Collection Title: Merthyr Pioneer

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 8 of 8
Full Screen
9 articles on this page
No title

Merthyr. To SECRETARIES.—Secretaries of lod- ges, Trade Union branches, Friendly and other Societies are requested to send in reports of meetings, concerts, etc., also notices of meetings to be held, as early as possible. MERTHYR MAY SHow.-The annual meeting of the Merthyr and District May Horse Show and Parade was held at the Castle Hotel on Wednesday last. Mr. J. Jenkins presided. The annual statement was submitted by the secre- tary. Mr. W. T. Jones, and showed a credit balance of R34 5s. Id.. Mr. W. R. Lewis was appointed president for the ensuing year, Mr. Stephen Leyshon chairman of committee, and Mr. W. T: Jones secretary. Thursday, May 14th, was fixed as the date of the next show. Y.M.C.A. LECITRF,An excellent lec- ture was delivered at the Drill Hall on Wednesday night by Mr. Richard Kearton, F.R.Z.S., on "Wonders of Nature." The lecture and the pictures were greatly appreciated by the audience. The pictures of the buffalo herds in Canada, and the bears in the forests of Canada were pactiularly fine. The organisers deserve commendation for having supplied Merthyr audiences with the opportunity of listening to some of Britain's foremost lecturers. MEP.THVR MODEL ENGINEERS' SOCIETY. —The Merthyr and District Society of Model Engineers and Craftsmen have made considerable progress of late. Their rooms at the old Telegraph Print- ing Offices, Glebeland Street, are al- ready equipped with many of the neces- sary fixtures and tools, comprising a lathe, benches, etc. The Society would welcome any persons interested in this kind of work. The secretary is Mr. Geo. R. Lewis. 17 Highland View, Twynyrodyn, Merthyr, to whom all communications should be sent. MERTHYR LITERARY SOCIETY. On February 24, Mr. Tom Whitney. B.A., gave the society an address on Robert Burns and Religion." considering the national poet of Scotland from a point of view somewhat unusual, but never- theless not uninteresting. The paper was followed by aa animated discussion. On Tuesday next, March 10, at 8 p.m., in the Y.M.C.A. Lecture Hall, the last meeting of the society in this session will be held. Miss Claudia Roberts, B.A., of the Intermediate School, will speak on "Early Welsh Romances." Yorxe WORSHIPPERS' LEAGUE.—Last Sunday morning, at Ebenezer Church, Merthyr, the Young Worshippers' Lea- gue was formed, when a large number of children were present at the service, and joined the League. The. Pastor (the Rev. D. Stephen Williams) preach- ed the first of a series of sermonettes in English to a good congregation of chil- dren and adults on Feed My Lambs (John xxvi.. 15). At the close of the sermonette the children's choir render- ed very sweetly one of the choruses out of the sacred cantata. "The Gentle Shepherd," viz., "He Shall Feed His -Flock." under the conductorship of Mr. Tom Williams, which was very much appreciated by the congregation. Dowlais. I ANOTHER VICTIM OF INDUSTRY. D. Thomas, of Penyard, a collier employed at No. 2 Pit, Fochriw, was run over bv a journey ill on Monday. He was killed instantly, his body being hor- ribly mutilated. Deceased, who was 34 years of age, leaves a widow, FATAL STREET .FALL.—John Sullivan, of Nibloe Terrace, slipped in a public street on Wednesday and broke his back. He was taken to the Hospital, where he died at noon on Thursday. The deceased sustained serious injury to his back some time ago, while fol- lowing his employment at a lumber lowing his emp l man at the pithead, and was unable to continue at his work. He was secre- tary of the local branch of the Irish National Foresters. He leaves a widow and a large family of young children to mourn his loss. SCHOOL CONCERT.—On Thursday last, February 26, a concert was given b} the teachers and children of Pant In- fants' School, the proceeds going to- wards defraying the expenses of a school piano. So many people assem- bled to see the tiny artistes that num- bers had to be turned away, another performance being given on the follow- ing Saturday. Coun. D. Davies, J.P., who was the chairman for the evening, spoke of the services rendered by th Headmistress (Mrs. Evans) in the most eulogistic terms. That the Headmis- tress and staff worked hard in prepare tion for the concert was evident from the high level of excellence reached by the children. The following is a list of items rendered —Recitation, "Open- ing Speech," Four Little Boys; song, "Come Soft and Lovely Evening," School Children Nursery Rhymes, Mother Hubbard and her Friends," Children's Party; song. "Goodbye, Miss M. P. Davies; school drill, "The Banner," School Boys; recitation. "Where Smiles are Sold," School Boy; Welsh Action Song, "Clodl vr Ysgol," First Class Children solo ajid chorus, "The Orange Girl." Miss G. Davies & Children; School game, "The Gypsies," "The Queen" and Twelve Girls song, "Flower Bells," School Children; solo, "The Heavenly Rest," Miss A. Jones; drill, 'Japanese .Fan Drill." School Girls; solo. "The Little Grey Home in the West." Miss M. P. Davies; musical item, "The Band," The School Band; recitation, "Closing Speech." School Girls; song. "Good Night," School Children finale. 11 Hen Wlad fv T'had- au." Accompanist, Miss M. P. Davies.

The RC School StrikeI

The R. C. School" Strike.' I I MATT DE LACEY ON "THE I FIGHT." I CLERGY AND CHILDREN WHO I KEEP AWAY. I About 300 Dowlais Roman Catholics met in Dowlais on Wednesday night, to consider the position since the police court proceedings of the day previous. Mr. Matt de Lacey, who was in the chair, said the Western Mail had never in its history made a bigger mi&- take than in saying they had lost the fight. Hitherto they had been fighting with four-ounce gloves—(laughter)— but now they were fighting with the naked fists. They were determined not to senli their children to school until there had been a proper and adequate inquiry. Sir Marchant Williams had stated he was bound to carry out the law, and fines were inflicted upon them. A certain newspaper had that day referred to them as Lloyd George revolvers. But in this they were out to fight for justice, and were not going to be led by the nose. (Applause.) 1' We are just commencing the fight, and in that fight we have just got our gloves off. We are determined, and will not send our children to school until there is a proper and adequate inquiry into the matter. I I ask you," he concluded, "to be steadfast; you have started well, and you are keeping your mouths shut. Keep your children out of school as you have been. I am told that Miss Kiernan is going to give a tea party to the children who are going to school. (Laughter.) It will not be an expen- sive job, will it? I may tell you this-. I know a substantial sum of money is held by one of our clergy to give a rattling good dinner, tea, and supper to the children who keep away." (Ap- plause.) Mr. Patrick Mansfield, one of the Managers, said Sir Marchant Williams at the police court on Tuesday said the Managers had absolutely nothing to do with the appointment or dismissal of the teachers, but, as a matter of fact, every teacher in the school at the pre- sent moment had been appointed by the Managers. It was only fair, how- ever. to add that every appointment had to be ratified by the Council. The Western Mail" were entirely mis- taken in supposing that the dispute was between the parents and the Managers. It was between the Managers and the Council. There was a certain amount of truth in the statement that the children were put in the firing line, but really it was the parents who were in the firing line. The parents of the children were not going to be fined 5/- for the purpose of airing their griev- ances. There was a lot more going to happen besides what had occurred. "As far as I am personally concerned, my idea is to get the fight on." On the motion of Mr. Matt de Lacey, a resolution was unanimously adopted deciding to continue the fight despite any action that might be taken by the local Education Committee. Abercanaid and Pentre- bach. LENTEN SERVICES.—On Wednesday, the 28th (Ash Wednesday), services were held at Stfl Peter's Church, Aber- canaid, at 11 a.m. and 7.30 p.m. PREACHING GYMANFA.—Students from Carmarthen College held preaching ser- vices at Zion Chapel on Sunday last. Collections were taken at all the ser- vices in aid of the students. GRAIG CHAPEL.—The pulpit at Graig Chapel was on Sunday occupied by Rev. William Hughes, B.A., of Cardiff Uni- versity. The adult and juvenile choirs are preparing a servioe of song en- titled "Riches and Rags," by C. King Procter, illustrated by 50 lantern slides, to be performed in a few weeks. I.L.P.—The weekly branch meeting was held on Friday night, when there was a good attendance. Delegates were appointed for the forthcoming L.R.A. conference. — —

I St Davids Day at the SchoolI

St. David's Day at the School I A novel and attractive programme was gone through at the Abercanaid School, under the chairmanship of Mr. David, headmaster. The first part was a description of an old Welsh Noson Lawen to show how the peo- ple of long ago spent their evenings. The opening dialogue was sung to the old air, "Pant-Corlan- yr Wyn," with Winnie Williams as "Madryb," and S. Roderick, M. Roderick, and G. Davies as her family, and Lizzie Thomas, J. E. Jones. W. J. Davies, E. Owen, Os- wald Thomas, Islwyn Jones her guesst, and Archie Davies the grandfather. The chorus was loudly cheered and en- cored. Then they sang a list of old Welsh proverbs metrically arranged. After this, an old Welsh harpist (im- personated by E. J. Jones, son of Coun. L. M. Jones) appeared, and the party sang Penllion Telyn to the "Llwyn Onn" and Alaw Penrhaw" measures —quite a new and beautiful addition to school music. After this sketch, Mr. David unveiled two fine drawings, the work of F. F. Samuel, a pupil at the school, and Mr. Bevan followed with a choice selection of Welsh airs on the piano. The second part of the programme was made up of the following historical tableaux, described by the Headmaster and the class masters, Mr. Bevan, Mr. Richards, and Mr. Jones:- (1) "St. David in his clerical attire," impersonated by Johnnie Davies. (2) "Hywel Dda, by Master D. J. Morgan. (3) "Caradog before Caesar." Solo describing the scene by Mr. Roberts; I Caradog's plea sung sweetly to the air, Llanddyfri," by Master George Howells, while D. J. Davies, Jack Da- vies, Jeff. Davies, Roy Davies and J. M. Jones impersonated Caesar and his soldiers. (4) "Ivor Bach," impersonated by J. E. Griffiths. (5) Llewelyn," impersonated by I Idris James. (6) Gruffydd Ap Cynon" and "Cyn- frig Hir," by Emrys Jones and M. J. Meek. A fine solo (Master G. How- ells) and chorus describing the delivery of Gruffydd Ap Cynon from Chester Castle was rendered by the senior class 1 under Mr. E. L. Jones. (7) Owain Glyndwr and his Atten- dant bidding good-bye to Sir L. Berk- rolles" was shown by Haydn Davies, Dewi Williams and D. M. Davies, while Myrtle Williams recited the poem des- cribing the scene. After the singing of more Welsh Airs. the Revs. Gwilym Roberta and R. R. Roberts, the curates at the two churches, then spoke in high terms of the performance, and thanked all who had taken part. The singing was conducted by Mr. G. J. Roberts, assistant master, while Mr T. T. Bevan, A.R.C.O., acted as pianist, and Miss Fanny Williams sup- erintended the tableaux. The National Anthems, Welsh and English, were splendidly rendered by the choir at the close. Troedyrhiw. I MOUNT ZION LITERARY SOCIETY.—On Monday the Society arranged a debate on Charity Organisations." Mr. Bert Morrell argued on the negative side, and Mr. W. Fowles the affirma- tive. A very lively interest was taken in both sides by every member present. On a vote being taken, the affirmative won by a small majority. Miss K. Lloyd presided. TEA AXD DANCE.—Troedyrhiw Stars A.F.C. held their annual tea and dance on Thursday evening last, at St. John's Hall. There was a large gathering, numbering about 200, present. Most of these danced of watched the dancers from the stage, where games were pro- vided. After such a large gathering the organisers anticipate the financial side will be very successful. The tray holders were Messrs. Webber, Thomas, Parry, Bryan, Beach, Estop, Chambers, Thomas Davies, and J. Thomas; cutters, Mrs. Thomas, Philips, Randall, Williams; M.C.'s, Messrs. R. Howells and W; Parry. Mr. J. Hinton supplied the music. FUNERALS.-Tlie funeral of Idoes Waile, the six-year-old son of Mr. R. Waile, Wyndham House, took place on Wednesday. The little boy had been suffering from the effects of a scald sustained a few weeks ago. The death occurred on Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. Waile wish to thank all the friends and relatives who sent floral gifts. Mr. W. J. Jones oonducted the funeral service at Aberfan Cemetery.—Mary Owen, the six-year-old daughter of John Owen 8 Cardiff Road, was also buried on Wed- nesday. Death was due to diphtheria after a few days' illness. The body was interred at Saron Cemetery. Rev. W. J. Price officiated. THE MISSION.—A service of song, en- titled A Child of Jesus" (Burnham), was given by the Mission choir and artistes at the Wesleyan Chapel (kindly lent for the occasion), on Thursday evening last. The intervening reading was very expressively read by Mr. W. J. Jones, and the choir, under the oonductorship of Mr. R. H. Waite, headmaster, ably rendered the chorus. Solos and quartettes sung by the artists were very touchingly worded, and the efficient renderings pleased the audience. All the proceeds of the evening go towards defraying the ex- penses of prizes ggiven to the beet schools. Mr. J. Davies, superinten- dent, thanked all those who had worked to bring the evening to such a success- ful termination. Merthyr Vale & Aberfan. SELF-SATISFACTION. You will be brimming over with satisfaction if you buy your next Suit with us. Best value. Biggest choice.—EARNEST JONES AND Co.. Aberfan. MUSICAL.—On Sunday Mr. John Thomas took up his new duties as sing- ing conductor at the Zion English Bap- tist Chapel, to which position he was appointed the week previous, on the retirement of Mr .J. Morgan. Mr. Thomas, being a native of Merthyr Vale, is well known in the locality, both for his singing and elocutionary powers. He has on several occasions carried off the premier prize for elocu- tion at the National Eisteddfod, and has also secured many prizes as a soloist. We feel sure that all will wish him every success in his new sphere, and we trust that he will gain the full confidence and co-opecration of the church choir. R.A.O.B.—Under the auspices of the Mackintosh Lodge of the R.A.O.B., a grand smoking concert was held at the Mackintosh Hotel on Monday evening. Aid. David Jones presided over a very large attendance, the room being packed to its utmost capacity. The songs and patter of Messrs. S. Bolton, Merthyr, and Lionel Thomas, Aberfan, comedians, were much appreciated by those in attendance, while the coon songs and dances of Mr. Francis Watkins, Merthyr, created an excellent impression. In addition to the above, the following local amateurs, Messrs. W. Watts, J. Parry, W. Hughes, and Llew Jones, rendered songs, both senti- mental and comic, which were loudly applauded by the audience. The accompanist was Mr. W. J. Jones, the Lodge Minstrel. This proved to be one of the most successful concerts organ- ised by the lodge. AIR RIFJÆ SHOOTING.—An interesting air rifle shooting match took place on Tuesday evening, at Havard's Rooms, between the Aberfan and Treharris Royals air rifle clubs, when the Aberfan team secured the full points, under the Merthyr and District Air Riue League rules. The scores were: —Aberfan 236, Treharris 204. The individual scores were as follows -Aberfan: A. Thomas 30, F. Smith 30, R. Jones 27, E. Jones 29, John Jones 30, Will Jones 31, Hugh Owens 30, and J. S. Crebey 29; total, 236. Treharris: D. Ellis 25, T. Evans 25, H. Weekes 26, G. Powell. 28, P. Lewis 22, C. Lester 27, E. Lewis 22, and W. loms 29; total, 204. Will Jones, the top scorer Tor Aberfan, has shown most consistent form thrOUgh-I out the season, and he has the excellent average of 31 points per match to his credit. The same two teams have been 'I drawn against each other for the second round of the "News of the World" Cup Competition, the match to be shot at Aberfan on March 18th. ST. DAVID'S DAY CELEBRATION.—On Monday evening the Bethania Young People's Society celebrated St. David's Day by holding a concert at the Beth- ania Vestry. Mr. John Hughes pre- sided, and an excellent programme was provided by the following local artistes:—Solos by Messrs. John Roberts, Evan Thomas, Septimus Ashton, and S. Roberts, Miss Minnie Lewis, Miss Annie Davies, and Miss C. Ashton. Recitations were delivered by Master Brinley Evans, Mr. Hugh Edwards, and Mr. Richard Evans. There was also a chorus by a male choir under the baton of Mr. J. Roberts, which was much applauded. A pleas- ing feature was a chorus by a number of school girls dressed in Welsh cos- tumes, conducted by Miss H. M. Lewis. Messrs. Richard Richards, D. Jenkins, and Benjamin Thomas gave short addresses on St. David's Day, and the Patron Saint, etc., while Mr. W. James and Mr. S. Ashton created much amusement with their impromptu com- position of Welsh poetry. The musi- cal items were accompanied upon the piano by Miss B. Parry, and an ex- cellent evening's entertainment was concluded with the singing of "Hen Wlad by Nhadau." SICK FUND.—A special meeting of members of the Merthyr Vale Colliery Workmen's Sick .Fund was held at the Aberfan Hotel on Tuesday evening, to consider what steps should be taken in view of the heavy drain upon the Society's funds. It was explained that the funds had sunk very low, so low in fact that the Society would be una bIe to meet the demands for sick relief after the next payment. The committee. suggested that the contri- butions should not be deducted from the workmen's earnings at the colliery offiœ in future, but that each member should pay his contributions by card, and that no new member should be admitted without a medical certifi- cate, and that an age limit should also be imposed. This suggestion was not adopted, however, and after a very lively discussion, it was decided that no contributions should be levied in future, and that the Society should be allowed to dissolve. The Society has been in existence for over 30 years, and up to the passing of the National Insurance Act it was one of the condi- tions of employment that each work- man should be a member. Since that Act has come into operation, however, it has been made voluntary, and has rapidly dwindled into insolvency. There are a large number of pen- sioners and aged workmen in the Society, and on their account it is to be regretted that no way oould be found to save the Society from dying out. HOSPITAL.—On Friday evening Mr. Rowland Evans, J.P., addressed a meeting of Merthyr Vale workmen at the Aberfan Half. Mr. Evans is the organising secretary of the King Edward VIII. Hospital, Cardiff, and his mission was to raise funds on behalf of that institution. He explained that the funds at the disposal of the hospital were very low, and that in oonsequenae frhe work of relieving human suffering was not nearly as effective as it should be. He submitted a scheme for rais- ing funds for the consideration of the workmen at the Merthyr Vale colleries. Under this scheme every workman whose earnings exceeded 10/- per week would contribute one penny per week towards the hospital fund, and in re- turn would receive (together with wife and family) treatment at the hos- pital and convalescent homes. Mr. Evans explained that at present there were no convalescent homes in connec- tion with the hospital, but if the work- men of South Wales adopted this scheme, the hospital authority would be enabled to provide such homes. These homes would greatly relieve the wait- ing list, which was at present 817. In addition to this, Mr. Evans explained that they had a new wing containing 50 beds at the hospital, which they could not throw open on account of the lack of funds. He was very desirous of having this new wing thrown open as soon as possible, in order to cope with the more urgent cases which were now on the waiting list. A good deal of discussion followed upon Mr. Row- land Evans's remarks, but it was finally decided that a special meeting should be called to consider the scheme at a future date. The meeting voted a sum of E25 out of the existing hospi- tal fund toward the opening of the new wing.

Concerning the Consumer1

Concerning the Consumer1 The oppression on poor wage-earners occasioned by increased prices must be terrible. Every excuse is being made to make the consumer pay through the nose. But when will he open his eyes? —" Co-operative News."

Advertising

THE Genuine Sale I SUITS TO MEASURE- 29s. 9d. Every Garment made on the Premises. LEWIS COHEN, MERTHYR'S PREMIER CUTTER, 94, Pontmorlais, MERTHYR.

Welsh National Library

Welsh National Library. In July of 1911 the foundation stones of the buildings of the National Library of Wales were laid at Aberystwyth, the institution having been established by Royal Charter granted by H.M. King Edward VII. This was the first step in the mea- sures taken for placing Wales on a footing with England, Scotland and Ireland in the matter of passessing a National Library of its own. These were followed by (a) the grant to the National Library of Wales, by the Copyright Act, 1911, of a right to claim a copy of every book (with few excep- tions) published in the British Isles, in whatsovere language written, as from July. 1912; and by (b) the Treasury promising towards the building fund a grant of -61 for every JE1 contributed up to £ 50,000, previous to 5th April, 1914 the contract price of the build- ings now in course of erection being £ 106,000. Towards the sum of C50,000 there has already been contributed over L35,000, leaving a balance of ZC15,000 to be raised by the date men- tioned (or to clear off the contract price, about -221,000). The need for contributions is therefore very urgent. The practical benefits to be derived by the Welsh people from the National Library fall broadly under the follow- ing heads:— (1) It will provide for advanced students of our University Colleges and other educational institutions the materials necessary for research work both literary and scientific, and will thus be the coping-stone of the edu- cational system of Wales In order to produce pioneers in the world of thought—those who extend the boundaries of knowledge, who influence the higher development of a country's life—such a privision is indispensable. (2) To overoome the geographical difficulties of Wales, and to meet, in a democratic way, the needs of all those who seriously pursue their studies at home, either individually or in organised groups such as liter- ary and scientific societies, Cymmro- dorion Societies, Teachers' and Cler- gy Unions, Farmers' Clubs, and the a?= organised by Clubs and In- stitutes, Trades Unions, and Co- operative Societies, the National Lib- rary will, in accordance with its Char- ter, acquire duplicate and multipli- cate copies of standard, up-to-date, and expensive books and other aids to learning for the purpose of lending them, under proper guarantees, for the use of such students and associa- tions. Already boxes of books in Industrial History and Economics are thus being placed at the disposal of the Tutorial Classes of the Workers' Education Association in various parts of Wales, and the first step has also been taken for lending educa- tional books to teachers, and books on farming, etc., to persons engaged in the study of agriculture. (3) To schools and other education- al institutions the library will lend collections of prints to illustrate les- sons in history, geography, geology and other subjects; also photographs and lantern slides for educational purposes. (4) The Library has a printing press of its own, from which will be issued catalogues of Welsh and Celtic books published each year, bibliogra- phies of special subjects, and print- ed catalogue cards, which can be sup- plied at a nominal pnoe to any lib- rary as material for a catalogue of its own books. The University Col- lege, Cardiff, is already availing it- self of this method of having its Salesbury Welsh Library catalogued. The government of the Library is a democratic one, its Court comprising persons appointed by the University of Wales, the three Colleges, the Central Welsh Board, the Teachers of Elemen- tary and Secondary Schools, and by the Councils of every County and Coun- ty Borough in Wales and Monmouth- shire. At the request of the Council of the Library, Ooun. H. M. Lloyd (the Mayor of Merthyr) has opened a sub- scription list for this district, and in view of the national character of the appeal, it is to be hoped that a gener- ous response will be forthcoming. Contributions may be paid to any collector possessing a collecting book bearing the signature of the Mayor, or bearing the sl- l g :yor's Amount at any direct to the Mayor's Account at any bank in the district.

Troedyrhiw Recognition Service

Troedyrhiw Recognition Service. WARM WELCOME FOR REV. ROWLAND JONES. To welcome the Rev. W. Rowland Jones, B.A., and Mrs. Jones to the above church, a social tea waa held at the Tabernacle Hall on Wednesday evening, .February 25th, 1914. The following ladies presided at the tablee: Mrs. A. Thomas, Mrs. Evans, Mrs. Granville, Mrs. E. Davies, Mrs. G. Davies, Mr. Buftain, Mrs. W. J. Jonea, Mrs. Burrows, Mrs. J. E. Jones, Miss Gladys Jones, Miss Gladys Davies, Miss Blod. Burrows. The following ladies also assisted to make the tea a suo- oess: Mrs. J. E. Davies, Mrs. Yeo, Mrs. Dd. Thomas, Mrs. T. Morgan, Mrs. Hughes, and Mrs. W. Morgan. Following the tea the recognition ser- vice was held in the chapel above, the building being crowded. The Rev. W. P. Stonier, Merthyr, opened the meet- ing by prayer. The Chairman, Rev. H. P. Jones. Merthyr Vale, in his opening address, said he was very pleased to be present on such an occasion. He sincerely hoped that the union between pastor and church would be a very blessed one. He eulogised Mr. Jones as a great preacher and teacher. Mr. James Evans, secretary of the church, then read letters of apology, also expressing their best wishes upon church and pastor, from Rev. James, Davies, Carmel, Troedyrhiw; Rev. W. A. Jones, Sion, Merthyr; Rev. Zac. Davies, Penydarren; Rev. J. M. Hug- hes, Elim, Penydarren; Rev. W. c. Thomas, Merthyr; Rev. T. Lloyd Rees, Bethel, Merthyr; Rev. A. G. Jones, iKngton, late pastor: Rev. J. Badham, and Rev. David Pughe. As an offioer of the church, and on behalf of the deaconate whom he represented, he most heartily welcomed Mr. Jones to Tabernacle. Rev. D. L. Jones, Secretary of Tab- ernacle, Merthyr, said he stood there. that night with deep personal feelings. The Church at Troedyrhiw had taken away their pastor. A good pastor. Rev. Gwilym Rees, B.A., Merthyr, spoke as to the character of Mr. Jones. He said three could be no doubt about, Mr. Jones, because he came from Llan- elly-like himself. (Laughter.) He knew him more intimately than any other minister in Merthyr. Mr. Jones had genius for making friends, because he was a good friend. The young people would find him a good friend. He had also the saving grace of hum- our. He sincerely hoped that this. would be a new epoch in the history of the church. Mr. W. P. Burrows, on behalf of the church, welcomed Mr. and Mrs. Jones. Rev. W. Rowland Jones afterwards addressed the meeting. He thanked the brethren who had spoken go kindly of him, and felt exceedingly grateful to them all for their warm-hearted re- ception. He had come to Troedyrhiw to do his utmost for Tabernacle, and to serve the oommunity generally in everything that was goood and Christ- ian. One of the previous speakers, said that he was on his way to a tem- ple. and that he would not be long in a Tabernacle. In reply to that, he wanted to say that he was not going to neglect his duties at Troedyrhiw by dreming of some imaginary temple in the duty. It was his duty to do his very best here and now and not think of any future spheres. So long as he would be in Troedyrhiw he intended doing his best. He hoped that they would pray for him, and he hoped the blessing of God would be upon their labour.

LATE FOOTBALL

LATE FOOTBALL.. SOUTHERN CHARITY CUP SEMI- FINAL. Southampton 3, Merthyr 1. Dominy and Hollis scored for South- ampton (Russell put through his own, goal). Hiftle scored for Merthyr. I Another Cap for Mose Russell. yongratulations to Mose Russell on gaining his second cap. It has been well earned, and we feel sure he will justify his selection against England on March 16th. Printed and Published for the Proprie- tors by John Pennell Kane, ai, Williams' Square, Glebeland Street Merthyr Tydfil, March 7th, 1914.

Advertising

I NOSTBOLIITE JMF- CURES COLD in the HEAD and CATARRH t NO matter how bad you may be with Cold in the Head and Catarrh, you will get immediate benefit by using Nostroline." It clears your head instantly. It relieves the dis- tressing irritation in the nostrils. It stops the running discharge. It geto rid of the thick, germ-laden mucus in your nose and throat. You will know that "Nostrolinell is doing you good the minute you try it, and you will soon be telling other sufferers how quickly 11 Nostroline" cured you! Nostroline is guaranteed to be safe and good for all ages and oondi- tions. It is safe and good for YOU. Tubes, 1/11 and 2/9 of most Ohemista, or post free from =ker&-HAnOLD E. MATTHKWS A CO., Chemists, OUftcm, Briatol. [tiœ Pioaeer. '?