- cept for a long blue overcoat of old service pattern, presumably those dis- carded by Kitchener's Army when served out with khaki. This coat the E.L.C. men regard with pride as their uniform, and however intense the heat they discard it with reluctance. Strange to say, lazy as they natur- ally are, they get through an extra- ordinary amount of work, they are so constituted muscuLarly That they can- not lift any considerable weight, but put a load adroitly on their back, and they march off with it even though twice as heavy as the average white man could carry. The magic that alone can make them work is the magic of chanting. There is usually a chanter in each gang, and the better the chanter the better the work. I MAGIC OF THE CHANT. Te chant is interminable on a minor scale of two or three notes, rising and falling monotonously. But to its rhythm I have seen .hard work done in an incredibly short time in the baking sunshine. The chant has many variations, but whatever the words there is a mystery of race in its steady relentless lilt that I cannot possibly understand. In it there is the solemn magic of the desert, and frequently, when engaged on a commonplace task, such as stacking ration, or ammunition boxes, the chanter swings the toilers into a. veritable hysteria of chanting, and then they work in a, frenzy of energy, as though they were taking part m some mystic ritual, some derv- teh ceremony. Eventually they stop exhausted, squat themselves down on the sand, and fall asleep.

WOMAN SOLDIER

WOMAN SOLDIER. IRISH LADY AS SERGEANT IN THE SERBIAN ARMY. A telegram from Toulon states that Miss Flora Sendes, an Irishwoman, who was in Serbia at the beginning of the war, served as a hospital nurse, and when the hospitals were closed enlisted as a private in a Serbian regi- ment. After spending a holiday for two months in London, she ha-s arrived at Toulon on her way to rejoin her regiment at Salonika, with the rank of sergeant.

No title

The winberry crop on the Welsh hills this year is a record one. Around SnQwden hundreds of women and child- ren mciy be seen every day gathering a Spielldda harvest.

Coalfield Anarchists

[Coalfield Anarchists. ——— • ——— Advanced Thinkers" Who Give I Advice and Stand Aside. Bitter Denunciation by Miners' Agent. v Councillor Evan Davies, the miners' agent for the Ebbw Vale District, who spoke out so strongly a the mass meeting on the eve of the last Cardiff conference on the question of pro- Germanism in the coalfield, has been interviewed by a "Western Mail" re- porter, and his views are decidedly in- teresting. "You ask me to give you an outline of the present position in the coalfield and the extent of the influence of the anti-war, pro-German section, both in- side and outside of the executive council?" repeated Mr Davies to the reporter. After a little thought he said:— This is very difficult to determine, hut I can make it very clear so far as the executive council is concerned. Taking the executive as a whole, there is no body of men in this country more patriotic, more loyal, and more ready to make any sacrifice to bring the war to a successful ending. No sane man can accuse them as a body, but there is oi feeling of uneasiness always pre- sent when efforts are being made to get the coalfield to give up holidays, or even to ask the men to subscribe to any fund in connection with the war. Now, the South Wales miners are as patriotic as any section of the community, but for some inexplicable reason there is a small section of men in the coalfield bent on defeating tha objects of the leaders whenever the opportunity presents itself. It must be remembered that these men are not ignorant men but are men who have given a little time to the study of ¡J¡,dJ(fl(}gyA.>#'&.d ,rJ;Jllt.4Œta:nq.. ,.tç-. meaning and application whfen dealing with the crowd. They always move by counter-suggestion, and invariably the courtterssuggestion runs in the direction of an. appeal to selfishness and to what is likely to capture the least thinking of the miners. "THE PRO-GERMAN ELEMENT." I ror instance, the young men are generally caught in the trap, and, indeed, older men can rarely escape the coals. When it is a holiday that is asked to be given up the cry is "double titne," and when the men are asked to subscribe sixpence for ambulances for the front the cry is 'Let the Government provide them.' The owners are always mixed up in it when an effort is made by the leaders to get the men to make some sacrifice. The owners play into the hands of this pro-German section so frequently that it makes the task of the leaders any- thing but pleasant, and, indeed, im- possible in many ways. On this oc- casion the offer of 6s. per man was made the day before the conference, and anyone can .imagine the advant- age the pro-German element had in their favour when the lodges met to consider the request of the Govern- ment to forego the holidays. "These men are distributed all over the coalfield. I do not say they are distributed for this purpose, but they are men of the calibre of anarchists, prepared to act in any devil-may-care fashion so long as they are satisfied they are destroying somebody or some- thing. For some reason they are out to destroy, and I am not sure that they care who goes under in the pro- cess. In ordinary times they consider themselves the advanced thinkers, but their solution on each occasion is 'down tools.' In this war they stand aside and give advice, generally, of course, making it clear that this coun- try is in the wrong. They do not ex- pjlain how, but take great care to point out our past history in connection with some skirmish in some country in years gone by. They are the men, they say, who have kept their heads and they secretly hope this coiintry will go under in order that they may be considered the true prophets in their own little world. They openly avow, many of them, that it makes no differ- ence to the workmen whether we win or lose, and declare publicly that they will do nothing to help what they call 'the military machine.' DEVELOPMENTS PENDING. It is thought that information, goes out from the executive council whenever any action is likely to be taken; this information is circulated throughout the coalfield to this see- tion, and they use all) their influence and time to work up a feeling against the executive council's advice, before the conference meets. We shall shortly hear that the men of the ooal- field will be put to a test as to whether the executive council shall lead the coal I field or the advice of this anti-war and pro-German section. Developments may take place rapidly." The reporter then asked Mr Davies what did he think was the cure for this, and his reply was: "The cure for this pro-German ele- ment lies in the direction of each miners' agent facing his own people, putting the facts of the situation be- fore them, and making it impossible by creating the necessary Mmœphere for ?e men to live with this object in t'hei r minds."

I COAL AND FOOD SUPPLIES

COAL AND FOOD SUPPLIES. SWANSEA CONFERENCE CALL I FOR STATE ACTION. At the resumed annual conference of the National Amalgamated Labour- ers' Union. at Swansea on Tuesday, on the motion of Mr Rothwell (Cardiff), seconded by Mr L. Beynon (Swansea), a resolution was passed calling upon the Government to take more effective action before the coming winter to pro- tect the poorer classes in respect to the price of coal, and expressing dis- approval of the attitude taken up with regard to the cost at pithead. A further resolution was passed ap- proving of the efforts which were being made locally to bring such open spaces as Clyne and Fairwood Commons under cultivation so as to increase the food supplies. In his annual report the General Secretary reported that in spite of 2,621 members having joined the colours, the Union showed continued progress. The balance of the Union had increased during the voar by £2,192 8s. 8d., and £ 7,070 18s. had heein recovered for members bv way of compensation for injuries and in wages during the year. Mr W. H. Burn (Cardiff), who had been fined jE3 for obstructing the last conference had, after being threatened with expulsion, forwarded the fine, ?T

MR J S CITFWEX DEAD

MR J. S. CITFWEX DEAD HIS WORK FOR TONIC SOL-FA I AND MUSICAL FESTIVALS. By the death of Mr John Spencer Curwtn, which took place on Monday, the Tonic Sol-fa Association loses its President. Mr CurweD was born in 1847, and in 889 became Principal of the Tonic Sol-f& College, which his father had Yon,d-d in 1869. He held this office tiU 1-11, but still remained President of he Association. He was also editor of the "Musical Herald," and another claim to dis- tiiiotafcn was the fact that he was the fonder of the Stratford Musical Festi- val in the early eighties, at a time when superior people pooh-poohed musical festivals He had a good deal to do with. the recognition which festivals have since obtained. Mr Our wen wrotei many books on the Sol-fa system, as well as a biography tOt his father. His widow is also a writer of books on musical subjects, the best known of which is "The Child Pianist."

BKEAK WITH GEBMASY I I

BKEAK WITH GEBMASY. It is Officiallv eonfii-ed that as from the 1st July Italy has denounced the commercial treaty with Germany. This treaty was one. wl-ricii greatly favoured the o^nnans, since it permitted GeT- man 7 unrivalled facilities for selling her industrial products in Italy, and though it was due normally to expire in 1917 it would have have been auto- matically extended for a further five Te ,Sxs if it had not been denounced during the present year.

I 48 YEARS ON THE LINEI

I 48 YEARS ON THE LINE. PROUD RECORD OF RETIRING BRECON GUARD. Mr Martin Spiers, one of the oldæt. passenger guards in the employ of the Midland Railway Company, and a well- known figure to travell between Hereford. Brecon, and Swansea, is about to retire, owiing to ill-health, after no less than 48 years' service. During that period he has travelled considerably over 2,500,(XX) miles, and he points with gratification to the fact that not a single passenger on the many thousands of trains of which he has had charge met with a fat.al acci- dent- Joining the Midland Company in 1869, he worked in. London, Bristol nerhy, and Bath, but for over 40 years he has been stationed at Brecon, whtre lie is exceedingly popular.

IMinister for Labour i

Minister for Labour. Mr. Arthur Henderson Resigns Ministry for Education. I Important New Post Created Mr Arthur Henderson. the Minister for Education, has tendered his resi g- lmtion to the Premier. 111 is understood that Mr Henderson finds incompatible with his duties at the Baord of Education the amount of work he has had to perform for the Government in connection with labour organisation and other matters. In view of criticisms in both Houses of Parliament he has, therefore, felt it his duty to resign. Mr Henderson. who represents the Barnard Castle Division of Durham. became President of the Board of Education on the formation of the Coalition Government in May last year. MR HENDERSON'S WORK. I WHAT HE HAS DONE IN TWO DE- PARTMENTS. Mr Frank Dilnot, editor of the de- funct "Dailv Citizen," writes on Mi- Henderson's combined duties as Minister for Education and Minister for Labour as follows- Pretty well half of Mr Henderson's time is taken up with the handling of Labour matters for the Government. He has an office at the Ministry of Munitions, aaid was in some vital direc- tions practically Assistant Minister to Mr Lloyd George. His heavy work and many achievements in connection with Labour in reference to the war are well known. He presided over the nation- al meeting of trade union leaders when the August Bank Holiday was re- I nounced, and within an hour or so was giving his explanation of education ad- I ministration and policy in the House of Commons. These are some of the war facts j which Mr Henderson has had to meet and deal with :— Twenty thousand teachers are serv- ing with the colours. Three hundred schools are in occu- pation for military purposes—hospitals etc. Three hundred school medical officers out of a total of 8130 have joined the forces. 15,750 children are employed on the farms instead of being at school. Inspection is restricted owing to in- spection officers being on military ser- vice. The entry into industrial life of large numbers of children who but for the war would otherwise have continued their education. That Mr Henderson has met these difficulties satisfactorily and kept the educational machine in good running order is a testimony to his day by day administration. He has also laid down at least a preliminary scheme for future action. Three education com- mittees of inquiry have been set up. One of these will investigate the prob- lems of educating young persons who have been abnormally employed, those who cannot find advantageous em- ployment, and those who require fur- ther training. The other two com- mittees will inquire respectively into the teaching of science and the teach- ing of modern languages. It was obvious that Mr Henderson, tireless worker as he is. could not con- tinue to do two hnisters" work in positions where duties and responsi- bilities increased. It was announced on Wednesday tha-t Mr Henderson will remain in the Cabinet, and will continue to perform the duties he has been discharging out- side the work of the Board of Edu- cAtion. The importance of these services is being recognised bv the creation of a new Cabinet office, that, of Labour Advisor to the Government, which Mr Henderson will be the first to fill. It is understood that. legislation will It is Lln d emtoo d -t b ?it, be at once introduced for the purpose of regularising this appointment.

I IBEFORE ACTION

BEFORE ACTION. I sit beside the brazier's glow. And, drowsing in the heat I dream of daffodils that, blow And Iambs that frisk and bleat. Black lambs that frolic in the snow Among the daffodils. In a far orchard that. I know Beneath the Malvern hills. Next year the daffodils will blow, And lambs will frisk and bleat; But I'll not feel the brazier's glow. Nor any cold or heat. —Wilfrid Wilson Gibson, in "Battle and Other Poemis."

Soldiers id Llandly A1 1 IY Steelworks

Soldiers id Llandly A 1 1 IY Steelworks. Alleged Araiy ScuiJU Mr Llewelyn Williams a.ked the Minister of Munitions if he would state how many soldiers were em- ployed at the Llanelly Steelworks, whether for the first three days, these soldiers were paraded at the Drill Hall and marche d to and from the works, whether this practice was still kept up, whether the men were par- aded on Sunday, what W:1rres were not less than would be paid to them if they were similarly employed as civilians. Dr. Addrison: A working party of 102 soldiers under an officer were sup- plied to the company. These men were all strange to the neighbourhood and for the first few days were paraded and marched from the Drill Hall to the works. On Sunday. 30th July, at 8 a.m.. there was a parade to inspect the men and their equipment. These lI!en> like all soldiers tempora,rily Ient b y the War Office as working parties.*re«- main in the military service of the Crown, and are under military dis- cipline. They receive no wages, but. continue in receipt of their military emoluments. The contractor to whom they are supplied is prohibited from making any payment to the men, but pavs to the military authorities a, sum equal to the wage rate current, in the district for civilian labour. Mr Hodge: Is it not foolish for the Army to take ,away capable men and send soldiers in their place who are incapable? Mr W. Thorne: Is it the fact that the War Office or Ministry of Muni- tions charge tfhe full wage for these men. but pay the men only their Army pay, and therefore make a profit out of these men's labours? Dr. Addison: There is no question ¡, of making e,.pr<)Pift- -Tlvt- r^uhtitians or the War Office require that tliwages which would have peen paid for the same number of men as civilians are parid to the military authorities. The amount paid by the employer is the same. Mr W. Thome: Is it not the fact that the War Office or someone gets* the difference between the current rate of wages and the men's Army pay? 'Dr Addison: I do not know what the War Office do with the money when they get it. Perhaps the htm. member will put a question to them. Mr Thorne: It is exploiting the soldier's labour absolutely. Mr Anderson: Was there not an unders_tanding when soldiers were brought back to act as workmen in establishments they, themselves would be paid not less tSan the standard rate of wages in the dietlietp Dr Addison I should like notice or j that. Addiaon:! 6'hould Lke notice 01 1 I. Mr Hodge: Is the hon. gentlema,, no*, aware that I with many others went down and saad so on M; tions many jnonths" ago P Dr. Addison said so far as military5* working parties were concerned th, were under the regulations of the W J — In the House of Commons on Wed- nesday, Mr Wardle (acting-chairman- the Labour Party) asked (for Mr J., Hodge) and without notice, the Secre- tary for War under whose authority soldiers are being lent to the Llanelly Steel Company for civilian.. work at the military rate of pay and under military control; under what Act of Parliament this has been sanctioned, and whether that is not a. breach of the arrangements which have been observed in all previous cases whereby men øo lent have been pa.id full civilian wages amd been entirely -under civilian con- trol during the time they have been working. Mr Lloyd George: I only received notice of this question, a few minutes ago. I may say that my attention was only called to tris matter by some- thing which appeare d in the papers this morning. I am having it thorough- ly investigated and will let the hon. member know in the course of the day. Answ?ntg Mr Peto, Mr Forster stated, speaking generally, that where soldiers are employed as civilians thev are treated a6 civilians in regard to their pay: and where they are em- ployed as working pa-rities under mili- tary command, as soldiers. We can- not, allow contractors to make a profit out of the employment. of soldiers. We expect them to pay to the State the full amount of civil wages.

No title

Lord Tredegar is ereeting a chapel in BaseaJeg parish church, Monmouth- shire, as a memorial to the late Vis- count Tredegar.