Collection Title: Merthyr Pioneer

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
11 articles on this page
Advertising

Small Prepaid Advertisements. One In- Three In- Six In- sertion. sertions. sertions. I 2€ words 0 6 10 1 9 30 words 0 9 1 6 2 9 j 40 words 1 0 2 0 36 50 words 1 3 2 6 46 60 words 1 6 3 0 5 6 In all cases the Name and Address a-r, oounted as part of the Advertise- ment. These prices apply only to Advertise- ments ordered for consecutive inser- tions and which are prepaid. In order to ensure accruacy. the Advertiser should request the clerk who takes the Advertisement to read it over. The greatest care is taken as to their being coirectly printed, but the Proprietors cannot be responsible for inaccuracies in either of these respects. or forv any consequences arising there- from. Irade Advertisements are inserted under t,he Heading" Personal," at 6d. per line. All advertisements should be posted to the Office on or before Wednesday. Postal Orders. It is strongly recommended that all Postal Orders be filled in with the name, the Labour Pioneer, and crossed. Answers to Advertnserrwnts. Replies to Advertisements addressed to the .fIONEER Office will be handed out on production of a ticket which may be obtained when the Advertise- ment s ordered, or they will be for- warded tv the Advertisers Address, provided stamps to cover postage are supplied. Applicants for Situation are re- quested not to send original documents (oopiea should be sent) or photographs with replies to Advertisements when letters are addressed to Box Numbers at this Office. The proprietors cannot undertake any responsibility if testi- monials or photographs are lost. Prize Drawings.  THOMAS' (2 Middle Taff Street, ? Mer?hyr) PHIZE DHAVIXG has been POSTPONED until Janary 28. THOS. HARRIS, Secretary, 52 Gladstone Terrace, Merthyr. PRIZE DRAWING for CHRIST- MAS IONES. List of Winning Numbers:—1. 166; 2, 390; 3, 368; 4, 614; 5, 437 6, 304; 7, 387; 8, 497; 9, 1028. 10. 844: 11. 1365; 12, 604; 13, 1B39; 14. 1424; 15. 1#8; 16, 611; 17, 599: 18, .506; 19. 688 20, 389; 21, 503 22, 824 23. 468; 24, 1039; 25, 694 26. 607: 27. 618; 28, 434; 29, 21; 30, 605 31. 1402; 32. 481 33 684; 34, 877 35, 1336; 36, 770; 37, 314; 38, 1430; 39, 799: 40. 678; 41. 693; 42, ?1; 46, 23.—Secretary. Mr. W. J. WILLIAMS, 1 Danyparc, Merthyr. Miscellaneous. A LL Sufferers from Tapeworm and AThroadworum quickly relieved. Particulars free.—Goulden, Box 284, North Church Street, Nottingham. Business Specials. BRONCHITIS and Asthma.-Have Byou tried Lungetine, the exal remedy? If not, buy a bottle to-day, and teat for yourself it* magical eurativ. power. Price 11 Ii and 2/9 per battle.-Addrem, Dept. I, Lungetine Co., 453 West Strand, London. LADIES I LADIES I WITHOUT Drugs, Pills, or Medi- VV cine, NURSE ROSS guaran- tees to cure lrregularitieee and Ob- structions, Female Ailments in married or single women from whatever cause arising or how long standing; no dis- appointments every case a guaranteed cure; numerous testimonials; send 8t&mp for free advice. NURSE ROSS S LABORATORY, ALMA VILLA," LOWER CHARMINSTER ROAD, BOURNEMOUTH. QUICK IN ACTION. For Stings, ?J Bums. Scalds, Cuts, and Wounds. Cures without a Mark. 100 years in U". ARABIAN OIL ROCA- TION. Large Bottles, II Ii. Sold by Boots Ltd., Oaah Chemists, or direct from Sole Proprietor and Manufacturer -R. W. WOOLOOCK, CARDIGAN. LADIES. ST. DOMINIC'S Therapeutic Pill- oids cure all irregularities from any cause in m rried or single. They act ia a few hours; wonderful; mar- vellous results. Every case guaran- teed. Enclose stamp for partioulaxe.- MADAME D. MACDONALD, 210 Wimborne Road, Winton, Bourne- mouth. NURSE E. STANLEY will send pri- ately how to cure yourself of all irregularities; new French method. — 114 Bold Street, Liverpool. Ladies, Read This. DVICE .FREE for Stamp.-Mn. ?? M. Stewart's famous Female Remedy never fails. Address—9 Guinea Street, Bristol. 0^4/t i-PAGn BOOK ABOUT HERBS 0?± AND HOW TO USE THEM, post free. Send for one. TRIMNELL, THB REBBALIST, 144 RICHMOND ROAD, CARDiirF. Established 1879. |J. T. PETERS, S««lf>Sr><- & Monumental Mason, 1CEFN & PANT. Estimates h. Terms M" Don't Support Capitalist Insurance Companies. THE PLANET FRIENDLY ASSURANCE COLLECTING SOCIETY Exists to enable the workers to own and control THEIR OWN INSURANCE BUSINESS, Chief Offices: OLD SQUARE, BIRMINGHAM. Agents ail over the Country. J. SIMPSON, Secretary. Founded and Managed by Laoour Men. District Manager H. JONKER, Claude Road, Cardiff. ADDITIONAL AGENTS WANTED.

OldTime Oddities I

Old-Time Oddities. I By OLIVER OLDE. A a old book on ancient superstition declares that ohurch beil-, were inven- ted in A.D. 400, to frighten away the Devil from the Sanotvtai-y I Of course, they were a complete failure in that respect, evidently soon becom- ing used to them. It is recorded that the hop was brought into our counity from the Netherlands in the reign of Henry VIII., and that the word "beer," from the German "bier," was then employ- ed here iipr the fivt time to distin- "It zh the hopped liquor from the more ancient beverage called "ale." Does the German origin of the word beer account in some ivow for the recent rise in the price of one of our popular drinks?" Is it retaliation? In 1?1. during the t reign of Henry III., it was enacted t&.t a brewer might sell 2 galls, of ale for Id. in cit- ies. and 3 or 4 galls, for the same price in the country. The penny of that time was worth about threepence of our currency. This seeing to show that ale was regarded then as an ab- solute necessary of life. Down to the time of Henry VIII., ale or beer was so highly esteemed that thtf- formed the liquid portion at break ia.st. and not tea or coffee. For instance, the breakfast of the Eanl and Countess of Northumberland of that period, on flesh-days throughout the year, consisted of a loaf of bread, two manchets (small loaves of fine bread), a quart of beer, a quart of Mine, half a chine of nftitton, or a, chine of beef. boiled. How many readers of the PIONEBH who could en- joy a bumper of a breakfast like that during the 365 mornings of the yeat- 1915 ? British brewers of the popular beve- rage cannot entertain the same opin- ion of King Charles II. and his Par- liament as our teetotallers do. Why ? Because it was by an Act enforced in 1660 that the duty of excise WAS first granted to that monarch. It was then 15d. per barrel on every barrel of beer above 6/- the barrel, and 3d. per bar- rel for every barrel of 61 or under, brewed for retail. < Lkie ale or beer, calves' heads also seem to have been value d much high- er in former days than they are in our time. So highly prized were they, indeed, that a generous old gentle- man named Phillip ab Morice, who died in July, 1773, aged 92, by his last will and testament, ordered 31 calves' heads to be given away annually to the poor of Cardigan on St. Mat- thew's Day, which was the anniversary of the testator's birthday. • » I recollect reading somewhere that in Glamorganshire there were several families who had a calf's head dressed for the table on every 30th January, which happened to be the day on which Charles 1. was beheaded at Whitehall in 1649. Whether this old custom was one of real joy or real sorrow connected with that event, I am not quite sure. It is related in an old medical book that towards the close of the four- teenth century a number of men and woman appeared at Aix-la-Chapelle, in Germany, on the festival of St. John, dancing and screaming in a frantic manner in the streets. Many foamed nt the mouth, and danced till they fell down insensible; others dashed their brains out against the walls! They were suffering from the dancing mania called "St. Vitus's Dance." < Epidemic disorders of that kind seem to have been very common in Germany during the Middle Ages, and were ascribed to the bite of the Lyeosa Tarentula," a species of spi- der the sting of which sometimes pro- duced an effect about equal to the sting of a wasp. If Messrs. Thomas Atkins & Oo. happen to meet German opponents of that stinging kindred, and take them prisoners, I hope they will see to it that none of them are transported to Britain under any cir- eumstanoee.

Cinderella and Beauty anli The Beasi

"Cinderella" and "Beauty anli The Beasi." CREDITABLE PERFORMANCES BY I THE MISSES FREEMAN'S PUPILS, On Thursday, December 17, a large and appreciative audience assembled at 111(, Olvmpia Skating, Merthyr, to | witness the dramatic performances of | Cinderella and "The Beauty and the Beast." by the pupils of the Miss- es Freeman. The Rev. 'David Pughe read a. letter from the Mayor apologi- sing for his absence, and regretting THAT circumstances, which had only that tlz*- occurred, prevented his be- ing present. 1'1' C' d II The performance of Cinderella pronounced a HUGE success by all. The principal characters were excel- lently sustained by the following Cinderella. Miss Flora Barr: Proudie and Crosspatch, her sisters. Misses Doris Evans and Marjorie Boots FAIRY Godmother, Miss Winifred Yeates; Prince Charming, Miss Sadie Evans; SV Holiday and Sir Hector, courtiers, Misses Gwen Lewis and Phylis Yeates.; Herald, Master John Pughe. Chorus of Fairies—The Misses Hilda Rogers. Gwynedd Edwards, Isola Yeates, Dona Parry. Peggie Thomas. Enid Jones. Flora Loewensohn, Mvtanwy Pughe. Connie Hughes and Margaret Lloyd. The distribution of prizes and certi- ficates by Mrs. Cromwell Jones, who was herself afterwards presented with a bouquet by Miss Kathleen Yeates, who also presented the Misses Free- man with boxes of ehocolartes, then took place. The were 38 certificates and prizes distributed. Fifteen certi- ficates and one prize being awarded by the Incorporated Society of Science, Letters and Art. London. Eleven of the fifteen were Honours' Certificates, and a prize was gained by Miss Flora Barr for obtaining maximum marks in an essay competition, in which there were competitors from all parts of the United Kingdom. The other 23 certificates and prize were awarded by the London College of Music, a prize being won by Miss Maggie Anderson for gaining the highest marks in the Merthyr Centre for piano playing. Five prize were awarded by the Misses .Freeman to Miss Winifred Ye- ates. Miss Sadie Evans, Miss Marjo- rie Boots, Miss Doris Evans. and Miss Phyllis Yeates. Certificates ware presented to Miss Millie Gittelsohn, Flora Barr, Phyllis Yeates, Maggie Anderson, Sadie Ev- anE-, Doris Evans. Winifred Yeates, Winifred Urquhart. Winnie Anderson, Gwen Lewis. Price, Gwen Lewis. Beatrice Gill, Jennie Edwards, Mabel Simons. Wilfrid Sturley. and May Si- mons. Coun. Ll. M. Francis, Deputy May- or, said he was deligh ted to find such excellent work being done by the Misses Freeman's pupils. The great advantage which private schools had over public ones was the individual teaching received. In public spools the teacher often had 60 or 70 schol- ars in a class, whilst in this school he understood that the pupils ranged from eight to ten in a class. This enabled the teacher to study and undesrta,nd the character of each pupil. Miss Winifred Anderson (on behalf of the school, then handed the Deputy Mayor a cheque for JS10 for the Prince of Wales' Fund, the proceeds of the concert. Beauty and the Beast was then performed. The principal characters were taken by: -Cassim, an Eastern Merchant, Miss Phyllis Yeates; Beau- ty, Ruby and Emerald, Cassim's Daughters, The Misses Flora Barr. Doris Evans, and Marjorie Boots; The Beast, a Prince under a spell, Miss Gwen Lewis; Boy and Mary, Servants to the Beast, Master J. M. Pughe and Miss Winifred Yeates. At the conclusion of the play, all the performers returned to the stage and sang The Good Night chorus, followed by the Belgian National An- them, in compliment to some of the Belgian Refugees who were present, and God Save the King." The dress- es for both plays were very much ad- mired. some having been hired from London. The staging was also very good, the Misses Freswian being in- debted to Mr. C. A. Harris for his valuable assistance in this respect.

Socialist Progress in USA

Socialist Progress in U.S.A. The Socialist Party of the U.S.A. has made a clear gain of 50 per cent. on its electoral returns of two years ago. The following are the results:—- United States Congressmen-1. Meyer London of New York City. State Senators—4. Oklahoma 1. Wisconsin 1. M innesota 1. Montana 1. State Representatives-26. Wisconsin 8. California, 4. Illinois 2. Minnesota, 1. Pennsylvania. 1. Massachusetts, 1. Kansas, 1. Oklahama, 6. Utah, 1. Montana, 2. In addition to the above, a re-count is proceding in severaj Ciates.

I Merthyr Husband and Wife I

I Merthyr Husband and' Wife. I ALLEGATIONS OF ADULTERY. David John Thomas, Mkrtliyr, was summoned at the Merthyr Police Court on Tuesday whh ssaulting- his wife. Margt. Thomas, on Nov. W, and also with desertion. Complainant said there were live children. Her husband" chucked her out oil the Saturday previous to RtJJk Holiday. On Dec. 12 she went to ask him about a sum of 9/6. She met him in Pontmorlais. and whilst she (complainant) was talking to dc- fendant's sister, lie ran away up Pen- yard. She followed, and defendant. struck liwi, in the eye and kicked her about the body. Defendant had given her 7 j 6 on Monday week, which was the only money he had given her since August. Defendant asked complainant to teH [he Bench why he had turned her out. Complamani said that one day sbe had met a man in Quen's Road who !I AX I previously asked her husfcaixl for work. She told this iiiaii that perhaps it would be better l not to come to the house that night, as her husband might be drunk. Someone had told her husband that she was speaking to a man in Queen's Road, and that was the cause of the trouble. Defendant alleged that if he was gi- ven time to call a witness who was in Kitchener's Army, now stationed in Shrewsbury, he would be prepared to PIO^E adultery against his wife. De- fendant also alleged that he was not the father of the youngest child of complainant. Dr. J. L. Wa rd said the Bench were satisfied that the charge of assault had been proved, and defendant wou ld be fined 40/- and costs. The charge of de- sertion would be adjourned.

How Long will the War Last I

How Long will the War Last? I I I All of us are probably asked a. dozen times A day how long the war will last, and all of us the best ati.siv,ei, we tan. endeavoiSrng to pre- serve an appearance of solemnity, but knowing PERFECTLY well in our hearts that our opinion on such a subject is nort worth a rap. This war is the biggest thing in the way of wars that has ever happened to the old world since the dawn of history. It transcends all flbiits of thought imagination, and reason. We little creeping creatures cannot see more than a fraction of it. Even if we climb painfully to the top of the highest ladder of thought we -are still pygmies, and the war still tow- ers high above us. We see the rag- ing torrent at our feet, but the high summits are veiled in inpenetrable mist. Try as we may to preserve a distinct and unbroken view of the scene before us, the clouds of suspicion prejudice, ignorance and optimism con- stantly obscure our vision. We look gasp. wonder, and are dumb. We do not know. Nobody knows. This war, for once, is bigger than anybody. No one dominates it. No one even un- derstands it. Nobody can. How long will the war last When the war began it was South Africa over again, and the pundits all held that it could not last beyond Christ- mas. Now April is the fashionble date, and a painful expression comes over of the face of the pundit if one asks him to return on the First of Ap- ril—on Bismark's birthday—with a. nice fresh new estimate. The forces at work forces, moral, material, reli- gious, fanatical defy analysis and investigation. The scene is too big, the forces at work too many, their influence too imponderable. Some half-mad mystic, some Mullah who has had a dream, may transform the character of the war in a night, AND we all have our mystics and our Mul- lahs. How long, then, will the war last?" All talk of a speedy ending of the war is like dangling a carrot before an ass, to make him move." All this is part of the grandmother- ly system of dealing with free peo- ples, born of a totally false and dan- uperouy view of the situation. We Al- lies are men, and not infants. We resent it when disasters are secreted and casualties doled out in homoepa- thic doses, so that we may be good children and swallow our pill because it is a little one. Our people are much greater than our temporary rulers caretakers, with their deceptions, their censorship, and their half-truths. "IL.tac,tl,-L est verita et prevalebit.' Let us talk of truth. ;< On the whole they (the Govern- ment) have done well. Money and eff- ort have not been spared. The Prime Minister stated at the Mansion House the conditions under which alone we should sheathe the sword. These were, that Belgium should be amply compensated for her losses; that France should be secured againt ag- gression that the rights of tit. smal- ler European nations should be placed upon an unassailable foundation, and that the military domination of Prus- sia should be wholly and finally de- stroyed. These are objects very desir- aBle to pursue, but let us admit that their attainment may well engage ..8 for a term of years." Times' Military Correspond- ent, December 15, 1914. I

Advertising

LLOYDS BANK LiUED LOMBARD ST., This Bank is prepared, in jm approved cases, to act as LM|8 Executor and Trustee of "r I! 18 Wills, Trustee of Settlements, I tffj Trustee of Debenture Stock Issues, &c. Copies of the I regulations can be obtained ???,????""?  from the Trustee Department, [I ?  71, Lombard Street, or from :||f|| I1I 11 1 1 ? i!§||8| ??JJtJ?H?? J  any of the Branches. a Pi THIS BANK HAS OVER 850 OFFICES IN ENGLAND & WALES, PARIS AUXILIARY: lLoves BANK (FRANCE) LIMITED. j

Merthyr Police Court

Merthyr Police Court. Tuesday. Before Dr. J. L. Ward. Dr. Web- ster, MR. D. Prosser, Dr. C. Biddle, and Mr. S. Sandbrook. GUARDIANS' ORDER INCREASED. George Jones, of Beau tort, was summoned at the instance of the Mer- thyr Guardians to show cause why he should not contribute towards the maintenance of his mother, who was receiving 5/- a week outdoor relief. Mr. Ll. Richards (Warrant Officer) said defendant's average earnings for the previous month were i:2 12s. a week. Defendant had received the of- fer by the Guardians to pay 2/6 a week. and it was for the Bench to SAY now vrlfat amount he should pay. Defendant had only one child. An order for the payment of 5/- a week was made. FORTHWITH. All red Freke, of Xeath. was sum- moned by the Merthyr "Cnion in re- spect of £; ]8- arrears of an order of :3 w"lzlv tot- the maintenance of HIS fa the I;. Mr. LI. Richards. Warrant Officer, said this people had not paid for years. The amount claimed was only a part of what was OW"1g. An order for payment forthwith WAS made. ALL THROUGH A LETTER. Julia Ann Abbott snnunoned Eliza- beth Lewis for using improper langu- age towards her on the 12th inst. Complainant said that she had been friends with defendant until Satur- (lay right, the 12th inst.. when defen- dant came into a chip shop after her. and pushed her and swore at her. The quarrel arose through a letter for de- fendant which came to her house. De- fendant had been U scandalising" her. Maria Woods corroborated the evid- ence of complainant. A cross-summons by Elizabeth Le- wis against Julia Abbott was also heard. Mrs. Lewis alleged that "Julia" fol- lowed her into the chip shop and ask- ed. Is she here now, the old ——"? am1 then threw some chips into her face. Both summonses were dismissed. WENT TO HIS HEAD. I Michael Conley was summoned for being drunk and disorderly in Union Sticef, Dowlais, on the 19th inst. Defendant said that as his son came heme from India to go to the front. he got in a couple of bottles of whis- k J, and not being used to it, it went, to his head. A tine of i5,1- was imposed. WORRIED ABOUT HER BOYS. I Mary Williams, Twynyroydn, was su mmoned for being drunk in Tram- roadside on the 18th inst. P.C. Jones proved the offence. Defendant, who said that she had heen worried about her boys at the front, was discharged. "HELPLESSLY DRUNK." Daniel Meek was charged with be- ing drunk in Bridge Street, Troedy- rhiw, on Sunday last. The Constable said that defendant was helplessly drunk. A fine of 10/- and oosts was imposed. A CHANCE TO PAY. Louisa Webb summoned William Farnsworth in respect of arrears of a maintenance order. Complainant said that an order for the payment of 4/- a, week for the maintenance of her child, of which defendant was the father, was made in July, of which he had not paid anything at all. Defendant was sentenced to six weeks' imprisonment, sentence to be deferred for a fortnight to give de- fendant a chance to pay. DRUNK AND DISORDERLY. John Sullivan was charged with be- ing drunk and disorderly in Union Street, Dowlais. P.C. Standring proved the offence, and defendant was fined 101- and costs. Juvenile Court. TOWN FOOTBALL CLUB OFFICES RAIDED. Two young lads, only one of whom appeared, were charged with stealing certain artioles from the office of the Merthyr Town Football Cllub at Peny- darren Park. Thomas Rowlands, secretary of the club, said that on Friday, the 19th of October, the office was left securely locked, but it was found next moan- ing that someone had broken into the office and taken away a roll of foot- ball tickets aati a rubber stamp. Detective O'Neill said that from information received he arrested the defendants. When charged, the lad who was present in court said that the other lad broke the window with a stone and tha.t he then went into the oiffce. Defendant WAS bound ovre to be of good behaviour in the sum of £ 5, the Clerk stating that the other defend- ant was being sent to an industrial school.

A Soldiers Grievance

A Soldier's Grievance. Mr. Keir Hardin. M.P., has received the following letter, duly authenticat- ed with name, regimental number, and camp: — Dear Sir,—The soldier at home and abroad must ever be thankful to you and all who have moved in the matter of getting for him this Christmas leave, and not the soldier only, but those dear little bits of humanity who carry in their heart& Britain's future. Nearly all the old Sergt.-Instruct- ors have families, also small busi- nesses. A day or two at or before Christmas would be of the utmost value to them to assist those left be- hind to carry on affairs, and keep things together as far as possible. There IS not the slightest hope for any leave whatever until the turn eouies IOR their company, the C.O. being emphatic and adamant on this point. We were promised (men with business to attend to) 48 hours a fortnight when we were asked to come up as instructors, but we have XRVEIt had 48 hours or any leave once a fortnight, being difficult to even get it once in three or four weeks. Now, with many, it will be seven weeks from last leave before ther can hope to see their children or their affairs.. I know FeLL WEIX AS AN OLD SOL- DIER that all cannot leave at one time. but surely times could be a little better arranged, and preference for Christmas given to old instruct- ors and men with families. We en- listed with a good spirit, and our country's need was absolutely our main thought, but we did expect that we could trust the Government to be true to the promises she made, or we SliOULI) NEVER WAVE RESPOND- ED AS WE DID. Trained and experienced men love service, and every ounce of effort is put into their work of training the young men, but these peace-time ri- diculous regulations only gall men, And HINDER MORE THAN ANYTHING THE EFFORTS OF THE GOVERNMENT TO GET RECRUITS. The officers take good oare that they don't stay with the men: they like their week-ends, but the instruc- tors, whom they laud as the back- bone of the army when it suits their purpose, must be bridled with har- nes that was never designed for them. This is the first time in all my service I have ever so far forgot my- self to take a pen for a growl, but I feel I am not doing it for myself. but others. I believe one so far- seeing as yourself will be able to do something with some of this that will make the whole army glad."

IGERMAN UNIONS

GERMAN UNIONS. The Correspondenzblat" states that the number of organised German workmen serving under the colours to October 31 was 6(31,00.5, or 31.3 per cent, of their organisation. Among those AVIIO have not been called up 300,000 are unemplyed. The organisa- tion has contributed 12,750,000 marks (637,500) to the aid of unemplovment, and 3,000.000 marks ( £ 150.000)' to the aid of the women and children of those serving.

Advertising

| m A 1 PfclBA StXMtMWMTtTC-? enci sing I d. ;tame foe *???'??'?M?? VALUABLE BOOKLET, TESTIMONIALS and FREE SAMPLE If BLANCHAMSMLL? Li., a( urt; ,i. fil f«. i ii; 1 I.adieu Ailments, A" I)(¡¡l"'j;.1 .ttfov,i r, 1 iof, and never fail to alleviate all sulfcriiiK. 1w\ I f-,j ,? Pennyroyal, Pil Coohia, Bitter Apple, A* ?.?.!?'),,?-11;, by KooM'. Tavlor's, Timothy White'* l.1:< .,d .11 Ct?miste, or post I&e. Mme trM?. hom j [SUE UMBTW, In. LAIIfc LMBM